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telegraphy

telegraphy

telegraphy Sentence Examples

  • Braun also gave an interesting solution of the problem of directive telegraphy.'

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  • - Wireless Telegraphy The early attempts to achieve electric telegraphy involved the use of a complete metallic circuit, but K.

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  • A method of syntonic telegraphy proposed by A.

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  • Such a bolometer receiver has been used by C. Tissot (Comptes rendus, 1904, 137, p. 846) and others as a receiver in electric wave telegraphy.

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  • At this stage it may be convenient to outline the progress of electric wave telegraphy since 1899.

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  • Marconi's success in bridging the English Channel at Easter in 1899 with electric waves and establishing practical wireless telegraphy between ships and the shore by this means drew public attention to the value of the new means of communication.

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  • Fleming, The Principles of Electric Wave Telegraphy (London, 1906), chap. vii.; also Cantor Lectures on Hertzian wave telegraphy, Lecture iv., Journ.

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  • The city has a public library (1905), and is the seat of an Institute of Telegraphy (founded in 1874; chartered in 1900) and of Valparaiso University (1873; formerly known as the Valparaiso Normal Training School).

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  • Land and Submarine Telegraphy will be considered in Part I., with a section on the commercial aspects.

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  • Lodge had previously described in 1897 a syntonic system of electric wave telegraphy, but it had not been publicly seen in operation prior to the exhibitions of Marconi and Slaby.'

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  • Lodge was, however, fully aware that it was necessary for syntonic telegraphy to provide a radiator capable of emitting sustained trains of waves.

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  • Braun showed that oscillations suitable for the purposes of electric wave creation in wireless telegraphy could be set up in a circuit consisting of a Leyden jar or jars, a spark gap and an inductive circuit, and communicated to an antenna either by inductive or direct coupling (Brit.

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  • Lodge had previously described in 1897 a syntonic system of electric wave telegraphy, but it had not been publicly seen in operation prior to the exhibitions of Marconi and Slaby.'

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  • 2 See Fahie, History of Wireless Telegraphy, p. 289; also an important letter by D.

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  • The application of this to telegraphic purposes was suggested by Laplace and taken up by Ampere, and afterwards by Triboaillet and by Schilling, whose work forms the foundation of much of modern telegraphy.

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  • In 1868 the International Bureau of Telegraphic Administrations was constituted at Berne, and a convention was formulated by which a central office was appointed to collect and publish information and generally to promote the interests of international telegraphy.

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  • International service regulations have been drawn up which possess equal authority with the convention and constitute what may be regarded as the law relating to international telegraphy.

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  • Highton in experiments described in 1872, also revived the same suggestion for wireless telegraphy.

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  • Sir Oliver Lodge in 1898 theoretically examined the inductive system of space telegraphy.

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  • There is no evidence that this plan of Edison's was practically operative as a system of telegraphy.

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  • The object which Marconi had in view was not merely the detection of electric waves, but their utilization in practical wireless telegraphy.

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  • He thus produced in 1896 for the first time an operative apparatus of electric wave telegraphy.

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  • Marconi in an operative system of syntonic wireless telegraphy.

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  • From and after that time the British Admiralty and the navies of other countries began to give great attention to the development of electric wave telegraphy.

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  • Transatlantic wireless telegraphy.

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  • In 1904 a regular system of communication of press news and private messages from the Poldhu and Cape Breton stations to Atlantic liners in mid-Atlantic was inaugurated, and daily newspapers were thenceforth printed on board these vessels, news being supplied to them daily by electric wave telegraphy.

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  • In this way he was able to produce an apparatus which created continuous trains of oscillations suitable for the purposes of wireless telegraphy.

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  • Fleming, The Principles of Electric Wave Telegraphy, 1906, p. 73.

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  • The scientific study of electric wave telegraphy has necessitated the introduction of many new processes and methods of electrical measurement.

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  • An immense mass of information has been gathered on the scientific processes which are involved in electric wave telegraphy.

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  • Starting from an observation of Marconi's, a number of interesting facts have been accumulated on the absorbing effect of sunlight on the propagation of long Hertzian waves through space, and on the disturbing effects of atmospheric electricity as well as upon the influence of earth curvature and obstacles of various kinds interposed in the line between the sending and transmitting stations.4 Electric wave telegraphy has revolutionized our means of communication from place to place on the surface of the earth, making it possible to communicate instantly and certainly between places separated by several thousand miles, whilst The Electrician, 1904, 5 2, p. 407, or German Pat.

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  • It is now generally recognized that Hertzian wave telegraphy, or radio-telegraphy, as it is sometimes called, has a special field of operations of its own, and that the anticipations which were at one time excited by uninformed persons that it would speedily annihilate all telegraphy conducted with wires have been dispersed by experience.

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  • Abraham, " Wireless Telegraphy and Electrodynamics," Physik.

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  • Marconi, " Wireless Telegraphy," Journ.

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  • Lond., 1899, 28, p. 273; id., " Wireless Telegraphy, "Proc. Roy.

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  • Inst., 16, p. 247; id., " Syntonic Wireless Telegraphy," Journ.

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  • Soc. Arts, 1901, 49, p. 505; id., " Progress of Electric Space Telegraphy," Proc. Roy.

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  • Collins, Wireless Telegraphy (New York, 1905); G.

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  • Eichhorn, Wireless Telegraphy (1906); J.

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  • Erskine-Murray, A Handbook of Wireless Telegraphy (1907); J.

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  • Fahie, A History of Wireless Telegraphy (Edinburgh, 1899); J.

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  • Fleming, Hertzian Wave Telegraphy (1905); id., The Principles of Electric Wave Telegraphy and Telephony (2nd ed., 1910); J.

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  • Mazotto, Wireless Telegraphy and Telephony, Eng.

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  • Sewall, Wireless Telegraphy (New York, 1903); A.

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  • He invented the wheel barometer, discussed the application of barometrical indications to meteorological forecasting, suggested a system of optical telegraphy, anticipated E.F.F.

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  • They connect all the important cities, towns and ports, but cover only a small part of the republic. The cost of erecting and maintaining telegraph lines in the sierra and montana regions is too great to permit their extensive use, and the government is seeking to substitute wireless telegraphy.

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  • There are numerous educational institutions, including classical and modern schools, and schools of commerce, navigation and telegraphy.

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  • Wireless telegraphy was represented in 1908 by a connexion between Mazatlan and Lower California, which was in successful operation.

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  • SIR CHARLES WHEATSTONE (1802-1875), English physicist and the practical founder of modern telegraphy, was born at Gloucester in February 1802, his father being a music-seller in that city.

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  • He not only guided the growth of scientific telegraphy on land wires, but made the earliest experiments with submarine cables, foreseeing the practicability of this means of communication as early as 1840.

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  • For his connexion with the growth of telegraphy, see Nature, xi.

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  • Aluminium conductors have been employed on heavy work in many places, and for telegraphy and telephony they are in frequent demand and give perfect satisfaction.

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  • In 1873 he was appointed professor of physics and telegraphy at the Imperial College of Engineering, Tokio.

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  • For the purposes of wireless telegraphy, when large condensers are required, the ordinary Leyden jar occupies too much space in comparison with its electrical capacity, and hence the best form of con denser consists of a number of sheets of crown glass, each partly coated on both sides with tin foil.

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  • Fessenden in wireless telegraphy, and they form a very excellent arrangement for standard condensers with which to compare the capacity of other Leyden jars.

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  • Fleming, Electric Wave Telegraphy (London, 1906); R.

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  • The principles of telegraphy (land, submarine and wireless) and of telephony are discussed in the articles Telegraph and Telephone, and various electrical instruments are treated in separate articles such as Amperemeter; Electrometer; Galvanometer; Voltmeter; Wheatstone'S Bridge; Potentiometer; Meter, Electric; Electrophorus; Leyden Jar; &C.

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  • Turning to practical applications of electricity, we may note that electric telegraphy took its rise in 1820, beginning with a suggestion of Ampere immediately after Oersted's discovery.

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  • In 1845 submarine telegraphy was inaugurated by the laying of an insulated conductor across the English Channel by the brothers Brett, and their temporary success was followed by the laying in 1851 of a permanent Dover-Calais cable by T.

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  • By this simple device he provided a means of measuring small electric currents far in advance of anything yet accomplished, and this instrument proved not only most useful in pure scientific researches, but at the same time was of the utmost value in connexion with submarine telegraphy.

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  • Marconi applied a modified and improved form of Branly's wave detector in conjunction with a novel form of radiator for the telegraphic transmission of intelligence through space without wires, and he and others developed this new form of telegraphy with the greatest rapidity and success into a startling and most useful means of communicating through space electrically without connecting wires.

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  • Fitzgerald was the first to attempt to measure the length of electric waves; Helmholtz put the problem into the hands of his favourite pupil, Heinrich Hertz, and the latter finally gave an experimental demonstration of electromagnetic waves, the "Hertzian waves," on which wireless telegraphy depends, and the velocity of which is the same as that of light.

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  • He was specially noted for his discovery of the electrical conductivity of bismuth and other metals, and for his pioneer work in wireless telegraphy.

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  • In the later years of his life he was engaged in developing a system of multiplex telegraphy.

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  • Submarisie telegraphy, which had done so much to knit the empire together, was not perfected for many years afterwards; and long ocean cables were almost entirely constructed in the last half of the reign.

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  • Although his contributions to thermodynamics may properly be regarded as his most important scientific work, it is in the field of electricity, especially in its application to submarine telegraphy, that Lord Kelvin is best known to the world at large.

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  • Some held that if this were true ocean telegraphy would be impossible, and sought in consequence to disprove Thomson's conclusion.

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  • The mirror galvanometer and the siphon recorder, which was patented in 1867, were the outcome of these researches; but the scientific value of the mirror galvanometer is independent of its use in telegraphy, and the siphon recorder is the direct precursor of one form of galvanometer (d'Arsonval's) now commonly used in electrical laboratories.

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  • Thomson's work in connexion with telegraphy led to the production in rapid succession of instruments adapted to the requirements of the time for the measurement of every electrical quantity, and when electric lighting came to the front a new set of instruments was produced to meet the needs of the electrical engineer.

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  • Hertz and of wireless telegraphy were investigated by him in 1853.

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  • In 1866, perhaps chiefly in acknowledgment of his services to transAtlantic telegraphy, Thomson received the honour of knighthood, and in 1892 he was raised to the peerage with the title of Baron Kelvin of Largs.

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  • (London, 1901), which contains a list of original papers on the oscillograph; Id., The Principles of Electric Wave Telegraphy (London, 1906), which gives illustrations of the use of the oscillograph and the Braun cathode ray tube in depicting condenser discharges; also, for the development of the oscillograph, A.

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  • He also carried on extensive researches in the theory of magnetism; and it is interesting that in connexion with his observations in terrestrial magnetism he not only employed an early form of mirror galvanometer, but also, about 1833, devised a system of electromagnetic telegraphy, by which a distance of some 9000 ft.

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  • Such equipment is defined as ' non-wireless telegraphy apparatus ' and is beyond the scope of these guidelines.

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  • Telegraphy The first message or ' telegram ' sent by a telegraph using electromagnetism was in 1833.

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  • In 1876, Heaviside took account of self inductance, obtaining the equation of damped harmonic motion known as Heaviside's Equation of Telegraphy.

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  • send wireless telegraphy she sent out signals of distress, and several liners were near enough to catch and respond to the call.

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  • Thanks to wireless telegraphy, 712 people were saved.

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  • In learning telegraphy, progress is rapid for a few weeks and then follow many weeks of less rapid improvement.

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  • My research has revealed his involvement in electric telegraphy from 1848 when he assisted Sir William Fothergill Cooke.

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  • If you would like to know more about early telegraphy, take a look at C&W's history site.

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  • telegraphy apparatus which causes undue interference to authorized radio services.

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  • telegraphy license.

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  • telegraphy act 1949 offenses.

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  • Under the Wireless telegraphy Act 1949, the use of wireless telegraphy equipment in the UK must be licensed unless it is specifically exempt.

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  • telegraphy cable landing in Comfortless Cove.

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  • The young inventor, who was born in Italy 24 years ago, has been experimenting with wireless telegraphy for the last four years.

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  • Another section is devoted to the use of radio telegraphy on board deep-sea trawlers.

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  • In their youth, the Epeirae, who are then very wide-awake, know nothing of the art of telegraphy.

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  • From this time he was in constant request in connexion with submarine telegraphy, and he became known also as an inventor.

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  • Since the time of these early experiments, various other modes of detecting the existence of electric waves have been found out in addition to the spark-gap which he first employed, and the results of his observations, the earliest interest of which was simply that they afforded a confirmation of an abstruse mathematical theory, have been applied to the practical purposes of signalling over considerable distances (see Telegraphy, Wireless).

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  • The city has a public library (1905), and is the seat of an Institute of Telegraphy (founded in 1874; chartered in 1900) and of Valparaiso University (1873; formerly known as the Valparaiso Normal Training School).

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  • Land and Submarine Telegraphy will be considered in Part I., with a section on the commercial aspects.

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  • Wireless Telegraphy is dealt with.

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  • - Although the history of practical electric telegraphy does not date much further back than the middle of the, 9th century, the idea of using electricity for telegraphic purposes is much older.

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  • The application of this to telegraphic purposes was suggested by Laplace and taken up by Ampere, and afterwards by Triboaillet and by Schilling, whose work forms the foundation of much of modern telegraphy.

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  • The experience gained in the earlier days of ocean telegraphy, from the failure and abandonment of nearly 50 per cent.

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  • Duplex telegraphy consists in the simultaneous transmission of two messages, one in each direction, over the same wire.

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  • The first to introduce a really good practical system of duplex telegraphy, in which this difficulty was sufficiently overcome for land line purposes, was J.

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  • Quadruplex telegraphy consists in the simultaneous transmission of two messages from each end of the line.

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  • In the undulator apparatus, which is similar in general principle to the " siphon recorder " used in submarine telegraphy, a spring or falling weight moves a paper strip beneath one end of a fine silver tube, the other end of which dips into a vessel containing ink.

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  • The earliest practical trial of electrical telegraphy was made in 1837 on the London and North Western Railway, and the first public line under the patent of Wheatstone and Cooke was laid from Paddington to Slough on the Great Western Railway in 1843.

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  • Mr Scudamore, who was regarded as the author of the bill for the acquisition of the telegraph systems, reported that the charges made by the telegraph companies were too high and tended to check the growth of telegraphy; that there were frequent delays of messages; that many important districts were unprovided with facilities; that in many places the telegraph office was inconveniently remote from the centre of business and was open for too small a portion of the day;' that little or no improvement could be expected so long as the working of the telegraphs was conducted by commercial companies striving chiefly to earn a dividend and engaged in wasteful competition with each other; that the growth of telegraphy had been greatly stimulated in Belgium and Switzerland by the annexation of the telegraphs to the Post Offices of those countries and the consequent adoption of a low scale of charges; that in Great Britain like results would follow the adoption of like means, and that the association of the telegraphs with the Post Office would produce great advantage to the public and ultimately a large revenue to the state.

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  • The relative backwardness of telegraphy in Great Britain was attributed to high charges made by the companies and to restricted facilities.

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  • Some of the complaints against the companies, however, were exaggerated, and the estimates formed of the possible commercial development of telegraphy were optimistic. The basis for these estimates was the experience of other countries, which, however, did not justify the expectation that a large increase of business consequent on reduction of rates could be obtained without serious diminution of profit.

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  • The Belgian government endeavoured by reducing rates and increasing facilities to stimulate inland telegraphy in the hope of thereby increasing the profits of the department.

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  • for 20 words, addressed free, was not remunerative in the then state of telegraphy, which made it necessary for messages to be re-transmitted at intervals of about 300 miles.

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  • It had to extend the hours of business at all the offices; it had to extend the wires from railway stations lying outside of town populations to post offices in the centre of those populations and throughout their suburbs; it had also to extend the wires from towns into rural districts previously devoid of telegraphic communication; it had to effect a complete severance of commercial and domestic telegraphy from that of mere railway traffic, and in order to effect this severance it had to provide the railways with some 6000 m.

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  • The monopoly conferred upon the Postmaster-General by the Telegraph Act 1869 was subsequently extended to telephony and wireless telegraphy, but it does not extend to submarine telegraphy.

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  • Since the early days of international telegraphy, conferences of representatives of government telegraph departments and companies have been held from time to time (Paris 1865, Vienna 1868, Rome 1871 and 1878, St Petersburg 1875, London 1879, Berlin 1885,1885, Paris 1891, Buda Pesth 1896, London 1903).

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  • In 1868 the International Bureau of Telegraphic Administrations was constituted at Berne, and a convention was formulated by which a central office was appointed to collect and publish information and generally to promote the interests of international telegraphy.

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  • International service regulations have been drawn up which possess equal authority with the convention and constitute what may be regarded as the law relating to international telegraphy.

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  • his Life of his father (1898), his Address to London Chamber of Commerce on " Imperial Telegraphic Communication " (1902), Lecture to Royal United Service Institution on " Submarine Telegraphy " (1907), Lectures to Royal Naval War College (1910) and R.E.

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  • - Wireless Telegraphy The early attempts to achieve electric telegraphy involved the use of a complete metallic circuit, but K.

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  • Encouraged by this success, he even made the further suggestion that the remaining metallic portion of the circuit might perhaps some day be abolished and a system of wireless telegraphy established.'

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  • Highton in experiments described in 1872, also revived the same suggestion for wireless telegraphy.

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  • Such an arrangement would distribute a 1 For a history of the discovery of the earth return, see Fahie, History of Electric Telegraphy to the Year 18 37, pp. 343-348.

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  • This method of communication by magnetic induction through space establishes, therefore, a second method of wireless telegraphy which is quite independent of and different from that due to conduction through earth or water.

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  • Other experiments in inductive telegraphy were made by Preece, aided by the officials of the British Postal Telegraph Service, in Glamorganshire in 1887; at Loch Ness in Scotland in 1892; on Conway Sands in 1893; and at Frodsham, on the Dee, in 1894.

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  • or conductive telegraphy not necessitating a continuous cable.

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  • A very ingenious call-bell arrangement was devised, capable of responding only to regularly reversed battery currents, but not 1 See Fahie, History of Wireless Telegraphy, p. 170; also 5th Report (1897) of the Royal Commission on Electrical Communication with Lightships and Lighthouses.

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  • Rathenau of Berlin made many experiments in 1894 in which, by means of a conductive system of wireless telegraphy, he signalled through 3 m.

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  • Sir Oliver Lodge in 1898 theoretically examined the inductive system of space telegraphy.

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  • A very ingenious call-bell or annunciator for use with inductive or conductive systems of wireless telegraphy was invented and described in 1898 by S.

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  • (Id., 27, p. 852.) In addition to the systems of wireless or space telegraphy depending upon conduction through earth or water, and the in ductive system based upon the power of a magnetic Eelson.

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  • There is no evidence that this plan of Edison's was practically operative as a system of telegraphy.

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  • A very similar system of wireless telegraphy was patented by Professor A.

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  • Many other more or less imperfect devices - such as those of Mahlon Loomis, put forward in 1872 and 1877, and Kitsee in 1895 - for wireless telegraphy were not within the region of practically realizable schemes.

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  • Up to 1895 or 1896 the suggestions for wireless telegraphy which had been publicly announced or tried can thus be classified under three or four divisions, based respectively upon electrical conduction through the soil or sea, magnetic induction through space, combinations of the two foregoing, and lastly, electrostatic induction.

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  • 2 See Fahie, History of Wireless Telegraphy, p. 289; also an important letter by D.

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  • The object which Marconi had in view was not merely the detection of electric waves, but their utilization in practical wireless telegraphy.

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  • See also The Principles of Electric Wave Telegraphy, by J.

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  • Marconi's system of electric wave telegraphy consists therefore in setting up at the transmitting station the devices just described for sending out groups of damped electric waves of the above kind in long or short trains corresponding to the dash or dot signals of the Morse alphabet.

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  • He thus produced in 1896 for the first time an operative apparatus of electric wave telegraphy.

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  • Marconi's successes and the demonstrations he had given of the thoroughly practical character of this system of electric wave telegraphy stimulated other inventors to enter the same field of labour, whilst theorists began to study carefully the nature of the physical operations involved.

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  • We now consider the more recent appliances for electric wave telegraphy under the two divisions of transmitting and receiving apparatus.

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  • In practical wireless telegraphy the antenna is generally a collection of wires in fan shape upheld from one or more masts or wooden towers.

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  • Fleming, The Principles of Electric Wave Telegraphy and Telephony, p. 416, 2nd ed.

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  • When used as a receiver for wireless telegraphy Marconi inserted the oscillation coil of this detector in between the earth and a receiving antenna, and this produced one of the most sensitive receivers yet made for wireless telegraphy.

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  • Such a bolometer receiver has been used by C. Tissot (Comptes rendus, 1904, 137, p. 846) and others as a receiver in electric wave telegraphy.

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  • The problem of syntonic electric wave telegraphy is then to construct a transmitter and a receiver of such kind that the receiver will be affected by the waves emitted by the corresponding or syntonic transmitter, but not by waves of any other wavelength or by irregular electric impulses due to atmospheric electricity.

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  • Marconi in an operative system of syntonic wireless telegraphy.

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  • Slaby in Berlin shortly afterwards made a similar exhibition of syntonic electric wave telegraphy' O.

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  • Lodge was, however, fully aware that it was necessary for syntonic telegraphy to provide a radiator capable of emitting sustained trains of waves.

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  • A method of syntonic telegraphy proposed by A.

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  • The apparatus is exceedingly complicated and can only be understood by reference to very detailed diagrams. (See Principles of Electric Wave Telegraphy, by J.

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  • At this stage it may be convenient to outline the progress of electric wave telegraphy since 1899.

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  • Marconi's success in bridging the English Channel at Easter in 1899 with electric waves and establishing practical wireless telegraphy between ships and the shore by this means drew public attention to the value of the new means of communication.

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  • Braun showed that oscillations suitable for the purposes of electric wave creation in wireless telegraphy could be set up in a circuit consisting of a Leyden jar or jars, a spark gap and an inductive circuit, and communicated to an antenna either by inductive or direct coupling (Brit.

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  • Hence it will be seen that the difference between various forms of the so-called spark systems of wireless telegraphy is not very great.

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  • In July and August 1899 the Marconi system of wireless telegraphy was tried for the first time during British naval manoeuvres, and the two cruisers, " Juno " and " Europa," were fitted with the new means of communication.

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  • From and after that time the British Admiralty and the navies of other countries began to give great attention to the development of electric wave telegraphy.

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  • Transatlantic wireless telegraphy.

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  • In 1904 a regular system of communication of press news and private messages from the Poldhu and Cape Breton stations to Atlantic liners in mid-Atlantic was inaugurated, and daily newspapers were thenceforth printed on board these vessels, news being supplied to them daily by electric wave telegraphy.

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  • In 1904, during the RussoJapanese war, war news was transmitted for The Times by wireless telegraphy, the enormous importance of which in naval strategy was abundantly demonstrated.

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  • A problem of great importance in connexion with electric wave telegraphy is that of limiting the radiation to certain directions.

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  • Fleming, The Principles of Electric Wave Telegraphy (London, 1906), chap. vii.; also Cantor Lectures on Hertzian wave telegraphy, Lecture iv., Journ.

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  • Braun also gave an interesting solution of the problem of directive telegraphy.'

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  • In this way he was able to produce an apparatus which created continuous trains of oscillations suitable for the purposes of wireless telegraphy.

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  • 15599 of 1903; also a lecture given in London, November 27, 1906, " On a Method of producing undamped Electrical Oscillations and their employment in Wireless Telegraphy," Electrician, 1906, 58, p. 166.

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  • Fleming, The Principles of Electric Wave Telegraphy, 1906, p. 73.

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  • The scientific study of electric wave telegraphy has necessitated the introduction of many new processes and methods of electrical measurement.

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  • An immense mass of information has been gathered on the scientific processes which are involved in electric wave telegraphy.

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  • Starting from an observation of Marconi's, a number of interesting facts have been accumulated on the absorbing effect of sunlight on the propagation of long Hertzian waves through space, and on the disturbing effects of atmospheric electricity as well as upon the influence of earth curvature and obstacles of various kinds interposed in the line between the sending and transmitting stations.4 Electric wave telegraphy has revolutionized our means of communication from place to place on the surface of the earth, making it possible to communicate instantly and certainly between places separated by several thousand miles, whilst The Electrician, 1904, 5 2, p. 407, or German Pat.

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  • It is now generally recognized that Hertzian wave telegraphy, or radio-telegraphy, as it is sometimes called, has a special field of operations of its own, and that the anticipations which were at one time excited by uninformed persons that it would speedily annihilate all telegraphy conducted with wires have been dispersed by experience.

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  • Nevertheless, transoceanic wireless telegraphy over long distances, such as those across the Atlantic and Pacific oceans, is a matter to be reckoned with in the future, but it remains to be seen whether the present means are sufficient to render possible communication to the antipodes.

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  • Abraham, " Wireless Telegraphy and Electrodynamics," Physik.

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  • Pierce, " Experiments in Resonance in Wireless Telegraphy," Physical Review, September 1904, April 1905, March 1906; G.

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  • Marconi, " Wireless Telegraphy," Journ.

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  • Lond., 1899, 28, p. 273; id., " Wireless Telegraphy, "Proc. Roy.

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  • Inst., 16, p. 247; id., " Syntonic Wireless Telegraphy," Journ.

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  • Soc. Arts, 1901, 49, p. 505; id., " Progress of Electric Space Telegraphy," Proc. Roy.

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  • Collins, Wireless Telegraphy (New York, 1905); G.

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  • Eichhorn, Wireless Telegraphy (1906); J.

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  • Erskine-Murray, A Handbook of Wireless Telegraphy (1907); J.

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  • Fahie, A History of Wireless Telegraphy (Edinburgh, 1899); J.

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  • Fleming, Hertzian Wave Telegraphy (1905); id., The Principles of Electric Wave Telegraphy and Telephony (2nd ed., 1910); J.

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  • Mazotto, Wireless Telegraphy and Telephony, Eng.

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  • Poincare, Les Oscillations electriques (Paris, 1894); Poincare and Vreeland, Maxwell's Theory and Wireless Telegraphy 0904); A.

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  • Sewall, Wireless Telegraphy (New York, 1903); A.

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  • Story, The Story of Wireless Telegraphy (1905); C. Tissot, Resonance des systemes d'antennes (Paris, 1906); J.

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  • He invented the wheel barometer, discussed the application of barometrical indications to meteorological forecasting, suggested a system of optical telegraphy, anticipated E.F.F.

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  • (See Telegraph.) He introduced into America Daguerre's process of photography, patented a marble-cutting machine in 1823, and in 1842 made experiments with telegraphy by a submarine cable.

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  • They connect all the important cities, towns and ports, but cover only a small part of the republic. The cost of erecting and maintaining telegraph lines in the sierra and montana regions is too great to permit their extensive use, and the government is seeking to substitute wireless telegraphy.

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  • There are numerous educational institutions, including classical and modern schools, and schools of commerce, navigation and telegraphy.

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  • Wireless telegraphy was represented in 1908 by a connexion between Mazatlan and Lower California, which was in successful operation.

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  • SIR CHARLES WHEATSTONE (1802-1875), English physicist and the practical founder of modern telegraphy, was born at Gloucester in February 1802, his father being a music-seller in that city.

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  • He not only guided the growth of scientific telegraphy on land wires, but made the earliest experiments with submarine cables, foreseeing the practicability of this means of communication as early as 1840.

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  • For his connexion with the growth of telegraphy, see Nature, xi.

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  • Aluminium conductors have been employed on heavy work in many places, and for telegraphy and telephony they are in frequent demand and give perfect satisfaction.

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  • In 1873 he was appointed professor of physics and telegraphy at the Imperial College of Engineering, Tokio.

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  • Leyden jars are now much employed for the production of the high frequency electric currents used in wireless telegraphy (see Telegraphy, Wireless).

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  • For the purposes of wireless telegraphy, when large condensers are required, the ordinary Leyden jar occupies too much space in comparison with its electrical capacity, and hence the best form of con denser consists of a number of sheets of crown glass, each partly coated on both sides with tin foil.

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  • Fessenden in wireless telegraphy, and they form a very excellent arrangement for standard condensers with which to compare the capacity of other Leyden jars.

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  • Fleming, Electric Wave Telegraphy (London, 1906); R.

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  • The principles of telegraphy (land, submarine and wireless) and of telephony are discussed in the articles Telegraph and Telephone, and various electrical instruments are treated in separate articles such as Amperemeter; Electrometer; Galvanometer; Voltmeter; Wheatstone'S Bridge; Potentiometer; Meter, Electric; Electrophorus; Leyden Jar; &C.

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  • Turning to practical applications of electricity, we may note that electric telegraphy took its rise in 1820, beginning with a suggestion of Ampere immediately after Oersted's discovery.

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  • In 1845 submarine telegraphy was inaugurated by the laying of an insulated conductor across the English Channel by the brothers Brett, and their temporary success was followed by the laying in 1851 of a permanent Dover-Calais cable by T.

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  • By this simple device he provided a means of measuring small electric currents far in advance of anything yet accomplished, and this instrument proved not only most useful in pure scientific researches, but at the same time was of the utmost value in connexion with submarine telegraphy.

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  • Marconi applied a modified and improved form of Branly's wave detector in conjunction with a novel form of radiator for the telegraphic transmission of intelligence through space without wires, and he and others developed this new form of telegraphy with the greatest rapidity and success into a startling and most useful means of communicating through space electrically without connecting wires.

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  • Fitzgerald was the first to attempt to measure the length of electric waves; Helmholtz put the problem into the hands of his favourite pupil, Heinrich Hertz, and the latter finally gave an experimental demonstration of electromagnetic waves, the "Hertzian waves," on which wireless telegraphy depends, and the velocity of which is the same as that of light.

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  • He was specially noted for his discovery of the electrical conductivity of bismuth and other metals, and for his pioneer work in wireless telegraphy.

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  • Metallic selenium is a conductor of electricity, and its conductivity is increased by light; this property has been utilized in apparatus for transmitting photographs by telegraphy (see Telegraph).

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  • In the later years of his life he was engaged in developing a system of multiplex telegraphy.

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  • Submarisie telegraphy, which had done so much to knit the empire together, was not perfected for many years afterwards; and long ocean cables were almost entirely constructed in the last half of the reign.

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  • Although his contributions to thermodynamics may properly be regarded as his most important scientific work, it is in the field of electricity, especially in its application to submarine telegraphy, that Lord Kelvin is best known to the world at large.

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  • Some held that if this were true ocean telegraphy would be impossible, and sought in consequence to disprove Thomson's conclusion.

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  • The mirror galvanometer and the siphon recorder, which was patented in 1867, were the outcome of these researches; but the scientific value of the mirror galvanometer is independent of its use in telegraphy, and the siphon recorder is the direct precursor of one form of galvanometer (d'Arsonval's) now commonly used in electrical laboratories.

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  • Thomson's work in connexion with telegraphy led to the production in rapid succession of instruments adapted to the requirements of the time for the measurement of every electrical quantity, and when electric lighting came to the front a new set of instruments was produced to meet the needs of the electrical engineer.

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  • Hertz and of wireless telegraphy were investigated by him in 1853.

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  • In 1866, perhaps chiefly in acknowledgment of his services to transAtlantic telegraphy, Thomson received the honour of knighthood, and in 1892 he was raised to the peerage with the title of Baron Kelvin of Largs.

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  • (London, 1901), which contains a list of original papers on the oscillograph; Id., The Principles of Electric Wave Telegraphy (London, 1906), which gives illustrations of the use of the oscillograph and the Braun cathode ray tube in depicting condenser discharges; also, for the development of the oscillograph, A.

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  • He also carried on extensive researches in the theory of magnetism; and it is interesting that in connexion with his observations in terrestrial magnetism he not only employed an early form of mirror galvanometer, but also, about 1833, devised a system of electromagnetic telegraphy, by which a distance of some 9000 ft.

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  • By wireless telegraphy she sent out signals of distress, and several liners were near enough to catch and respond to the call.

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  • Thanks to wireless telegraphy, 712 people were saved.

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  • In learning telegraphy, progress is rapid for a few weeks and then follow many weeks of less rapid improvement.

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  • My research has revealed his involvement in electric telegraphy from 1848 when he assisted Sir William Fothergill Cooke.

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  • If you would like to know more about early telegraphy, take a look at C&W 's history site.

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  • However, Section 10 of the 1949 Act provides for regulation of non-wireless telegraphy apparatus which causes undue interference to authorized radio services.

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  • The intention is to permit the use of such devices without the need to hold a Wireless Telegraphy license.

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  • A consultation document on the proposal to impose fixed penalty notices for summary wireless telegraphy act 1949 offenses.

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  • Under the Wireless Telegraphy Act 1949, the use of wireless telegraphy equipment in the UK must be licensed unless it is specifically exempt.

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  • The old Cable & Wireless telegraphy cable landing in Comfortless Cove.

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  • The young inventor, who was born in Italy 24 years ago, has been experimenting with wireless telegraphy for the last four years.

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  • Another section is devoted to the use of radio telegraphy on board deep-sea trawlers.

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  • In their youth, the Epeirae, who are then very wide-awake, know nothing of the art of telegraphy.

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  • Part 1.-Land And Submarine Telegraphy Historical Sketch.

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  • - Although the history of practical electric telegraphy does not date much further back than the middle of the, 9th century, the idea of using electricity for telegraphic purposes is much older.

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  • The experience gained in the earlier days of ocean telegraphy, from the failure and abandonment of nearly 50 per cent.

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  • Duplex telegraphy consists in the simultaneous transmission of two messages, one in each direction, over the same wire.

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  • The first to introduce a really good practical system of duplex telegraphy, in which this difficulty was sufficiently overcome for land line purposes, was J.

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  • Quadruplex telegraphy consists in the simultaneous transmission of two messages from each end of the line.

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  • In the undulator apparatus, which is similar in general principle to the " siphon recorder " used in submarine telegraphy, a spring or falling weight moves a paper strip beneath one end of a fine silver tube, the other end of which dips into a vessel containing ink.

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  • The earliest practical trial of electrical telegraphy was made in 1837 on the London and North Western Railway, and the first public line under the patent of Wheatstone and Cooke was laid from Paddington to Slough on the Great Western Railway in 1843.

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  • The relative backwardness of telegraphy in Great Britain was attributed to high charges made by the companies and to restricted facilities.

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  • Some of the complaints against the companies, however, were exaggerated, and the estimates formed of the possible commercial development of telegraphy were optimistic. The basis for these estimates was the experience of other countries, which, however, did not justify the expectation that a large increase of business consequent on reduction of rates could be obtained without serious diminution of profit.

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  • The Belgian government endeavoured by reducing rates and increasing facilities to stimulate inland telegraphy in the hope of thereby increasing the profits of the department.

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  • for 20 words, addressed free, was not remunerative in the then state of telegraphy, which made it necessary for messages to be re-transmitted at intervals of about 300 miles.

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  • Since the early days of international telegraphy, conferences of representatives of government telegraph departments and companies have been held from time to time (Paris 1865, Vienna 1868, Rome 1871 and 1878, St Petersburg 1875, London 1879, Berlin 1885,1885, Paris 1891, Buda Pesth 1896, London 1903).

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  • his Life of his father (1898), his Address to London Chamber of Commerce on " Imperial Telegraphic Communication " (1902), Lecture to Royal United Service Institution on " Submarine Telegraphy " (1907), Lectures to Royal Naval War College (1910) and R.E.

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  • Encouraged by this success, he even made the further suggestion that the remaining metallic portion of the circuit might perhaps some day be abolished and a system of wireless telegraphy established.'

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  • This method of communication by magnetic induction through space establishes, therefore, a second method of wireless telegraphy which is quite independent of and different from that due to conduction through earth or water.

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  • Other experiments in inductive telegraphy were made by Preece, aided by the officials of the British Postal Telegraph Service, in Glamorganshire in 1887; at Loch Ness in Scotland in 1892; on Conway Sands in 1893; and at Frodsham, on the Dee, in 1894.

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  • or conductive telegraphy not necessitating a continuous cable.

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  • Rathenau of Berlin made many experiments in 1894 in which, by means of a conductive system of wireless telegraphy, he signalled through 3 m.

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  • A very ingenious call-bell or annunciator for use with inductive or conductive systems of wireless telegraphy was invented and described in 1898 by S.

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  • (Id., 27, p. 852.) In addition to the systems of wireless or space telegraphy depending upon conduction through earth or water, and the in ductive system based upon the power of a magnetic Eelson.

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  • A very similar system of wireless telegraphy was patented by Professor A.

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  • Many other more or less imperfect devices - such as those of Mahlon Loomis, put forward in 1872 and 1877, and Kitsee in 1895 - for wireless telegraphy were not within the region of practically realizable schemes.

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  • Up to 1895 or 1896 the suggestions for wireless telegraphy which had been publicly announced or tried can thus be classified under three or four divisions, based respectively upon electrical conduction through the soil or sea, magnetic induction through space, combinations of the two foregoing, and lastly, electrostatic induction.

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  • Fleming's Electric Wave Telegraphy, by permission of Longmans, Green & Co.

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  • See also The Principles of Electric Wave Telegraphy, by J.

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  • We now consider the more recent appliances for electric wave telegraphy under the two divisions of transmitting and receiving apparatus.

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  • In many cases additional condensers or inductance coils are inserted in various places so that the arrangement is somewhat disguised, but by far the larger part of the electric wave wireless telegraphy in 1907 was effected by transmitters having antennae either inductively or directly coupled to a closed condenser circuit containing a spark gap.

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  • In practical wireless telegraphy the antenna is generally a collection of wires in fan shape upheld from one or more masts or wooden towers.

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  • Fleming, The Principles of Electric Wave Telegraphy and Telephony, p. 416, 2nd ed.

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  • When used as a receiver for wireless telegraphy Marconi inserted the oscillation coil of this detector in between the earth and a receiving antenna, and this produced one of the most sensitive receivers yet made for wireless telegraphy.

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  • Slaby in Berlin shortly afterwards made a similar exhibition of syntonic electric wave telegraphy' O.

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  • Hence it will be seen that the difference between various forms of the so-called spark systems of wireless telegraphy is not very great.

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  • In July and August 1899 the Marconi system of wireless telegraphy was tried for the first time during British naval manoeuvres, and the two cruisers, " Juno " and " Europa," were fitted with the new means of communication.

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  • This result created a great sensation, and proved that Transatlantic electric wave telegraphy was quite feasible and not inhibited by distance, or by the earth's curvature even over an arc of a great circle 3000 m.

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  • In 1904, during the RussoJapanese war, war news was transmitted for The Times by wireless telegraphy, the enormous importance of which in naval strategy was abundantly demonstrated.

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  • A problem of great importance in connexion with electric wave telegraphy is that of limiting the radiation to certain directions.

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  • 15599 of 1903; also a lecture given in London, November 27, 1906, " On a Method of producing undamped Electrical Oscillations and their employment in Wireless Telegraphy," Electrician, 1906, 58, p. 166.

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  • Part 1.-Land And Submarine Telegraphy Historical Sketch.

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  • Fleming's Electric Wave Telegraphy, by permission of Longmans, Green & Co.

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    1
  • In many cases additional condensers or inductance coils are inserted in various places so that the arrangement is somewhat disguised, but by far the larger part of the electric wave wireless telegraphy in 1907 was effected by transmitters having antennae either inductively or directly coupled to a closed condenser circuit containing a spark gap.

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    1
  • This result created a great sensation, and proved that Transatlantic electric wave telegraphy was quite feasible and not inhibited by distance, or by the earth's curvature even over an arc of a great circle 3000 m.

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  • Wireless Telegraphy is dealt with.

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  • Marconi's successes and the demonstrations he had given of the thoroughly practical character of this system of electric wave telegraphy stimulated other inventors to enter the same field of labour, whilst theorists began to study carefully the nature of the physical operations involved.

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