Tasmania sentence example

tasmania
  • A narrow Cambrian sea must have extended across central Australia from the Kimberley Goldfield in the north-west, through Tempe Downs and the Macdonnell chain in central Australia, to the South Australian highlands, central Victoria at Mansfield, and northern Tasmania.
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  • One of these, Prothylacinus, is regarded as the forerunner of the marsupial wolf of Tasmania.
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  • This species and many others do not extend to Tasmania.
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  • Nickel, so abundant in the island of New Caledonia, has up to the present been found in none of the Australian states except Queensland and Tasmania.
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  • The honour was later transferred to the discoverer himself, and the island is now known as Tasmania.
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  • The bill as amended was submitted to the electors of each colony and again triumphantly carried in Victoria, South Australia and Tasmania.
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  • The Australian sub-region consists of Australia, Tasmania, New Caledonia and New Zealand, and, though partly lying within the tropic is most naturally treated as a whole.
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  • Of Cupuliferae, Quercus in three species only reaches Colombia, but Fagus, with only a single one in North America, is represented by several from Chile southwards and thence extends to New Zealand and Tasmania.
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  • It is widely distributed in the United States, and occurs in Mexico and Brazil; it is found in Tunisia and Algeria, in the Altai Mountains and India, and in New South Wales, Queensland, and in Tasmania.
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  • In 1841 a separate census was taken of New Zealand and Tasmania respectively.
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  • In other parts of the British empire there are some 1045 churches and mission stations (many native), South Africa, 385; Australia, 311, and Tasmania, 49; British North America, 151; British Guiana, 50, and Jamaica, 48; New Zealand, 35; India, 15; Hongkong, 1.
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  • With Australia may be associated the islands lying close under its coasts, including Tasmania.
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  • Exploring expeditions were sent to Australia under his auspices in 1636 and 1642, and Abel Tasman named after him (Van Diemen's Land) the island now called Tasmania.
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  • Sapphire occurs also in Tasmania.
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  • The single species is from Tasmania, though it has been found fossil in New South Wales; it is somewhat similar in size and appearance to the English water-rat, but has longer and softer fur.
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  • A new beginning was made in 1850 by the Anglican Board of Missions for Australia and Tasmania, and now each diocese is responsible for its own area.
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  • In Tasmania the aborigines are extinct, the last pure-blooded native dying in 1876.
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  • The half-castes settled in the Bass Straits are ministered to by the bishop of Tasmania.
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  • In Tasmania also diamonds have been found in the Corinna goldfields.
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  • In a more restricted sense the term Australasia corresponds to the large division including Australia, Tasmania and New Zealand.
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  • The Lower Cambrian has been found at various places in South Australia; and in Tasmania a thick series of strata appears to be in part at least of Upper Cambrian age.
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  • The wombat of Tasmania and the islands of Bass's Straits (P. ursinus), and the closely similar but larger P. platyrhinus of the southern portion of the mainland of Australia, belong to this group. On the other hand, in the hairy-nosed wombat (P. latifrons) of Southern Australia, the fur is smooth and silky; the ears are large and more pointed; the muzzle is hairy; the frontal region of the skull is broader than in the other section, with well-marked postorbital processes; and there are thirteen ribs.
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  • The prevailing colour of the last-named species, as well as P. ursinus of Tasmania, is brownish grey.
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  • Lyell smelting works in Tasmania, which are of special interest, will be referred to later.
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  • The most important case of naturalization of fish is, however, the establishment of some Salmonidae in Tasmania and New Zealand.
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  • The majority are inhabitants of Australia and Tasmania, forming one of the most prominent and characteristic features of the fauna of these lands, and performing the part of the deer and antelopes of other parts of the world.
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  • Nearly allied are the rock-wallabies of Australia and Tasmania, constituting the genus Petrogale, chiefly distinguished by the thinner tail being more densely haired and terminating in a tuff.
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  • The group is confined to Australia and Tasmania, and all the species are relatively small.
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  • Among the celebrities of Hoorn are William Schouten, who discovered in 1616 the passage round Cape Horn, or Hoorn, as he named it in honour of his birthplace; Abel Janszoon Tasman, whose fame is associated with Tasmania; and Jan Pietersz Coen, governorgeneral of the Dutch East Indies.
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  • Penal establishments were formed at Newcastle in New South Wales, at Hobart and Launceston in Tasmania, and an unsuccessful attempt was made to colonize Port Phillip. The most noteworthy incident in the first decade of the 19th century was the forcible deportation by the officers of the New South Wales Corps, a regiment raised in England for service in the colony, of the governor, Captain Bligh, R.N., the naval officer identified with the mutiny of the " Bounty."
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  • Telegraphic communication was established between Sydney, Melbourne, Adelaide and Tasmania in 1859; and during the same year the Moreton Bay district was separated from New South Wales and was constituted the colony of Queensland.
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  • Those of Victoria, South Australia and Tasmania agreed to the measure; but the majority in New South Wales, 5458, was not sufficient to carry the bill.
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  • This is Tasmania, where as in the adjacent continent of Australia, the survival of marsupial animals indicates long isolation from the rest of the world.
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  • Themeda Forskalii, which occurs from the Mediterranean region to South Africa and Tasmania, is the kangaroo grass of Australia, where, as in South Africa, it often covers wide tracts.
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  • Smaller cones, less than an inch long, occur in the larch, Athrotaxis (Tasmania), Fitsroya (Patagonia and Tasmania), &c. In the Taxodieae and Araucarieae the cones are similar in appearance to those of the Abietineae, but they differ in the fact that the scales appear to be single, even in the young condition; each cone-scale in a genus of the Taxodiinae (Sequoia, &c.) bears several seeds, while in the Araucariinae (Araucaria and Agathis) each scale has one seed.
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  • The female flowers of the Taxaceae assume another form; in Microcachrys (Tasmania) the reproductive structures are spirally disposed, and form small globular cones made up of red fleshy scales, to each of which is attached a single ovule enclosed by an integument and partially invested by an arillus; in Dacrydium the carpellary leaves are very similar to the foliage leaves - each bears one ovule with two integuments, the outer of which constitutes an arillus.
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  • In Araucaria Cookii and some allied species each scale has a small pointed projection from its upper face near the distal end, the scales of Cunninghamia (China) are characterized by a somewhat ragged membranous projection extending across the upper face between the seeds and the distal end of the scale; in the scales of Athrotaxis (Tasmania) a prominent rounded ridge occupies a corresponding position.
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  • When the home government became aware of the state of affairs orders were sent directing the " Neptune " to proceed to Tasmania, and it did so after having been in Simon's Bay for five months.
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  • It is the seat of the Anglican bishop of Tasmania, and of the Roman Catholic archbishop of Hobart.
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  • Government House, the residence of the governor of Tasmania, a handsome castellated building, stands in its domain on the banks of the Derwent, to the north of the town.
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  • Of the parks and public gardens, the most extensive is the Queen's Domain, covering an area of about 700 acres, while the most central is Franklin Square, adorned with a statue of Sir John Franklin, the famous Arctic explorer, who was governor of Tasmania from 1837 to 1843.
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  • The university of Tasmania, established in 1890, and opened in 1893, has its headquarters at Hobart.
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  • This order contains the two genera Phylloglossum and Lycopodium; the former has a single species, confined to Australia, Tasmania and New Zealand, while nearly one hundred species of Lycopodium are known.
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  • The last-mentioned is found in south-eastern New Guinea, Australia and Tasmania.
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  • It is composed of the island of Tasmania and its adjoining islands, and is separated from the Australian continent on the south-east by Bass Strait.
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  • The southern portion of the eastern shore of Tasmania is remarkable for its picturesque inlets and bold headlands.
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  • In Bass Strait are several large islands belonging to Tasmania; King's, Flinders, Cape Barren and Clarke Islands are the largest.
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  • The main axis of the Great Cordillera - so termed originally by Sir Roderick Murchison - bordering the eastern coast-line of Australia, may be traced across Bass Strait in the chain of islands forming the Furneaux and Kent group, which almost continually link Tasmania with Wilson's Promontory, the nearest and most southerly part of the Australian mainland.
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  • Tasmania is wholly occupied by the ramifications of this chain, and in itself may be said to embrace one and all of its characteristic features.
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  • The precise date of the separation is fixed as later than the Miocene, since the fringe of the marine Miocene deposits along the southern coast of Victoria is broken, from Flinders to Alberton; and this gap was no doubt due to the subsidence of the land; of which the islands in the Bass Strait are remnants, which then connected Tasmania with the continent.
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  • The latest date for the existence of this connexion is given by the absence from Tasmania of the dingo, the lyre-bird and the giant marsupials; so that the isolation of Tasmania was earlier than the arrival of those animals in south-eastern Australia.
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  • The geological sequence in Tasmania is full, and the island contains a better series of Carboniferous rocks than is found in Victoria.
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  • The Lower Palaeozoic systems begin with the Cambrian, which are found in northern Tasmania near Latrobe, and contain Cambrian fossils as Dikelocephalus Tasmanicus and Conocephalites stephensi.
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  • The Silurian system, however, is well developed in north-western Tasmania, and is.
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  • The Carboniferous rocks occupy the whole of the south-eastern corner of Tasmania; and one outlier occurs on the northern coast in the Mersey Valley.
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  • The most conspicuous member of the Mesozoic group is the sheet of diabase and dolerite, made up of laccolites and sills, which covers most of the central plateau of Tasmania.
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  • Lower Cainozoic lacustrine beds with fossil plants, of the same age as those which underlie the older basalts of Victoria, occur in the valleys of northern Tasmania.
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  • North-western Tasmania in Pleistocene times had an._ extensive series of glaciers, of which the lower moraines were deposited only about 400 feet above sea level.
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  • Johnston's Systematic Account of the Geology of Tasmania, which gives a bibliography up to that date.
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  • Twelvetrees, and in papers published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society of Tasmania.
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  • Animal life in Tasmania is similar to that in Australia.
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  • Like all the Australian states, Tasmania shows a decline in the birthrate; in 5905 the births were 5256-36 less than in 1904 - which gives a rate of 29.32 per loco of mean population.
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  • The climate is probably more healthy than that of any of the Australian states, although, owing to the large number of old people in the colony, the death-rate would appear to put Tasmania on a par with New South Wales and South Australia.
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  • As one of the states of Australia, Tasmania returns six senators and 'five representatives to the federal parliament.
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  • Electors of the council must be natural-born or naturalized subjects of the king, twenty-one years of age, resident in Tasmania for twelve months, and possessing a freehold of the annual value of £ro or a leasehold of the annual value of 30 within the electoral district; the property qualification being waived in the case of persons with university degrees or belonging to certain professions.
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  • Every resident of Tasmania for a period of twelve months who is twenty-one years of age, natural-born or naturalized, is entitled to have his name placed on the electoral roll, and to vote for the district in which he resides.
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  • The university of Tasmania has an endowment of £4000 and a revenue from other sources (chiefly fees) of from £1 too to £2000.
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  • For local government purposes Tasmania is divided into municipalities, town boards, and road trusts.
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  • Tasmania is the largest producer of tin in Australasia, and a very large proportion of the tin hitherto produced has been obtained from alluvial deposits, the lodes, except at Mount Bischoff, having, comparatively speaking, been neglected.
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  • Tasmania is renowned for its fruit crops, and now that this fruit has found an opening in the British market, renewed attention is being devoted to the industry.
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  • Tasmania finds its best markets for fruits in New South Wales and in Great Britain.
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  • Tasmania shows a decline in sheep-breeding, yet the state is singularly well adapted for sheep-raising, and its stud flocks are well known and annually drawn upon to improve the breed in the other states.
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  • This system was abolished in New South Wales in 1840, after which date the island was the receptacle for all convicts not only from the United Kingdom, but from India and the colonies, and it was not until 18J3 that transportation to Van Diemen's Land finally ceased; in the same year representative institutions were introduced, the name of the colony was changed to Tasmania, and three years later the colony was granted responsible government.
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  • The discovery of gold in Victoria produced a very remarkable effect upon Tasmania.
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  • It was not till the sixties that Tasmania embarked upon a new period of prosperity.
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  • Like her neighbours, Tasmania organized a defence force, and was able to send a contingent to South Africa in 'goo.
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  • Africa (Eeca boulder-beds), Australia and Tasmania (Bacchus Marsh boulder-beds, &c.), and South America, which are associated with Glossopteris-bearing strata.
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  • We have a flora of wide distribution in South Africa, South America, Borneo, Australia, Tasmania and India which is clearly of PermoCarboniferous age, but which differs in its composition from the flora of the same age in other parts of the world.
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  • Other seams are full of the twigs and cones of Athrotaxis, a Conifer now confined to Tasmania.
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  • If this sounds too energetic, take it easy, with the warmest welcome in the world, fortified by Tasmania's abundant seafood.
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  • His father, my father's uncle George, had emigrated to Tasmania in 1898, settled well and had a family.
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  • In England in 1876 two churches united to form the Presbyterian Church of England; in the Netherlands two churches became one in 1892; in South Africa a union of the different branches of the Presbyterian Church took place in 1897; in Scotland the Free Church and the United Presbyterian became one in 1900 under the designation of the United Free Church; in Australia and Tasmania six churches united in 1901 to form the Presbyterian Church of Australia; and a few months later the two churches in New Zealand which represented respectively the North and South Islands united to form the Presbyterian Church of New Zealand.
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  • The Carboniferous period began with a marine transgression, enabling limestones to form in Tasmania and New South Wales; and at the same time the sea first got in along the western edge of the western plateau, depositing the Carboniferous rocks of the Gascoyne basin and the coastal plain of north-western Australia.
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  • In Victoria, Tasmania, northern New South Wales and Queensland, there are Jurassic terrestrial deposits, containing the coal seams of Victoria, of the Clarence basin of north-eastern New South Wales, and of the Ipswich series in Queensland; the same beds range far inland on the western slopes of the east Australian highlands in New South Wales and Queensland and they occur, with coal-seams, at Leigh's Creek, at the northern foot of the South Australian highlands.
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  • Captain Tobias Furneaux, in the " Adventure," also found his way to Storm Bay in Tasmania.
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  • The Labour party has been in power in Queensland, Western Australia and South Australia, and has, on many occasions, decided the fate of the government on a critical division in all the states except Tasmania and Victoria.
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  • In India the northern range of the group is only bounded by the slopes of the Himalaya, and farther to the eastward parrots are not only abundant over the whole of the Malay Archipelago, as well as Australia and Tasmania, but two very well-defined families are peculiar to New Zealand and its adjacent islands (see Kakapo and Nestor).
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  • The southern boundary is generally regarded as the parallel of 40° S., but sometimes the part of the great Southern Ocean (40 0 to 662° S.) between the meridians passing through South Cape in Tasmania and Cape Horn is included.
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  • Immediately after the arrival of the first fleet, surveys of the adjacent coast were made; the existence of a strait between Australia and Tasmania was discovered by Surgeon Bass; and before the retirement of Governor King in 1806 Australia had been circumnavigated and the principal features of its coast-line accurately surveyed by Captain Flinders, R.N.
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  • His father, my father 's uncle George, had emigrated to Tasmania in 1898, settled well and had a family.
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  • Athrotaxis - A little group of tender trees from Tasmania, which do well in the southern parts of our islands near the sea, but of slight value elsewhere.
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  • It is a variable plant, spread over nearly half the world, the hardiest forms coming from Chili, New Zealand, and Tasmania.
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  • P. alpina, from the mountains of Tasmania, is probably the hardiest of the group, but is only a Yew-like shrub of semi-prostrate habit, more interesting than beautiful.
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  • To add to his Australian winemaking knowledge base, he also spent time the Hunter Valley as well as Tasmania.
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  • Of more interest is the imperfectly known Wynyardia, from older Tertiary beds in Tasmania, which apparently presents points of affinity both to phalangers and dasyures.
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  • The edge of the abysmal area comes close to the eastern coasts of Tasmania and New South Wales, approaching to within 60 m.
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  • The terrace closest to the land, known as the continental shelf, has an average depth of 600 ft., and connects Australia, New Guinea, and Tasmania in one unbroken sweep. Compared with other continents, the Australian continental shelf is extremely narrow, and there are points on the eastern coast where the land plunges down to oceanic depths with an abruptness rarely paralleled.
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  • With the exception of Tasmania there are no important islands belonging geographically to Australia, for New Guinea, Timor and other islands of the East Indian archipelago, though not removed any great distance from the continent, do not belong to its system.
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  • It consists in the main of an Archean block or " coign,"which still occupies nearly the whole of the western half of the continent, outcrops in north-eastern Queensland, forms the foundation of southern New South Wales and eastern Victoria, and is exposed in western Victoria, in Tasmania, and in the western flank of the Southern Alps of New Zealand.
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  • Silurian rocks are well developed in western Tasmania, and the Silurian sea must have washed the south-western corner of the continent, if the rocks of the Stirling Range be rightly identified as of this age.
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  • The Upper Devonian was a period of marine retreat; the crustal disturbances of the Lower Devonian were renewed and great quartz-pebble beaches were formed on the rising shore lines, producing the West Coast Range conglomerates of Tasmania, and the similar rocks to the south-east of Mansfield in Victoria.
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  • Kitson's work in Tasmania shows that there also the glacial beds may be correlated with the lower or Greta Coal Measures of New South Wales.
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  • The Permian deposits are best developed in New South Wales and Tasmania, where their characters show the continuation of the Carboniferous conditions.
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  • They also occur in northern Tasmania.
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  • Similar deposits, of approximately the same age, occur in Tasmania and New Zealand; and at about the same time there began the Kainozoic volcanic period of Australasia.
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  • Farther east the sea was interrupted by the still existing land-connexion between Tasmania and Victoria; but beyond it, the marine deposits are found again, fringing the coasts of eastern Gippsland and Croajingolong.
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  • Tasmania and Victoria were separated by the foundering of Bass Strait, and at the same time the formation of the rift valley of Spencer Gulf, and Lake Torrens, isolated the South Australian highlands from the Eyre Peninsula and the Westralian plateau.
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  • From an area corresponding to what is now South America there entered a fauna and flora, which, after undergoing modification, passed by way of Tasmania to Australia.
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  • On the Australian side the fact that Tasmania is richest in marsupial types indicates the gate by which they entered.
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  • The zoology of Australia and Tasmania presents a very conspicuous point of difference from that of other regions of the globe, in the prevalence of non-placental mammalia.
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  • There are some twenty smaller species in Australia and Tasmania, besides the rock wallabies and the hare kangaroos; these last are wonderfully swift, making clear jumps 8 or io ft.
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  • Australia and Tasmania possess two animals of this order - the echidna, or spiny ant-eater (hairy in Tasmania), and the Platypus anatinus, the duckbilled water mole, otherwise named the Ornithorhynchus paradoxus.
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  • The distribution of population at the close of 1906 (4,118,000) was New South Wales 1,530,000, Victoria 1,223,000, Queensland 534,000, South Australia 381,000, Western Australia 270,000, Tasmania 180,000.
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  • The principal cities and towns are Sydney (pop. 530,000), Newcastle, Broken Hill, Parramatta, Goulburn, Maitland, Bathurst, Orange, Lithgow, Tamworth, Grafton, Wagga and Albury, in New South Wales; Melbourne (pop. 511,900), Ballarat, Bendigo, Geelong, Eaglehawk, Warrnambool, Castlemaine, and Stawell in Victoria; Brisbane (pop. 128,000), Rockhampton, Maryborough, Townsville, Gympie, Ipswich, and Toowoomba in Queensland; Adelaide (pop. about 175,000), Port Adelaide and Port Pirie in South Australia; Perth (pop. 56,000), Fremantle, and Kalgoorlie in Western Australia; and Hobart (pop. 35,500) and Launceston in Tasmania.
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  • In Western Australia, New South Wales, Tasmania and Queensland there are many hundreds of well-equipped saw-mills affording employment to about 5000 men.
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  • Trout may now be taken in many of the mountain streams. At one time whaling was an important industry on the coasts of New South Wales and Tasmania, and afterwards on the Western Australian coasts.
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  • Tasmania is a gold producer to the extent of about 70,000 or 80,000 oz.
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  • Tasmania is now the largest copper-producing state of the Commonwealth; in 1905 the output was over £672,010 and in earlier years even larger.
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  • The total value of copper produced in Australia up to the end of 1905 was £42,500,000 sterling, £24,500,000 having been obtained in South Australia, £7,500,000 in New South Wales, £6,400,000 in Tasmania and over £3,500,000 in Queensland.
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  • Tasmania during the last few years has attained the foremost position in the production of tin, the annual output now being about £363,000.
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  • The total value of tin produced in Australia is nearly a million sterling per annum, and the total production to the end of 1905 was £22,500,000, of which Tasmania produced about 40%, New South Wales one-third, Queensland a little more than a fourth.
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  • Extensive deposits, which are being developed successfully, occur in Tasmania, it being estimated that there are, within easy shipping facilities, 17,000,000 tons of ore.
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  • Wolfram (tungstate of iron and manganese) occurs in some of the states, notably in New South Wales, Victoria, Tasmania and Queensland.
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  • Chromium has been discovered in Tasmania also.
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  • Yet while the Tasmanians are so distinctly separated in physique and customs from the Australians, the fauna and flora of Tasmania and Australia prove that at one time the two formed one continent, and it would take an enormous time for the formation of Bass Strait.
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  • Did they get to Tasmania before or after its separation from the main continent?
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  • In 1777, while on his way to search for a north-east passage between the Atlantic and Pacific oceans, Cook again touched at the coast of Tasmania and New Zealand.
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  • On his first voyage, in 1770, Cook had some grounds for the belief that Van Diemen's Land, as Tasmania was then called, was a separate island.
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  • Van Diemen's Land, now called Tasmania, had been occupied as early as 1803.
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  • The copper mines of South Australia were for the time deserted, while Tasmania and New Zealand lost many inhabitants, who emigrated to the more promising country.
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  • The effects of the crisis were mainly felt in the three eastern states, Queensland, New South Wales and Victoria, Tasmania and South Australia being affected chiefly by reason of the fact of their intimate financial connexion with the eastern states.
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  • During the year 1896 Enabling Acts were passed by New South Wales, Victoria, Tasmania, South Australia and Western Australia, and delegates were elected by popular vote in all the colonies named except Western Australia, where the delegates were chosen by parliament.
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  • The constitution was accepted by Victoria, South Australia and Tasmania by popular acclamation, but in New South Wales very great opposition was shown, the main points of objection being the financial provisions, equal representation in the Senate, and the difficulty in the way of the larger states securing an amendment of the constitution in the event of a conflict with the smaller states.
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  • In Victoria, Tasmania and South Australia, on the other hand, the bill was accepted by triumphant majorities.
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  • Under this act, which was dated the 9th of July 1900, a proclamation was issued on the 17th of September of the same year, declaring that, on and after the 1st of January 1901, the people of New South Wales, Victoria, South Australia, Queensland, Tasmania and Western Australia should be united in a federal commonwealth under the name of the Commonwealth of Australia.
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  • Amongst Coniferae Podocarpus is common to this and preceding sub-regions; Libocedrus extends from California to New Zealand and New Caledonia; Fitzroya is found in Chile and Tasmania; and Araucaria in its most familiar species occurs in Chile.
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  • The Australian Subregion comprises Australia and Tasmania.
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  • The species, about a dozen in number, are widely distributed over Australia, Tasmania, New Guinea and several of the adjacent islands.
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  • Some notices of Australian birds by Mr Ramsay and others are to be found in the Proceedings of the Linnaean Society of New South Wales and of the Royal Society of Tasmania.
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  • The platypus is pretty generally distributed in situations suitable to its aquatic habits throughout the island of Tasmania and the southern and eastern portions of Australia.
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  • In this coal, as well as in the lignite of Tasmania, known as white coal or Tasmanite, the sulphur occurs in organic combination, but is so firmly held that it can only be very partially expelled, even by exposure to a very high and continued heating out of contact with the air.
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  • The group is situated eastward of Tasmania and Victoria, and Wellington, its capital and central seaport, is 1204 m.
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  • The southern boundary is generally regarded as the parallel of 40° S., but sometimes the part of the great Southern Ocean (40 0 to 662° S.) between the meridians passing through South Cape in Tasmania and Cape Horn is included.
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  • In1642-1643Abel Tasman, working from the east, discovered Van Diemen's Land (Tasmania) and the west coast of New Zealand, subsequently reaching the Tonga Islands.
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  • Tiliqua of Australia, Tasmania and Malay Islands, has stout lateral teeth with rounded-off crowns; C. gigas of the Moluccas and of New Guinea is the largest member of the family, reaching a length of nearly 2 ft.; the limbs are well developed, as in Trachysaurus rugosus of Australia, which is easily recognized by the large and rough scales and the short, broad, stump-like tail.
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  • For two years after that date a constant stream of squatters with their sheep flowed in from around Sydney and Tasmania to settle in the Port Phillip district, and by 1841 the population of the town had grown to 11,000.
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  • Readers of Dante know the idea that the dead have no shadows; this was no invention of the poet's but a piece of traditionary lore; at the present day among the Basutos it is held that a man walking by the brink of a river may lose his life if his shadow falls on the water, for a crocodile may seize it and draw him in; in Tasmania, North and South America and classical Europe is found the conception that the soul - o-tab., umbra - is somehow identical with the shadow of a man.
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