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taylor

taylor

taylor Sentence Examples

  • Maybe you could hire on as a nanny at Old Man Taylor's ranch.

  • So, what's it gonna be, The Carpenters or Taylor Swift?

  • NATHANIEL WILLIAM TAYLOR (1786-1858), American Congregational theologian, was born in New Milford, Connecticut, on the 2 3 rd of June 1786, grandson of Nathaniel Taylor (1722-1800), pastor at New Milford.

  • In the Yale Divinity School his influence was powerful, and in 1833 one of his foremost opponents, Bennet Tyler (1783-1858), founded in East Windsor a Theological Institute to offset Taylor's teaching at Yale.

  • Philip Meadows Taylor >>

  • Ann and Jane Taylor >>

  • Bishop Jeremy Taylor was forward in this work of persecution.

  • Taylor, Archaeologia, lii., " On the Use of the Terms Crosier, Pastoral Staff and Cross ").

  • Hann, with Messrs Warner, Tate and Taylor, in 1873, related to the country north of the Kirchner range, watered by the Lynd, the Mitchell, the Walsh and the Palmer rivers, on the east side of the Gulf of Carpentaria.

  • - For Physical Geography: Barton, Australian Physiography (Brisbane, 1895); Wall, Physical Geography of Australia (Melbourne, 1883); Taylor, Geography of New South Wales (Sydney, 1898); Saville Kent, The Great Barrier Reef of Australia (London, 1893); A.

  • After the close of the war with Mexico Green was sent to that country in 1849 by President Taylor to negotiate concerning the moneys which, by the treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, the United States had agreed to pay; and he saved his country a considerable sum by arranging for payment in exchange instead of in specie.

  • "I have often noted," writes John Taylor, the water-poet, in his Jack a Lent (1620), "that if any superfluous feasting or gormandizing, paunch-cramming assembly do meet, it is so ordered that it must be either in Lent, upon a Friday, or a fasting: for the meat does not relish well except it be sauced with disobedience and comtempt of authority."

  • See also Clayton, Churches of Sir C. Wren (1848-1849); Taylor, Towers and Steeples of Wren (London, 1881); Niven, City Churches (London, 1887), illustrated with fine etchings; A.

  • Taylor (reprinted, 1896).

  • Taylor, p. 3).

  • Taylor (Republican), each of whom claimed the election, Goebel was assassinated at Frankfort.

  • Laughton's polemical treatise was published in 1780, and those of Milner and Taylor in 1781.

  • Taylor, Owen Roe O'Neill (London, 1896); John Mitchell, Life and Times of Hugh, Earl of Tyrone, with an Account of his Predecessors, Con, Shane, Turlough (Dublin, 1846); L.

  • Subsequently from March 1849 to July 1850 he was a member of President Taylor's cabinet as the first secretary of the newly established department of the interior.

  • TAYLOR, a town in Williamson county, Texas, U.S.A., about 35 m.

  • In the city are machine and car shops of the International & Great Northern railway, and cottoncompresses, and there are manufactures of cotton-seed oil, &c. Taylor, named in honour of Gen.

  • Zachary Taylor, was founded in 1876, and was incorporated in 1882.

  • JEREMY TAYLOR (1613-1667), English divine and author, was baptized at Cambridge on the 15th of August 1613.

  • The tradition that he was descended from Dr Rowland Taylor, Cranmer's chaplain, who suffered martyrdom under Mary, is grounded on the untrustworthy evidence of a certain Lady Wray, said to have been a granddaughter of Jeremy Taylor.

  • Jeremy Taylor was a pupil of Thomas Lovering, at the newly founded Perse grammar school.

  • Lovering is first mentioned as master in 1619, so that Taylor probably spent seven years at the school before he was entered at Gonville and Caius College as a sizar in 1626, 1 eighteen months after Milton had entered Christ's, and while George Herbert was public orator and Edmund Waller and Thomas Fuller were undergraduates of the university.

  • Archbishop Laud sent for Taylor to preach before him at Lambeth, and took the young man under his special protection.

  • Taylor did not vacate his fellowship at Cambridge before 1636, but he spent, apparently, much of his time in London, for Laud desired that his "mighty parts should be afforded better opportunities of study and improvement than a course of constant preaching would allow of."

  • At Oxford William Chillingworth was then busy with his great work, The Religion of Protestants, and it is possible that by intercourse with him Taylor's mind may have been turned towards the liberal movement of his age.

  • Taylor probably accompanied the king to Oxford.

  • During the next fifteen years Taylor's movements are not easily traced.

  • Here he became private chaplain to Richard Vaughan, 2nd earl of Carbery (1600-1686), whose hospitable mansion, Golden Grove, is immortalized in the title of Taylor's still popular manual of devotion, and whose first wife was a constant friend of Taylor.

  • Mrs Taylor had died early in 1651.

  • From time to time Jeremy Taylor appears in London in the company of his friend Evelyn, in whose diary and correspondence his name repeatedly occurs.

  • In 1658, through the kind offices of his friend John Evelyn, Taylor was offered a lectureship in Lisburn, Ireland, by Edward Conway, second Viscount Conway.

  • The day after his son's funeral Taylor caught fever from a patient whom he visited, and, after a ten days' illness, he died at Lisburn on the 13th of August 1667, in the fifty-fifth year of his life and the seventh of his episcopate, and was buried in the cathedral of Dromore.

  • With all the majesty and stately elaboration and musical rhythm of Milton's finest prose, Taylor's styleis relieved and brightened by an astonishing variety of felicitous illustrations, ranging from the most homely and terse to the most dignified and elaborate.

  • The Poems and Verse-translations of Jeremy Taylor were edited by Dr. A.

  • The first biographer of Jeremy Taylor was his friend and successor, George Rust, who preached a funeral sermon (in 1668) which remains a valuable document.

  • Gosse's Jeremy Taylor (1904) in the English Men of Letters series.

  • Coleridge was a diligent student and a warm admirer of Jeremy Taylor, whom he regarded as one of the great masters of English style.

  • John Taylor (Pamphleteer) >>

  • This he has called his third stage as a political economist, and he says that he was helped towards it by the lady, Mrs Taylor,' who became his wife in 1851.

  • This new inner life was strengthened and enlarged by Mrs Taylor.

  • During the seven years of his married life Mill published less than in any other period of his career, but four of his most ' Mrs Taylor (Harriet Hardy) was the wife of John Taylor, a wholesale druggist in the city of London.

  • Mill's friendship with Mrs Taylor and their marriage in 1851 involved a break with his family (apparently due to his resentment at a fancied slight, not to any bitterness on their part), and his practical disappearance from society.

  • (On these points see Mary Taylor, Mrs Mill's grand-daughter, in Elliott's edition of the Letters.) closely reasoned and characteristic works, the Liberty, the Utilitarianism, the Thoughts on Parliamentary Reform, and the Subjection of Women, besides his posthumously published essays on Nature and on the Utility of Religion, were thought out and partly written in collaboration with his wife.

  • Captain Taylor, however, found their nests as well on low bushes of the same tree in the Bay of Fonseca (Ibis, 1859, pp. 150-152).

  • It is the birthplace of Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772); and W.

  • Taylor, History of the State of Ohio: First Period 1650-1787 (Cincinnati, 1854), are useful.

  • Other works: C. Taylor, Dirge of Koh.

  • Most of the measures were rejected and the whole plan seemed likely to fail, when the situation was changed by the death of President Taylor and the accession of Millard Fillmore on the 9th of July 1850.

  • Samuel Taylor Coleridge lived some time at Keswick, and also with the Wordsworths at Grasmere.

  • He reached the conclusion that the religious friend who directed Wesley's attention to the writings of Thomas a Kempis and Jeremy Taylor, in 1725, was Miss Betty Kirkham, whose father was rector of Stanton in Gloucestershire.

  • C. Taylor (London, 1897); Jataka, ed.

  • Wisdom the father and Intelligence the mother, from whose union the other 1 C. Taylor, Sayings of the Jewish Fathers (1897), pp. 106 sqq., 175 seq.; W.

  • Later, in April 1864, the Confederates under General Richard Taylor won a success against the Unionists under General N.

  • Taylor, The United States and Cuba (London, 1851); F.

  • This situation did not last long, however, for on the 3rd of March 1849 the bill organizing the territory of Minnesota was passed, and on the 19th President Zachary Taylor appointed Alexander Ramsey of Pennsylvania the first territorial governor.

  • 1 1 where laan and di denotes, not s successive operations of d1, but the operator of order s obtained by raising d l to the s th power symbolically as in Taylor's theorem in the Differential Calculus.

  • = exp,udl where exp denotes (by the rule over exp) that the multiplication of operators is symbolic as in Taylor's theorem.

  • - If, in the identity 1 (1 +anx = 1+aiox+aoly+a20x 2 +allxy+a02y 2 +..., we multiply each side by (I -�-P.x+vy), the right-hand side becomes 1 +(aio+1.1 ') x +(a ol+ v) y +...+(a p4+/ 1a P-1,4+ va Pr4-1) xPyq - - ...; hence any rational integral function of the coefficients an, say f (al °, aol, ...) =f exp(�dlo+vdol)f d a P-1,4, dot = dapg The rule over exp will serve to denote that i udio+ vdo h is to be raised to the various powers symbolically as in Taylor's theorem.

  • Complaints of the obstructions in it are not uncommon, and John Taylor, the Water Poet (1580-1653), in a poem commemorating a voyage from Oxford to London, bewails the difficulties he found on the passage.

  • John Hales (1584-1656); Edmund Calamy (1600-1666); the Cambridge Platonist, Benjamin Whichcote (1609-1685); Richard Baxter (1615-1691); the puritan John Owen (1616-1683); the philosophical Ralph Cudworth (1617-1688); Archbishop Leighton (1611-1684) - each of these holds an eminent position in the records of pulpit eloquence, but all were outshone by the gorgeous oratory and art of Jeremy Taylor (1613-1667), who is the most illustrious writer of sermons whom the British race has produced.

  • The best known of the Anglican books is Jeremy Taylor's Ductor Dubitantium (1660).

  • Taylor Jones subsequently found a good agreement between the theoretical and the observed values of the tractive force in fields ranging up to very high intensities (Phil.

  • Taylor Jones (Wied.

  • Taylor Jones showed in 1897 that only a small proportion of the contraction exhibited by a nickel wire when magnetized could be accounted for on Kirchhoff's theory from the observed effects of pulling stress upon magnetization; and in a more extended series of observations Nagaoka and Honda found wide quantitative divergences between the results of experiment and calculation, though in nearly all cases there was agreement as to quality.

  • Taylor Jones (Proc. Roy.

  • Taylor, Political rand Constitutional History of Roane (1899).

  • Taylor, another Englishman in Brazilian service, followed the vessels across the Atlantic, and even captured some of the ships in sight of the land of Portugal.

  • In June 1835 he resigned from the army, married Miss Knox Taylor, daughter of Colonel (later General) Zachary Taylor, and became a cotton planter in Warren county, Miss.

  • He served in the Northern Campaign under his father-in-law, General Taylor, and was greatly distinguished for gallantry and soldierly conduct at Monterey and particularly at Buena Vista, where he was severely wounded early in the engagement, but continued in command of his regiment until victory crowned the American arms. While still in the field he was appointed (May 1847) by President Polk to be brigadier-general of volunteers; but this appointment Davis declined, on the ground, as he afterwards said, "that volunteers are militia and the Constitution reserves to the state the appointment of all militia officers."

  • In the autumn of 1765 he escorted to Italy the son of a Mr Taylor.

  • Taylor, The Future of the Southern Sla y s (1916); M.

  • Taylor and Paterson,.

  • Osler, The Principles and Practice of Medicine (1909); Allbutt and Rolleston, A System of Medicine (1906-1910); Sir Patrick Manson, Tropical Medicine (1907); Frederick Taylor, A Manual of the Practice of Medicine (1908).

  • Taylor, The Life of Lord Edward Fitzgerald (London, 1903), which gives a prejudiced and distorted picture of Pamela.

  • Conant (1868); The Life That Now is (1871); The Simple Truth (1877); Talks to Young Men: With Asides to Young Women (1888); Things New and Old (1893); Father Taylor (1906); and A History of the Town and Parish of Ilkley (with Horsefall Turner, 1886).

  • Interesting accounts of the impression produced by the performance at Rome may be found in the first volume of Mendelssohn's letters and in Miss Taylor's Letters from Italy.

  • Taylor bag filters are generally used for clearing the melted liquor of its mechanical impurities.

  • In the war with Mexico he was on the staffs successively of Generals Taylor, J.

  • His associations and predilections were with the Whigs, and he was a delegate to the National Convention that nominated General Zachary Taylor in 1848.

  • C. Taylor, as below), the Didache, and perhaps certain " Sibylline Oracles."

  • (Tubingen, 1901), and in an English trans., with Introduction and occasional notes, by Dr C. Taylor (S.P.C.K., 2 vols., 1903 - 1906).

  • BROOK TAYLOR (1685-1731), English mathematician, was the son of John Taylor, of Bifrons House, Kent, by Olivia, daughter of Sir Nicholas Tempest, Bart., of Durham, and was born at Edmonton in Middlesex on the r8th of August 1685.

  • Taylor's Methodus Incrementorum Directa et Inversa (London, 1715) added a new branch to the higher mathematics, now designated the " calculus of finite differences."

  • Taylor was elected a fellow of the Royal Society early in 1712, sat in the same year on the committee for adjudicating the claims of Sir Isaac Newton and Gottfried Wilhelm Leibnitz, and acted as secretary to the society from the 13th of January 1714 to the 21st of October 1718.

  • Taylor's fragile health gave way; he fell into a decline, died on the 29th of December 1731, at Somerset House, and was buried at St Ann's, Soho.

  • Taylor gave (Methodus Incrementorum, p. 108) the first satisfactory investigation of astronomical refraction.

  • Sir Henry Taylor >>

  • Among the rectors of Hadleigh several notable names appear, such as Rowland Taylor, the martyr, who was burned at the stake outside the town in 1 555, and Hugh James Rose, during whose tenancy of the rectory an initiatory meeting of the leaders of the Oxford Movement took place here in 1833.

  • In September 1845 he went with his regiment to join the forces of General Taylor in Mexico; there he took part in the battles of Palo Alto, Resaca de la Palma and Monterey, and, after his transfer to General Scott's army, which he joined in March 1847, served at Vera Cruz, Cerro Gordo, Churubusco, Molino del Rey and at the storming of Chapultepec. He was breveted first lieutenant for gallantry at Molino del Rey and captain for gallantry at Chapultepec. In August 1848, after the close of the war, he married Julia T.

  • Taylor, Christina of Sweden (1909).

  • It was in 1857 that Bayard Taylor saw him, and carried away the impression of a man "tall and broad-shouldered as a son of Anak, with hair, beard and eyes of southern darkness."

  • Taylor Innes (1899).

  • Thornton, Illustrations of the History and Practices of the Thugs (London, 1837); Meadows Taylor, Confessions of a Thug (London, 1839; new ed.

  • On the one hand are Andrewes, Hall, Chillingworth, Jeremy Taylor, Barrow and South; on the other Baxter, Calamy, the Goodwins, Howe, Owen, Bunyan, in each case but a few names out of many.

  • During the Black Hawk War (1832) Zachary Taylor, then a lieutenant-colonel, was in command of Fort Crawford, and to him Black Hawk was entrusted after his capture.

  • The problem of vibrating cords, which had been some time before resolved by Brook Taylor (1685-1731) and d'Alembert, became the subject of a long discussion conducted in a generous spirit between Bernoulli and his friend Euler.

  • An army of 2000 men under Zachary Taylor arrived on the north bank of the Rio Grande, opposite Matamoras, on the 28th of March 1846.

  • The Mexican commander, Pedro de Ampudia, demanded Taylor's withdrawal beyond the Nueces within twenty-four hours.

  • Taylor, Constitutional and Political History of Rome (1899).

  • Taylor, 10 Josiah Royce" and others.

  • Taylor, Elements of Metaphysics (1903); R.

  • In November 1847 he was elected comptroller of the state of New York, and in 1848 he was elected vice-president of the United States on the ticket with Zachary Taylor as president.

  • President Taylor died on the 9th of July 1850, and on the next day Fillmore took the oath of office as his successor.

  • Unlike Taylor, Fillmore favoured the " Compromise Measures," and his signing one of them, the Fugitive Slave Law, in spite of the vigorous protests of anti-slavery men, lost him much of his popularity in the North.

  • Dr C. Taylor in 1886 drew attention to some important parallels in Jewish literature; his edition contains an English translation.

  • About the same time a new English version was made by Isaac Taylor (London, 1829).

  • Taylor (Yale) and Edwards A.

  • Sedley Taylor, Sound and Music (1882), contains a simple and excellent account of Helmholtz's theory of consonance and dissonance.

  • Taylor in 1854, in a ruin then called by the natives AbuShahrein, a few miles south-south-west of Moghair, ancient Ur, nearly in the centre of the dry bed of an inland sea, a deep valley, 15 m.

  • The ruins, in which Taylor conducted brief excavations, consist of a platform of fine sand enclosed by a sandstone wall, 20 ft.

  • Since Taylor's time the place has not been visited by any explorer, owing to the unsafe condition of the neighbourhood; but T.

  • Calculating from the present rate of deposit of alluvium at the head of that gulf, Eridu should have been founded as early as the seventh millennium B.C. It is mentioned in historical inscriptions from the earliest times onward, as late as the 6th century B.C. From the evidence of Taylor's excavations, it would seem that the site was abandoned about the close of the Babylonian period.

  • Taylor, Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society, vol.

  • Under the pseudonym George Taylor he wrote several historical romances, especially Antinous (1880), which quickly ran through five editions, and is the story of a soul "which courted death because the objective restraints of faith had been lost."

  • Taylor at p. 362 of his version of Iamblichus.

  • He founded or endowed various professorships, including those of Hebrew and Arabic, and the office of public orator, encouraged English and foreign scholars, such as Voss, Selden and Jeremy Taylor, founded the university printing press, procuring in 1633 the royal patent for Oxford, and obtained for the Bodleian library over 1300 MSS., adding a new wing to the building to contain his gifts.

  • Taylor, The Life of Queen Henrietta Maria (1905).

  • Skirmishing constantly with the Confederates under Kirby Smith and Taylor, the Federals eventually on the 8th and 9th of April suffered serious reverses at Sabine Cross Roads and Pleasant Hill.

  • by Dr C. Taylor in Sayings of the Jewish Fathers (2nd ed., 1897).

  • by Taylor, 1898), pp. 167 ff.; see also A.

  • There are also many connexions with Dr Johnson, a frequent visitor here to his friend Dr Taylor, who occupied a house opposite the grammar school.

  • Taylor, Republican, was inaugurated governor on the 12th of December, but the legislative committee on contests decided in favour of the Democrats.

  • Taylor fled the state to escape trial on the charge of murder.

  • Taylor § William Goebel* J.

  • § Taylor's election was contested by Goebel, who received the certificate of election.

  • The next great advance on the Trigonometria artificialis took place more than a century and a half afterwards, when Michael Taylor published in 1792 his seven-decimal table of log sines and tangents to every second of the quadrant; it was calculated by interpolation from the Trigonometria to 10 places and then contracted to 7.

  • Importance attaches chiefly to the movements of the first force under General Zachary Taylor.

  • It was not till the 5th of September 1846 that General Zachary Taylor could leave his depot at Camargo on the Rio Grande, and march on Monterey.

  • John Taylor Gilman John Langdon.

  • John Taylor Gilman William Plumer.

  • Taylor) with 25,514 vols.

  • George Taylor Denison >>

  • Taylor, Jour.

  • Taylor (1784-1854) of New York making the admission of the state conditional upon its adoption of a constitution prohibiting slavery.

  • Mt Taylor in western New Mexico is of similar age, but here dissection seems to have advanced farther, probably because of the weaker nature of the underlying rocks, with the result of removing the smaller cones and exposing many lava conduits or pipes in the form of volcanic necks or buttes.

  • lxvi; Jeremy Taylor, A Discourse of Confirmation; A.

  • JOHN COLERIDGE PATTESON (1827-1871), English missionary, bishop of Melanesia, was born in London on the 1st of April 1827, the eldest son of Sir John Patteson, justice of the King's Bench, and Frances Duke Coleridge, a near relative of Samuel Taylor Coleridge.

  • Norton, North American Review, 99, P. 523; "Poetry Of Charles Heavysege," By Bayard Taylor, Atlantic, 16, P. 412; " Charles Heavysege," By L.

  • 58 is corrupt as it appears; but the adoption of a correction recommended by Bishop Lightfoot and Dr C. Taylor will restore it to sense..

  • Subsequently another inquiry was carried out by Major Reynell Taylor, which dealt simply with Hodson's accounts and found them to be "an honest and correct record.

  • and ii., Richard and John Edward Taylor, vols.

  • Richard Taylor and William Francis (1855); Experimental Researches in Chemistry and Physics, Taylor and Francis (1859); Lectures on the Chemical History of a Candle (edited by W.

  • In addition to the authorities cited in the text, see Taylor, Law of Evidence (9th ed., London, 1895); J.

  • Taylor, an Englishwoman of the China Inland Mission, started from Tao-chow (Kansuh) in September 1892, Miss A.

  • Passing by the Taylor, famous lamasery of Labrang, south of the Yellow 1892.

  • Taylor, National Review (September 1893) Geog.

  • The fort and the settlement were named in honour of General William Jenkins Worth (1794-1849), a native of Hudson, New York, who served in the War of 1812, commanded the United States forces against the Seminole Indians in 1841-1842, served under both General Taylor and General Scott in the Mexican War, distinguishing himself at Monterey (where he earned the brevet of major-general) and in other engagements, and later commanded the department of Texas.

  • Taylor, 1694, 1712) Conversations chretiennes (1677, and frequently; Eng.

  • To those wishing to pursue the subject further, the following books among others may be suggested: - Sabin, Cement and Concrete (New York); Taylor and Thompson, Concrete, Plain and Reinforced (London); Sutcliffe, Concrete, Nature and Uses (London); Marsh and Dunn, Reinforced Concrete (London); Twelvetrees, Concrete Steel (London); Paul Christophe, Le Beton arme (Paris); Buel and Hill, Reinforced Concrete Construction (London).

  • when he fixed on the garter as the emblem of the order, and it was stated so to have been by Taylor, master of the rolls, in his address to Francis I.

  • C. Taylor (Ibis, 1878, p. 372) saw an adult which had been killed near Lake Menzal in 1877.

  • C. Taylor remarked (Ibis, 18 59, p. 51), that the buff-backed heron, Ardea bubulcus, was made by the tourists' dragomans to do duty for the "sacred ibis," and this seems to be no novel practice, since by it, or something like it, Hasselqvist was misled, and through him Linnaeus.

  • Hudson Taylor in 1853 went to China as the agent of a number of folk in England who feared that missionary work was becoming too mechanical.

  • Bishop Taylor's effort at creating a self-supporting mission proved fruitless.

  • Hudson Taylor, the founder of the China Inland Mission, and James Gilmour, the apostle of Mongolia, are pre-eminent.

  • 4 These phenomena are clearly explained at greater length by Sedley Taylor in Sound and Music (London, 1896), pp. 1 341 53 and pp. 74-86.

  • They received no electoral votes, all these being divided between the Whig candidate, Zachary Taylor, who was elected, and the Democratic candidate, Lewis Cass.

  • These include the austenitic or gamma non-magnetic manganese steel, already patented b y Robert Hadfield in 1883, the first important known substance which combined great malleableness with great hardness, and the martensitic or beta " high speed tool steel " of White and Taylor, which retains its hardness and cutting power even at a red heat.

  • Taylor, Principles and Practice of Medical Jurisprudence (1894); Sir J.

  • of Taylor's Scientific Memoirs.

  • Taylor, Memoir of Samuel Phillips (Boston, 1856); and Philena and Phebe F.

  • GRAFTON, a city and the county-seat of Taylor county, West Virginia, U.S.A., on Tygart river, about loo m.

  • It has also the Taylor Library (founded in 1894), and along the Sound are many summer residences.

  • GEORGE TAYLOR DENISON (1839-), Canadian soldier and publicist, was born in Toronto on the 31st of August 1839.

  • PETER TAYLOR FORSYTH (1848-), British Nonconformist divine, was born at Aberdeen in 1848.

  • In the Mexican War he served as a brigadier-general of volunteers under General Zachary Taylor on the Rio Grande, under General John E.

  • Taylor, Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society (1855), vol.

  • Taylor, With Scott, the Silver Lining (1916); Sir D.

  • The harbour is defended by Fort Taylor, built on the island of Key West in 1846, and greatly improved and modernized after the Spanish-American War of 1898.1898.

  • In 1861 Confederate forces attempted to seize Fort Taylor, but they were successfully resisted by General William H.

  • Taylor, Koreans at Home (London, 1904); E.

  • The sturdy Protestantism of Taylor and his flock, who seem to have caused various commotions, marked him out for the special enmity of Mary's government; and he was one of the first to suffer when in January 1 555 parliament had once more given the clerical courts liberty of jurisdiction.

  • The alleged descent of Jeremy Taylor from him has not been proved.

  • Thomas Taylor >>

  • Shaw's Golden Dreams (London, 1851); Bayard Taylor's Eldorado (2 vols., New York, 1850); W.

  • Zachary Taylor's staff at the battle of Buena Vista.

  • Taylor's Constitutional and Political History of Rome (1899) will also be found useful.

  • He thus fixes the date at the same period as Isaac Taylor had done in his Greeks and Goths and The Alphabet.

  • Taylor, however, derived the runes from the alphabet of a Greek colony on the Black Sea.

  • If this view (which is identical with Taylor's) be true, we have a parallel in the Armenian alphabet, which is similarly used for a new value of the sounds.

  • Taylor, however, conjectures (The Alphabet, ii.

  • Taylor contends that the alphabet is Iranian in origin, but the circum.

  • Taylor (The Alphabet, ii.

  • The alphabet, according to Taylor, shows no resemblance to any northern Semitic script, while its stiff, straight lines and its forms seem like the Sabaean.

  • But he rejects Taylor's derivation of this alphabet from the Sabaean script, and contends that it is borrowed from the North Semitic. To the pedantry of the Hindu he attributes its main characteristics, viz.

  • The best general accounts, though already somewhat antiquated, are: (I) The Alphabet (2 vols., with references to earlier works), by Canon Isaac Taylor (1883), reprinted from the stereotyped plates with small necessary corrections (1899); and (2) Histoire de l'e'criture dans l'antiquite, by M.

  • Bevan) in the Encyclopaedia Biblica, and " Alphabet "(by Isaac Taylor) in Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible.

  • Taylor, History of Wakefield (1886).

  • Owen (13,102), Teocalli Mountain (13,220), Snow Mass (13,970, Hayden) and Maroon (14,003, Hayden) mountains, Castle Peak (14,259), Capitol Mountain (13,997, Hayden), Pyramid Peak (13,885, Hayden), Taylor Peak (13,419), and about a dozen other summits above 12,000 ft.

  • "An air more delicious to breathe," wrote Bayard Taylor, "cannot anywhere be found; it is neither too sedative nor too exciting, but has that pure, sweet, flexible quality which seems to support all one's happiest and healthiest moods."

  • 3, 32nd Congress Special Session); Francis Parkman, The California and Oregon Trail (New York, 1849; revised ed., Boston, 1892), - a narrative of personal experience, as are the two following books: Bayard Taylor, Colorado; A Summer Trip (New York, 1867); Samuel Bowles, The Switzerland of America, A Summer Vacation in Colorado (Springfield, Mass., 1869); F.

  • In 1848, Zachary Taylor, a Mexican War hero, and hardly even a convert to the Whig party, defeated Clay for the nomination, Kentucky herself deserting her "favourite son."

  • Taylor volcano (11,389 ft.), which is surrounded by lava tables and some of the most wonderful volcanic buttes in the world.

  • Among books professedly dealing with the Free Church question, the most valuable are Sydow's Die Schottische Kirchenfrage (Potsdam, 1845), and The Scottish Church Question (London, 1845); Buchanan's Ten Years' Conflict (1849); Hanna's Life of Chalmers (1852); and Taylor Innes on The Law of Creeds in Scotland (1867).

  • by C. Taylor, Camb.

  • Taylor, Te Ika a Maui, 165), or when uncleanness is removed as if it were a physical secretion by washing, wiping and so forth, it is hard to say whether what we should now call a " material " nature is not ascribed to the sacred, more especially when its transmissibility after the manner of a contagion is the trait that holds the attention.

  • In 1770 the orthodox portion of the General Baptists, mainly under the influence of Dan Taylor (b.

  • Taylor, The Origin and Growth of the English Constitution (2 vols., London, 1889-1899); A.

  • Taylor, A System of Applied Optics (1906); reference may also be made to R.

  • In March 1849 he became secretary of state in the cabinet of President Zachary Taylor, to whose nomination and election his influence had contributed.

  • His brief tenure of the state portfolio, which terminated on the 22nd of July 1850, soon after Taylor's death, was notable chiefly for the negotiation with the British minister, Sir Henry Lytton Bulwer, of the Clayton-Bulwer Treaty.

  • For several years after 1840 Zachary Taylor made his home on a plantation near Baton Rouge.

  • Next year he married Harriet Ann Taylor, whose father had been the founder and proprietor of the Manchester Guardian.

  • SAMUEL TAYLOR COLERIDGE (1772-1834), English poet and philosopher, was born on the 21st of October 1772, at his father's vicarage of Ottery St Mary's, Devonshire.

  • In the year following, 1788, Nembana, a Timni chief, sold a strip of land to Captain John Taylor, R.N., for the use of the "free community of settlers, their heirs and successors, lately arrived from England, and under the protection of the British government."

  • Taylor (1889), a collection of passages from contemporary writers; and R.

  • In 1812 the fort was successfully defended against an attack of the Indians by its commandant Captain Zachary Taylor, and in 1817 was abandoned.

  • He was an apprentice of Joseph Henry Green, the distinguished surgeon at St Thomas's, well known for his friendship for Samuel Taylor Coleridge, whose literary executor Green became.

  • Mr Taylor (A Treatise of International Public Law, p. 174) treats the Transvaal after the convention of 1884 as a " neutralized state only part sovereign."

  • C. Taylor (Ibis, 1864, p. 90), have a strong crow-like odour.

  • 2," which had been drawn by John Taylor (1770-1832) of South Carolina, and was not actively supported by him.

  • ZACHARY TAYLOR (1784-1850), twelfth president of the United States, was born in Orange county, Virginia, on the 24th of September 1784.

  • During the following year his father, Colonel Richard Taylor, a veteran of the War of Independence, migrated to Kentucky, settling near Louisville, and thereafter played an important part in the wars and politics of his adopted state.

  • The boyhood and youth of Zachary Taylor were thus passed in the midst of the stirring frontier scenes of early Kentucky, and from this experience he acquired the hardihood and resoluteness that characterized his later life, although he inevitably lacked the advantages of a thorough education.

  • In May 1808 Taylor received a commission as first lieutenant in the 7th United States Infantry, and for the next few years was employed in routine duties.

  • In 1836 Taylor was ordered from Wisconsin to take command against the Seminoles in Florida.

  • While at New Orleans in 1845, Taylor received orders from President Polk to march his troops into Texas, as soon as that state should accept the terms of annexation proposed by the Joint Resolution of Congress of March 2, 1845.

  • Upon the definite refusal of the Mexican government under Paredes to resume with the United States the diplomatic relations broken off by the annexation of Texas, Taylor was ordered to advance to the Rio Grande for the purpose of anticipating any hostile incursion from Mexico.

  • Taylor not only disregarded this summons, but within the following week proceeded to blockade the Rio Grande.

  • Meanwhile Taylor had strengthened his base of supplies at Point Isabel, where he was reinforced by militia from Texas and Louisiana, and during the return march from this post was fiercely attacked at Palo Alto (about 8 m.

  • The latter was easily driven from the field, but on the following day threatened Taylor's advance in a much stronger position, Resaca de la Palma (about 4 m.

  • A brilliant charge by the dragoons under Captain May decided this contest, which Taylor followed up by a pursuit of the Mexican general to the Rio Grande.

  • After relieving Fort Brown, which had been besieged since the 3rd of May, Taylor himself crossed the river, and on the 18th of May occupied Matamoras, from which Arista had already retreated to Monterrey.

  • As it was the intention of the administration to wage war for the purpose merely of bringing Mexico to negotiate, Taylor did not immediately advance southward from the Rio Grande.

  • Taylor formed a new base of operations at Camargo, farther up the river, and from this point, in August began an advance towards Monterrey, the capital of Nuevo Leon.

  • By this time Taylor had been reinforced by some 3000 troops which had marched under Gen.

  • President Polk distrusted Taylor because of his supposed Whig views, and now began to express his dissatisfaction with the general's failure to take full advantage of his victories and his hesitancy to suggest a plan for the future conduct of the war.

  • Taylor was unwilling to lead his own army farther into the desert interior of Mexico and remained non-committal upon the projected attempt from Vera Cruz.

  • Learning of the weakened condition of Taylor's force he made a sudden advance to the northward, with some 20,000 troops, and on the 22nd of February 1847 encountered Taylor with one-fourth that number at Buena Vista, a few miles beyond Saltillo.

  • The all-day battle in the narrow mountain pass was the most stubbornly contested of the whole war, and the brilliant victory of Taylor over such odds made " Old Rough and Ready," as he was called by his troops, the hero of the hour.

  • Taylor's brilliant victory, won when he was so greatly handicapped by 'Polk, emphasized the popular discontent which that president's policy had already aroused, and suggested him to the political leaders as a presidential possibility.

  • Taylor first adopted a course of discouraging these suggestions and emphasized his non-partisan attitude, but later gave way to the pressure, and issued a statement that proved satisfactory to the majority of the Whig politicians.

  • The disaffection of these leaders was more than counterbalanced, however, by the split of the New York Democrats over the slavery question, which assured Taylor of the vote of that state.

  • As a result Taylor carried eight slave states while his opponent secured seven, but in the free states the conditions were exactly reversed.

  • Under the circumstances the first message from President Taylor was awaited with great interest.

  • The only son that survived him, Richard Taylor (1826-1879), popularly known as " General Dick," graduated at Yale in 1845, entered the Confederate army at the beginning of the Civil War, was commanding officer in Louisiana, and under Kirby Smith helped to administer the western half of the Confederacy, after the fall of Vicksburg.

  • Montgomery's Life (Auburn, 1850) and John Frost's Life (New York and Philadelphia, 1847) are almost wholly devoted to President Taylor's military career, and are excessively laudatory in character.

  • There is much material about Taylor in the general histories of M`Master, Von Holst, and Rhodes.

  • Taylor >>

  • During the war between Mexico and the United States General Zachary Taylor arrived before the city on the 19th of September 1846, with about 6600 men.

  • On the 29th of January 1555, Hooper, Rogers, Rowland Taylor and others were condemned by Gardiner and degraded by Bonner.

  • With Peter Cooper, Moses Taylor (1806-1882), Marshall Owen Roberts (1814-1880) and Chandler White, he formed the New York, Newfoundland & London Telegraph Company, which procured a more favourable charter than Gisborne's, and had a capital of $1,500,000.

  • In 1847 Brigham Young had succeeded Joseph Smith as president of the Mormons, and he held that position of veritable dictator until his death (1877); John Taylor succeeded him, and Wilford Woodruff in 1890 was chosen head of the organization; then Lorenzo Snow was president in 1898-1901, and Joseph Fielding Smith was elected in 1901.

  • Among Heber's works are: Palestine: a Poem, to which is added the Passage of the Red Sea (1809); Europe: Lines on the Present War (1809); a volume of poems in 1812; The Personality and Office of the Christian Comforter asserted and explained (being the Bampton Lectures for 1815); The Whole Works of Bishop Jeremy Taylor, with a Life of the Author, and a Critical Examination of his Writings (1822); Hymns written and adapted to the Weekly Church Service of the Year, principally by Bishop Heber (1827); A Journey through India (1828); Sermons preached in England, and Sermons preached in India (1829); Sermons on the Lessons, the Gospel, or the Epistle for every Sunday in the Year (1837).

  • C. Gotch, Mr and Mrs Stanhope Forbes, Chevalier Taylor and H.

  • There is an English translation of selected portions by Thomas Taylor, re-edited in Bohn's Philosophical Library (1895, with introduction and bibliography by G.

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