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teignmouth

teignmouth Sentence Examples

  • TEIGNMOUTH, a seaport and market town in the Ashburton parliamentary division of Devonshire, England, at the mouth of the river Teign, on the English Channel, 15 m.

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  • Two parishes, East and West Teignmouth, form the town.

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  • St Michael's church in East Teignmouth was rebuilt in 1824 in Decorated style, but retains a Norman doorway and other ancient portions; of St James', in West Teignmouth, the south porch and tower are Norman.

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  • East Teignmouth was formerly called Teignmouth Regis, and West Teignmouth, Teignmouth Episcopi.

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  • Teignmouth is not mentioned in the Domesday Survey, but in 1276 what is now West Teignmouth appears as a mesne borough held by the dean and chapter of Exeter; what is now East Teignmouth continuing with the bishop, who was accused in that year of holding in his manor a market which should be held in the borough.

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  • The bishop's manor was alienated in 1550 to Sir Andrew Dudley, but West Teignmouth remained with the dean and chapter until early in the 19th century.

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  • In the middle ages Teignmouth was a flourishing port, able to furnish 7 ships and 120 mariners to the Calais expedition of 1347, and depending chiefly on the fishing and salt industries.

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  • Teignmouth was burned by French pirates in 1340, and was again devastated by the French on the 26th of June 1690.

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  • See Victoria County History, Devonshire; The Teignmouth Guide and Complete Handbook to the Town and Neighbourhood (Teignmouth, 1875).

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  • Supported by representative Christian leaders, such as Granville Sharp, Zachary Macaulay, William Wilberforce, Charles Grant and Henry Thornton, with Lord Teignmouth, ex-governorgeneral of India, as its first president, and Dr Porteus, bishop of London, as its friendly counsellor, the new society made rapid progress.

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  • He then returned to England, was made a colonel of the 8th Foot, and in 1687 created duke of Berwick, earl of Teignmouth and Baron Bosworth.

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  • Jones, the Welsh philologist and linguist, gives the Indian equivalent (Lord Teignmouth's Life of Jones, ed.

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  • Though Lord Cornwallis carried the scheme into execution, all praise or blame, so far as details are concerned, must belong to Sir John Shore, afterwards Lord Teignmouth, whose knowledge of the country was unsurpassed by that of any civilian of his time.

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  • CHARLES BABBAGE (1792-1871), English mathematician and mechanician, was born on the 26th of December 1792 at Teignmouth in Devonshire.

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  • To another member of the civil service, John Shore, afterwards Lord Teignmouth (1786-1793), is due the formation of a regular system of Anglo-Indian legislation.

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  • Teignmouth is our next stop with its two mile long esplanade.

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  • TO MOST people Teignmouth is a pretty seaside town, a picturesque holiday destination nestling on the south Devon coast below Dartmoor.

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  • TEIGNMOUTH, a seaport and market town in the Ashburton parliamentary division of Devonshire, England, at the mouth of the river Teign, on the English Channel, 15 m.

    0
    0
  • Two parishes, East and West Teignmouth, form the town.

    0
    0
  • St Michael's church in East Teignmouth was rebuilt in 1824 in Decorated style, but retains a Norman doorway and other ancient portions; of St James', in West Teignmouth, the south porch and tower are Norman.

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    0
  • East Teignmouth was formerly called Teignmouth Regis, and West Teignmouth, Teignmouth Episcopi.

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  • Teignmouth (Tennemue, Tengemue) possessed a church of St Michael as early as 1044, when what is now East Teignmouth was granted by Edward the Confessor to Leofric, bishop of Exeter, and an allusion to salterers in the same grant proves the existence of the.

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  • Teignmouth is not mentioned in the Domesday Survey, but in 1276 what is now West Teignmouth appears as a mesne borough held by the dean and chapter of Exeter; what is now East Teignmouth continuing with the bishop, who was accused in that year of holding in his manor a market which should be held in the borough.

    0
    0
  • The bishop's manor was alienated in 1550 to Sir Andrew Dudley, but West Teignmouth remained with the dean and chapter until early in the 19th century.

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    0
  • In the middle ages Teignmouth was a flourishing port, able to furnish 7 ships and 120 mariners to the Calais expedition of 1347, and depending chiefly on the fishing and salt industries.

    0
    0
  • Teignmouth was burned by French pirates in 1340, and was again devastated by the French on the 26th of June 1690.

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    0
  • See Victoria County History, Devonshire; The Teignmouth Guide and Complete Handbook to the Town and Neighbourhood (Teignmouth, 1875).

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    0
  • Supported by representative Christian leaders, such as Granville Sharp, Zachary Macaulay, William Wilberforce, Charles Grant and Henry Thornton, with Lord Teignmouth, ex-governorgeneral of India, as its first president, and Dr Porteus, bishop of London, as its friendly counsellor, the new society made rapid progress.

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    0
  • He then returned to England, was made a colonel of the 8th Foot, and in 1687 created duke of Berwick, earl of Teignmouth and Baron Bosworth.

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  • Jones, the Welsh philologist and linguist, gives the Indian equivalent (Lord Teignmouth's Life of Jones, ed.

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    0
  • Though Lord Cornwallis carried the scheme into execution, all praise or blame, so far as details are concerned, must belong to Sir John Shore, afterwards Lord Teignmouth, whose knowledge of the country was unsurpassed by that of any civilian of his time.

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  • CHARLES BABBAGE (1792-1871), English mathematician and mechanician, was born on the 26th of December 1792 at Teignmouth in Devonshire.

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  • To another member of the civil service, John Shore, afterwards Lord Teignmouth (1786-1793), is due the formation of a regular system of Anglo-Indian legislation.

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