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talent

talent

talent Sentence Examples

  • "Very nice talent," he said.

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  • His talent is for narrative and description.

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  • "It's a byproduct of his talent," Dusty said.

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  • Whatever Natural talent she had, she'd somehow turned her brother from a vamp back into a human.

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  • My talent lies with the mind.

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  • The new essays in this volume were mostly critical, but one of them, in which perhaps his guessing talent is seen at its best, "The Divisions of the Irish Family," is an elaborate discussion of a problem which has long puzzled both Celtic scholars and jurists; and in another, "On the Classificatory System of Relationship," he propounded a new explanation of a series of facts which, he thought, might throw light upon the early history of society, at the same time putting to the test of those facts the theories he had set forth in Primitive Marriage.

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  • So, Elisabeth gets her musical talent from you.

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  • He had a considerable talent for this work and was often employed on similar occasions.

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  • All the best of me belongs to her--there is not a talent, or an aspiration or a joy in me that has not been awakened by her loving touch.

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  • We test them to see what the talent is and where to assign them.

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  • After being educated at the high school of Edinburgh and at Durham, he attended the literary and law classes at the university of Edinburgh, and becoming in 1810 a member of the Edinburgh faculty of advocates, he for some time enjoyed the intimate acquaintance of Cockburn, Jeffrey, Scott and other distinguished men whose talent then lent lustre to the Scottish bar.

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  • Her talent is the ability to move in stealth mode.

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  • Her talent is the ability to move in stealth mode.

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  • He'd never thought much of that talent, the ability to see into someone.

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  • "Dean," he said, "not much talent but a lot of hustle.

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  • "Dean," he said, "not much talent but a lot of hustle.

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  • Such superb self-confidence can accomplish much, and it undoubtedly helped to form Fustel's talent and to give to his style that admirable concision which subjugates even when it fails to convince; but a student instinctively distrusts an historian who settles the most controverted problems with such impassioned assurance.

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  • In his episcopal capacity he attended several diets of the empire, as well as the opening meetings of the council of Trent; and the influence of his father, now chancellor, led to his being entrusted with many difficult and delicate pieces of public business, in the execution of which he developed a rare talent for diplomacy, and at the same time acquired an intimate acquaintance with most of the currents of European politics.

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  • Augustus, who showed neither talent nor inclination for government, was content to leave Poland under the influence of Russia, and Saxony to the rule of his ministers.

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  • You were only inattentive, but you had talent--oh yes, you had talent!

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  • In 1730 he entered the Mazarin College under the Jansenists, who soon perceived his exceptional talent, and, prompted perhaps by a commentary on the Epistle to the Romans which he produced in the first year of his philosophical course, sought to direct it to theology.

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  • "Good you have a talent, or your skinny hide would be in trouble," Speck replied, amused.

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  • From his youth he was diligent in his studies and a great reader, and during his college life showed a marked talent for extemporaneous speaking.

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  • Ayala persuaded his sister to appear as the heroine of his comedy, La primera Dama, and the innovation, if it scandalized some of his townsmen, permitted him to develop his talent more freely.

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  • This exclusiveness naturally strengthened the popularity and power of the districts, where energy and talent found a scope elsewhere denied.

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  • In both fields he displayed much talent, and by writing his Synopsis of the Indian Tribes within the United States East of the Rocky Mountains and in the British and Russian Possessions in North America (1836), and by founding the American Ethnological Society of New York in 1842, he earned the title of "Father of American Ethnology."

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  • "I know this is the peculiar talent which God has given me."

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  • But nothing save a very great talent could have shown itself so receptive.

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  • In a temperate and learned speech, based on Fox's declaration against constitution-mongering, he supported both the enfranchising and the disfranchising clauses, and easily disposed of the cries of "corporation robbery," "nabob representation," "opening for young men of talent," &c. The following year (1832) found Campbell solicitor-general, a knight and member for Dudley, which he represented till 1834.

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  • He showed extraordinary energy, resource and military talent in stemming the advance of the royalists, who now followed up their victories by advancing into the association; he defeated them at Gainsborough on the 28th of July, and managed a masterly retreat before overwhelming numbers to Lincoln, while the victory on the 11th of October at Winceby finally secured the association, and maintained the wedge which prevented the junction of the royalists in the north with the king in the south.

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  • The last prince of the house of Saman, Montasir, a bold warrior and a poet of no mean talent, carried on for some years a kind of guerilla warfare against both Mahmud and the Ilek Khan, who had occupied Transoxiana, till he was assassinated in 1005 (395 A.H.).

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  • Impelled by his convictions and talent, supported by the emperor Napoleon III.

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  • She almost equalled her husband in knowledge, and infinitely excelled him in talent and in tact.

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  • Waiting for professional business, he was content to act as court crier for two dollars and a half a day; but he soon gave indications of his talent, and his studious habits and attention to his cases rapidly brought him clients.

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  • Among the other writers previous to the Revolution mention must be made of John Ray the botanist and of John Evelyn, both men of great talent and research, whose works are still in high estimation.

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  • She almost equalled her husband in knowledge, and infinitely excelled him in talent and in tact.

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  • Afewyearsafter Constantinople passed into the hands of the Ottomans, some ghazels, the work of the contemporary Tatar prince, Mir `Ali Shir, who under the nom de plume of Nevayi wrote much that shows true talent and poetic feeling, found their way to the Ottoman capital, where they were seen and copied by Ahmed Pasha, one of the viziers of Mahommed II.

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  • That readiness will not weaken in me, but I and Russia have a right to expect from you all the zeal, firmness, and success which your intellect, military talent, and the courage of the troops you command justify us in expecting.

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  • He cursed the talent that initially drew him to her, forced to wait for the fog to clear.

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  • He cursed the talent that initially drew him to her, forced to wait for the fog to clear.

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  • His talent enabled him to weld together the mixed southern clans which became incorporated under Judah, and to build up a monarchy which represented the highest conception of national life possible under the circumstances.

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  • There is a legend that William Pitt the younger thought of her; the somewhat notorious lover of Mlle de Lespinasse, Guibert, a cold-hearted coxcomb of some talent, certainly paid her addresses.

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  • "Ah, Countess," he said at last, "that's a European talent, she has nothing to learn--what softness, tenderness, and strength...."

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  • In the 17th century we find Ludovico Sergardi (Quinto Settano), a Latinist and satirical writer of much talent and culture; but the most original and brilliant figure in Sienese literature is that of Girolamo Gigli (1660-1722), author of the Gazzettino, La Sorellina di Don Pilone, Il Vocabolario cateriniano and the Diario ecclesiastico.

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  • Even in an imitative artist such precocity of talent is remarkable, and the date is therefore open to legitimate doubt.

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  • In the 17th century we find Ludovico Sergardi (Quinto Settano), a Latinist and satirical writer of much talent and culture; but the most original and brilliant figure in Sienese literature is that of Girolamo Gigli (1660-1722), author of the Gazzettino, La Sorellina di Don Pilone, Il Vocabolario cateriniano and the Diario ecclesiastico.

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  • They have no genius or talent for comparatively humble questions of taxation and finance, commerce and manufacturers and agriculture.

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  • "Or he wants to use me for my talent," she added.

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  • My guess is someone did a bit of planning for Jerome Shipton's big fall, and Edith hasn't demonstrated any real talent for long-range thinking.

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  • In spite of his absolute lack of talent, he attained the highest of positions - an exceptional fact in the history of the French Revolution.

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  • Rousseau, a fervid panegyric showing a good deal of talent but no power of criticism.

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  • "Or he wants to use me for my talent," she added.

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  • Rousseau, a fervid panegyric showing a good deal of talent but no power of criticism.

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  • It was this strange talent that warned him of something very bad.

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  • Herculano had greater book learning than Scott, but lacked descriptive talent and skill in dialogue.

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  • Having failed to form a rival party against Sagasta, Martos subsided into political insignificance, despite his great talent as an orator and debater, and died in Madrid on the 16th of January 1893.

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  • Unquestionably, an extraordinary amount of talent was present during the Renaissance.

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  • It frustrated to Betsy who spent hours on the Internet seeking the most effective uses of Howie's talent.

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  • How would have another embraced this talent?

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  • For someone who needs more power, it's a very useful talent.

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  • She'd learned to stop thinking when in the ring with him and listen to her senses, to include the mind control talent.

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  • Every Natural has a talent.

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  • She was also able to turn objects into something else, a rare talent.

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  • From her early years she showed great aptitude for study, an ardent and enthusiastic spirit, and unquestionable talent.

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  • His mother was one of a family named Winston, of Welsh descent, noted for conversational and musical talent.

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  • He was weak, vacillating and ineffective as a politician, lacking in judgment and decision, and without any great parliamentary talent.

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  • Three of the seven poets were drinking in a garden when Firdousi approached, and wishing to get rid of him without rudeness, they informed him who they were, and told him that it was their custom to admit none to their society but such as could give proof of poetical talent.

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  • According to his own account, he was the twenty-fourth of twenty-nine children, and was early remarkable for precocious talent.

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  • Albert and no doubt stood on a higher level than Anselm and Abelard, not merely by their wider range of knowledge but also by the intellectual massiveness of their achieve ments; but it may be questioned whether the earlier writers did not possess a greater force of originality and a keener talent.

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  • Slight as these sketches are, they show considerable dramatic talent and an Aristophanic wit.

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  • The four volumes of the Meditations, the Harmonies and the Recueillements, which contained the prime of his verse, are perhaps the most monotonous reading to be found anywhere in work of equal bulk by a poet of equal talent.

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  • In the early autumn of 1751 La Mettrie, one of the king's parasites, and a man of much more talent than is generally allowed, horrified Voltaire by telling him that Frederick had in conversation applied to him (Voltaire) a proverb about "sucking the orange and flinging away its skin," and about the same time the dispute with Maupertuis, which had more than anything else to do with his exclusion from Prussia, came to a head.

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  • His talent in finance won him a distinguished place in the chamber.

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  • His talent for electrical engineering was soon shown, and his progress was rapid; so that in 1852 he was appointed engineer to the Magnetic Telegraph Company, and in that capacity superintended the laying of lines in various parts of the British Isles, including in 1853 the first cable between Great Britain and Ireland, from Portpatrick to Donaghadee.

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  • `Arib of Cordova made an abridgment, adding the history of the West and continuing the story to about 975.1 Ibn 1Vlashkawaih wrote a history from the creation to 980, with the purpose of drawing the lessons of the story, following Tabari closely, as far as his book is known, and seldom recurring to other sources before the reign of Moqtadir; what follows is his own composition and shows him to be a writer of talent.

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  • Miss Sullivan, whose ability as a teacher must be considered almost as marvellous as the talent of her pupil, was throughout her devoted companion.

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  • Down to this time he had never made any pretensions to literary skill or talent, but on being approached by the Century Magazine with a request for some articles he undertook the work in order to keep the wolf from the door.

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  • Their country was rich in figs, vines and olive trees; the silver mines in the mountain range of Dysorum brought in a talent a day to their conqueror Alexander.

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  • During the medieval era of internecine strife the Buddhist priests were the sole depositaries of literary talent, and seeing that, from the close of the 14th century, the ShintO mime (Kagura) was largely employed by the military class to invo,~ce or acknowledge the assistance of the gods, the monks of Buddha set themselves to compose librettos for this mime, and the performance, thus modified, received the name of NO.

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  • It came into existence in KiOto and was thence transferred to Yedo (Tokyo), where the greatest of Japanese playwrights, Chikamatsu Monzaemon (1653-1724), and a musician of exceptional talent, Takemoto Gidayu, collaborated to render this puppet drama a highly popular entertainment.

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  • The tempestuous politics of the war and reconstruction period suited his aggressive nature and constructive talent.

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  • While in England he had made active use of his remarkable talent for pamphleteering.

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  • The specimens we possess are not devoid of talent or of a certain happy art of expression.

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  • His education was begun at the College des Quatre Nations, where he obtained a smattering of the classics; but, his artistic talent being already obvious, he was soon placed by his guardian in the studio of Francois Boucher.

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  • 4 Athens was at this time the centre of intellectual life, and could boast an almost unique galaxy of talent - Pericles, Thucydides the son of Melesias, Aspasia, Antiphon, the musician Damon, Pheidias, Protagoras, Zeno, Cratinus, Crates, Euripides and Sophocles.

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  • There is sufficient evidence that his family was of Croatian stock: a fact which throws light upon the distinctively Slavonic character of much of his music. He received the first rudiments of education from his father, a wheelwright with twelve children, and at an early age evinced a decided musical talent.

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  • Moreover, his commanding qualities were coupled with an organizing talent which made itself felt in every department of the state, and with a marvellous adaptability which made him an ideal diplomatist.

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  • His personal courage and extreme affability made him highly popular among the lower orders, but he showed himself quite incapable of taking advantage permanently of the revival of the national energy, and the extraordinary overflow of native middle-class talent, which were the immediate consequences of the revolution of 1660.

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  • As a boy he showed much talent, which was carefully trained under his father's eye.

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  • But the Montagnards made up by their fanatical, or desperate, energy and boldness for what they lacked in talent or in numbers.

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  • Mickiewicz had had a predecessor, but of far less talent, Casimir Brodzinski (1791-1835).

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  • Gathered there also were a host of publicists, secretaries and courtiers, and never before had Europe witnessed such a collection of rank and talent.

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  • Here we have a first proof of his talent for romancing; for alike to two pilgrims who show him the road and to the huntsmen of Mark's court (whom he instructs in the rightful method of cutting up and disposing the quarry), Tristan invents different, and most detailed, fictions of his land and parentage.

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  • He had been introduced to Richelieu in 1623, and by his humour and his talent as a raconteur soon made himself indispensable to the cardinal.

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  • Thus foot, digit, palm, cubit, stadium, mile, talent, mina, stater, drachm, obol, pound, ounce, grain, metretes, medimrius, modius, hin and many others mean nothing exact unless qualified by the name of their country or city.

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  • By the theory of maris 1/5 of 20.6 cubed is 1755; by maris = Assyrian talent, 1850, in place of 1850 or 1980 stated above; hence the more likely theory of weight, rather than cubit, connexion is nearer to the facts.

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  • The theories of connexion give, for the value of the cotyle, metretes = Aeginetan talent --

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  • and the other system double of this in each stage except the talent.

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  • This is the system of the "Babylonian" talent, by Herodotus = 70 minae Euboic, by Pollux = 70 minae Attic, by Aelian = 72 minae Attic, and, therefore, about 470,000 grains.

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  • In Syria, as early as the 15th century B.C., the tribute of the Rutennu, of Naharaina, Megiddo, Anaukasa, &c. (34), is on a basis of 454-484 kats, or 300 shekels (1/10 talent) of 226 grains.

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  • The talent was of 120 minae of 5400, or 3000 shekels, shown by the talent from Herculaneum, TA, 660,000 and by the weight inscribed PONDO CXXV.

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  • talent of 3000 shekels (2) (the M being omitted; just as Epiphanius describes this talent as 125 librae, or θ (=9) nomismata, for 9000).

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  • The Alexandrian talent of Festus, 12,000 denarii, is the same talent again.

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  • Then Attic: Euboic or Aeginetan :: 18:25 in the metrologists (2), and the Euboic talent = 7000 "Alexandrian" drachmae; the drachma therefore is 80.0.

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  • The "Alexandrian" wood talent: Attic talent:: 6:5 (Hero, Didymus), and therefore 480,000, which is 60 minae of 8000.

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  • Pliny states the Egyptian talent at 80 librae = 396,000; evidently = the Abydus lion talent, which is divided by 100, and the mina is therefore 3960, or 50 x 79.2.

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  • The largest weight is the "wood" talent of Syria (18) = 6 Roman talents, or 1,860,000, evidently 120 Antioch minae of 15,500 or 2 x 7750.

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  • It also passed into Italy, but in a smaller multiple of 35 drachmae, or 1/4th of the Greek mina; 12 Italian weights (44) bearing value marks (which cannot therefore be differently attributed) show a libra of 2400 or 1/4th of 9600, which was divided in unciae and sextulae, and the full-sized mina is known as the 24 uncia mina, or talent of 120 librae of Vitruvius and Isidore (18) = 9900.

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  • The 80-grain system, as we have seen, was probably formed by binarily dividing the 10 shekels, or "stone"; and it had a talent (Abydus lion) of 5000 drachmae; this is practically identical with the talent of 6000 Attic drachmae.

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  • So the talent of the 80-grain system was sexagesimally divided for the mina which was afterwards adopted by Solon.

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  • In literature it is constantly referred to; but we may notice the "general mina" (Cleopatra), in Egypt, 16 unciae=6600; the Ptolemaic talent, equal to the Attic in weight and divisions (Hero, Didymus); the Antiochian talent, equal to the Attic (Hero); the treaty of the Romans with Antiochus, naming talents of 80 librae, i.e.

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  • His work was destroyed,' but the copious extracts which we find in Lactantius, Augustine, Jerome, Macarius Magnus and others show how profoundly he had studied the Christian writings, and how great ' was his talent for real historical research.

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  • His early mastery of classical literature led him to the study of classic monuments in classic lands, while his equally conspicuous talent for mathematics gave him the laws of form and proportion in architectural design.

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  • Young men of talent, on the contrary, found his instruction most stimulating, and after Bowditch's death in 1838 Peirce stood first among American mathematicians.

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  • After a brief reign, characterized, it is said, by dignity and talent, he died in July 1274, suffocated, according to the generally received accounts, by his own fat.

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  • This masterpiece of historiography was composed in 1225 or 1226 by a professional poet of talent at the request of William, son of the marshal.

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  • Educated at the Boulogne municipal college, where he distinguished himself and showed much artistic talent, he went to England in 1839 when eighteen as professor of French and drawing at a boys' school at Stratford-on-Avon.

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  • Alford was a not inconsiderable artist, as his picture-book, The Riviera (1870), shows, and he had abundant musical and mechanical talent.

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  • His brilliant talent, which seems to have been formed by the influence of that world of statues with which Louis XIV.

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  • While still a youth his talent became known to Sulpicius Severus, who had estates in that neighbourhood, and in 395 Sulpicius, who probably baptized him, sent him with letters to Paulinus of Nola, where he met with a friendly reception.

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  • The grand pensionary was nominally the paid servant of the States of Holland, but his functions were such as to permit a man of talent and industry in the stadholderless republic to exercise control in all departments of policy and of government.

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  • Scaliger called him "a povertystricken talent, slow in operation; his work is very commonplace; he aped his father."

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  • It was this lack of native talent which compelled Gustavus frequently to employ the services of foreign adventurers like Berent von Mehlen, John von Hoja, Konrad von Pyhy and others.

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  • He became a candidate for the Illinois House of Representatives; and on the 9th of March 1832 issued an address "To the people of Sangamon county" which betokens talent and education far beyond mere ability to "read, write and cipher," though in its preparation he seems to have had the help of a friend.

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  • To this fact is largely due the excellence of the Germans in grandiose decorative painting and sculpture, a talent for the exercise of which plenty of scope has been given them by the numerous public buildings and memorials raised since the war of 1870.

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  • What chiefly wounded him was a cruel review in Blackwood, written in the worst style of unreasoning abuse; but the enthusiasm of private friends, together with their wiser criticism, did much to help him and to foster his talent.

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  • Louis Francois Joseph, prince de Conti (1734-1814), son of the preceding, possessed considerable talent as a soldier, and distinguished himself during the Seven Years' War.

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  • So long as the centre of the Islamic world was not in Egypt, the best talent was attracted elsewhere; but after the fall of Bagdad, Cairo became the chief seat of Islamic learning, and this rank, chiefly owing to the university of Azhar, it has ever since continued to maintain.

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  • In future all posts in Egypt were to be open to all classes of the inhabitants; the conduct of affairs was to be committed to the men of talent, virtue, and learning; and in proof of the statement that the French were sincere Moslems the overthrow of the papal authority in Rome was alleged.

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  • The Enevaelde, or absolute monarchy, also distinctly benefited the whole Danish state by materially increasing its reserve of native talent.

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  • Hans Tausen, the bishop of Ribe (1494-1561), continued Pedersen's work, but with far less literary talent.

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  • The number of writers of some talent was very great, but genius was wanting.

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  • The early death of Ole Samsoe (1759-1796) prevented the development of a dramatic talent that gave rare promise.

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  • His talent reached its height in the novel called Little Folk (1880), a most admirable study of lower middle-class life in Copenhagen.

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  • Kaalund (1818-1885), Carl Ploug (1813-1894) and Christian Richardt (1831-1892), of very great talent, were not yet silent, and among the veteran novelists were still active H.

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  • The principal theatres are liberally open to fresh dramatic talent of every kind, and the great fondness of the Danes for this form of entertainment gives unusual scope for experiments in halls or private theatres; nothing is too eccentric to hope to obtain somewhere a fair hearing.

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  • She had shown precocious talent, and was sent to the school at Haddington where Edward Irving (q.v.) was a master.

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  • Neither can the London silversmiths, though they employed the best talent available, particularly in the decade following the Great Exhibition of 1851, be credited with much influencing the art metal revival.

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  • In 1858 he was appointed traffic manager to the Compagnie de Chemins de fer du Midi, a post in which he gave proof of his remarkable talent for organization, and in 1862 returned to the engineering service (in which he attained in 1886 the rank of inspector-general).

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  • His orthodoxy was, however, unimpeachable, his talent conspicuous, and in 1761 he was appointed lecturer on biblical exegesis, and preacher (Katechet) at the church of St Peter..

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  • In the early days of Greece the Argives enjoyed high repute for their musical talent.

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  • Having given promise of mathematical talent he was sent to the Ecole Centrale of Fontainebleau, and was fortunate in having a kind and sympathetic teacher, M.

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  • Lagrange, whose lectures on the theory of functions he attended at the Rcole Polytechnique, early recognized his talent, and became his friend; while P. S.

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  • That this has for centuries been regarded as the main route northward from Kabul, the Buddhist relics of Bamian and Haibak bear silent witness; but it may be doubted whether Abdur Rahman's talent for roadmaking has not opened out better alternative lines.

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  • He had a ready purse for men of talent, drawing them from England, Scotland, Italy, Spain and Portugal.

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  • The old divisions of nobility, clergy and people were a maintained and their mutual rivalry encouraged; the nobles were won over by titles and by the splendour of the viceregal court, but many persons of low birth who showed talent were raised to high positions.

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  • blacksmiths; skilful and intelligent workmen, such as the French and Japanese, find a wide outlet for their versatile and artistic talent.

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  • Ali was a valiant man, but had no great talent as a ruler.

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  • Turgot was struck with the talent they displayed, and by virtue of his patronage Vergniaud, having gone to Paris, was admitted to the college of Plessis.

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  • Cetywayo had inherited much of the military talent of his uncle Chaka, the organizer of the Zulu military system, and chafed under his father's peaceful policy towards his British and Boer neighbours.

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  • The year before the Revolution broke out he, with some assistance from a man of similar but lesser talent, Champcenetz, 2 compiled a lampoon, entitled Petit Almanach de nos grands hommes pour 1788, in which some writers of actual or future talent and a great many nobodies were ridiculed in the most pitiless manner.

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  • For several years Lacordaire studied at Dijon, showing a marked talent for rhetoric; this led him to the pursuit of law, and in the local debates of the advocates he attained a high celebrity.

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  • At a very early age she displayed considerable literary and artistic talent.

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  • He established schools throughout his empire for the education of both Hindus and Moslems, and he gathered round him many men of literary talent, among whom may be mentioned the brothers Feizi and Abul Fazl.

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  • From his early youth he gave promise of great military talent, and served his apprenticeship in the science of war under Zolkiewski in the Muscovite campaigns of 1610-1612, and under Chodkiewicz in 1617-1618.

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  • A study of his works reveals an unusual combination of skill and originality in the mathematical treatment of many of the most difficult problems of astronomy, an unfailing patience and sagacity in dealing with immense masses of numerical results, and a talent for observation of the highest order.

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  • The noticeable barrenness of Italian literature at this period is referable to the fact that men of genius and talent devoted themselves to erudition and struggled to express their thoughts and feelings in a speech which was not natural.

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  • From his early years he displayed an extraordinary talent and appetite for knowledge, and as soon as he had completed his own education he began to teach with distinguished success grammar, rhetoric, divinity and philosophy.

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  • His great organizing talent and oratorical power quickly made him one of the leaders of the socialists and their chief spokesman in parliament.

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  • Of singularly alert faculties, with a remarkable knowledge of the men and history of his country, and an extraordinary memory, his masterful talent for politics and state-craft, together with his captivating manner and engaging personality, gave him, for nearly two decades, an unrivalled hold upon the fealty and affection of his party.

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  • Unity and vigour were scarcely to be expected from a many-headed administration composed of men of mediocre talent whose contrary opinions speedily gave rise to contending factions.

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  • Talent had been shown by certain individuals, but no healthy school of Swedish poetry had been founded, and the latest imitators of Stjernhjelm had lost every vestige of taste and independence.

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  • It was to Fru Nordenflycht's credit that she discovered and encouraged the talent of two very distinguished poets younger than herself, Creutz and Gyllenborg, who published volumes of poetry in collaboration.

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  • This period of less than forty years was particularly Gustavian rich in literary talent, and the taste of the people Period.

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  • A polemical writer of great talent was Magnus Jakob Crusenstople (1795-1865), of whose work it has been said that " it is not history and it is not fiction, but something brilliant between the one and the other."

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  • A man of great talent, he was a violent reactionary, and suffered from the consequences of an attitude so unpopular.

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  • In 1879 the success of his realistic novel, The Red Room, fixed universal attention upon his talent.

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  • Three other volumes followed in 1894, 1895 and 1897, each displaying to further advantage the versatility and sensuous splendour of Frdding's talent, as well as its somewhat scandalous recklessness.

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  • Drama has rarely flourished in Sweden, but several of the poets mentioned above have written important plays, and, somewhat earlier, the socialistic problempieces of Anne Charlotte Edgren-Leffler, duchess of Cajanello (1849-1893), possessed considerable dramatic talent, working under a direct impulse from Ibsen; but her greatest gift was as a novelist.

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  • Halifax, however, concludes by desiring to moderate the roughness of his picture by emphasizing the excellence of his intellect and memory and his mechanical talent, by deprecating a too censorious judgment and by dwelling upon the disadvantages of his bringing up, the difficulties and temptations of his position, and on the fact that his vices were those common to human frailty.

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  • Yet even in this, his most characteristic talent, his proneness to exaggeration, the attraction which coarse and repulsive images have for his mind, and the tendency to sacrifice general effect to minuteness of detail not infrequently mar his best effects.

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  • Large numbers settled in Holland, where their commercial talent afterwards greatly assisted the Dutch in their rivalry with the Portuguese.

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  • - Though no literary documents belonging to the first century of Portuguese history have survived, there is, evidence that an indigenous popular poetry both Poetry sacred and profane existed, and while Provencal influences moulded the manifestations of poetical talent for nearly two hundred years, they did not originate them.

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  • Speaking generally, the cancioneiros form monotonous reading owing to their poverty of ideas and conventionality of metrical forms and expression, but here and there men of talent who were poets by profession and better acquainted with Provencal literature endeavoured to lend their work variety by the use of difficult processes like the lexaprem and by introducing new forms like the pastorela and the descort.

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  • In Santarem appeared Antonio Prestes, a magistrate who drew from his judicial experience but evinced more knowledge of folk-lore than dramatic talent, while Camoens himself was so far influenced by Gil Vicente, whose plays he had perhaps seen performed in Lisbon, that in spite of his Coimbra training he never exchanged the old forms for those of the classical comedy.

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  • The Relic conveys the impressions of a journey in Palestine and in parts suggests his indebtedness to Flaubert, but its mysticism is entirely new and individual; while the versatility of his talent further appears in The Correspondence of Fradique Mendes, where acute observation is combined with brilliant satire or rich humour.

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  • Some earlier stories, such as The Wheels of Chance (1896) and Love and Mr Lewisham (1900), had proved his talent for drawing character, and pure phantasies like The War of the Worlds (1898) his abundant invention; but Kipps (1905) and Tono-Bungay (1909) showed a great advance in artistic power.

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  • His talent for experimental research was utilized in investigation into improvements of the army rifle, and he was largely responsible for starting the Hythe School of Musketry.

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  • Her best-known story, Mrs Keith's Crime (1885), was followed by several other volumes, the best of which is Aunt Anne (1893); and the literary talent in the family was inherited by her daughter Ethel (Mrs Fisher Dilke), a writer of some charming verse.

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  • In spite of her talent for government she went far to hasten the empire's, downfall by her unbounded extravagance, and made the dynasty unpopular by her open profligacy, which went unpunished but for one short term of banishment.

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  • Moreover, he had no very pronounced political ambition, and was an utter stranger to that longing for power, which drives so many men of talent to adopt extreme expedients.

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  • His peculiar talent, comparable in many respects to that of the so-called "calculating boys," was not combined with any exceptional measure of intellectual power, and produced nothing of permanent value.

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  • His victories were counterbalanced by numerous defeats, sustained by his subordinates, and his lack of statesmanlike talent prevented his securing the loyalty of his subjects.

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  • During this march he displayed an amount of engineering skill in the construction of roads, of military talent and fertility of resource, that excited the admiration and astonishment of his enemies.

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  • The principal editor of his posthumous writings was his son, John Donne the younger (1604-1662), a man of eccentric and scandalous character, but of considerable talent.

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  • In order the better to qualify himself for this appointment, he went to Europe (May 15th, 1826) and spent three years and a half travelling in France, Italy, Spain, Germany, Holland and England, learning languages, for which he had unusual talent, and drinking in the spirit of the history and life of these countries.

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  • Among the most favourable specimens of his talent may be mentioned En el puno de la espada (1875); 0 locura o santidad (1877), which has been translated into Swedish and Italian; En el seno de la muerte (1879), of which there exists an admirable German version by Fastenrath.

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  • He was the founder of the first political and literary review, and he had a genius for discovering talent, and the merit of assisting it.

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  • Whatever the causes may have been, the fact remains, that now there is a great dearth of talent and great poverty in output.

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  • In music and painting there have been artists of talent in the Cape Colony, but the country is still too young, and the conditions of life too disturbed, to allow such a development as has already occurred in Australia.

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  • shakal, to weigh), originally a Jewish unit of weight (5 1 r, of a mina, and 3 o aj of a talent) and afterwards a coin of the same weight.

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  • He may be allowed a talent for religious matters, but he possessed not the genius which Buddha undoubtedly had..

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  • Canning, who had the best reason for knowing, defended the unreformed system on the ground that its very anomalies opened a variety of paths by which talent could make its way into parliament, and thus produced an assembly far more widely representative than could be expected from a more uniform and logical system.

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  • He was a man of great natural talent, with an imposing presence, and he always bore himself like the aristocrat he was.

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  • He was the only rebel leader in the Mutiny who showed any conspicuous military talent.

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  • The Right Centre, sometimes called the Monarchiens,were a large body and included several men of talent, notably Mounier and Malouet, as well as many men of rank and wealth.

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  • Inferior to these men in talent, Brissot de Warville, a restless pamphleteer, exerted more influence over the party which has sometimes gone by his name.

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  • Every calling and profession was made free to all French citizens, and in the public service the principle of an open career for talent was adopted.

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  • They show exceptional talent and industry, but their value is impaired by the spirit of system and by strong prepossessions.

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  • At this period the unequal and uncertain talent of Cooper would seem to have been at its best.

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  • He did not shrink from any of the consequences of thin theory, for he would give the same remuneration to the worst mason as to a Phidias; but he looks forward also to a period in human development when the present inequality in the talent and capacity of men would be reduced to an inappreciable minimum.

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  • In his later years he gave much of his time and talent to the interests of children, editing papers for boys and dedicating hundreds of his finest songs to children.

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  • In the meantime the provinces of the Netherlands had revolted against the arbitrary and oppressive Spanish rule, and Don John of Austria, who had been sent as governorgeneral to restore order, had found himself helpless in face of the superior talent and personal influence of the prince of Orange, who had succeeded in uniting all the provinces in common resistance to the civil and religious tyranny of Philip. In the autumn of 1577 Farnese was sent to join Don John at the head of reinforcements, and it was mainly his prompt decision at a critical moment that won the battle of Gemblours (1578).

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  • He was an able man, with a special talent for finance, free from all taint of personal corruption, and sincerely solicitous for the honour of Athens, but enslaved to popularity, and without principles of policy.

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  • Gaj was a poet of considerable talent, and one of the founders of Croatian journalism.

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  • His talent as a boy attracted the attention of George Dance, junior, the architect, who with other friends helped him on.

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  • being markedly superior to Louis in political resource, military talent and energy.

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  • Of talent there was enough and to spare in the Assembly; what was conspicuously lacking was common sense and a practical knowledge of affairs.

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  • Many of its members were sons of the bourgeoisie, men who having been educated at college, thanks to some charitablt, agency, in the pride of learning, and raised above their original station, were ready for anything but had achieved nothing They bad plenty of talent at c0mmand, were full of classical tirades against tyranny, and, though sensitive enough in their private life, were bloodthirsty butchers in their public relations.

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  • At the head of the former type Robespierre, without special knowledge or exceptional talent, devoured by jealous ambition and gifted with cold grave eloquence, enjoyed a great moral ascendancy, due to his incorruptible purity of life and the invariably correct behaviour that had been wanting in Mirabeau, and by the persevering will which Danton had lacked.

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  • Finally, there was no real government on the part of the five directors: La Rvellire-Lpeaux, an honest man but weak; Reubell, the negotiator of the Hague; Letourneur, an officer of talent; Barras, a man of intrigue, corrupt and without real convictions; and Carnot, the only really worthy member.

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  • But his nature was cold, unsympathetic and calculating, combined with a talent for intrigue, to which was added an excellent memory and a ready wit.

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  • The battle of Sacile, where he fought against the Austrian army of the Archduke John, did not yield proofs of military talent on the part of Eugene or of Macdonald; but on the retreat of the enemy into Austrian territory (owing to the disasters of their main army on the Danube) Eugene's forces pressed them vigorously and finally won an important victory at Raab in the heart of the Austrian empire.

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  • (4) In this discourse the author treats of the ideas which are attached to such words as genius, imagination, talent, taste, good sense, &c. The only original ideas in his system are those of the natural equality of intelligences and the omnipotence of education, neither of which, however, is generally accepted, though both were prominent in the system of J.

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  • Moreover, his preferences for at least an aristocratic republic were shared by many other men of talent.

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  • He gave early proofs of rare talent, and after studying at the university of Pavia he passed as doctor of law in 1789.

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  • I awoke to the meaning of the words talent, fame, celebrity."

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  • It was another principle that his chief exertions should be bestowed on the intermediate class of talent, as the geniuses would help themselves, and the dunces were beyond remedy.

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  • It frustrated to Betsy who spent hours on the Internet seeking the most effective uses of Howie's talent.

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  • How would have another embraced this talent?

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  • Whatever Natural talent she had, she'd somehow turned her brother from a vamp back into a human.

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  • "Good you have a talent, or your skinny hide would be in trouble," Speck replied, amused.

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  • "It's a byproduct of his talent," Dusty said.

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  • For someone who needs more power, it's a very useful talent.

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  • Of what use is this type of talent?

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  • He'd almost forgotten that the word for Oracle in his native tongue also meant soul-reader, the dual nature of a woman whose talent allowed her to see a person's soul and future with a simple touch.

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  • She was getting a better grip on her newfound talent and was now able to predict the winner of their rounds—without flashes of their deaths.

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  • Sometimes we find Naturals, humans with the ability to track Czerno's creatures or to heal our kind or some other natural talent.

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  • He'd never thought much of that talent, the ability to see into someone.

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  • What little talent he'd possessed, he disguised in hard work and determination until he'd risen to his zenith—mediocrity.

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  • Randy is a sharp kid—man—with a bushel full of talent and the brains to go with it.

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  • My talent lies with the mind.

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  • "Rather, doing nothing is my apparent talent," she clarified.

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  • "Very nice talent," he said.

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  • My guess is someone did a bit of planning for Jerome Shipton's big fall, and Edith hasn't demonstrated any real talent for long-range thinking.

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  • So, Elisabeth gets her musical talent from you.

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  • She'd learned to stop thinking when in the ring with him and listen to her senses, to include the mind control talent.

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  • It was this strange talent that warned him of something very bad.

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  • You use your talent to help me, and I leave your family alone.

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  • An unmistakable Natural with a unique talent, she was likely in the Guardians' databases.

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  • Every Natural has a talent.

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  • We test them to see what the talent is and where to assign them.

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  • She was also able to turn objects into something else, a rare talent.

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  • She expressed disdain at the adulation the industry gives to beauty over talent.

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  • Heller's surprising ability to get into the mind of a middle-aged spinster also illustrates her strong talent for imaginative empathy.

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  • His talent is at the top of the range for an amateur film maker.

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  • Passionate about football, Derrick focused on his natural talent for the game of basketball.

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  • Look out for prodigious talent Mark Allen in the semi finals.

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  • His talent is quite prodigious and we are looking forward seeing him at this level where I am sure he will be very effective.

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  • He was very accident-prone child with a particular talent for head injuries that would have most parents investigated these days!

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  • On the field, the young crop of talent continued to make excellent progress, with notable achievements at all levels.

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  • appreciative of the help we've received from the Royal Navy through HMS Talent.

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  • Outstanding levels of performance in areas such as memory, chess, sports or music are commonly ascribed to innate talent.

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  • assiduous observer of culture, he showed precocious artistic talent and fierce ambition.

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  • The open audition threw up lots of great talent.

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  • Sarah helped cook bangers and mash before displaying another talent as a Spice Girl during the evening's entertainment.

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  • bear witness to a glorious past, characterized by a talent for living life to the fullest.

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  • bear witness to a glorious past, characterized by a talent for living life to the fullest.

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  • blessed with a great talent in the area.

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  • Ellenâs artistic talent blossomed during her marriage to Edward.

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  • It's a tremendous boon to the ego, to your sense of self-reliance, to your feeling about your own talent.

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  • Now the former headhunter wants not only to keep Polish talent in Poland, but to reverse the brain drain.

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  • brimming with talent.

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  • brimful of talent.

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  • It was at Cambridge that Armitage found his talent for writing catchy, jolly tunes that were popular with his fellow undergraduates.

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  • But poetry is not her only talent - she is also a riveting cabaret chanteuse, entertaining with her own brand of twisted tunes.

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  • He was 46 and a friend for almost 25 years â a research chemist of great talent and an atheist.

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  • managers coddled him for his talent and he eased into superstardom without the correcting influence of a need to be liked.

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  • comedic talent in just a look than most comic actors working in Hollywood today.

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  • His natural talent threw the crowd into a frenzy, resulting in a night of laugh-out-loud comedy.

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  • The recent report shows that, in a fierce global competition for the best talent, the UK is in danger of losing.

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  • He later developed a taste for secular music and entered numerous talent contests, eventually landing a record deal with Fantasy in 1968.

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  • creative talent.

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  • It celebrates the DC athletes who risk life and limb as the ultimate culmination of team talent in the action sports community.

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  • dearth of creative talent in the wake of the Cambodian genocide.

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  • Each is expertly designed by Claire, an experienced cake decorator with natural artistic flair and an inspired talent for sugarcraft.

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  • Our immigration bureaucracies enforce destitution, separate families and waste talent.

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  • directorial talent.

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  • double-header finale gives spectators the chance to see some of Scotland's brightest sporting talent in action.

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  • eagle-eyed TV viewers will have spotted him last year on Missy Elliott's " Road To Stardom " talent competition.

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  • emergeteam was a mixture of young emerging talent and experienced ` old timers ' .

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  • encouraging to see the talent coming through, an excellent group of couples.

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  • exceptional talent, " he says.

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  • There is every reason to feel excited about the film, however, given the wealth of talent involved.

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  • exodus of talent to regions where the money may then accumulate to.

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  • faithless one, a young man of great talent of whom I was very fond.

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  • Above everything else, of course, he brings his own talent; we all know he's a very fast driver.

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  • Talent Circle The UK's only completely free resource for the community of emerging independent filmmakers, crew & artists.

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  • filmographyppointing. * Talent Files - Text based filmographies and biographies for the major cast and crew.

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  • But my midfield foursome is completed on the right side by the attacking talent of Kaka.

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  • freakish talent, Saratoga may have suffused Sheikh Mohammed with a hazardous sense of vindication.

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  • There is also a dearth of creative talent in the wake of the Cambodian genocide.

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  • Library News On 4 th July the library hosted an author visit from an exciting talent writing in the fantasy genre, Oisin McGann.

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  • gifted with a talent for digital art, which has proved quite popular.

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  • God-given talent.

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  • The other talent we remember Lara for is her ability to shoot people whilst bouncing around like an Olympic gymnast on game day.

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  • Now the former headhunter wants not only to keep Polish talent in Poland, but to reverse the brain drain.

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  • hidden talent for drumming.

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  • histrionic talent displayed by the brothers at the annual Theodore Roosevelt reunion.

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  • homegrown talent in favor of foreign signings.

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  • Almiro has been most selective on your behalf; choosing to display mostly homegrown artistic talent for you.

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  • honed the talent of Queens ' 2nd and 3rd teams, but as yet 1st round fixtures have not been played.

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  • hotbed of talent in the Horror genre.

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  • Asian cinema is becoming the new hotbed of talent in the Horror genre.

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  • More than just a groundbreaking shopping experience, the Quiggins Center is a long-established hothouse for Liverpool's creative talent.

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  • A very hyperactive comedian, whose talent lies in the delivery.

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  • The frustrating thing for Doherty's fans is that beneath all the tabloid hysteria lies a genuine talent.

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  • His talent was recognized by American impresario Colonel Bateman who promptly whisked him off to the Lyceum Theater where he made his name.

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  • inborn talent.

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  • incredible musical talent, who is not afraid to experiment with genres.

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  • Throughout the term lessons are taught to whole classes - 30 beginner instrumentalists grappling with their newfound talent is a sight to behold!

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  • labourible supply of talent Strong local labor forces have been a major draw.

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  • Now, finally, they've reached a landmark that should draw attention from anyone who cares about homegrown talent.

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  • We have lost valuable talent from almost every base and every occupational specialty, including mission-critical linguists and infantry men.

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  • lookout for new talent.

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  • losers in the war for talent?

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  • He is a very pious man and regularly prays to God for that rare talent needed to become a musical maestro of reknown.

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  • Another hidden talent was his skill in making marmalade to a secret family recipe.

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  • Martha burk how strong players the amazing talent.

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  • maverick talent, one worth treasuring.

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  • A waste of talent is always tragic, and there can only be hope his next offering can rise above such mediocrity.

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  • middle-aged spinster also illustrates her strong talent for imaginative empathy.

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  • One of the authors most popular and widely read books, marrying the mistress shows Joanna's wonderful storytelling talent at its very best.

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  • modicum of talent he posseses.

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  • musical talent first revealed itself at a similar time.

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  • nonentity to see someone with real nurtured talent on the TV rather than vacuous celebrity nonentities.

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  • nurture emerging British music talent.

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  • nurturelub became renowned for nurturing youthful talent starting with the famous ' Busby Babes ' .

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  • nurture initiative for 2000 was the Pumphouse, an informal venue that embraces experimentation, spontaneity and nurturing of new talent.

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  • overabundance of talent who fail because they fully expect to do so.

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  • overweight teenager, by a major talent.

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  • The village pantomime is also a great addition to the celebrations; there is some amazing talent out there.

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  • Values dear in being asked to vince van patten integrated talent financing.

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  • paucity of local talent, but I am just not prepared to accept them.

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  • What a great pity to see a project with such remarkable talent vanish.

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  • playwriting talent.

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  • prance around in skimpy outfits is to distract the audience from the fact they have no musical talent.

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  • precocious talent of Stuart Green.

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  • He oozes talent while lacking pretension, improvisation is in his blood, and as a pianist, he is almost virtuosic.

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  • The television producer Jack Good was also keen to benefit from the flow of new teenage talent provided by Larry Parnes.

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  • Very little talent is required for the majority of the free interactive music programs available on the web.

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  • provocative, psychological thriller; David Slade is a clearly a talent to watch.

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  • Certainly a player with the talent to keep pace with Wimbledon's ambition to rise through the non-league pyramid.

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  • rapper called Nathan - Mad Kida... Harvey: He's raw street talent!

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  • raw natural talent was to make between the umbrella.

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  • The club became renowned for nurturing youthful talent starting with the famous ' Busby Babes ' .

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  • rewarding to watch them enjoying themselves using their talent.

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  • scout for talent, and having found it work out what he can afford.

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  • Despite her parents ' opposition, Jess joins a ladies football team and gets spotted by a talent scout.

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  • The story follows a talent scout 's journey to China in search of his missing daughter.

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  • seedbed for creative talent.

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  • In 2004 VOLBEAT reaches the semifinals in Denmarks biggest music talent competition LIVE CONTEST.

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  • showcase international talent, alongside music from the unusual quartet, who originate from Reading.

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  • A scheme such as we have developed at the Royal Institution, where monthly talks showcase upcoming scientific talent, is only the beginning.

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  • showcase talent.

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  • I have developed projects in Lozells and presented talent showcases for young people demonstrating traditional music and dance.

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  • showcase of unsigned talent, this year held in Liverpool.

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  • showcase for some impressive acting talent.

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  • showcaseclass="ex">Showcasing an array of talent, visual styles and social themes that put modern India under the microscope.

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  • skimpy outfits is to distract the audience from the fact they have no musical talent.

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  • smorgasbord of black talent.

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  • Heller's surprising ability to get into the mind of a middle-aged spinster also illustrates her strong talent for imaginative empathy.

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  • Such places benefit from a virtuous circle, or upward spiral, whereby talent attracts talent.

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  • LTA talent spotters will be on the look out for kids who possess the innate sporting potential to be a future tennis champion.

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  • style of playing has resulted in his performance today which is an extraordinary talent, simply because he makes music he loves.

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  • England should stop takin ' our Aussie talent... Max Harlow says: Why has Shane been forgotten about?

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  • His idea for a school to nurture talent outside the commercial sector was first discussed in the early 1990s.

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  • On the Cross takes a look at the production line of emerging talent at Saints.

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  • Compiled by Keith himself, this is a first look into the world of a major songwriting talent!

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  • The Association also works with its members to attract the top talent into the industry.

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  • Valkyrie's musical talent first revealed itself at a similar time.

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  • How do you nurture the nation's foremost creative talent?

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  • I tried to is raw natural talent actual reductions in.

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  • Destination Scotland Scotland's first priority is to nurture and retain home-grown talent by striving to meet hopes and aspirations.

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  • talent scouts.

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  • talent spotters will be on the look out for kids who possess the innate sporting potential to be a future tennis champion.

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  • talent contests, eventually landing a record deal with Fantasy in 1968.

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  • talent r-mo about the price receipt family size.

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  • Daniel: Do your sons, Brooklyn and Romeo, show any signs of footballing talent?

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  • This success demonstrates the great story-telling and film-making talent that we have in the UK.

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  • I hope your readers will support this dinner and join me for a celebration of Welsh sporting talent on the 28th February 2004.

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  • The Script Factory has become one of Europe's leading development organizations working to support screenwriters by finding and developing new screenwriting talent.

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  • It was 1966, and record company talent scouts were still touring the Village looking for " the new Dylan " .

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  • Despite her parents ' opposition, Jess joins a ladies football team and gets spotted by a talent scout.

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  • Full-Screen teleprompter - The full-screen teleprompter will enable you and other talent in your video to read your script from a distance.

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  • It takes place at the end of the lent term and showcases a wealth of talent from the student body and residents of Cambridge.

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  • Even in private theatricals it was no longer possible to persuade him to exercise the talent which he had often shown that he possessed.

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  • I have a thimbleful of talent but everybody finds me funny and that results in pop.

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  • He proposes similar thought experiments to cover contingencies such as unemployment and having a poor endowment of marketable talent.

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  • top-notch jazz talent.

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  • With over 35 years experience, this family owned toyshop has something for every interest and talent.

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  • He had been given a typewriter by Louisa Wallis, wife of the Hollywood producer Hal Wallis, who believed he had talent.

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  • undeniable talent on display here.

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  • underrated talent and glad to see he will be in the hunt to win for Jaguar F1 next year.

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  • undoubted talent he doesn't score enough goals.

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  • unearth the very best talent - wherever it may be.

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  • And speaking of vocals, Universal United House of Prayer is the first album that highlights Miller`s usually unsung talent: his singing.

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  • unsuspected comic talent with her stories of life in the classroom.

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  • up-and-coming talent is a special priority at the MPS.

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  • Loz also presents the Sunday Evening Session, keeping an eye on the local music scene, particularly up-and-coming new talent.

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  • uplifting tale of talent triumphing over prejudice.

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  • upswing in the economy in the mid-1990s, employers attracted new talent by offering increasingly generous salaries.

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  • vacillating character easily influenced by people of stronger personality than himself, Arran nevertheless had a great talent for self-preservation.

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  • vaudeville theater, she was approached by a talent scout for Fox.

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  • virtuous circle, or upward spiral, whereby talent attracts talent.

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  • wangle that dream job, you'll need to create a reel that showcases your talent in a couple of minutes.

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  • wealth of talent in many areas, from science to satire.

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  • Darwin, already well-disposed toward Bates, became increasingly convinced of his worth and talent as the year progressed.

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  • westernized world and the Order attracted a lot of heavyweight talent.

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  • All of them bear witness to a glorious past, characterized by a talent for living life to the fullest.

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  • Nicholas Royle Already published as a poet and translator, David Constantine is now emerging as a short-story writer of considerable talent.

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  • writing talent.

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  • zings with energy, panache and fresh acting talent.

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  • From her early years she showed great aptitude for study, an ardent and enthusiastic spirit, and unquestionable talent.

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  • Having failed to form a rival party against Sagasta, Martos subsided into political insignificance, despite his great talent as an orator and debater, and died in Madrid on the 16th of January 1893.

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  • Innocent was genial, skilled in flattery, and popular with the Romans, but he lacked talent and relied on the stronger will of Cardinal della Rovere, afterwards Julius II.

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  • But a better idea of Moratin's talent is afforded by his anacreontic verses and by his Carta histOrica sobre el origen y progresos de las fiestas de toros en Espana.

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  • His literary talent, though mainly employed in journalism, was also shown in a little volume of verses, Poems of a Life (1884).

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  • Impelled by his convictions and talent, supported by the emperor Napoleon III.

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  • These last articles, which like his other writings represent much original research and are excellent examples of Johnston's rare talent for terse narrative and keen analysis and interpretation of facts, were republished in two volumes entitled American Political History 1763-1876 (1905-1906), edited by Professor J.

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  • He showed extraordinary energy, resource and military talent in stemming the advance of the royalists, who now followed up their victories by advancing into the association; he defeated them at Gainsborough on the 28th of July, and managed a masterly retreat before overwhelming numbers to Lincoln, while the victory on the 11th of October at Winceby finally secured the association, and maintained the wedge which prevented the junction of the royalists in the north with the king in the south.

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  • Ayala persuaded his sister to appear as the heroine of his comedy, La primera Dama, and the innovation, if it scandalized some of his townsmen, permitted him to develop his talent more freely.

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  • In 1730 he entered the Mazarin College under the Jansenists, who soon perceived his exceptional talent, and, prompted perhaps by a commentary on the Epistle to the Romans which he produced in the first year of his philosophical course, sought to direct it to theology.

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  • Ivan did not display much military talent, but he showed a remarkable amount of tenacity.

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  • The question is one which practical railway men have long since ceased to argue on general principles; they recognize that the answer depends upon the respective degree of talent and integrity which characterize the business community on the one hand and the government officials on the other.

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  • He had a considerable talent for this work and was often employed on similar occasions.

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  • From his youth he was diligent in his studies and a great reader, and during his college life showed a marked talent for extemporaneous speaking.

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  • Waiting for professional business, he was content to act as court crier for two dollars and a half a day; but he soon gave indications of his talent, and his studious habits and attention to his cases rapidly brought him clients.

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  • In his episcopal capacity he attended several diets of the empire, as well as the opening meetings of the council of Trent; and the influence of his father, now chancellor, led to his being entrusted with many difficult and delicate pieces of public business, in the execution of which he developed a rare talent for diplomacy, and at the same time acquired an intimate acquaintance with most of the currents of European politics.

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  • It was published partly in compliance with his father's wishes, who thought that the proof of some literary talent might introduce him favourably to public notice, and secure the recommendation of his friends for some appointment in connexion with the mission of the English plenipotentiaries to the congress at Augsburg which was at that time in contemplation.

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  • His mother was one of a family named Winston, of Welsh descent, noted for conversational and musical talent.

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  • Such superb self-confidence can accomplish much, and it undoubtedly helped to form Fustel's talent and to give to his style that admirable concision which subjugates even when it fails to convince; but a student instinctively distrusts an historian who settles the most controverted problems with such impassioned assurance.

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  • Augustus, who showed neither talent nor inclination for government, was content to leave Poland under the influence of Russia, and Saxony to the rule of his ministers.

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  • His talent enabled him to weld together the mixed southern clans which became incorporated under Judah, and to build up a monarchy which represented the highest conception of national life possible under the circumstances.

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  • He was weak, vacillating and ineffective as a politician, lacking in judgment and decision, and without any great parliamentary talent.

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  • His talent is for narrative and description.

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  • Among the other writers previous to the Revolution mention must be made of John Ray the botanist and of John Evelyn, both men of great talent and research, whose works are still in high estimation.

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  • Three of the seven poets were drinking in a garden when Firdousi approached, and wishing to get rid of him without rudeness, they informed him who they were, and told him that it was their custom to admit none to their society but such as could give proof of poetical talent.

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  • The commentaries are of course intolerably diffuse and tedious, a great deal of them is now quite unreadable; yet, on the other hand, one has not unfrequently occasion to admire the sound linguistic perception and the critical talent of the author.'

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  • The last prince of the house of Saman, Montasir, a bold warrior and a poet of no mean talent, carried on for some years a kind of guerilla warfare against both Mahmud and the Ilek Khan, who had occupied Transoxiana, till he was assassinated in 1005 (395 A.H.).

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  • All the earlier accounts agree that he had a winning personality and considerable talent, but he was badly educated, systematically terrorized by a brutal governor and hopelessly debauched by corrupt pages, and grew up a semi-idiot.

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  • After being educated at the high school of Edinburgh and at Durham, he attended the literary and law classes at the university of Edinburgh, and becoming in 1810 a member of the Edinburgh faculty of advocates, he for some time enjoyed the intimate acquaintance of Cockburn, Jeffrey, Scott and other distinguished men whose talent then lent lustre to the Scottish bar.

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  • This exclusiveness naturally strengthened the popularity and power of the districts, where energy and talent found a scope elsewhere denied.

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  • The new essays in this volume were mostly critical, but one of them, in which perhaps his guessing talent is seen at its best, "The Divisions of the Irish Family," is an elaborate discussion of a problem which has long puzzled both Celtic scholars and jurists; and in another, "On the Classificatory System of Relationship," he propounded a new explanation of a series of facts which, he thought, might throw light upon the early history of society, at the same time putting to the test of those facts the theories he had set forth in Primitive Marriage.

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  • In both fields he displayed much talent, and by writing his Synopsis of the Indian Tribes within the United States East of the Rocky Mountains and in the British and Russian Possessions in North America (1836), and by founding the American Ethnological Society of New York in 1842, he earned the title of "Father of American Ethnology."

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  • In spite of his absolute lack of talent, he attained the highest of positions - an exceptional fact in the history of the French Revolution.

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  • "I know this is the peculiar talent which God has given me."

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  • Afewyearsafter Constantinople passed into the hands of the Ottomans, some ghazels, the work of the contemporary Tatar prince, Mir `Ali Shir, who under the nom de plume of Nevayi wrote much that shows true talent and poetic feeling, found their way to the Ottoman capital, where they were seen and copied by Ahmed Pasha, one of the viziers of Mahommed II.

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  • There is a legend that William Pitt the younger thought of her; the somewhat notorious lover of Mlle de Lespinasse, Guibert, a cold-hearted coxcomb of some talent, certainly paid her addresses.

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  • But nothing save a very great talent could have shown itself so receptive.

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  • According to his own account, he was the twenty-fourth of twenty-nine children, and was early remarkable for precocious talent.

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  • In a temperate and learned speech, based on Fox's declaration against constitution-mongering, he supported both the enfranchising and the disfranchising clauses, and easily disposed of the cries of "corporation robbery," "nabob representation," "opening for young men of talent," &c. The following year (1832) found Campbell solicitor-general, a knight and member for Dudley, which he represented till 1834.

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  • Herculano had greater book learning than Scott, but lacked descriptive talent and skill in dialogue.

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  • Until this time no plays had been acted in Denmark except in French and German, but Holberg now determined to use his talent in the construction of Danish comedy.

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  • Albert and no doubt stood on a higher level than Anselm and Abelard, not merely by their wider range of knowledge but also by the intellectual massiveness of their achieve ments; but it may be questioned whether the earlier writers did not possess a greater force of originality and a keener talent.

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  • Slight as these sketches are, they show considerable dramatic talent and an Aristophanic wit.

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  • In these his language is vigorous and dignified; he states the results of his labour and thought with freshness and lucidity; tells numberless stories in a most delightful manner, and exhibits a wonderful talent for the representation of personal character; the many portraits of historic persons of all orders which he draws in these prefaces are as brilliant in execution as they are exact and convincing.

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  • Even in an imitative artist such precocity of talent is remarkable, and the date is therefore open to legitimate doubt.

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  • The four volumes of the Meditations, the Harmonies and the Recueillements, which contained the prime of his verse, are perhaps the most monotonous reading to be found anywhere in work of equal bulk by a poet of equal talent.

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  • Returning to Normandy he was presented to the king by Jacques of Matignon; after he had abjured Protestantism, being again presented by Philip Desportes, abbot of Tiron, as a young man without equal for knowledge and talent, he was appointed reader to the king.

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  • In the early autumn of 1751 La Mettrie, one of the king's parasites, and a man of much more talent than is generally allowed, horrified Voltaire by telling him that Frederick had in conversation applied to him (Voltaire) a proverb about "sucking the orange and flinging away its skin," and about the same time the dispute with Maupertuis, which had more than anything else to do with his exclusion from Prussia, came to a head.

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  • His talent in finance won him a distinguished place in the chamber.

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  • His talent for electrical engineering was soon shown, and his progress was rapid; so that in 1852 he was appointed engineer to the Magnetic Telegraph Company, and in that capacity superintended the laying of lines in various parts of the British Isles, including in 1853 the first cable between Great Britain and Ireland, from Portpatrick to Donaghadee.

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  • `Arib of Cordova made an abridgment, adding the history of the West and continuing the story to about 975.1 Ibn 1Vlashkawaih wrote a history from the creation to 980, with the purpose of drawing the lessons of the story, following Tabari closely, as far as his book is known, and seldom recurring to other sources before the reign of Moqtadir; what follows is his own composition and shows him to be a writer of talent.

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  • Miss Sullivan, whose ability as a teacher must be considered almost as marvellous as the talent of her pupil, was throughout her devoted companion.

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  • Down to this time he had never made any pretensions to literary skill or talent, but on being approached by the Century Magazine with a request for some articles he undertook the work in order to keep the wolf from the door.

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  • Their country was rich in figs, vines and olive trees; the silver mines in the mountain range of Dysorum brought in a talent a day to their conqueror Alexander.

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  • During the medieval era of internecine strife the Buddhist priests were the sole depositaries of literary talent, and seeing that, from the close of the 14th century, the ShintO mime (Kagura) was largely employed by the military class to invo,~ce or acknowledge the assistance of the gods, the monks of Buddha set themselves to compose librettos for this mime, and the performance, thus modified, received the name of NO.

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  • It came into existence in KiOto and was thence transferred to Yedo (Tokyo), where the greatest of Japanese playwrights, Chikamatsu Monzaemon (1653-1724), and a musician of exceptional talent, Takemoto Gidayu, collaborated to render this puppet drama a highly popular entertainment.

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  • Mimetic posture-dances (Shosagoto) were always introduced as interludes; past and present indiscriminately contributed to the playwrights subjects; realism was carried to extremes; a revolving stage and all mechanical accessories were supplied; female parts were invariably taken by males, who attained almost incredible skill in these simulations; a chorusrelic of the Nochanted expositions of profound sentiments or thrilling incidents; and histrionic talent of the very highest order was often displayed.

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  • The Occident does not yet appear to have full realized the existence of such talent in Japan; partly perhaps because its displays in former times were limited chiefly to swordfurniture, possessing little interest for the average European or American; and partly because the Japanese have not yet learned to adapt their skill to foreign requirements.

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  • The tempestuous politics of the war and reconstruction period suited his aggressive nature and constructive talent.

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  • As member of the Committee of Public Safety, he devoted himself particularly to the question of food-supplies, and it was only by dint of dogged perseverance and great administrative talent that he was successful in coping with this difficult problem.

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  • While in England he had made active use of his remarkable talent for pamphleteering.

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  • The specimens we possess are not devoid of talent or of a certain happy art of expression.

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  • 3 While the church of the 3rd and 4th centuries could point to a brilliant succession of great preachers, whose discourses were wont to be taken down in shorthand and circulated among the Christian public as edifying reading, it does not appear that the supply of ordinary homiletical talent kept pace with the rapidity of church extension throughout the Roman empire.

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  • His education was begun at the College des Quatre Nations, where he obtained a smattering of the classics; but, his artistic talent being already obvious, he was soon placed by his guardian in the studio of Francois Boucher.

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  • 4 Athens was at this time the centre of intellectual life, and could boast an almost unique galaxy of talent - Pericles, Thucydides the son of Melesias, Aspasia, Antiphon, the musician Damon, Pheidias, Protagoras, Zeno, Cratinus, Crates, Euripides and Sophocles.

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  • There is sufficient evidence that his family was of Croatian stock: a fact which throws light upon the distinctively Slavonic character of much of his music. He received the first rudiments of education from his father, a wheelwright with twelve children, and at an early age evinced a decided musical talent.

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  • Moreover, his commanding qualities were coupled with an organizing talent which made itself felt in every department of the state, and with a marvellous adaptability which made him an ideal diplomatist.

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  • His personal courage and extreme affability made him highly popular among the lower orders, but he showed himself quite incapable of taking advantage permanently of the revival of the national energy, and the extraordinary overflow of native middle-class talent, which were the immediate consequences of the revolution of 1660.

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  • In 1795 Napoleon procured for him admission to the military school at Chalons, and wrote thus of the boy: - "I am very pleased with Louis; he fulfils my hopes; intelligence, warmth, good health, talent, good address, kindness - he possesses all these qualities."

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  • As a boy he showed much talent, which was carefully trained under his father's eye.

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  • But the Montagnards made up by their fanatical, or desperate, energy and boldness for what they lacked in talent or in numbers.

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  • Scientific effort received an impetus from the establishment of an independent Czech university at Prague in 1881, and from that time there is hardly a branch of science in which workers of profound and creative talent did not arise (in physics Zenger, in biology Vejdovsky), while a whole series of eminent names as well in the technical and mathematical as in the historical and philological (e.g.

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  • Mickiewicz had had a predecessor, but of far less talent, Casimir Brodzinski (1791-1835).

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  • Besides showing talent as a poet, he has also written some good plays, as "The Jew" (Zid), Cola di Rienzi, and Kiejstut.

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  • Gathered there also were a host of publicists, secretaries and courtiers, and never before had Europe witnessed such a collection of rank and talent.

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  • Here we have a first proof of his talent for romancing; for alike to two pilgrims who show him the road and to the huntsmen of Mark's court (whom he instructs in the rightful method of cutting up and disposing the quarry), Tristan invents different, and most detailed, fictions of his land and parentage.

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  • He had been introduced to Richelieu in 1623, and by his humour and his talent as a raconteur soon made himself indispensable to the cardinal.

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  • Thus foot, digit, palm, cubit, stadium, mile, talent, mina, stater, drachm, obol, pound, ounce, grain, metretes, medimrius, modius, hin and many others mean nothing exact unless qualified by the name of their country or city.

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  • By the theory of maris 1/5 of 20.6 cubed is 1755; by maris = Assyrian talent, 1850, in place of 1850 or 1980 stated above; hence the more likely theory of weight, rather than cubit, connexion is nearer to the facts.

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  • The theories of connexion give, for the value of the cotyle, metretes = Aeginetan talent --

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  • and the other system double of this in each stage except the talent.

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  • This is the system of the "Babylonian" talent, by Herodotus = 70 minae Euboic, by Pollux = 70 minae Attic, by Aelian = 72 minae Attic, and, therefore, about 470,000 grains.

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  • In Syria, as early as the 15th century B.C., the tribute of the Rutennu, of Naharaina, Megiddo, Anaukasa, &c. (34), is on a basis of 454-484 kats, or 300 shekels (1/10 talent) of 226 grains.

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  • The talent was of 120 minae of 5400, or 3000 shekels, shown by the talent from Herculaneum, TA, 660,000 and by the weight inscribed PONDO CXXV.

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  • talent of 3000 shekels (2) (the M being omitted; just as Epiphanius describes this talent as 125 librae, or ÃŽ¸ (=9) nomismata, for 9000).

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  • The Alexandrian talent of Festus, 12,000 denarii, is the same talent again.

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  • Then at Abydus, or more probably from Babylonia, there is the large bronze lion-weight, stated to have been originally 400,500 grains; this has been continually divided by 60 by different writers, regardless of the fact (Rev. arch., 1862, 30) that it bears the numeral 100; this therefore is certainly a talent of 100 minae of 4005; and as the mina is generally 50 shekels in Greek systems it points to a weight of 80.1.

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