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taste

taste

taste Sentence Examples

  • That way you don't have to taste it.

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  • You taste like honey, love.

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  • I imagine it would taste mighty good.

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  • She was starting to taste the bitterness of reality.

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  • He complied and kissed her deeply, enjoying the taste and feel of her despite the mix of salty tears.

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  • She put her cell phone on its charger and explored the house, admiring his taste in everything from furniture to paintings to simple décor.

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  • It don't taste right.

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  • The scent, the taste, was unlike anything she ever experienced.

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  • She's got a sharp tongue, but she could make shoe soles taste like fine steak.

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  • It made her hungry to taste him.

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  • "It's all still too much of a coincidence for my taste," Dean said.

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  • But then, he didn't say her taste was stylish - he said it had style.

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  • Never in her wildest dreams would she have considered her taste stylish or elegant.

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  • He focused on the taste of their warm blood and on tearing them limb from limb.

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  • Other businesses in the food industry—say those pricey health foods you see at fancy grocery stores—optimize for taste and nutrition at the expense of price.

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  • You taste like cheap whiskey.

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  • It somewhat squelched the taste, enough so they were palatable.

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  • "We have similar taste in alcohol," he said, and lifted his glass to her.

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  • She stared at the embroidered tablecloth, tormented by the scent of food she couldn't eat and the visions of death and betrayal that left an acrid taste in her mouth.

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  • Fast food chains optimize for two of them: taste and price, at the expense of nutrition.

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  • We're not the custodians of the morals of our guests, nor the taste of her lovers.

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  • At the first taste, she wolfed it and three more pieces down until the edge of her hunger disappeared.

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  • But I want to be the first demon to taste a deity.

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  • But I want to be the first demon to taste a deity.

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  • He smelled like dark chocolate, spices and man, a combination that ensnared her senses and made her want to taste him.

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  • He smelled like dark chocolate, spices and man, a combination that ensnared her senses and made her want to taste him.

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  • Her senses filled with his taste, scent, the heat of his body, enveloping her yet never enough.

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  • "How does it taste?" asked the Wizard.

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  • I taste like shit.

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  • I taste like shit.

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  • Or that taste like meat, taking pastureland off the grid.

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  • The manufacturers have learned that this taste is merely whimsical.

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  • The taste of your sweet nectar before I tear you apart?

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  • The taste of your sweet nectar before I tear you apart?

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  • His tongue flicked out to taste her tears.

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  • "You know she'll taste good," another agreed.

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  • "You know she'll taste good," another agreed.

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  • "Taste," Talon said, handing her arm to the silver-haired man beside him.

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  • It is partly his taste, and not merely his misfortune.

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  • There is in this town, with a very few exceptions, no taste for the best or for very good books even in English literature, whose words all can read and spell.

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  • Rhyn felt suddenly jealous, wishing he could taste what smelled so wonderful.

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  • (If that can be achieved, to my readers under age twelve, I hold out the possibility of Brussels sprouts that taste like chocolate.)

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  • Did her blood taste half as good as Damian's?

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  • She wanted – needed – to taste him again.

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  • You taste as sweet as you look, little girl?

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  • "I have neither taste nor smell," he remarked, sniffing at his glass.

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  • It is the rule and custom of the cupbearer to pour out a little of the wine and taste it before handing the cup to me.

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  • They praised her taste and toilet, and at eleven o'clock, careful of their coiffures and dresses, they settled themselves in their carriages and drove off.

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  • I have certainly acquired a taste for war, and it is just as well for me; what I have seen during these last three months is incredible.

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  • The chef is glad to adjust the level of spice of each dish to the taste of the guest, and suggests that those who are unfamiliar with this sort of cuisine start mild and work their way up to spicy.

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  • Now that we.re friends, I thought you might let me have a taste of your monkey.

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  • He added a little tequila this time, and the absence of the plastic improved the taste more than he expected.

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  • He added a little tequila this time, and the absence of the plastic improved the taste more than he expected.

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  • Prince Vasili finds you to his taste as a daughter-in-law and makes a proposal to you on his pupil's behalf.

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  • On some level – in the newfound instincts that wanted to taste him – his words made sense.

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  • He dwelled on her scent, the taste of her, the kiss.

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  • Deidre took his face in her hands, hungrily trying to taste more of him as she explored his mouth with fervor.

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  • It was as good when a week old as the day it was dipped, and had no taste of the pump.

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  • We meet at meals three times a day, and give each other a new taste of that old musty cheese that we are.

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  • It has a sweetish taste, much like that of a frost-bitten potato, and I found it better boiled than roasted.

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  • Alaskan king crab is one type of shellfish in the commercial harvest famed for its size and taste.

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  • Brown or golden king crabs are the smallest in size of the three main species and are similar in taste to blue king crab.

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  • Indianapolis features restaurants for every taste and every price range.

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  • Zagat's rates it an affordable restaurant with big entrees and great taste.

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  • If you can't decide what to eat, you can start with a mezza platter to get your senses warmed up and experience a variety of taste sensations.

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  • Each restaurant offers a different setting, and cuisine that will satisfy the taste of everyone that visits.

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  • The menu offers options for every taste and budget, ranging from diner-delicious hearty breakfasts to well-appointed steak, pasta dishes, and seafood platters.

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  • Stonington's variety of eateries has something for everyone, no matter your budget or taste.

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  • Chicken and seafood entrees are also on the menu and the choices are sure to guarantee there is something to satisfy everyone's taste buds.

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  • Savor the taste of grilled salmon, steak frites, cappellini pomodora or organic chicken piccata for dinner.

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  • You cannot go wrong starting with the garden fresh salad because you can definitely taste the freshness.

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  • Each exotic dish is prepared to your taste and can be made mild, medium or spicy.

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  • Look for monthly and seasonal steak specials celebrating seasonal harvest to also satisfy your taste buds.

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  • A treat for the taste buds and an entertaining night on the town, this restaurant is sure to become a fast favorite as you delight in rolling up your sleeves and demonstrating your culinary skills.

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  • Several of these eateries have actually become destinations for those who savor the taste of wild game.

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  • The restaurant is dining-room style with a buffet and is a pleasurable experience in taste that fits any budget.

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  • Give your taste buds a burst of excitement by trying new cuisine.

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  • Get a true taste of the quirky neighborhood in this eclectic restaurant.

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  • "You do taste as sweet as you look," he said, voice thick with need.

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  • "Walk," she managed, shuddering at the lingering visions that left an acrid taste in her mouth.

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  • The taste of him filled her, calmed her.

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  • Do you want a taste of this?... said the huntsman, pointing to his dagger and probably imagining himself still speaking to his foe.

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  • Obviously his taste was compatible with hers.

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  • "Very good taste," he said, taking in the house.

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  • Really Sarah, can you honestly say you don't taste the plastic bag?

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  • Only not quite my taste--he is so narrow, like the dining-room clock....

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  • It became less of a request and more of a demand, with his tongue flickering to taste her.

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  • Food can be optimized according to three factors, broadly speaking: taste, price, and nutrition.

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  • We could say he has excellent taste.

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  • The water was cool and had a metallic taste.

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  • I think you have impeccable taste.

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  • This was what she smelled, what she ached to taste.

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  • Deidre reached for him, straining to ease the need to taste him.

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  • Near frenzied, Deidre fought to pull some part of him close enough for her to taste.

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  • She wasn't going to fall under the spell of Gabriel's strong body, his passion, his taste.

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  • The alternative was irreparable and too permanent for my taste.

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  • He drooled at the smell, his gums and body aching for a taste.

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  • He couldn't protect anyone from Sasha in Hell, and he itched to taste the woman meant to be his mate.

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  • The taste of death was in her mouth and if she looked, she knew her shoes would be covered in blood.

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  • He lifted her at last and carried her to his quarters, senses full of her quickened breath, heady female scent, sweet taste.

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  • She has great taste.

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  • This will warm your blood, best get used to the taste.

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  • That way, no plastic taste.

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  • I want you to taste it.

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  • Jackson thought, Does she want Elisabeth to taste my blood?

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  • He scowled at the immediate burn and taste of acid.

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  • Now he'll get a taste for chickens and start raiding my hen house every night.

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  • No.  Mortals are like … candy to demons.  Demons don't need them, but they taste good.

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  • She handed the pale woman a food and water cube and popped two of her own.  Standing, she waded into the brush where she'd thrown the knife.  It glinted in the morning light.  Katie swiped it, glad the trees didn't have a taste for metal as well as Immortal sustenance.

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  • Carmen suggested a family project of redecorating the room to his taste, and Alex was in full agreement.

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  • The black memories that made him wake up screaming at night, the fear he could still taste in moments of despair, were softened by the sense of stillness that settled into him.

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  • Always wanted to taste a Healer.

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  • He shivered at the taste of night-blooming flowers and the salty ocean on the cool breeze.

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  • No darkness lasts the ages, Taran…I do not care to remember the sound of a bird's cry, but I wish I remembered the taste of spiced ale.

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  • He listened to her breathing, could almost taste her skin from their position.

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  • He responded to her kiss, savoring the sweet taste and softness of her warm lips.

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  • His reminder of her failure left a bitter taste to her mouth.

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  • What do they taste like?

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  • What would the tea taste like?

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  • Instead of the sweet taste she expected, it was bitter - like alum.

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  • Barely noticing the taste of blood on her lip, she kicked the bedroll away and scrambled awkwardly to her feet again.

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  • Maybe she lacked taste, but she knew what she liked.

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  • A glass of water would taste good right now.

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  • Sure, you can eat those weeds, but what do they taste like?

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  • The water was cold and had a metallic taste she liked.

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  • The last pose with Toni was far too …intimate for Jessi's taste.

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  • Xander licked his fangs and lips clean, enjoying her taste while she stared at him with far too much emotion for him to determine what she'd do: freak out or melt.

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  • He teased and nipped, his kiss deep enough to rob her of any resistance yet light enough that she raised onto her tiptoes to taste more of him.

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  • The kisses continued, and his tongue flickered out to taste her skin.

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  • What would a … Watcher taste like?

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  • "Does hair color mean they taste different?" she asked.

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  • They taste better anyway.

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  • His lips teased her, his mouth opening so she could taste him once more.

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  • Burmann was rather a compiler than a critic; his commentaries show immense learning and accuracy, but are wanting in taste and judgment.

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  • Their selection for a particular purpose depends upon some special quality which they possess; thus for brewing certain essentials are demanded as regards stability, clarification, taste and smell; whereas, in distilleries, the production of alcohol and a high multiplying power in the yeast are required.

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  • This last post left him plenty of leisure, which he used for travelling and cultivating the society of interesting people, a taste which earned him the title of Monsignore Ubique.

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  • Every Italian artist and man of letters in an age of singular intellectual brilliancy tasted or hoped to taste of his bounty.

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  • It has more than one advantage over the meadow mushroom in its extreme commonness, its profuse growth, the length of the season in which it may be gathered, the total absence of varietal forms, its adaptability for being dried and preserved for years, and its persistent delicious taste.

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  • alliaceus, is also strongly impregnated with the scent and taste of onions or garlic. Two species, M.

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  • (1784) a professorship at the university of Wilna, which he did not find to his taste.

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  • The attention of the reader was distracted, and his good taste annoyed, by the incessant use of puns, of which Hood had written in his own vindication: "However critics may take offence, A double meaning has double sense."

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  • During the winter of 1612 he completed his preparations for the world by lessons in horsemanship and fencing; and then started as his own master to taste the pleasures of Parisian life.

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  • The odour is heavy and disagreeable, and the taste acrid and bitter.

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  • Lydgate had a consuming passion for literature, and it was probably that he might indulge this taste more fully that in 1 434 he retired from the priorate of Hatfield Broadoak (or Hatfield Regis), to which he had been appointed in June 1423.

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  • In spite of that, Lydgate is characteristically medieval - medieval in his prolixity, his platitude, his want of judgment and his want of taste; medieval also in his pessimism, his Mariolatry and his horror of death.

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  • The danger in this direction is that when Presbyterianism has been modified far enough to suit the English taste it may be found less acceptable to its more stalwart supporters from beyond the Tweed.

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  • It has a sharp burning taste, and is very poisonous.

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  • 3 In his view of touch and taste, as the two fundamental and essential senses, he may remind one of Herbert Spencer's doctrine.

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  • In the design of spires Wren showed much taste and wonderful power of invention.

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  • In 1746 he published his treatise Les Beaux-Arts adults a un meme Principe, an attempt to find a unity among the various theories of beauty and taste, and his views were widely accepted.

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  • After the division of the Roman empire, Constantinople became the last refuge of learning, arts and taste; while Alexandria continued to be the emporium whence were imported the commodities of the East.

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  • It has a characteristic smell, and a biting taste; it is poisonous, and acts as a powerful antiseptic. It dissolves in water, 15 parts of water dissolving about one part of phenol at 16-17° C., but it is miscible in all proportions at about 70° C.; it is volatile in steam, and is readily soluble in alcohol, ether, benzene, carbon bisulphide, chloroform and glacial acetic acid.

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  • the Nearctic and the Palaearctic. The reduction of the Oriental to a subregion, with consequent " provincial " rank of its main subdivisions, will probably be objected to, but these are matters of taste and prejudice.

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  • James was a cultured prince with a taste for music and architecture, but was a weak and incapable king.

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  • He entered the House of Commons as Liberal member for Berwick-on-Tweed in 1885, but he was best known as a country gentleman with a taste for sport, and as amateur champion tennis-player.

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  • They are all, as found in commerce, of a pale yellow-green colour; they emit a peculiar aromatic odour, and have a slightly astringent bitter taste.

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  • A taste for French literature spread rapidly, and the poets and dramatists of Paris found clever imitators in St Petersburg.

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  • Thanksgiving, blessing and offering were co-ordinate terms. Hence the Talmudic rule, "A man shall not taste anything before blessing it" (Tosephta Berachoth, c. 4), and hence St Paul's words, "He that eateth, eateth unto the Lord, for he giveth God thanks" (Rom.

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  • We do not lie down at table until prayer has been offered to God, as it were a first taste.

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  • " Unprovided with original learning, unformed in the habits of thinking, unskilled in the arts of composition, I resolved to write a book "; but the discovery of his own weakness, he adds, was the first symptom of taste.

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  • He particularly congratulated himself on having discovered the " philosophical argument " against transubstantiation, " that the text of Scripture which seems to inculcate the real presence is attested only by a single sense - our sight, while the real presence itself is disproved by three of our senses - the sight, the touch, and the taste."

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  • In 1757 Voltaire came to reside at Lausanne; and although he took but little notice of the young Englishman of twenty, who eagerly sought and easily obtained an introduction, the establishment of the theatre at Monrepos, where the brilliant versifier himself declaimed before select audiences his own productions on the stage, had no small influence in fortifying Gibbon's taste for the French theatre, and in at the same time abating that "idolatry for the gigantic genius of Shakespeare which is inculcated from our infancy as the first duty of an Englishman."

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  • In London he seems to have seen but little select society - partly from his father's taste, "which had always preferred the highest and lowest company," and partly from his own reserve and timidity, increased by his foreign education, which had made English habits unfamiliar, and the very language 2 The affair, however, was not finally broken off till 1763.

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  • A garden of four acres had been laid out by the taste of M.

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  • They met with a quick and easy sale, were very extensively read, and very liberally and deservedly praised for the unflagging industry and vigour they displayed, though just exception, if only on the score of good taste, was taken to the scoffing tone he continued to maintain in all passages where the Christian religion was specially concerned, and much fault was found with the indecency of some of his notes.'

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  • Within the seven years next following he failed twice as a storekeeper and once as a farmer; but in the meantime acquired a taste for reading, of history especially, and read and re-read the history of Greece and Rome, of England, and of her American colonies.

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  • He had no taste for historical investigations.

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  • In some measure we find this practice adopted by more than one of the Fathers, but it was the Alexandrian school, with its pronounced taste for symbolism, that made the most of it.

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  • Their houses are slightly built, but the surrounding ground and roads are laid out with great care and taste.

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  • The original motive of the recipients of these favours was doubtless the taste of the time for outward display; St Bernard, zealous for the monastic ideal, de nounced abbots for wearing mitres and the like more pontificum, and Peter the Cantor roundly called the abbatial mitre " inane, superfluous and puerile " (Verb.

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  • Then we will highlight them on the home page so people can get a great taste of just how great the 1911 can be.

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  • The appeal is still to the individual, who, if not by reason then by some higher faculty, claims to realize absolute truth and to taste absolute blessedness.

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  • " As the little water-drop poured into a large measure of wine seems to lose its own nature entirely and to take on both the taste and the colour of the wine; or as iron heated red-hot loses its own appearance and glows like fire; or as air filled with sunlight is transformed into the same brightness so that it does not so much appear to be illuminated as to be itself light - so must all human feeling towards the Holy One be self-dissolved in unspeakable wise, and wholly transfused into the will of God.

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  • He was handsome, conciliatory and agreeable, and a man of refined taste and untarnished honour.

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  • The story of Tristan and Iseult, immensely popular as it was, was too genuine - (shall we say too crude?) - to satisfy the taste of the court for which Chretien was writing.

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  • r 265 at 15° C., possessing a somewhat sweet taste; below o° C. it solidifies to a white crystalline mass, which melts at 17° C. When heated alone it partially volatilizes, but the greater part decomposes; under a pressure of 12 mm.

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  • He went over every part of the translation with me, observed on every passage in which justice was not done to the thought or the force of the expression lost, and made many useful criticisms. During this occupation we had occasion to see one another often, and became very intimate; and, as he had read much, had seen a great deal of the world, was acquainted with all the most distinguished persons who at that time adorned either the royal court or the republic of letters in France; had a great knowledge of French and Italian literature, and possessed very good taste, his conversation was extremely interesting and not a little instructive.

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  • Lower down the valley cattle-breeding is the chief source of wealth, while in the small towns and villages of the former Georgian kingdom various petty trades, exhibiting a high development of artistic taste and technical skill, are widely diffused.

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  • On the other hand, the domestic industries are extensively carried on and exhibit a high degree of technical skill and artistic taste.

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  • His artistic taste was shown by his patronage of Velasquez, and his love of letters by his favour to Lope de Vega, Calderon, and other dramatists.

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  • Throughout life Carteret not only showed a keen love of the classics, but a taste for, and a knowledge of, modern languages and literatures.

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  • Organs of similar type on the maxillae and epipharynx appear to exercise the function of taste.

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  • The existence of these two works explains the widely-spread taste for ornithology in England, which is to foreigners so puzzling, and the zeal - not always according to knowledge, but occasionally reaching to serious study - with which that taste is pursued.

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  • His taste for literature was early seen, and his father Pierre (1496-1556) cultivated it to the utmost.

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  • After Longhena's date church architecture in Venice declined upon the dubious taste of baroque; the facades of San Moise and of Santa Maria del Giglio are good specimens of this style.

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  • But he had no taste for military adventure.

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  • Citric acid has an agreeable sour taste.

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  • The last and the worst of the Cid ballads are those which betray by their frigid conceits and feeble mimicry of the antique the false taste and essentially unheroic spirit of the age of Philip II.

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  • His knowledge of the ancient authors was wide, but his taste was not select, and his erudition was superficial.

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  • His taste, however, was curious; he preferred Cato the elder, Ennius and Caelius Antipater to Cicero, Virgil and Sallust, the obscure poet Antimachus to Homer and Plato.

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  • Soaps give an alkaline reaction and have a decided acrid taste; in a pure condition - a state never reached in practice - they have neither smell nor colour.

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  • As the lye becomes absorbed, a condition indicated by the taste of the goods, additional quantities of lye of increasing strength are added.

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  • He came to the throne after the ten years of confusion which followed the death of Archelaus, the patron of art and literature, and showed the same taste for Greek culture and its representatives.

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  • But this would not help Wagner to feel that contemporary music was really a great art; indeed it could only show him that he was growing up in a pseudo-classical time, in which the approval of persons of " good taste " was seldom directed to things of vital promise.

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  • But with Der Ring des Nibelungen Wagner devoted himself to a story which any ordinary dramatist would find as unwieldy as, for instance, most of Shakespeare's subjects; a story in which ordinary canons of taste and probability were violated as they are in real life and in great art.

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  • He combined a roving disposition with a natural taste for mechanics and for literature.

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  • There are 15 churches in the city, some occupying the most conspicuous sites on the hills, all dating from the more prosperous days of the city's history, but all devoid of architectural taste.

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  • The salt has a sweet, mawkish taste.

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  • He was a man of insignificant character, with a taste for artificial verse.

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  • 2 Its information should not only be accurate, but also conveyed intelligibly and with taste.

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  • In the violent controversy that ensued he wrote many pamphlets, often anonymous, and frequently not in the best of taste.

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  • He had no taste except for ornament, and no serious interest except in amusements, versemaking, hunting and tournaments.

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  • It has abandoned its peculiarities of dress and language, as well as its hostility to music and art, and it has cultivated a wider taste in literature.

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  • Among the larger trees are the mountain cedar, reaching to 100 ft.; the gob, which bears edible berries in appearance something like the cherry with the taste of an apple, grows to some 80 ft., and is found fringing the river beds; the hassadan, a kind of euphorbia, attaining a height of about 70 ft.; and the darei, a fig tree.

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  • A man of literary taste and culture, familiar with the classics, a facile writer of Latin verses' as well as of Ciceronian prose, he was as anxious that the Roman clergy should unite human science and literature with their theological studies as that the laity should be educated in the principles of religion; and to this end he established in Rome a kind of voluntary school board, with members both lay and clerical; and the rivalry of the schools thus founded ultimately obliged the state to include religious teaching in its curriculum.

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  • The institution does not present itself in a very harsh form in Homer, especially if we consider (as Grote suggests) that " all classes were much on a level in taste, sentiment and instruction."

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  • The peculiar musky odour was perceived from a distance of a hundred yards; but according to Professor Nathoist there was no musky taste or smell in the flesh if the carcase were cleaned immediately the animals were killed.

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  • A friend describes Wesley at this time as "a young fellow of the finest classical taste, and the most liberal and manly sentiments."

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  • No man in the 18th century did so much to create a taste for good reading and to supply it with books at the lowest prices.

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    0
  • Priestley, who obtained it by reducing nitrogen peroxide with iron, may be prepared by heating ammonium nitrate at 170-260° C., or by reducing a mixture of nitric and sulphuric acid with zinc. It is a colourless gas, which is practically odourless, but possesses a sweetish taste.

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    0
  • Hence the vast majority of the people whom we are accustomed to think of as Ottomans are so only by adoption, being really the descendants of Seljuks or Seljukian subjects, who had derived from Persia whatever they possessed of civilization or of literary taste.

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  • The sight of some battle-pictures revived his taste for fine art.

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  • Early in 1886 he struck the public taste with precision in his wild symbolic tale of The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde.

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  • Art industries, particularly those which appeal to the luxurious taste of the inhabitants in fitting their houses, such as wall-papers and furniture, and those which are included in the equipment of ocean-going steamers, have of late years made rapid strides and are among the best productions of this character of any German city.

    0
    0
  • The secular fashions altered with changes of taste; but the Church retained the dress with the other traditions of the Roman Empire.

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    0
  • Its taste is somewhat sweet, its sweetening power being estimated at from a to -*- that of cane sugar.

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    0
  • When heated to above 200 it turns brown and produces caramel, a substance possessing a bitter taste, and used, in its aqueous solution or otherwise, under various trade names, for colouring confectionery, spirits, &c. The specific rotation of the plane of polarized light by glucose solutions is characteristic. The specific rotation of a freshly prepared solution is 105°, but this value gradually diminishes to 52.5°, 24 hours sufficing for the transition in the cold, and a few minutes when the solution is boiled.

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    0
  • Their bronze ornaments and implements, often polished, evince considerable artistic taste; and their irrigated fields covered wide areas in the fertile tracts.

    0
    0
  • Lead acetate, Pb(C2H302)2.3H20 (called "sugar" of lead, on account of its sweetish taste), is manufactured by dissolving massicot in aqueous acetic acid.

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  • After this every portion of the animal is thoroughly examined, for if there is any organic disease the devout Jew cannot taste the meat.

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  • Semler, while he cultivated his strong taste for history under Chancellor Ludwig.

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  • By Ancillon he was grounded in religion, in history and political science, his natural taste for the antique and the picturesque making it easy for his tutor to impress upon him his own hatred of the Revolution and its principles.

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  • The streets are as a rule arcaded, and this characteristic has been preserved in modern additions, which have on the whole been made with considerable taste, as have also the numerous restorations of medieval buildings.

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    0
  • To the south of the cantonment is situated the park, created by the taste and public spirit of Lord Wellesley.

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    0
  • As alum and green vitriol were applied to a variety of substances in common, and as both are distinguished by a sweetish and astringent taste, writers, even after the discovery of alum, do not seem to have discriminated the two salts accurately from each other.

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    0
  • The Brazilian people have the natural taste for art, music and literature so common among the Latin nations of the Old World.

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    0
  • Although it suffered at the hands of revolutionary fanatics in 1688, the damage was confined mainly to the external ornament, and the chapel, owing to restoration in judicious taste, is now in perfect condition.

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  • The local patriotism and good taste of the citizens have regulated recreation and have also preserved in pristine vigour many peculiarly Scottish customs and pastimes.

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  • He was educated for the priesthood in Paris and Utrecht, but his taste for Hebrew, Arabic, Persian, and other languages of the East 7 Anorthite.

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  • Intended to evolve a history of jurisprudence from the truthful portraits of England's greatest lawyers, it merely exhibits the ill-digested results of desultory learning, without a trace of scientific symmetry or literary taste, without a spark of that divine imaginative sympathy which alone can give flesh and spirit to the dead bones of the past, and without which the present 1 See thereon J.

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  • Thanks to all these architectural treasures, the narrow Sienese streets with their many windings and steep ascents are full of picturesque charm, and, together with the collections of excellent paintings, foster the local pride of the inhabitants and preserve their taste and feeling for art.

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    0
  • His relative, noting the lad's passionate addiction to study, solemnly warned him, against indulging such a taste, as likely to prove a fatal obstacle to his success in commercial life.

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    0
  • It is discursive and badly arranged, but it is marked by a power of style, a vigour of narrative, and a skill in delineation of character which give life to the most unattractive period of German history; notwithstanding the extreme spirit of partisanship and some faults of taste, it will remain a remarkable monument of literary ability.

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  • cellence of taste hitherto unknown soon became apparent.

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  • But he owed all to Concini, and his taste of power ended with the murder of his patron on the 24th of August 161 7.

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    0
  • The newcomers adopted the language of the conquered, but brought with them new customs and a new artistic taste probably largely borrowed from the metal-working tribes of Siberia.

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  • Hardy, simple and industrious, fond of music, kind-hearted, and with a strangely artistic taste in dress, these people possess in a wonderful degree the secret of cheerful contentment.

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  • marriage, worship, feasts), and especially upon individual status and taste.

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  • Then followed the dramatic " Lot's Wife," in marble (1878), and" Artemis " (1880), which for grace, elegance and purity of taste the sculptor never surpassed.

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    0
  • It has a strong and characteristic odour, and a hot sweetish taste, is soluble in ten parts of water, and in all proportions in alcohol, and dissolves bromine, iodine, and, in small quantities, sulphur and phosphorus, also the volatile oils, most fatty and resinous substances, guncotton, caoutchouc and certain of the vegetable alkaloids.

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  • However praiseworthy the intention may have been, the list of authors specially recommended does not speak well for Fronto's literary taste.

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    0
  • Dropsical liquids are usually pale yellow or greenish, limpid, with a saltish taste and alkaline reaction, and a specific gravity ranging from 1005 to 1024.

    0
    0
  • - Nitroglycerin has a sweet burning taste and is decidedly poisonous.

    0
    0
  • It is of course possible that Map's rise at court may have been due to his having hit the literary taste of the monarch, who, we know, was interested in the Arthurian tradition, but it must be admitted that direct evidence on the subject is practically nil, and that in the present condition of our knowledge we can only advance possible hypotheses.

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    0
  • He was now over seventy; his powers had deserted him, and even if they had not the public taste had entirely changed.

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    0
  • Lamartine has been extolled as a pattern of combined passion and restraint, as a model of nobility of sentiment, and as a harmonizer of pure French classicism in taste and expression with much, if not all, the better part of Romanticism itself.

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    0
  • If the Roman aristocracy of his time had lost much of the virtue and of the governing qualities of their ancestors, they showed in the last years before the establishment of monarchy a taste for intellectual culture which might have made Rome as great in literature as in arms and law.

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    0
  • A new taste for philosophy had developed among members of the governing class during the youth of Lucretius, and eminent Greek teachers of the Epicurean sect settled at Rome at the same time, and lived on terms of intimacy with them.

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  • He allows his taste for these tricks of style to degenerate into mannerism.

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  • But there is immense wit, a wonderful command of such metre and language as the taste of the time allowed to the poet, occasionally a singular if somewhat artificial grace, and a curious felicity of diction and manner.

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  • that we are not surprised to find him encouraging the citizens in the same expensive taste.

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    0
  • Pressed glass, which is necessarily thick and serviceable, has well met this legitimate demand, but it also caters for the less legitimate taste for cheap imitations of hand-cut glass.

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  • Many of the examples of these processes exhibit surprising skill and taste, and are among the most beautiful objects produced at the Venetian furnaces.

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  • He also made with great taste and skill large lustres and mirrors with frames of glass ornamented either in intaglio or with foliage of various colours.

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    0
  • Although Ken wrote much poetry, besides his hymns, he cannot be called a great poet; but he had that fine combination of spiritual insight and feeling with poetic taste which marks all great hymnwriters.

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    0
  • The wood has a pure bitter taste, and is without odour or aroma.

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    0
  • They had a taste for ornaments, necklaces of wood, bone and shells, worked in different designs.

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    0
  • Formerly the name was given to compounds having a sweet taste, e.g.

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    0
  • Its aqueous solution has a faint sweet taste, and is dextro-rotatory, the rotation of a fresh solution being about twice that of an old one.

    0
    0
  • "No sooner" (it is related) "had Mirza completed the Diwan-i-Khas than it came to the ears of the emperor Jehangir that his vassal had surpassed him in magnificence, and that this last great work quite eclipsed all the marvels of the imperial city; the columns of red sandstone having been particularly noticed as sculptured with exquisite taste and elaborate detail.

    0
    0
  • Other tests show variability in burning quality, elasticity of leaf, texture, taste, &c. The United States Department of Agriculture has closely investigated this important question and the results attained are brought together by Messrs H.

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    0
  • By a proper mixing and blending the manufacturer is enabled to prepare the smoking mixture which is desirable for his purpose; but certain of the rough, bitter qualities cannot be manufactured without a preliminary treatment by which their intense disagreeable taste is modified.

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    0
  • Much of his boyhood was spent in Italy, where he received part of his schooling, and acquired a taste for the fine arts and a love of travel; but he was at school also in England, France and Switzerland.

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    0
  • Previous to the loss of the Italian provinces, a considerable proportion came from Italy (30,000 in 1859), including artists, members of the learned professions and artisans who left their mark on Viennese art and taste.

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  • Its articles of clothing, silk goods and millinery also enjoy a great reputation for the taste with which they are manufactured.

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    0
  • It crystallizes in quadratic prisms and has a bitter taste.

    0
    0
  • These works appear to have been erected by powerful sovereigns with unlimited command of labour, possibly with the object of giving employment to subjugated people, while feeding the vanity or pleasing the taste of the conqueror.

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    0
  • The simple distillation of sea-water, and the production thereby of a certain proportion of chemically fresh water, is a very simple problem; but it is found that water which is merely evaporated and recondensed has a very disagreeable flat taste, and it is only after long exposure to pure atmospheric air, with continued agitation, or repeated pouring from one vessel to another, that it becomes sufficiently aerated to lose its unpleasant taste and smell and become drinkable.

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  • 20 a rigid steel wire or gold frames, with fastening-pieces over the ears; single or double eye-glasses, and hand-glasses, or lorgnettes, being varieties of form, according to the circumstances and the wearer's taste.

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  • Here are already both richness and power, although their expression is not yet clarified by taste.

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  • It was true that the bent of his genius was slightly altered, in a direction which seemed less purely and austerely that of the highest art; but his concessions to public taste vastly added to the width of the circle he now addressed.

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  • There came a reaction of taste and sense, but the delicate spirit of Tennyson had been wounded.

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  • His Life, written with admirable piety and taste by his son, Hallam, second Lord Tennyson, was published in two volumes in 1897.

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  • The exterior has been altered in French taste.

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  • He rose to great celebrity as an architect, and designed many graceful and richly sculptured buildings in Venice, Rome and even in France; he used classical forms with great taste and skill, and with much of the freedom of the older medieval architects, and was specially remarkable for his rich and delicate sculptured decorations.

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  • At the outset of his career he occupied himself mostly with landscapes and paintings of animals, executed with extraordinary detail in imitation of the prevailing taste of the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood; but in 1857, while on a visit to the West of England, he made his first attempts as a sea-painter.

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  • If, on the one hand, huge stones are transported hundreds of miles from sea-shore or river-bed where, in the lapse of long centuries, waves and cataracts have hammered them into strange shapes, and if the harmonizing of their various colors and the adjustment of their forms to environment are studied with profound subtlety, so the training and tending of the trees and shrubs that keep them company require much taste and much toil.

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  • Thus far the great obstacle has been that pictures painted in accordance with Western canons are not suited to Japanese interiors and do not appeal to the taste of the most renowned Japanese connoisseurs.

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  • Foreign demand has shown so little discrimination that experts, finding it impossible to obtain adequate remuneration for first-class work, have been obliged to abandon the field altogether, or to lower their standard to the level of general appreciation, or by forgery to cater for the perverted taste which attaches unreasoning value to age.

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  • Their vivid realism appealed strongly to the taste of the average foreigner.

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  • Midway between the Matsumoto school and the pure style approved by the native taste in former times stand a number of wood-carvers headed by Takamura KOun, who The Semi- occupies in the field of sculpture much the same place ign as that held by Hashimoto Gaho in the realm of 00.

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  • The latter ceramist excelled also in the production of purple, green and yellow glazes, which he combined with admirable skill and taste.

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  • They are frankly adapted to Western taste.

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  • Having little to guide them, they often interpreted Western taste incorrectly, and impaired their own reputation in a corresponding degree.

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  • The porcelains of Owari and Arita naturally received most attention at the hands of the Hyochi-en decorators, but there was scarcely one of the principal wares of Japan upon which they did not try their skill, and if a piece of monochromatic Minton or Svres came in their way, they undertook to improve it by the addition of designs copied from old masters or suggested by modern taste.

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  • The sum of the matter is that the modern Japanese ceramist, after many efforts to cater for the taste of the Occident, evidently concludes that his best hope consists in devoting all his technical and artistic resources to reproducing the celebrated wares of China.

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  • Cabinets, fire-screens, plaques and boxes resplendent with gold lacquer grounds carrying elaborate and profuse decoration of ivory and mother-of-pearl are not objects that appeal to Japanese taste.

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  • Defoe's Review (1704-1713) dealt chiefly with politics and commerce, but the introduction in it of what its editor fittingly termed the "scandalous club " was another step nearer the papers of Steele and the periodical essayists, the first attempts to create an organized popular opinion in matters of taste and manners.

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  • It was a kind of resurrection of good taste; under the empire it formed the sole refuge of the opposition.

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  • He is, in fact, an instance of the tendency, which has so often been remarked by other nations in the English, to drag in moral distinctions at every turn, and to confound everything which is novel to the experience, unpleasant to the taste, and incomprehensible to the understanding, under the general epithets of wrong, wicked and shocking.

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  • He had much taste and love for music, and considerable gifts as an orator of a florid type.

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  • He was already a poet by predilection, an idyllist and steeped in the classical archaism of the time, when, in 1784, his taste for the antique was confirmed by a visit to Rome made in the company of two schoolfellows, the brothers Trudaine.

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  • Even oratory was intended quite as much for readers as for the audiences to which it was immediately addressed; and some of the greatest speeches which have come down from that great age of orators were never delivered at all, but were published as manifestoes after the event with the view of influencing educated opinion, and as works of art with the view of giving pleasure to educated taste.

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  • Of C. Julius Caesar (102-44) as an orator we can judge only by his reputation and by the testimony of his great rival and adversary Cicero; but we are able to appreciate the special praise of perfect taste in the use of language attributed to him.'

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  • Satire, debarred from comment on political action, turned to social and individual life, and combined with the newly-developed taste for ethical analysis and reflection introduced by Cicero.

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  • but of less refinement in his life and less exquisite taste in his art, is Sextus Propertius (c. 50 - c. 15).

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  • Olivares did not share the king's taste for art and literature, but he formed a vast collection of state papers, ancient and contemporary, which he endeavoured to protect from destruction by entailing them as an heirloom.

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  • Frederick William, who had no taste for military matters, put his authority as "War-Lord" into commission under a supreme college of war (Oberkriegs-Collegium) under the duke of Brunswick and General von Mollendorf.

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  • He obtained a situation at Lubeck, where he had leisure to cultivate his natural taste for drawing and poetry.

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  • It would, however, be incorrect to suppose that the translation of the text was left entirely to the individual taste of the translator.

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  • At the age of fourteen Parkman began to show a strong taste for literary composition.

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  • 13), of bad taste in matters of hospitality (ii.

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  • Hence, probably, the wide popularity which his works enjoyed in the 18th century; and hence the agreeable feeling with which, notwithstanding all their false taste and their tiresome digressions, they impress the modern reader.

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  • His great principle was that of Harmony or Balance, and he based it on the general ground of good taste or feeling as opposed to the method of reason.

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    0
  • For metaphysics, properly so called, and even psychology, except so far as it afforded a basis for ethics, he evidently had no taste.

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  • He was also a man of letters, possessed of fine taste and a graceful style.

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  • Dioscorides refers to it as agallochon, a wood brought from Arabia or India, which was odoriferous but with an astringent and bitter taste.

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  • Thus in the period 1520-1550 we have separate chapters on ancient literature, theology, speculative philosophy and jurisprudence, the literature of taste, and scientific and miscellaneous literature; and the subdivisions of subjects is carried further of course in the later periods.

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  • noticed in their immediate connexion with literary results; but Hallam had little taste for the spacious generalization which such subjects suggest.

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  • This study, however, did not check his hereditary taste for geometry.

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  • By the end of August 1885, when a political crisis had supervened between Great Britain and Russia, under the orders of the Amir the Mosalla was destroyed; but four minars standing at the corners of the wide plinth still remain to attest to the glorious proportions of the ancient structure, and to exhibit samples of that decorative tilework, which for intricate beauty of design and exquisite taste in the blending of colour still appeals to the memory as unique.

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  • That the emperor had an honest and soldierly satisfaction in his own well-doing is clear; but if he had had anything like the vanity of a Domitian, the senate, ever eager to outrun a ruler's taste for flattery, would never have kept within such moderate bounds.

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  • At the same time this coarseness of taste did not blunt his intellectual sagacity.

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  • When unemployed in work or study he was not averse to the society of boon companions, gave himself readily to transient amours, and corresponded in a tone of cynical bad taste.

    0
    0
  • - Sea-water differs from fresh water by its salt and bitter taste and by its unsuitability for the purposes of washing and cooking.

    0
    0
  • In her taste for art and her love of magnificence and luxury, Catherine was a true Medici; her banquets at Fontainebleau in 1564 were famous for their sumptuousness.

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  • At the same time her undisguised impatience of the cumbrous court etiquette shocked many people, and her taste for pleasure led her to seek the society of the comte d'Artois and his young and dissolute circle.

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    0
  • In a paper on a " Proposed New Version of the Bible " he paraphrased a few verses of the first chapter of Job, making them a satiric attack on royal government; but the version may well rank with these hoaxes, and even modern writers have been taken in by it, regarding it as a serious proposal for a " modernized " version and decrying it as poor taste.

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  • He had the good taste to recognize, and the spirit to make public his recognition of, the excellence of Gray's odes at a time when they were either ridiculed or neglected.

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    0
  • The chief faults of the book are obscurity, verbal conceits and a forced ingenuity which shows itself in grotesque puns, odd metres and occasional want of taste.

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  • Their manners are more courteous, their women better treated, than is usual with Papuans, but they show perhaps less ingenuity and artistic taste.

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    0
  • He was exceptionally well read, with a refined taste for books and art, and purchased the famous Thomason Tracts now in the British Museum.

    0
    0
  • The flesh of the American beaver is eaten by the Indians, and when roasted in the skin is esteemed a delicacy and is said to taste like pork.

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    0
  • Castoreum is a substance contained in two pear-shaped pouches situated near the organs of reproduction, of a bitter taste and slightly foetid odour, at one time largely employed as a medicine, but now used only in perfumery.

    0
    0
  • Pure methyl alcohol is a colourless mobile liquid, boiling at 66°-67°, and having a specific gravity of 0 8142 at o° C. It has a burning taste, and generally a spirituous odour, but when absolutely pure it is said to be odourless.

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  • Nor had he any taste for rule; his days were spent in the society of musicians, buffoons and poets, and he himself dabbled in verse-making of a mystic tendency.

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  • painting; and the treasures of the Vatican galleries helped to confirm David in a taste already moulded by so many kindred influences.

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  • It is difficult for a generation which has witnessed another complete revolution in the standards of artistic taste to realize the secret of David's immense popularity in his own day.

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  • 3 We learn that Athens was the place to which he went, and that he appealed from the verdict of his countrymen to Athenian taste and judgment.

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  • Among the passages quoted from Pacuvius are several which indicate a taste both for physical and ethical speculation, and others which expose the pretensions of religious imposture.

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    0
  • It has a bitter, saline, but not acrid taste.

    0
    0
  • As a general rule, an agreeable grotesque of the affairs of life (a grotesque which never loses hold of good taste sufficiently to be called burlesque) occupies him.

    0
    0
  • The odour of cubebs is agreeable and aromatic; the taste, pungent, acrid, slightly bitter and persistent.

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    0
  • could not forgive Kdrber for prevailing upon him to promise to take the oath to the constitution, since the constitution was no longer tenable and Stiirgkh had already prepared constitutional amendments; on the other hand Charles's assumption of the supreme command of the army was opposed to Korber's taste.

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  • In spite of many instances of a want of taste in his typology, they are distinguished by a certain sobriety and sense of proportion in his exegesis.

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    0
  • He was a prince with a taste for music and literature, whose reign was a time of confusion.

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    0
  • The International Exhibition of 1851, the creation of the Museum and Science and Art Department at South Kensington, the founding of art schools and picture galleries all over the country, the spread of musical taste and the fostering of technical education may be attributed, more or less directly, to the commission of distinguished men which began its labours under Prince Albert's auspices.

    0
    0
  • The "pale" and "light brown" oils are used in pharmacy; the "brown" oil, the cod oil of commerce, being obtained from putrid and decomposing livers, has an objectionable taste and odour and is largely employed by tanners.

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    0
  • In all these works the imperfection of his musical education is painfully apparent, and his compositions betray an equal lack of knowledge, though his refined taste is as clearly displayed there as is his literary power in the Letters and Dictionary.

    0
    0
  • Though very unequal, and exceedingly simple both in style and construction, it contains some charming melodies, and is written throughout in the most refined taste.

    0
    0
  • Baisa Bol, Bhesa Bol or Bissa Bol, from Balsamodendron Kataf, resembles true myrrh in appearance, but has a disagreeable taste and is scarcely bitter.

    0
    0
  • pubescens, Hook, is of a dark reddish colour, has an acrid taste and an odour resembling cedar-wood, and softens in the hand.

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    0
  • The fashionable accomplishments of the day, and the new Greek culture, were wholly alien to his taste.

    0
    0
  • His model in language was Virgil, to whom he is far inferior in taste and lucidity.

    0
    0
  • It crystallizes in colourless prisms, possessing a saline taste; it sublimes on heating and is easily soluble in water.

    0
    0
  • It crystallizes in small prisms, having a sharp saline taste, and is exceedingly soluble in water.

    0
    0
  • It forms large rhombic prisms, has a somewhat saline taste and is easily soluble in water.

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    0
  • In 1508 he had conceived a work on lines more to the taste of the learned world, full of apt and recondite learning, and now and again relieved by telling comments or lively anecdotes.

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    0
  • Of a less severe type were Cherbuliez, the novelist; TSpffer, who spread a taste for pedestrianism among Swiss youth; Duchosal, the poet; Marc Monnier, the litterateur; not to mention the names of any persons still living, or of politicians of any date.

    0
    0
  • He had no taste for office work, and much of his time was occupied in commanding a battery of volunteers and in charge of a steam launch.

    0
    0
  • The pure salt has a sharp saline taste and is readily soluble in water.

    0
    0
  • Sal ammoniac (ammonium chloride, British and United States pharmacopoeiae) as used in medicine is a white crystalline odourless powder having a saline taste.

    0
    0
  • The drug may be given in a mixture with glycerine or liquorice to cover the disagreeable taste or it may be used in a spray by means of an atomizer.

    0
    0
  • The former was now mixed with Latin and classical expressions; much of the literature consists of fulsome panegyric, verses written on the marriages and funerals of nobles, with conceits and fantastic ideas, devoid of all taste, drawn from their coats of arms. The poets of this period are, as may be imagined, in most cases mere rhymesters; there are, however, a few whose names are worth recapitulating, such as Waclaw Potocki (c. 1622 - c. 1696), now known to have been the author of the Wojna Chocimska, or "War of Khotin," the same campaign which afterwards formed the subject of the epic of Krasicki.

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  • Moreover, Potocki had the good taste to avoid the macaronic style so much in vogue; his language is pure and vigorous.

    0
    0
  • We now come to the reign of the last Polish king, Stanislaus Poniatowski, and the few quiet years before the final division of the country, during which the French taste was allpowerful.

    0
    0
  • His poetry shows the influence of the French taste, then prevalent throughout Europe.

    0
    0
  • In most cases they are associated with concert-halls and open-air restaurants, which account for much of their material prosperity, but the natural taste of the people for wild animals, and the increasing scientific and commercial enterprise of the nation have combined to make the collections rich and interesting.

    0
    0
  • The anhydrous salt is a colourless powder or porous mass, having an alkaline taste and reaction.

    0
    0
  • The milk of the cow, which may be taken as typical of all others, and is indeed by far the most important and valuable of all, is, when newly drawn, an opaque white fluid, with a yellowish tinge, soft, bland and sweetish to the taste, and possessed of a faintly animal odour.

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    0
  • Meeting with an accident while he was wandering on the Palatine, and being detained in Rome, he passed part of his enforced leisure in giving lectures (possibly on Homer, his favourite author), and thus succeeded in arousing among the Romans a taste for the scholarly study of literature.

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    0
  • They opened the doors of their schools to the Greek and Latin classics, but they represented the ancient masterpieces dissevered from their original historic environment, as impersonal models of taste, as isolated standards of style.

    0
    0
  • The reaction of 1815-1821 in favour of classics was followed by the more liberal programme of Vatimesnil (1829), including, for those who had no taste for a classical education, certain " special courses " (1830), which were the germ of the enseignement special and the enseignement moderne.

    0
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  • The Catholic and Protestant schools of the 16th century succeeded, as a rule, in giving a command over a correct Latin style and a taste for literary form and for culture.

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  • It is a colourless gas, possessing a faint pungent smell and a slightly acid taste.

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  • Primarily a warrior with a strong taste for heroic adventure, John Albert desired to pose as the champion of Christendom against the Turks.

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  • The country, in the words of an expert sent to report on the subject by the French government, " can produce an infinite variety of wines suitable to every constitution and to every caprice of taste."

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  • libatio, from libare, to take a portion of something, to taste, hence to pour out as an offering to a deity, &c.; cf.

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  • - Potassium fluoride, KF, is a very deliquescent salt, crystallizing in cubes and having a sharp saline taste, which is formed by neutralizing potassium carbonate or hydroxide with hydrofluoric acid and concentrating in platinum vessels.

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  • The solution has a bitter taste, and on exposure to the air turns yellow, but on long exposure it recovers its original colourless appearance owing to the formation of thiosulphate.

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  • They have a bitter, salty taste.

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  • A caustic taste in the mouth is quickly followed by burning abdominal pain, vomiting and diarrhoea, with a feeble pulse and a cold clammy skin; the post-mortem appearances are those of acute gastrointestinal irritation.

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  • Great fluency and ease of diction, considerable warmth of imagination and moral sentiment, and a sharp eye to discover any oddity of style or violation of the accepted canons of good taste, made his criticisms pungent and effective.

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  • Vauquelin in 1798 published in the Annales de chimie an account of a new earth obtained by him from beryl he refrained from giving the substance a name, but in a note to his paper the editors suggested glucine, from -yXvrcus, sweet, in reference to the taste of its salts, whence the name Glucinum or Glucinium (symbo G1.

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  • He possessed a just and discriminating taste for the fine arts, and was a great lover of music.

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  • About the same time he showed by a wonderful series of experiments that the colouring matter of Prussian blue could not be produced without the presence Of a substance of the nature of an acid, to which the name of prussic acid was ultimately given; and he described the composition, properties and compounds of this body, and even ascertained its smell and taste, quite unaware of its poisonous character.

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  • The designs were identical with those in favour with the goldand silver-smiths of the period, which was happily one when exceptionally good taste prevailed.

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  • Between John Craig and John Napier a friendship sprang up which may have been due to their common taste for mathematics.

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  • They are possibly organs of external taste (smell) as well as of touch.

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  • He had, however, little taste for law and much for literature; and he obtained an academic prize at Aix for a discourse on Vauvenargues.

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  • and Thomas and he said unto (them) every one that hearkens to these words shall never taste of death."

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  • It is a miscellany of literary and historical: anecdotes, of original critical remarks, and of interesting and_ curious information of all kinds, animated by genuine literary feeling, taste and enthusiasm.

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  • With much that was sordid and brutal in his character George combined a highly cultivated literary taste, and in the course of his chequered career he had found the means of collecting a splendid library, which Julian ordered to be conveyed to Antioch for his own use.

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  • His taste was extraordinarily developed and absolutely sure.

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  • The Rime of di Costanzo are remarkable for finical taste, for polish and frequent beauty of expression, and for strict obedience to the poetical canons of his time.

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  • This, the greatest of all the monuments of the wealth and artistic taste of the Norman kings in northern Sicily, was begun about 1170 by William II., and in 1182 the church, dedicated to the Assumption of the Virgin Mary, was, by a bull of Pope Lucius III., elevated to the rank of a metropolitan cathedral.

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  • 2), that this " magician " used in the Eucharist cups apparently mixt with wine, but really containing water, and during long invocations made them appear " purple and red, as if the universal Grace xapes dropped some of her blood into the cup through his invocation, and by way of inspiring worshippers with a passion to taste the cup and drink deep of the influence termed Charis."

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  • Hincmar of Reims and Haimo of Halberstadt, took the side of Paschasius, and affirmed that the substance of the bread and wine is changed, and that God leaves the colour, taste and other outward properties out of mercy to the worshippers, who would be overcome with dread if the underlying real flesh and blood were nakedly revealed to their gaze !

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  • Four years later he was admitted a solicitor, and in course of time he acquired an extensive practice, but his taste and inclination ultimately led him to devote almost the whole of his time to literary research, and especially the elucidation of the history of the university of Cambridge.

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  • The fragments are Boo in number, both on paper and vellum, written and adorned with the pious care and good taste which the Manichaeans are known to have bestowed on their manuscripts.

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  • The extensive additions and alterations made by Wren according to the taste of the King resulted in a severely plain edifice of brick; the orangery, added in Queen Anne's time, is a better example of the same architect's work.

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  • Above all we must avoid applying our own standards of taste, style and morality to the judgment of the text before us.

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  • The solecism in the Preface to the Adonais, " My known repugnance to the narrow principles of taste on which several of his earlier compositions were modelled prove at least that I am an impartial judge," would probably have been corrected by the poet if his attention had been called to it; but the two first ones, with others, cannot be thus regarded.

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  • The taste is mucilaginous, sweetish and slightly bitter and aromatic. The root is frequently forked, and it is probably owing to this circumstance that medicinal properties were in the first place attributed to it, its resemblance to the body of a man being supposed to indicate that it could restore virile power to the aged and impotent.

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  • It was his taste to preserve the skulls of the enemies he had killed - those of the meaner men to be used as flower-pots, while those of the princes were kept in special chests.

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  • Ferdinand had good taste for art and music. Some modification of the tight-handed rule of his father was made by the Staatsconferenz during his reign.

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  • Its nauseous bitter taste may to some extent be concealed by acidifying the solution with dilute sulphuric acid, and in some cases where full doses have failed the repeated administration of small ones has proved effectual.

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  • On the French Alps a sweet exudation is found on the small branchlets of young larches in June and July, resembling manna in taste and laxative properties, and known as Manna de Briancon or Manna Brigantina; it occurs in small whitish irregular granular masses, which are removed in the morning before they are too much dried by the sun; this manna seems to differ little in composition from the sap of the tree, which also contains mannite; its cathartic powers are weaker than those of the manna of the manna ash (Fraximus ornus), but it is employed in France for the same purposes.

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  • It contains, in addition to tannin, a peculiar principle called larixin, which may be obtained in a pure state by distillation from a concentrated infusion of the bark; it is a colourless substance in long crystals, with a bitter and astringent taste, and a faint acid reaction; hence some term it larixinic acid.

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  • Unfortunately his extemporaneous speeches were commonplace, in very bad taste, fervently intemperate and denunciatory; and though this was probably due largely to temperament and habits of stump-speaking formed in early life, it was attributed by his enemies to drink.

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  • The classics had not refined his taste, for he was amused by setting the wandering scholars, who swarmed to his court, to abuse one another in the indescribably filthy Latin scolding matches which were then the fashion.

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  • The cathedral is partly of the 12th century, with a porch and facade with small arcades - in black and white marble, as is the case with several other churches of Pistoiabut was remodelled in the 13th century, and modernized inside in the worst taste.

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  • A typical resin is a transparent or translucent mass, with a vitreous fracture and a faintly yellow or brown colour, inodorous or having only a slight turpentine odour and taste.

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  • John James Ruskin, a typical Scot, of remarkable energy, probity and foresight, built up a great business, paid off his father's debts, formed near London a most hospitable and cultured home, where he maintained his taste for literature and art, and lived and died, as his son proudly wrote upon his tomb, "an entirely honest merchant."

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  • He was also a man of strong brain, generous nature and fine taste.

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  • Although the diffusion of epic poetry in England did not actually inspire any new chansons de geste, it developed the taste for this class of literature, and the epic style in which the tales of Horn, of Bovon de Hampton, of Guy of Warwick (still unpublished), of Waldef (still unpublished), and of Fulk Fitz Warine are treated, is certainly partly due to this circumstance.

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  • By the time he was admitted a member of the Faculty of Advocates (1834) he had acquired a strong love of the classics and a taste.

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  • The Freiburg minster is considered one of the finest of all the Gothic churches of Germany, being remarkable alike for the symmetry of its proportions, for the taste of its decorations, and for the fact that it may more correctly be said to be finished than almost any other building of the kind.

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  • More was not only a lawyer, a wit, a scholar, and a man of wide general reading; he was also a man of cultivated taste, who delighted in music and painting.

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  • Although thus highly poisonous, the bean has nothing in external aspect, taste or smell to distinguish it from any harmless leguminous seed, and very disastrous effects have resulted from its being incautiously left in the way of children.

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  • They are readily soluble in water or alcohol and possess a bitter taste.

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  • The Romanesque churches, still reminiscent of antique models, had preserved all the simplicity of the ancient basilicas with much more than their grandeur; but the taste for religious symbolism which culminated in the 13th century, and the imaginative genius of the northern peoples, transformed them into the marvellous dreams in stone of the " Gothic " period.

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  • It had no pretensions to verbal accuracy, and the coarseness of the language was modified to suit European taste, but the narrative was adequately rendered.

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  • To this period belong his exercises in Latin verse, in the loose taste of the day, foolishly published by him as Juvenilia in 1548.

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  • At an early age Melville began to show a taste for learning, and his brother did everything in his power to give him the best education.

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  • The ability of his lectures was universally acknowledged, and he created a taste for the study of Greek literature.

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  • His taste for mathematics early developed itself; and he acquired Latin that he might study Newton's Principia.

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  • Having acquired some command of the Chinese tongue, and modified his personal appearance and dress in accordance with Chinese taste, he started from Canton.

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  • Never was man more free than Latimer from the taint of fanaticism or less dominated by " vainglory," but the motives which now inspired his courage not only placed him beyond the influence of fear, but enabled him to taste in dying an ineffable thrill of victorious achievement.

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  • Various finishing processes, and particularly the mercerizing of yarn and cloth, have increased the possibilities in cotton materials, and while staples still form the bulk of our foreign trade, it seems that as the stress of competition in these grows acute, more and more of our energy may be transferred to the production of goods which appeal to a growing taste or fancy.

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  • His mind was cultivated; he was a discriminating patron of literature, and Westminster Abbey is an abiding memorial of his artistic taste.

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  • Poole lived in Cairo from 1842 to 1849, thus imbibing an early taste for Egyptian antiquities.

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  • His most manly taste did not rise above the kind of military interest which has been defined as "corporal's mania," the passion for uniforms, pipeclay, buttons, the "tricks of parade and the froth of discipline."

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  • Yet she confessed with her usual candour that she had no taste for painting, sculpture or music. Her supposed love of literature does not appear to have amounted to more than a lively curiosity, which could be satisfied by dipping into a great number of books.

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  • Its taste is exceptionally bitter.

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  • Against luxury and moral corruption he indulges in declamations, which are so frequent that (like those of Seneca) they at last pall upon the reader; and his rhetorical flourishes against practically useful inventions (such as the art of navigation) are wanting in good sense and good taste (xix.

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  • But Henry, despite a violent and capricious temper, had a strong taste for the work of a legislator and administrator.

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  • Even at the lowest ebb of his fortunes Christian had never lost hope of retrieving them, and between 1629 and 1643 the European situation presented infinite possibilities to politicians with a taste for adventure.

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  • Moreover, Professor Lloyd Morgan found that young birds that had tasted and rejected workers of the hive bee as unpalatable subsequently refused to taste not only drones, which have no sting, but also drone-flies.

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  • Now insects that possess noxious attributes, and the same is true of other animals, usually have a conspicuous warning coloration which appeals to the eyes of enemies and helps them to remember more easily the cause of an unpleasant experience, helps in fact to establish a psychical association between a particular style of coloration and a nasty taste or a painful wound.

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  • With two exceptions, these chickens that had learnt to associate black and yellow banding with a bitter taste also refused to touch the caterpillar of the cinnabar moth (Euchelia jacobaeae), which is banded with these colours.

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  • The baboon took it, held it in her hands for a few moments, and then let it escape uninjured without trying to taste it.

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  • It has a sweet astringent taste, very soluble in water, but scarcely soluble in alcohol.

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  • In the early fifties of the 19th century the taste for mountaineering rapidly developed for several very different reasons.

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  • The taste of the day demands that " double flowers " should be largely grown.

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  • Grass walks were common in English gardens during the prevalence of the Dutch taste, but, owing to the frequent humidity of the climate, they have in a great measure been discarded.

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  • To diversify properly and mingle well together the reds, whites, purples, yellows and blues, with all their intervening shades, requires considerable taste and powers of combination; and ascertained failures may be rectified at the proper time the next season.

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  • The taste for cultivation of the class of plants, of which the foregoing list embraces some of the more prominent members, is on the increase, and gardens will benefit by its extension.

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  • A third species, the common sloe or blackthorn, P. spinosa, has stout spines; its flowers expand before the leaves; and its fruit is very rough to the taste, in which particulars it differs from the two preceding.

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  • Castor oil is a viscid liquid, almost colourless when pure, possessing only a slight odour, and a mild yet highly nauseous and disagreeable taste.

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  • On the 13th of October 1825, he was succeeded by his son, Louis I, an enlightened patron of the arts and sciences, who transferred the university of Landshut to Munich, which, by his magnificent taste in building, he transformed into one of the most beautiful cities of the continent.

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  • 28: " There be some of them that stand here which shall in no wise taste of death till they see the Son of Man coming in his kingdom."

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  • CHLOROFORM (trichlor-methane), CHC1 3, a valuable anaesthetic, a colourless liquid, possessing an agreeable smell and a pleasant taste.

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  • The British Pharmacopoeia contains a watery solution - the Aqua Chloroformi - which is useful in disguising the taste of nauseous drugs; a liniment which consists of equal parts of camphor liniment and chloroform, and is a useful counter-irritant; the Spiritus Chloroformi (erroneously known as "chloric ether"), which is a useful anodyne in doses of from five to forty drops; and the Tinctura Chloroformi et Morphinae Composita, which is the equivalent of a proprietary drug called chlorodyne.

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  • He next put together a kind of anthology, containing epigrams by earlier and contemporary poets and himself, under the title of a Cycle of New Epigrams. About a hundred epigrams by Agathias have been preserved in the Greek Anthology and show considerable taste and elegance.

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  • in 1754 for the instruction of artists, and for disseminating a taste for the fine arts among manufacturers and operatives.

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  • In 1757 appeared Four Dissertations: The Natural History of Religion, Of the Passions, Of Tragedy, Of the Standard of Taste.

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  • The prepared leaves have a faint odour and bitter taste; and to preserve their properties they must be kept excluded from light in stoppered bottles.

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  • Though free from the grosser vices of his predecessors, a man of taste, and economical without being avaricious, Clement VII.

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  • Newly pressed rape oil has a dark sherry colour with, at first, scarcely any perceptible smell; but after resting a short time the oil deposits an abundant mucilaginous slime, and by taking up oxygen it acquires a peculiar disagreeable odour and an acrid taste.

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  • In Germany it is very considerably used as a salad oil under the name of Schmalzol, being for that purpose freed from its biting taste by being mixed with starch,.

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  • The offensive taste of rape oil may also be removed by treatment with a small proportion of sweet spirit of nitre (nitrous ether).

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  • These sophistications can be most conveniently detected, first by taste and next by saponification, rosin oil and mineral oil remaining unsaponified, hemp oil giving a greenish soap, while rape oil yields a soap with a yellow tinge.

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  • cupri rosa, the flower of copper), green vitriol, or ferrous sulphate, FeSO 4.7H 2 0, having a bluish-green colour and an astringent, inky and somewhat sweetish taste.

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  • The same character of elaborate decoration, guided almost uniformly by good taste and artistic feeling, is displayed in the mosaic pavements, which in all but the humbler class of houses frequently form the ornament of their floors.

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  • All who have eaten it declare the flesh of the Tinamou to have a most delicate taste, as it has a most inviting appearance, the pectoral muscles being semi-opaque.

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  • The industry is a declining one, because of change in the American taste, and the area under cultivation has diminished by nearly 20 per cent.

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  • Writing of the Tibetan he states: "As a beverage he drinks, all day long, cupfuls of, hot buttered tea, which is really a soup or broth made by boiling tea-leaves with rancid butter and balls of dough, and adding a little salt, and straining - a decoction which was invariably nasty to our taste, though no doubt it is wholesome; for it is not merely a stimulating hot drink in the cold, but overcomes the danger of drinking unboiled water in a country where the water supply is dangerously polluted."

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  • This rifacimento remained the standard text with a few unimportant additions for nearly two centuries, except that, by a truly comic revolution of public taste, Condorcet in 1776 published, after study of the original, which remained accessible in manuscript, another garbling, conducted this time in the interests of unorthodoxy.

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  • He had as a youth a taste for collecting objects of natural history and other curiosities.

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  • Beryllium salts are easily soluble and mostly have a sweetish taste (hence the name Glucinum, from yXv,dc, sweet); they are readily precipitated by alkaline sulphides with formation of the white hydroxide, and may be distinguished from salts of all other metals by the solubility of the oxide in ammonium carbonate.

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  • His taste in cookery, formed in subterranean ordinaries and a la mode beef shops, was far from delicate.

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  • Chesterfield had long been celebrated for the politeness of his manners, the brilliancy of his wit, and the delicacy of his taste.

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  • He proposed to bring out an edition of Shakespeare by subscription, and many subscribers sent in their names and laid down their money; but he soon found the task so little to his taste that he turned to more attractive employments.

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  • Even in his massy and elaborate Dictionary he had, with a strange want of taste and judgment, inserted bitter and contumelious reflexions on the Whig party.

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  • To discuss questions of taste, of learning, of casuistry, in language so exact and so forcible that it might have been printed without the alteration of a word, was to him no exertion, but a pleasure.

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  • It is drawn up after Greek models, in the taste of the rhetoric and sophistry of the later imperial period.

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  • Of the noble palaces which it produced the castle of the Wartburg remains a perfect specimen, while the many magnificent churches dating from this time that still survive, prove the taste, wealth and piety of the burghers.

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  • Lastly, the conscience of King William, though since the acquisition of Lauenburg he had developed a taste for conquest, shrank from provoking war with a German power.

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  • As he was a historian before he became a bishop, so it was his historical sense which determined his general attitude as a bishop. It was this, together with a certain native taste for ecclesiastical pomp, which made him - while condemning the unhistorical extravagances of the ultraritualists - himself a ritualist.

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  • Patmore is one of the few Victorian poets of whom it may confidently be predicted that the memory of his greater achievements will outlive all consideration of occasional lapses from taste and dignity.

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  • In the cathedral, which is in better taste than the cathedral of Havana, Diego Velazquez (c. 1460-1524), conqueror of Cuba, was buried.

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  • His literary style is poor, and his taste and judgment are frequently warped by prejudice, but his two great works and unpublished collections form a priceless source of information on Oxford and her worthies.

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  • The taste of the day -not yet emancipated from the influence of the Sicilian rhetoric -probably demanded a large use of antithesis.

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  • She had been educated at Ackworth school, and was a woman of great strength of character and refined taste.

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  • William had a taste for books, and made the most of his limited opportunities.

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  • C. t has for its subject pavements and roads, their construction, mosaic floors; c. 2 is on white stucco for walls (opus albarium); c. 3 on concrete vaults, gypsum mouldings, stucco prepared for painting; c. 4 on building of hollow walls to keep out the damp, wall decoration by various processes; c. 5 on methods and styles of wall painting, the debased taste of his time; c. 6 on fine stucco made of pounded marble - three coats to receive wall paintings; c. 7 on colours used for mural decoration; c. 8 on red lead (minium) and mercury, and how to use the latter to extract the gold from wornout pieces of stuff or embroidery; c. 9 on the preparation of red lead and the method of encaustic painting with hot wax, finished by friction; cc. to-14 on artificial colours - black, blue, purple;, c. to white lead and ostrum, i.e.

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  • This circumstance alone is sufficient to give it an urgent claim on our attention, whether it suit our taste and fall in with our religious and philosophical views or not.

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  • But Mahomet's mistake consists in persistent and slavish adherence to the semi-poetic form which he had at first adopted in accordance with his own taste and that of his hearers.

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  • Under his influence literature became less suited to the popular taste, more especially addressed to a limited and cultivated class, but at the same time more truly expressive of what was greatest and most worthy to endure in the national sentiment and traditions.

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  • The edifices raised by the Moorish kings of Spain and the Moslem rulers of India may have been more splendid in their materials, and more elaborate in their details; the houses of the great men of Damascus may be more costly than were those of the Mameluke beys; but for purity of taste and elegance of design both are far excelled by many of the mosques and houses of Cairo.

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  • Human the ~ihutes like Taste, Knowledge, Joy and so forth were likewise eve:

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  • ~r widgeon s;.t s e~o bolti-fish Ln.t in - in tusk (I) Lbh tooth bb bb (2) bw taste bw ~ cut branch bt ~3t ~st]

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  • After some thirty years of settled rule uninterrupted by revolt, Egypt was now strong and rich enough to indulge to the full its new taste for war and lust of conquest.

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  • The security which he thereby gained gave him the opportunity to indulge his taste for costly buildings, parks and other luxuries, of which the chroniclers give accounts bordering on the fabulous.

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  • His taste for building and street improvement led to the beautifying of Cairo, and his example was followed by the governors of other great cities in the empire, notably Aleppo and Damascus.

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  • The regions of the cortex, whose conduction paths are early completed, may be arranged in groups by their connexions with sense-organs: eye-region, ear-region, skin and somaesthetic region, olfactory and taste region.

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  • Johan Ludvig Heiberg (q.v.; 1791-1860) was a critic who ruled the world of Danish taste for many years.

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  • In 1876, in his fortieth year, he was encouraged by the change in taste to publish a volume of realistic stories, Country Life, and in 1878 a novel, Without a Centre.

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  • In addition to the varied and beautiful forms of implements and weapons - frequently ornamented with a high degree of artistic taste - armlets and other personal ornaments in gold, amber, jet and bronze are not uncommon.

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  • The pottery accompanying the remains is often elaborately ornamented, and the mound builders were evidently possessed of a higher development of taste and skill than is evinced by any of the modern aboriginal races, by whom the mounds and their contents are regarded as utterly mysterious.

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  • His hymns and poems, which have frequently been published, are evidence of his literary taste and ability.

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  • Fusel, bad spirits), the name applied to the volatile oily liquids, of a nauseous fiery taste and smell, which are obtained in the rectification of spirituous liquors made by the fermentation of grain, potatoes, the marc of grapes, and other material, and which, as they are of higher boiling point than ethyl alcohol, occur in largest quantity in the last portions of the distillate.

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  • Encouraged by his mother, and under the influence of his governess Madame de Roucoulle, and of his first tutor Duhan, a French refugee, he acquired an excellent knowledge of French and a taste for literature and music. He even received secret lessons in Latin, which his father invested with all the charms of forbidden fruit.

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  • But when his taste was formed, German literature did not exist; the choice was between Racine and Voltaire on the one hand and Gottsched and Gellert on the other.

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  • His chief passion, after that for his own fame and glory, seems to have been for theology and religion; it was in this field that his literary powers exerted themselves (for he wrote controversial treatises and hymns), and his taste also, for among his numerous buildings the churches are those on which he spent most thought and money.

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  • (1700-1746) Italianised the rooms, and completed the degradation by running up partitions which blocked up whole apartments, gems of taste and patient ingenuity.

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  • At the same time he was cultured, with a taste for literature, art and music. Henry lies buried in Westminster Abbey.

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  • Although the remedies acceptable to a eulogist of Cromwell could not be to their taste, they admired his moral teaching; and he received their attentions, as Sir C. G.

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  • Yet Duncan Forbes of Culloden, president of the Court of Session, after the outbreak of the war with Spain, reported amazing scarcity of money in the country, and strenuously advised legislative checks on the taste for tea, which naturally diminished the profits of the excise on more generous beverages.

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