Tannin sentence example

tannin
  • Among other contents of the cell, fatty substances and tannin are known.
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  • The presence of tannin has been established in the case of a great number of freshwater algae.
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  • The bark of various Australian species, known as wattles, is also very rich in tannin and forms an important article of export.
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  • The proteid matter combines with a part of the tannin in the wine, forming an insoluble tannate, and this gradually subsides to the bottom of the cask, dragging with it the mechanically suspended matters which are the main cause of the wine's turbidity.
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  • Some wines, particularly those which lack acid or tannin, are very difficult to fine.
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  • The value of oak bark depends upon the amount of tannin contained in it, which varies much, depending not only on the growth of the tree but on the care bestowed on the preparation of the bark itself, as it soon ferments and spoils by exposure to wet, while too much sun-heat is injurious.
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  • The wood contains no tannin, and for this reason quassia, like chiretta and calumba, may be preserved with iron.
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  • An astringent fluid, known as shibu, rich in tannin, is expressed from the green fruit and used in various industries.
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  • In addition to their use for timber or basket-making, willows contain a large quantity of tannin in their bark.
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  • Chinese galls examined by Viedt 12 yielded 72% of tannin, and less mucilage than Aleppo galls.
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  • The amount of tannin found in green teas appears to be FIG.
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  • Tannin is a hardening and astringent substance, and in large quantities impairs digestion.
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  • The bark and young cones afford a tanning material, inferior indeed to oakbark, and hardly equal to that of the larch, but of value in countries where substances more rich in tannin are not abundant.
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  • A comparatively new product in this region is that of canaigre, which is grown for the tannin found in its root.
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  • It contains, in addition to tannin, a peculiar principle called larixin, which may be obtained in a pure state by distillation from a concentrated infusion of the bark; it is a colourless substance in long crystals, with a bitter and astringent taste, and a faint acid reaction; hence some term it larixinic acid.
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  • Thus the protoand per-salts of iron, as well as the protoand per-salts of tin, including also a large variety of tannin, sumac, divi-divi, chestnut, valonia, the acacias (Areca Catechu and Acacia Catechu from India), from which are obtained cutch and gambier, &c., are no longer used solely as mordants or tinctorial matters, but mainly to serve the object of converting the silk into a greatly-expanded fibre, consisting of a conglomeration of more or less of these substances."
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  • The character of the acidity, however, changes, the free tartaric acid gradually disappearing, forming bitartrate of potash and being otherwise broken up. On the other hand, the free malic acid increases and the tannin decreases.
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  • Among the principal varieties are those which contain carbolic acid and other ingredients of coal tar, salicylic acid, petroleum, borax, camphor, iodine, mercurial salts, sulphur and tannin.
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  • The preparations of morphine are incompatible with salts of iron, copper and mercury, also with lime water and alkaline earths and substances containing tannin.
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  • The juice at this period contains an appreciable amount of tannin.
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  • This disease is generally caused by infection and is favoured by a lack of alcohol, acid and tannin.
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  • Again, it is well known that in the case of the viscous disease the difficulty may be overcome by the addition of a small quantity of tannin.
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  • In the same way the disease caused by the mildew organism may be counteracted by a slight addition of alcohol and tannin.
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  • Tanning leather is an important industry, especially in the south, some of the Chilean trees, notably the algarrobilla (Balsamocarpon brevifolium) and lingue (Persea lingue), being rich in tannin.
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  • The manufacturing industries are of relatively slight importance, though considerable promise attends the experiments with canaigre as a source of tannin.
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  • Where tannin drugs are useful, as in diarrhea, the fluid extract is an excellent astringent.
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  • The bark exudes a kino (astringent tannin ).
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  • Numerous other substances are also found in the cytoplasm, such as tannin, fats and oil, resins, mucilage, caoutchouc, guttapercha, sulphur and calcium oxalate crystals.
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  • Davy) to 77 (Buchner)% of tannin (see 8 " Resherches pour servir a l'histoire des galles," Ann.
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  • It dyes silk, wool and leather direct, and cotton after mordanting with tannin and tartar emetic (see Dyeing).
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  • The commercial value appears to depend on the essential oil and aroma, not on the amount of caffeine, tannin or extract.
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  • The main problem being the high tannin content in French red wines.
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  • The palate has flavors of black fruit and nuts and is balanced with good tannin structure and acidity.
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  • If you tried to eat a cider apple you would discover its main difference from eaters or cookers is its tannin level.
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  • There is slight jolt of tannin that slips away and the wine finishes with its fruit flavors at the forefront.
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  • Parker scores this wine a 91 and notes the "great fruit, huge body, sweet tannin and long finish."
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  • It produces fruity, juicy, and low tannin wines.
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  • American oak is not always favored by producers, giving off a slighter sweeter character or more lavender notes than French oak, but it also doesn't project as much tannin, which fits Silver Oak's design.
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  • Full and lush on the palate, it actually finishes strong on the tannin and wood side, telling me that this wine needs a couple of years to come around to release what it has in store.
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  • Try to pick lighter to medium-bodied reds and avoid big burly tannin ones or big fruit Zinfandel bombs.
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  • The tannin level in a wine is caused by the seeds, stems and skins of the grape.
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  • Wood aging lessens tannin and acid levels, "softening" the wine.
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  • When the grape is ripe, the sugar has attained to a maximum and the acidity is very much reduced; the tannin has entirely disappeared.
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  • In the case of red wines colouring matter is dissolved from the skins and a certain amount of mineral matter and tannin is extracted.
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  • The tannin in young red wines may amount to as much as 0.4 or 0.5%, but in white wines it is much less.
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  • As the wine matures the most noticeable feature in the first instance is the reduction in the acidity, which is mainly due to a deposition of tartar, and the disappearance of tannin and colouring matter, due to fining and the action of oxygen.
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  • The softening effect of age is due to the deposition of a part of the tartar together with a part of the tannin and some of the colouring matter.
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  • This disease is also caused by the wine lacking alcohol, acid and tannin, and to the presence of an excess of albuminous matters.
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  • As a rule this disease is due to a lack of tannin (hence its more frequent occurrence in white wines).
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  • Frequently alcohol, tannin, glycerin, and similar wine constituents are also added.
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  • It is to this relatively large amount of body and absence of an excess of acid and of tannin that the peculiarly soft effect of the Bordeaux wines on the palate is due.
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  • Comparing the fine wines of the better vintages with, for instance, the red wines of the Gironde, the main features of interest are the relatively high proportions of acid and glycerin and the low proportion of tannin which they contain.
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  • Common tannin, or tannic acid, C, 4 H, 0 0 9.2H 2 O, occurs to the extent of 50% in gall-nuts, and also in tea, sumach and in other plants.
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  • It may be obtained by extracting powdered gall-nuts with a mixture of ether and alcohol, whereupon the tannin is taken up in the lower layer, which on separation and evaporation yields the acid.
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  • The tannin of oak, C/9H16010, which is found, mixed with gallic acid, ellagic acid and quercite, in oak bark, is a red powder; its aqueous solution is coloured dark blue by ferric chloride, and boiling with dilute sulphuric acid gives oak red or phlobaphene.
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  • The tannin of coffee, C3,H,80,6, found in coffee beans, is not precipitated from its solutions by gelatin.
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  • Frequent doses of a teaspoonful of tannin dissolved ' in water should be administered, together with strong tea and coffee and mucilaginous fluids.
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  • An excess of the precipitant is shown by a drop of the solution imparting a yellow colour to a solution of tannin, prepared by dissolving one part of tannin in 300 of water; drops of this solution are placed on a white porcelain plate, and as the precipitant is added to the lead solution a drop of the latter is removed from time to time on a glass stirring-rod and added to one of the drops on the porcelain plate.
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  • Colloidal silver is the name given by Carey Lea to the precipitates obtained by adding reducing solutions, such as ferrous sulphate, tartrates, citrates, tannin, &c., or to silver solutions.
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  • Gallic acid is most readily obtained by boiling the tannin procured from oak-galls by means of alcohol and ether with weak solution of acids.
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  • Owing to the quantity of tannin they contain, no harmful miasma exhales from the Irish bogs.
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