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tanks

tanks Sentence Examples

  • In many gardens open-air tanks have been fitted up with hot-water pipes running through them to keep the water sufficiently warm in severe weather.

  • Cylinders, tanks and independent boilers should be encased in a non-conducting material such as silicate cotton, thick felt or asbestos composition.

  • In districts where the water is of a " hard nature," that is, contains bicarbonate of lime in solution, the interior of the boiler cylinders, tanks and pipes of a hot water system will become incrusted with a deposit of lime which is gradually precipitated as the water is heated to boiling point.

  • With " very hard " water this deposit may require removal every three months; in London it is usual to clean out the boiler every six months and the cylinders and tanks at longer intervals.

  • Both descriptions of rock yielded good material for building; while in the soft meleke tanks, underground chambers, tombs, &c., were easily excavated.

  • Should these tests prove satisfactory the core is served with jute yarn, coiled in water-tight tanks, and surrounded with salt water.

  • As the cable is sheathed it is stored in large water-tight tanks and kept at a nearly uniform temperature by means of water.

  • When the cable is to be laid it is transferred to a cable ship, provided with water-tight tanks similar to those used in the factory.

  • The tanks are nearly cylindrical in form and have a truncated cone fixed in the centre, as shown at C, fig.

  • The cable is carefully coiled into the tanks in horizontal flakes, each of which is begun at the outside of the tank and coiled towards the centre.

  • Since then it has been discovered in other botanic gardens in various parts of Europe, its two most recent appearances being at Lyons (1901) and Munich (1905), occurring always in tanks in which the Victoria regia is cultivated, a fact which indicates that tropical South America is its original habitat.

  • In the same tanks a small hydroid, very similar to Microhydra, has been found, which bears medusa-buds and is probably the stock from which the medusa is budded.

  • The filtering works include 6 lime saturators, 2 mixing or softening tanks, 6 settling basins, 10 mechanical filters and 2 clear-water reservoirs.

  • The water cranes or towers which are placed at intervals along the railway to supply the engines with water require similar care in regard to the quality of the water laid on to them, as also to the water troughs, or track tanks as they are called in America, by which engines are able to pick up water without stopping.

  • These at first consisted of an ordinary truck on which were placed two wooden tub-like tanks, each holding about 2000 gallons; they were replaced in 1871 by the modern type of tank-car, constructed with a horizontal cylindrical tank of boiler plate.

  • Tanks of various types are employed in storing the oil, those at the wells being circular and usually made of wood, with a content of 250 barrels and upwards.

  • Large tanks of boiler-plate are used to receive the oil as it comes through the pipe-lines.

  • south of Biarritz on a ridge behind two lakes (or tanks) through Arcangues towards the Nive.

  • The liquid is now run into neutralizing tanks containing sodium carbonate, and, after settling, the supernatant liquid, termed "light liquor," is run through bag filters and then on to bone-char filters, which have been previously used for the "heavy liquor."

  • The plan usually adopted is to collect the latex in rectangular tanks or casks.

  • Large objects are suspended in the tanks by hooks or wires, care being taken to shift their position and so avoid wire-marks.

  • The strength of the current may also be regulated by introducing lengths of German silver or iron wire, carbon rod, or other inferior conductors in the path of the current, and a series of such resistances should always be provided close to the tanks.

  • The cantonment is situated on the left bank of the Hugh; it has also a large bazaar and several large tanks, and also a parade ground.

  • The state came under British management, and the administration was improved, the revenue increased, a system of irrigation developed, new tanks and wells constructed and an excellent system of roads and public buildings organized.

  • Water may be raised from mines by buckets, tanks or pumps.

  • Tanks operated by the main hoisting engines, and of capacities up to 50o gallons or more, are applicable under several conditions: (1) When the shaft is deep, the quantity of water insufficient to keep a pump in regular operation, and the hoisting engine not constantly employed in raising mineral, the tank is worked at intervals, being attached temporarily to the hoisting rope in place of the cage.

  • (2) For raising large volumes of water from deep shafts pairs of tanks are operated in balance in special shaft compartments by their own hoisting engine.

  • As the water level falls the tanks readily follow it while at work, whereas pumps must be lowered to new positions to keep within suction distance.

  • Self-acting tanks are occasionally built underneath the platforms of hoisting cages.

  • Thus the dimensions of the largest glass tanks greatly exceed those of the largest steel furnaces; glass furnaces containing up to 250 tons of molten sible to work glass-tanks continuously for many months together; on the other hand, glass is not readily freed from foreign bodies that may become admixed with it, so that the absence of detachable particles is much more essential in glass than in steel melting.

  • Tanks and pots are both used for melting the glass.

  • This is easily done in liming or measuring tanks of known capacity, into which the juice is run from the mill.

  • The boiling juice is run down into subsiding tanks, where it cools, and at the same time the albumen, which has been suddenly coagulated by momentary exposure to high temperature, falls to the bottom of the tank, carrying with it the vegetable and other matters which were in suspension in the juice.

  • In Australia a continuous juice separator is generally used, and preferred to ordinary subsiding or filtering tanks.

  • The clear juice when it arrives at the top of the separator flows slowly over the level edges of, a cross canal and passes in a continuous stream to the service tanks of the evaporators or vacuum pan.

  • In some factories they are collected in suitable tanks, and steam is blown into them, which further coagulates the albuminous par Scums. tides.

  • After the juice has been defecated or purified by any of the means above mentioned it is sent to the evaporating apparatus, hereinafter described, where it is concentrated to 26° or 28° Beaume, and is then conducted in a continuous stream either into the service tanks of the vacuum pan, if dark sugars are required, or, if a better colour is wanted, into clarifiers.

  • The latter are circular or rectangular vessels, holding from 500 to 1500 gallons each, according to the capacity of the factory, and fitted with steam coils at the bottom and skimming troughs at the top. In them the syrup is quickly brought up to the boil and skimmed for about five minutes, when it is run off to the service tanks of the vacuum pans.

  • Apart from increased yield in sugar of good quality, we may sum up the advantages procurable from the use of Hatton defecators as follows: cold liming; heating gently to the temperature required to coagulate the albumen and not beyond it, whereby disturbance would ensue; the continuous separation of the scums; the gradual drying of the scums so as to make them ready for the fields, without carrying away juice or requiring treatment in filter presses; and the continuous supply of hot defecated juice to the evaporators, without the use of subsiding tanks or eliminators; and, finally, the saving in expenditure on plant, such as filter presses, &c., and wages.

  • They consist of tanks or cisterns fitted with " heads " from which a number of bags of specially woven cloth are suspended in a suitable manner, and into which the melted sugar or liquor to be filtered flows from the melting pans.

  • In a refinery in Nova Scotia a system has been introduced by which a travelling crane above the bag filters lifts up any head bodily with all its bags attached, and runs it to the mud and washing tanks at the end of the battery, while another similar crane drops another head, fitted with fresh bags, into the place of the one just removed.

  • The filtered liquors, being collected in the various service tanks according to their qualities, are drawn up into the vacuum pans and boiled to crystals.

  • Among the most famous remains of Ma'rib are those of a great dike reminding one of the restored tanks familiar to visitors at Aden.

  • Above it was a series of three tanks (A Journey through the Yemen, p. 279, aondon, 1893).

  • After filtration the water is pumped to the storage tanks.

  • Water everywhere abounds, and is supplied to the shipping by means of tanks.

  • He suggested the use of experimental tanks for testing the powers of ship models, invented an ear-trumpet for the deaf, improved the common house-stove of his native land, cured smoky chimneys, took a lively interest in machine-guns and even sketched a flying machine.

  • pp. 354 and 474) in connexion with the production of hypochlorites and chlorates in tanks without diaphragms, by C. Haussermann and W.

  • They cannot endure captivity, dying in the course of two or three days, even when kept in capacious tanks.

  • After charging, the barrel is rotated, and when the chlorination is complete the contents are emptied on a filter of quartz or some similar material, and the filtrate led to settling tanks.

  • After settling the solution is run into the precipitating tanks.

  • The precipitation is carried out in tanks or vats made with"wooden sides and a cement bottom.

  • The supernatant liquid is led into settling tanks, where a further amount of "gold is deposited, r and is then filtered through sawdust or sand, the sawdust being afterwards burnt and the gold separated from the ashes and the sand treated in the chloridizing vat.

  • The liquors are run off from the vats to the electrolysing baths or precipitating tanks, and the leached ores are removed by means of doors in the sides of the vats into wagons.

  • Some 45 tanks were available, and owing to the absence of some of the corps artillery only 600 guns covered the advance.

  • Five hundred gun's and 45 tanks were detailed off to assist.

  • Twenty-three tanks joined in the attack, which was preceded by no bombardment but was covered by the fire of 978 guns.

  • This was enhanced by the fact that only in certain sectors where the canal passed under the Bellicourt tunnel was it possible to employ tanks, of which some 130 were allotted to the left of the IX.

  • Notwithstanding the large number of streams, the depression of their channels and height of their banks render them for the most part unsuitable for the purposes of irrigation, - which is conducted by means of jhils and tanks.

  • Some of the tanks are of great capacity; the Barwa Sagar, for instance, is 22 m.

  • It is then removed to lead-lined tanks and again washed with water and dried; the product obtained contains about 95% of anthraquinone.

  • There is a total want of streams and wells of fresh water, and the inhabitants are dependent on the rain, which they collect and preserve in tanks.

  • Lead, copper, sulphur, orpiment, also lignite, have been found within the confines of the province; also a kind of beautiful, variegated, translucent marble, which takes a high polish, is used in the construction of palatial buildings, tanks, baths, &c., and is known as Maragha, or Tabriz marble.

  • The oil is pumped from buried tanks and warmed to about 90° F.

  • This acid is exhaled in volcanic gas, which is passed through water tanks.

  • The water supply of the city was formerly obtained from rainwater tanks on the walls or by carriage from springs a few miles inland.

  • If the rods are to be buffed they are immersed in large tanks of boiling water from 4 to 6 hours.

  • It fell com pletely into decay, and it is only of recent years that the jungle has been cleared away, the ruins laid bare, and some measure of prosperity brought back to the surrounding country by the restoration of hundreds of village tanks.

  • The most famous is the Brazen Palace erected by King Datagamana about 164 B.C. The pokunas are bathing-tanks or tanks for the supply of drinking-water, which are scattered everywhere through the jungle.

  • It flourishes best in small tanks and ponds, in which the water is constantly changing and does not freeze; in such localities, and with a full supply of food, which consists of weeds, crumbs of bread, bran, worms, small crustaceans and insects, it attains to a length of from 6 to 12 in., breeding readily, sometimes at different times of the same year.

  • Nineveh was badly supplied with water for drinking; the inhabitants had to " turn their eyes to heaven for the rain," but Sennacherib conducted water by eighteen canals from the hills into the Husur and distributed its waters round the moats and into store tanks, or ponds, within the city.

  • Tanks for fish.

  • The state sank wells and built and maintained tanks from which brine was delivered to lessees.

  • It is then run into settling tanks, from which it next passes into the evaporating pans, which are shallow leadlined pans heated by the gases of the soffioni.

  • Scorpions noted for the virulence of their poison abound as well as horse leeches in the tanks.

  • Those intended to provide bottom heat, however, are set in (a) water tanks running under the beds, or (b) in enclosed dry chambers under the beds, or are (c) embedded in the soil or plunging material.

  • After boiling about an hour, it is allowed to cool, the water is drawn off, and the oil is transferred to zinc tanks or clarifiers capable of holding from 60 to loo gallons.

  • The Jumna and the Ganges enclose within their angle a fertile tract well irrigated with tanks and wells.

  • It contains bathing-stairs, tanks and wells, and a great number of handsome temples, of which the finest is that of Govind Deva, a cruciform vaulted building of red sandstone, dating from 1590.

  • In the jungles of Ceylon are to be found remains of gigantic irrigation dams, and on the neighbouring mainland of Southern India, throughout the provinces of Madras and Mysore, the country is covered with irrigation reservoirs, or, as they are locally termed, tanks.

  • It may safely be said that at no time in history were there more tanks in operation than at present.

  • The ruins which are seen are the ruins of long centuries of tanks that once flourished and became silted up. But they did not all flourish at once.

  • The Periyar scheme has for its object both the addition of new irrigation and the safeguarding of that which exists in the district of Madura, a plain watered by means of a great number of shallow tanks drawing their supply from a very uncertain river, the Vaigai.

  • In other cases tanks are fed from neighbouring streams, and the greatest ingenuity is displayed in preventing the precious water from going to waste.

  • These streams are all dry during the hot season, but in the rains they flow freely and replenish the numerous tanks and irrigation channels.

  • In cases where the atmospheric conditions are suitable the brine is run into large tanks and concentrated merely by solar heat, or it may be caused to trickle over faggots arranged under large open sheds called " graduation houses " (Gradirh¢user), whereby a more extensive surface of evaporation is obtained and the brine becomes rapidly concentrated.

  • The thin watery "slip" or slurry flows into large settling tanks ("backs") where the solids in suspension are deposited; the water is drawn off, leaving behind an intimate mixture of chalk and clay in the form of a wet paste.

  • In the cold season ice is frequently seen in the small tanks at an elevation of about 2000 ft.

  • Gossage to the condensation of hydrochloric acid, are still nearly everywhere in use, frequently combined with a number of stone tanks through which the gas from the furnaces travels before entering the towers, meeting on its way the acid condensed in the tower.

  • It consists of a number of tanks or " vats," placed at the same level and connected by pipes which reach nearly to the bottom of one tank and open out at the top into the next tank.

  • Tepid water is run in at one end of the series, where nearly exhausted black-ash is present; the weak liquor takes up more soda from the intermediate tanks and at last gets up to full strength in the last tank, charged with fresh black-ash and kept at a higher temperature, viz.

  • In France the crystallization of soda is performed not in large tanks but in sheet-iron dishes holding only about 4 cwt., and requires only from 27 to 48 hours in the cool season; it is not carried on at all in warmer climates during the summer months.

  • A hot, concentrated solution of the alkaline chloride is treated by the electric current in large iron tanks which at the same time serve as cathodes.

  • Broadly speaking the salt consumed in India is derived from four sources: (1) importation by sea, chiefly from England and the Red Sea and Aden; (2) solar evaporation in shallow tanks along the seaboard; (3) the salt lakes in Rajputana; (4) quarrying in the salt hills of the northern Punjab.

  • In Bombay and Madras almost all the irrigation systems, except in the deltas of the chief rivers, are dependent on reservoirs or " tanks," which collect the rainfall of the adjacent hills.

  • In Sind and the Punjab there are many canals which act merely as distributaries of the overflow of the great rivers at the time of inundation; but where the utility of the canals has been increased by permanent headworks the supply of water is perennial and practically inexhaustible, thus contrasting favourably with the less certain protection given by tanks.

  • Within the castle is an artesian well, the only water-supply, save that collected in rain tanks, on the island.

  • The normal annual means on Indio, Mammoth Tanks, Salton and Volcano Springs are from 73.9° to 78.4 F.; the monthly means from 52.8° to 101.3° (frequently 95° to 98°).

  • The town has many large tanks and an English church, built in 1875.

  • Before sending out, it is usually stored in settling tanks for a few weeks, during which time the uncombined dryers settle at the bottom as ” foots."

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