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taste

taste

taste Sentence Examples

  • That way you don't have to taste it.

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  • You taste like honey, love.

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  • I imagine it would taste mighty good.

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  • She was starting to taste the bitterness of reality.

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  • He complied and kissed her deeply, enjoying the taste and feel of her despite the mix of salty tears.

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  • She put her cell phone on its charger and explored the house, admiring his taste in everything from furniture to paintings to simple décor.

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  • It don't taste right.

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  • The scent, the taste, was unlike anything she ever experienced.

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  • She's got a sharp tongue, but she could make shoe soles taste like fine steak.

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  • It made her hungry to taste him.

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  • "It's all still too much of a coincidence for my taste," Dean said.

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  • But then, he didn't say her taste was stylish - he said it had style.

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  • Never in her wildest dreams would she have considered her taste stylish or elegant.

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  • He focused on the taste of their warm blood and on tearing them limb from limb.

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  • Other businesses in the food industry—say those pricey health foods you see at fancy grocery stores—optimize for taste and nutrition at the expense of price.

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  • "We have similar taste in alcohol," he said, and lifted his glass to her.

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  • She stared at the embroidered tablecloth, tormented by the scent of food she couldn't eat and the visions of death and betrayal that left an acrid taste in her mouth.

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  • You taste like cheap whiskey.

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  • It somewhat squelched the taste, enough so they were palatable.

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  • Fast food chains optimize for two of them: taste and price, at the expense of nutrition.

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  • We're not the custodians of the morals of our guests, nor the taste of her lovers.

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  • At the first taste, she wolfed it and three more pieces down until the edge of her hunger disappeared.

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  • But I want to be the first demon to taste a deity.

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  • But I want to be the first demon to taste a deity.

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  • He smelled like dark chocolate, spices and man, a combination that ensnared her senses and made her want to taste him.

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  • He smelled like dark chocolate, spices and man, a combination that ensnared her senses and made her want to taste him.

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  • Her senses filled with his taste, scent, the heat of his body, enveloping her yet never enough.

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  • "How does it taste?" asked the Wizard.

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  • I taste like shit.

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  • I taste like shit.

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  • Or that taste like meat, taking pastureland off the grid.

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  • The manufacturers have learned that this taste is merely whimsical.

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  • The taste of your sweet nectar before I tear you apart?

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  • The taste of your sweet nectar before I tear you apart?

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  • His tongue flicked out to taste her tears.

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  • "You know she'll taste good," another agreed.

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  • "You know she'll taste good," another agreed.

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  • "Taste," Talon said, handing her arm to the silver-haired man beside him.

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  • It is partly his taste, and not merely his misfortune.

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  • There is in this town, with a very few exceptions, no taste for the best or for very good books even in English literature, whose words all can read and spell.

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  • Rhyn felt suddenly jealous, wishing he could taste what smelled so wonderful.

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  • (If that can be achieved, to my readers under age twelve, I hold out the possibility of Brussels sprouts that taste like chocolate.)

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  • She wanted – needed – to taste him again.

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  • You taste as sweet as you look, little girl?

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  • "I have neither taste nor smell," he remarked, sniffing at his glass.

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  • It is the rule and custom of the cupbearer to pour out a little of the wine and taste it before handing the cup to me.

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  • They praised her taste and toilet, and at eleven o'clock, careful of their coiffures and dresses, they settled themselves in their carriages and drove off.

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  • I have certainly acquired a taste for war, and it is just as well for me; what I have seen during these last three months is incredible.

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  • The chef is glad to adjust the level of spice of each dish to the taste of the guest, and suggests that those who are unfamiliar with this sort of cuisine start mild and work their way up to spicy.

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  • Now that we.re friends, I thought you might let me have a taste of your monkey.

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  • He added a little tequila this time, and the absence of the plastic improved the taste more than he expected.

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  • He added a little tequila this time, and the absence of the plastic improved the taste more than he expected.

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  • Prince Vasili finds you to his taste as a daughter-in-law and makes a proposal to you on his pupil's behalf.

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  • On some level – in the newfound instincts that wanted to taste him – his words made sense.

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  • He dwelled on her scent, the taste of her, the kiss.

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  • Did her blood taste half as good as Damian's?

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  • Deidre took his face in her hands, hungrily trying to taste more of him as she explored his mouth with fervor.

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  • It was as good when a week old as the day it was dipped, and had no taste of the pump.

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  • We meet at meals three times a day, and give each other a new taste of that old musty cheese that we are.

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  • It has a sweetish taste, much like that of a frost-bitten potato, and I found it better boiled than roasted.

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  • Alaskan king crab is one type of shellfish in the commercial harvest famed for its size and taste.

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  • Brown or golden king crabs are the smallest in size of the three main species and are similar in taste to blue king crab.

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  • Indianapolis features restaurants for every taste and every price range.

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  • Zagat's rates it an affordable restaurant with big entrees and great taste.

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  • If you can't decide what to eat, you can start with a mezza platter to get your senses warmed up and experience a variety of taste sensations.

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  • Each restaurant offers a different setting, and cuisine that will satisfy the taste of everyone that visits.

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  • The menu offers options for every taste and budget, ranging from diner-delicious hearty breakfasts to well-appointed steak, pasta dishes, and seafood platters.

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  • Stonington's variety of eateries has something for everyone, no matter your budget or taste.

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  • Chicken and seafood entrees are also on the menu and the choices are sure to guarantee there is something to satisfy everyone's taste buds.

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  • Savor the taste of grilled salmon, steak frites, cappellini pomodora or organic chicken piccata for dinner.

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  • You cannot go wrong starting with the garden fresh salad because you can definitely taste the freshness.

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  • Each exotic dish is prepared to your taste and can be made mild, medium or spicy.

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  • Look for monthly and seasonal steak specials celebrating seasonal harvest to also satisfy your taste buds.

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  • A treat for the taste buds and an entertaining night on the town, this restaurant is sure to become a fast favorite as you delight in rolling up your sleeves and demonstrating your culinary skills.

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  • Several of these eateries have actually become destinations for those who savor the taste of wild game.

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  • The restaurant is dining-room style with a buffet and is a pleasurable experience in taste that fits any budget.

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  • Give your taste buds a burst of excitement by trying new cuisine.

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  • Get a true taste of the quirky neighborhood in this eclectic restaurant.

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  • "You do taste as sweet as you look," he said, voice thick with need.

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  • "Walk," she managed, shuddering at the lingering visions that left an acrid taste in her mouth.

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  • The taste of him filled her, calmed her.

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  • Do you want a taste of this?... said the huntsman, pointing to his dagger and probably imagining himself still speaking to his foe.

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  • Obviously his taste was compatible with hers.

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  • "Very good taste," he said, taking in the house.

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  • Really Sarah, can you honestly say you don't taste the plastic bag?

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  • Only not quite my taste--he is so narrow, like the dining-room clock....

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  • It became less of a request and more of a demand, with his tongue flickering to taste her.

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  • Food can be optimized according to three factors, broadly speaking: taste, price, and nutrition.

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  • We could say he has excellent taste.

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  • The water was cool and had a metallic taste.

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  • I think you have impeccable taste.

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  • This was what she smelled, what she ached to taste.

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  • Deidre reached for him, straining to ease the need to taste him.

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  • Near frenzied, Deidre fought to pull some part of him close enough for her to taste.

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  • She wasn't going to fall under the spell of Gabriel's strong body, his passion, his taste.

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  • The alternative was irreparable and too permanent for my taste.

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  • He drooled at the smell, his gums and body aching for a taste.

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  • He couldn't protect anyone from Sasha in Hell, and he itched to taste the woman meant to be his mate.

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  • The taste of death was in her mouth and if she looked, she knew her shoes would be covered in blood.

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  • He lifted her at last and carried her to his quarters, senses full of her quickened breath, heady female scent, sweet taste.

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  • She has great taste.

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  • This will warm your blood, best get used to the taste.

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  • That way, no plastic taste.

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  • I want you to taste it.

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  • Jackson thought, Does she want Elisabeth to taste my blood?

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  • He scowled at the immediate burn and taste of acid.

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  • Now he'll get a taste for chickens and start raiding my hen house every night.

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  • No.  Mortals are like … candy to demons.  Demons don't need them, but they taste good.

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  • She handed the pale woman a food and water cube and popped two of her own.  Standing, she waded into the brush where she'd thrown the knife.  It glinted in the morning light.  Katie swiped it, glad the trees didn't have a taste for metal as well as Immortal sustenance.

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  • Carmen suggested a family project of redecorating the room to his taste, and Alex was in full agreement.

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  • The black memories that made him wake up screaming at night, the fear he could still taste in moments of despair, were softened by the sense of stillness that settled into him.

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  • Always wanted to taste a Healer.

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  • He shivered at the taste of night-blooming flowers and the salty ocean on the cool breeze.

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  • No darkness lasts the ages, Taran…I do not care to remember the sound of a bird's cry, but I wish I remembered the taste of spiced ale.

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  • He listened to her breathing, could almost taste her skin from their position.

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  • He responded to her kiss, savoring the sweet taste and softness of her warm lips.

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  • His reminder of her failure left a bitter taste to her mouth.

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  • What do they taste like?

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  • What would the tea taste like?

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  • Instead of the sweet taste she expected, it was bitter - like alum.

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  • Barely noticing the taste of blood on her lip, she kicked the bedroll away and scrambled awkwardly to her feet again.

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  • Maybe she lacked taste, but she knew what she liked.

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  • A glass of water would taste good right now.

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  • Sure, you can eat those weeds, but what do they taste like?

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  • The water was cold and had a metallic taste she liked.

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  • The last pose with Toni was far too …intimate for Jessi's taste.

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  • Xander licked his fangs and lips clean, enjoying her taste while she stared at him with far too much emotion for him to determine what she'd do: freak out or melt.

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  • He teased and nipped, his kiss deep enough to rob her of any resistance yet light enough that she raised onto her tiptoes to taste more of him.

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  • The kisses continued, and his tongue flickered out to taste her skin.

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  • What would a … Watcher taste like?

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  • "Does hair color mean they taste different?" she asked.

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  • They taste better anyway.

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  • His lips teased her, his mouth opening so she could taste him once more.

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  • Burmann was rather a compiler than a critic; his commentaries show immense learning and accuracy, but are wanting in taste and judgment.

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  • Their selection for a particular purpose depends upon some special quality which they possess; thus for brewing certain essentials are demanded as regards stability, clarification, taste and smell; whereas, in distilleries, the production of alcohol and a high multiplying power in the yeast are required.

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  • This last post left him plenty of leisure, which he used for travelling and cultivating the society of interesting people, a taste which earned him the title of Monsignore Ubique.

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  • Every Italian artist and man of letters in an age of singular intellectual brilliancy tasted or hoped to taste of his bounty.

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  • It has more than one advantage over the meadow mushroom in its extreme commonness, its profuse growth, the length of the season in which it may be gathered, the total absence of varietal forms, its adaptability for being dried and preserved for years, and its persistent delicious taste.

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  • alliaceus, is also strongly impregnated with the scent and taste of onions or garlic. Two species, M.

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  • (1784) a professorship at the university of Wilna, which he did not find to his taste.

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  • The attention of the reader was distracted, and his good taste annoyed, by the incessant use of puns, of which Hood had written in his own vindication: "However critics may take offence, A double meaning has double sense."

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  • During the winter of 1612 he completed his preparations for the world by lessons in horsemanship and fencing; and then started as his own master to taste the pleasures of Parisian life.

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  • The odour is heavy and disagreeable, and the taste acrid and bitter.

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  • Lydgate had a consuming passion for literature, and it was probably that he might indulge this taste more fully that in 1 434 he retired from the priorate of Hatfield Broadoak (or Hatfield Regis), to which he had been appointed in June 1423.

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  • In spite of that, Lydgate is characteristically medieval - medieval in his prolixity, his platitude, his want of judgment and his want of taste; medieval also in his pessimism, his Mariolatry and his horror of death.

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  • The danger in this direction is that when Presbyterianism has been modified far enough to suit the English taste it may be found less acceptable to its more stalwart supporters from beyond the Tweed.

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  • It has a sharp burning taste, and is very poisonous.

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  • 3 In his view of touch and taste, as the two fundamental and essential senses, he may remind one of Herbert Spencer's doctrine.

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  • In the design of spires Wren showed much taste and wonderful power of invention.

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  • In 1746 he published his treatise Les Beaux-Arts adults a un meme Principe, an attempt to find a unity among the various theories of beauty and taste, and his views were widely accepted.

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  • After the division of the Roman empire, Constantinople became the last refuge of learning, arts and taste; while Alexandria continued to be the emporium whence were imported the commodities of the East.

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  • It has a characteristic smell, and a biting taste; it is poisonous, and acts as a powerful antiseptic. It dissolves in water, 15 parts of water dissolving about one part of phenol at 16-17° C., but it is miscible in all proportions at about 70° C.; it is volatile in steam, and is readily soluble in alcohol, ether, benzene, carbon bisulphide, chloroform and glacial acetic acid.

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  • the Nearctic and the Palaearctic. The reduction of the Oriental to a subregion, with consequent " provincial " rank of its main subdivisions, will probably be objected to, but these are matters of taste and prejudice.

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  • James was a cultured prince with a taste for music and architecture, but was a weak and incapable king.

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  • He entered the House of Commons as Liberal member for Berwick-on-Tweed in 1885, but he was best known as a country gentleman with a taste for sport, and as amateur champion tennis-player.

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  • They are all, as found in commerce, of a pale yellow-green colour; they emit a peculiar aromatic odour, and have a slightly astringent bitter taste.

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  • A taste for French literature spread rapidly, and the poets and dramatists of Paris found clever imitators in St Petersburg.

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  • Thanksgiving, blessing and offering were co-ordinate terms. Hence the Talmudic rule, "A man shall not taste anything before blessing it" (Tosephta Berachoth, c. 4), and hence St Paul's words, "He that eateth, eateth unto the Lord, for he giveth God thanks" (Rom.

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  • We do not lie down at table until prayer has been offered to God, as it were a first taste.

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  • " Unprovided with original learning, unformed in the habits of thinking, unskilled in the arts of composition, I resolved to write a book "; but the discovery of his own weakness, he adds, was the first symptom of taste.

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  • He particularly congratulated himself on having discovered the " philosophical argument " against transubstantiation, " that the text of Scripture which seems to inculcate the real presence is attested only by a single sense - our sight, while the real presence itself is disproved by three of our senses - the sight, the touch, and the taste."

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  • In 1757 Voltaire came to reside at Lausanne; and although he took but little notice of the young Englishman of twenty, who eagerly sought and easily obtained an introduction, the establishment of the theatre at Monrepos, where the brilliant versifier himself declaimed before select audiences his own productions on the stage, had no small influence in fortifying Gibbon's taste for the French theatre, and in at the same time abating that "idolatry for the gigantic genius of Shakespeare which is inculcated from our infancy as the first duty of an Englishman."

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  • In London he seems to have seen but little select society - partly from his father's taste, "which had always preferred the highest and lowest company," and partly from his own reserve and timidity, increased by his foreign education, which had made English habits unfamiliar, and the very language 2 The affair, however, was not finally broken off till 1763.

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  • A garden of four acres had been laid out by the taste of M.

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  • They met with a quick and easy sale, were very extensively read, and very liberally and deservedly praised for the unflagging industry and vigour they displayed, though just exception, if only on the score of good taste, was taken to the scoffing tone he continued to maintain in all passages where the Christian religion was specially concerned, and much fault was found with the indecency of some of his notes.'

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  • Within the seven years next following he failed twice as a storekeeper and once as a farmer; but in the meantime acquired a taste for reading, of history especially, and read and re-read the history of Greece and Rome, of England, and of her American colonies.

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  • He had no taste for historical investigations.

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  • In some measure we find this practice adopted by more than one of the Fathers, but it was the Alexandrian school, with its pronounced taste for symbolism, that made the most of it.

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  • Their houses are slightly built, but the surrounding ground and roads are laid out with great care and taste.

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  • The original motive of the recipients of these favours was doubtless the taste of the time for outward display; St Bernard, zealous for the monastic ideal, de nounced abbots for wearing mitres and the like more pontificum, and Peter the Cantor roundly called the abbatial mitre " inane, superfluous and puerile " (Verb.

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  • Then we will highlight them on the home page so people can get a great taste of just how great the 1911 can be.

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  • The appeal is still to the individual, who, if not by reason then by some higher faculty, claims to realize absolute truth and to taste absolute blessedness.

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  • " As the little water-drop poured into a large measure of wine seems to lose its own nature entirely and to take on both the taste and the colour of the wine; or as iron heated red-hot loses its own appearance and glows like fire; or as air filled with sunlight is transformed into the same brightness so that it does not so much appear to be illuminated as to be itself light - so must all human feeling towards the Holy One be self-dissolved in unspeakable wise, and wholly transfused into the will of God.

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  • He was handsome, conciliatory and agreeable, and a man of refined taste and untarnished honour.

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  • The story of Tristan and Iseult, immensely popular as it was, was too genuine - (shall we say too crude?) - to satisfy the taste of the court for which Chretien was writing.

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  • r 265 at 15° C., possessing a somewhat sweet taste; below o° C. it solidifies to a white crystalline mass, which melts at 17° C. When heated alone it partially volatilizes, but the greater part decomposes; under a pressure of 12 mm.

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  • He went over every part of the translation with me, observed on every passage in which justice was not done to the thought or the force of the expression lost, and made many useful criticisms. During this occupation we had occasion to see one another often, and became very intimate; and, as he had read much, had seen a great deal of the world, was acquainted with all the most distinguished persons who at that time adorned either the royal court or the republic of letters in France; had a great knowledge of French and Italian literature, and possessed very good taste, his conversation was extremely interesting and not a little instructive.

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  • Lower down the valley cattle-breeding is the chief source of wealth, while in the small towns and villages of the former Georgian kingdom various petty trades, exhibiting a high development of artistic taste and technical skill, are widely diffused.

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  • On the other hand, the domestic industries are extensively carried on and exhibit a high degree of technical skill and artistic taste.

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  • His artistic taste was shown by his patronage of Velasquez, and his love of letters by his favour to Lope de Vega, Calderon, and other dramatists.

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  • Throughout life Carteret not only showed a keen love of the classics, but a taste for, and a knowledge of, modern languages and literatures.

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  • Organs of similar type on the maxillae and epipharynx appear to exercise the function of taste.

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  • The existence of these two works explains the widely-spread taste for ornithology in England, which is to foreigners so puzzling, and the zeal - not always according to knowledge, but occasionally reaching to serious study - with which that taste is pursued.

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  • His taste for literature was early seen, and his father Pierre (1496-1556) cultivated it to the utmost.

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  • After Longhena's date church architecture in Venice declined upon the dubious taste of baroque; the facades of San Moise and of Santa Maria del Giglio are good specimens of this style.

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  • But he had no taste for military adventure.

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  • Citric acid has an agreeable sour taste.

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  • The last and the worst of the Cid ballads are those which betray by their frigid conceits and feeble mimicry of the antique the false taste and essentially unheroic spirit of the age of Philip II.

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  • His knowledge of the ancient authors was wide, but his taste was not select, and his erudition was superficial.

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  • His taste, however, was curious; he preferred Cato the elder, Ennius and Caelius Antipater to Cicero, Virgil and Sallust, the obscure poet Antimachus to Homer and Plato.

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  • Soaps give an alkaline reaction and have a decided acrid taste; in a pure condition - a state never reached in practice - they have neither smell nor colour.

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  • As the lye becomes absorbed, a condition indicated by the taste of the goods, additional quantities of lye of increasing strength are added.

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  • He came to the throne after the ten years of confusion which followed the death of Archelaus, the patron of art and literature, and showed the same taste for Greek culture and its representatives.

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  • But this would not help Wagner to feel that contemporary music was really a great art; indeed it could only show him that he was growing up in a pseudo-classical time, in which the approval of persons of " good taste " was seldom directed to things of vital promise.

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  • But with Der Ring des Nibelungen Wagner devoted himself to a story which any ordinary dramatist would find as unwieldy as, for instance, most of Shakespeare's subjects; a story in which ordinary canons of taste and probability were violated as they are in real life and in great art.

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  • He combined a roving disposition with a natural taste for mechanics and for literature.

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  • There are 15 churches in the city, some occupying the most conspicuous sites on the hills, all dating from the more prosperous days of the city's history, but all devoid of architectural taste.

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  • The salt has a sweet, mawkish taste.

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  • He was a man of insignificant character, with a taste for artificial verse.

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  • 2 Its information should not only be accurate, but also conveyed intelligibly and with taste.

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  • In the violent controversy that ensued he wrote many pamphlets, often anonymous, and frequently not in the best of taste.

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  • He had no taste except for ornament, and no serious interest except in amusements, versemaking, hunting and tournaments.

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  • It has abandoned its peculiarities of dress and language, as well as its hostility to music and art, and it has cultivated a wider taste in literature.

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  • Among the larger trees are the mountain cedar, reaching to 100 ft.; the gob, which bears edible berries in appearance something like the cherry with the taste of an apple, grows to some 80 ft., and is found fringing the river beds; the hassadan, a kind of euphorbia, attaining a height of about 70 ft.; and the darei, a fig tree.

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  • A man of literary taste and culture, familiar with the classics, a facile writer of Latin verses' as well as of Ciceronian prose, he was as anxious that the Roman clergy should unite human science and literature with their theological studies as that the laity should be educated in the principles of religion; and to this end he established in Rome a kind of voluntary school board, with members both lay and clerical; and the rivalry of the schools thus founded ultimately obliged the state to include religious teaching in its curriculum.

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  • The institution does not present itself in a very harsh form in Homer, especially if we consider (as Grote suggests) that " all classes were much on a level in taste, sentiment and instruction."

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  • The peculiar musky odour was perceived from a distance of a hundred yards; but according to Professor Nathoist there was no musky taste or smell in the flesh if the carcase were cleaned immediately the animals were killed.

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  • A friend describes Wesley at this time as "a young fellow of the finest classical taste, and the most liberal and manly sentiments."

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  • No man in the 18th century did so much to create a taste for good reading and to supply it with books at the lowest prices.

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  • Priestley, who obtained it by reducing nitrogen peroxide with iron, may be prepared by heating ammonium nitrate at 170-260° C., or by reducing a mixture of nitric and sulphuric acid with zinc. It is a colourless gas, which is practically odourless, but possesses a sweetish taste.

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  • Hence the vast majority of the people whom we are accustomed to think of as Ottomans are so only by adoption, being really the descendants of Seljuks or Seljukian subjects, who had derived from Persia whatever they possessed of civilization or of literary taste.

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  • The sight of some battle-pictures revived his taste for fine art.

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  • Early in 1886 he struck the public taste with precision in his wild symbolic tale of The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde.

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  • Art industries, particularly those which appeal to the luxurious taste of the inhabitants in fitting their houses, such as wall-papers and furniture, and those which are included in the equipment of ocean-going steamers, have of late years made rapid strides and are among the best productions of this character of any German city.

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  • The secular fashions altered with changes of taste; but the Church retained the dress with the other traditions of the Roman Empire.

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  • Its taste is somewhat sweet, its sweetening power being estimated at from a to -*- that of cane sugar.

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  • When heated to above 200 it turns brown and produces caramel, a substance possessing a bitter taste, and used, in its aqueous solution or otherwise, under various trade names, for colouring confectionery, spirits, &c. The specific rotation of the plane of polarized light by glucose solutions is characteristic. The specific rotation of a freshly prepared solution is 105°, but this value gradually diminishes to 52.5°, 24 hours sufficing for the transition in the cold, and a few minutes when the solution is boiled.

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  • Their bronze ornaments and implements, often polished, evince considerable artistic taste; and their irrigated fields covered wide areas in the fertile tracts.

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  • Lead acetate, Pb(C2H302)2.3H20 (called "sugar" of lead, on account of its sweetish taste), is manufactured by dissolving massicot in aqueous acetic acid.

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  • After this every portion of the animal is thoroughly examined, for if there is any organic disease the devout Jew cannot taste the meat.

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  • Semler, while he cultivated his strong taste for history under Chancellor Ludwig.

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  • By Ancillon he was grounded in religion, in history and political science, his natural taste for the antique and the picturesque making it easy for his tutor to impress upon him his own hatred of the Revolution and its principles.

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  • The streets are as a rule arcaded, and this characteristic has been preserved in modern additions, which have on the whole been made with considerable taste, as have also the numerous restorations of medieval buildings.

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  • To the south of the cantonment is situated the park, created by the taste and public spirit of Lord Wellesley.

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  • As alum and green vitriol were applied to a variety of substances in common, and as both are distinguished by a sweetish and astringent taste, writers, even after the discovery of alum, do not seem to have discriminated the two salts accurately from each other.

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  • The Brazilian people have the natural taste for art, music and literature so common among the Latin nations of the Old World.

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  • Although it suffered at the hands of revolutionary fanatics in 1688, the damage was confined mainly to the external ornament, and the chapel, owing to restoration in judicious taste, is now in perfect condition.

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  • The local patriotism and good taste of the citizens have regulated recreation and have also preserved in pristine vigour many peculiarly Scottish customs and pastimes.

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  • He was educated for the priesthood in Paris and Utrecht, but his taste for Hebrew, Arabic, Persian, and other languages of the East 7 Anorthite.

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  • Intended to evolve a history of jurisprudence from the truthful portraits of England's greatest lawyers, it merely exhibits the ill-digested results of desultory learning, without a trace of scientific symmetry or literary taste, without a spark of that divine imaginative sympathy which alone can give flesh and spirit to the dead bones of the past, and without which the present 1 See thereon J.

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  • Thanks to all these architectural treasures, the narrow Sienese streets with their many windings and steep ascents are full of picturesque charm, and, together with the collections of excellent paintings, foster the local pride of the inhabitants and preserve their taste and feeling for art.

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  • His relative, noting the lad's passionate addiction to study, solemnly warned him, against indulging such a taste, as likely to prove a fatal obstacle to his success in commercial life.

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  • It is discursive and badly arranged, but it is marked by a power of style, a vigour of narrative, and a skill in delineation of character which give life to the most unattractive period of German history; notwithstanding the extreme spirit of partisanship and some faults of taste, it will remain a remarkable monument of literary ability.

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  • cellence of taste hitherto unknown soon became apparent.

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  • But he owed all to Concini, and his taste of power ended with the murder of his patron on the 24th of August 161 7.

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  • The newcomers adopted the language of the conquered, but brought with them new customs and a new artistic taste probably largely borrowed from the metal-working tribes of Siberia.

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  • Hardy, simple and industrious, fond of music, kind-hearted, and with a strangely artistic taste in dress, these people possess in a wonderful degree the secret of cheerful contentment.

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  • marriage, worship, feasts), and especially upon individual status and taste.

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  • Then followed the dramatic " Lot's Wife," in marble (1878), and" Artemis " (1880), which for grace, elegance and purity of taste the sculptor never surpassed.

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  • It has a strong and characteristic odour, and a hot sweetish taste, is soluble in ten parts of water, and in all proportions in alcohol, and dissolves bromine, iodine, and, in small quantities, sulphur and phosphorus, also the volatile oils, most fatty and resinous substances, guncotton, caoutchouc and certain of the vegetable alkaloids.

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  • However praiseworthy the intention may have been, the list of authors specially recommended does not speak well for Fronto's literary taste.

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  • Dropsical liquids are usually pale yellow or greenish, limpid, with a saltish taste and alkaline reaction, and a specific gravity ranging from 1005 to 1024.

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  • - Nitroglycerin has a sweet burning taste and is decidedly poisonous.

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  • It is of course possible that Map's rise at court may have been due to his having hit the literary taste of the monarch, who, we know, was interested in the Arthurian tradition, but it must be admitted that direct evidence on the subject is practically nil, and that in the present condition of our knowledge we can only advance possible hypotheses.

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  • He was now over seventy; his powers had deserted him, and even if they had not the public taste had entirely changed.

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  • Lamartine has been extolled as a pattern of combined passion and restraint, as a model of nobility of sentiment, and as a harmonizer of pure French classicism in taste and expression with much, if not all, the better part of Romanticism itself.

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  • If the Roman aristocracy of his time had lost much of the virtue and of the governing qualities of their ancestors, they showed in the last years before the establishment of monarchy a taste for intellectual culture which might have made Rome as great in literature as in arms and law.

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  • A new taste for philosophy had developed among members of the governing class during the youth of Lucretius, and eminent Greek teachers of the Epicurean sect settled at Rome at the same time, and lived on terms of intimacy with them.

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  • He allows his taste for these tricks of style to degenerate into mannerism.

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  • But there is immense wit, a wonderful command of such metre and language as the taste of the time allowed to the poet, occasionally a singular if somewhat artificial grace, and a curious felicity of diction and manner.

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