Tail sentence example

tail
  • Tail long, clothed with long hairs.
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  • He would've turned tail and run.
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  • Fighting down a wave of nausea, she kneeled at the tail of the goat.
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  • I caught one today, but he got away when his tail broke off.
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  • It wasn't our turn to pin the tail on the donkey.
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  • In Pierre, however, that comet with its long luminous tail aroused no feeling of fear.
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  • I can't make head or tail of it.
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  • If you see Lori, tell her I said to get her tail back home where she belongs.
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  • Tail generally long and well clothed with hair.
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  • Pulling her hair into a pony tail, she secured it with a blue ribbon.
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  • You be careful and keep in touch or I'll put a tail on you.
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  • At the door she stopped and watched his truck go down the road – watched the tail lights get bright as he stopped on the main road, and then watched them fade down the highway.
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  • The tail is very short.
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  • It suddenly occurred to me that he might make a delightful pet; so I seized him by the tail with both hands and carried him home.
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  • A little further ahead, they glimpsed a white flash of tail as a deer bounded crossed the trail no more than fifty feet ahead of them.
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  • Both jumped to their feet and started around the cluster of boulders where Joseph had parked only to see the tail of Joseph Dawkins' Jeep as it bumped across the blanketing wave of wild flowers.
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  • It has a long tail and shaggy fur; the general colour of the latter being dark grey, with conspicuous black and white markings on the face.
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  • The Nepidae breathe by means of a pair of long, grooved tail processes (really out-growths c, labrum; d, epipharynx.
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  • FALLOW-DEER (that is, DUN Deer, in contradistinction to the red deer, Cervus [Dama] dama), a medium-sized representative of the family Cervidae, characterized by its expanded or palmated antlers, which generally have no bez-tine, rather long tail (black above and white below), and a coat spotted with white in summer but uniformly coloured in winter.
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  • TAEL (Malay tail, tahil, weight, probably connected with Hind.
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  • Tail rope system.
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  • On the tail rope plan the engine has two drums worked by spur gearing, which can be connected with, or cast loose from, the driving shaft at pleasure.
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  • The tail rope, which is of lighter section than the main one, is coiled on the second drum, passes over similar guide sheaves placed near the roof or side of the gallery round a pulley at the bottom of the plane, and is fixed to the end of the train or set of tubs.
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  • He kept looking to either side of the road for familiar faces, but only saw everywhere the unfamiliar faces of various military men of different branches of the service, who all looked with astonishment at his white hat and green tail coat.
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  • Its furry tail stood up firm and round as a plume, its bandy legs served it so well that it would often gracefully lift a hind leg and run very easily and quickly on three legs, as if disdaining to use all four.
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  • Bumpus followed, slapping our legs with his tail.
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  • Dean said as he entered his quarters, with Fred close on his tail.
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  • Jack sat beside it, wagging his tail.
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  • And tried to spook my stepfather in the process, only he lost your tail.
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  • Her head was tipped back so that she could see his face and her excitement was personified in the dancing of her pony tail.
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  • Xander snorted, eyes on her ass and the swinging pony tail.
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  • Among other characteristics of these animals may be noticed the great length of the neck and limbs, the complete absence of lateral toes and the long and tufted tail.
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  • It has a total length of 37 in., of which 22 are taken up by the tail.
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  • Although entirely naked in summer, these cats developed in winter a slight growth of hair on the back and the ridge of the tail.
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  • The single species, which is a native of western and southern Australia, is about the size of an English squirrel, to which its long bushy tail gives it some resemblance; but it lives entirely on the ground, especially in sterile sandy districts, feeding on ants.
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  • Tail rather short, clothed with short depressed hairs.
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  • A separate family, Notoryctidae, is represented by the marsupial mole (Notoryctes typhlops), of the deserts of south Central Australia, a silky, golden-haired, burrowing creature, with a curious leathery muzzle, and a short, naked stumpy tail.
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  • The tail is rudimentary, the first hind-toe opposable, the first pair of upper incisors very large, but the second and third either absent or small and placed partially behind the larger pair; and only five pairs of cheek-teeth in each jaw.
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  • Tail rudimentary.
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  • No external tail.
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  • The tail is long and in some cases prehensile; the first hind-toe may be either large, small or absent; the dentition usually includes three pairs of upper and one of lower incisors, and six or seven pairs of cheekteeth in each jaw; the stomach is either simple or sadculated, without a cardiac gland; and there are four teats.
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  • Tail longer than the body and head, scantily clothed with short hairs, prehensile.
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  • The rock wallabies again have short tarsi of the hind legs, with a long pliable tail for climbing, like that of the tree kangaroo of New Guinea, or that of the jerboa.
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  • Arboreal species include the well-known opossums (Phalanger); the extraordinary tree-kangaroo of the Queensland tropics; the flying squirrel, which expands a membrane between the legs and arms, and by its aid makes long sailing jumps from tree to tree; and the native bear (Phascolarctos), an animal with no affinities to the bear, and having a long soft fur and no tail.
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  • The graceful Menura superba, or lyre-bird, with its tail feathers spread in the shape of a lyre, is a very characteristic form.
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  • In life, however, its appearance must be wholly unlike, for it rarely flies, hops actively on the ground or among bushes, with its tail erect or turned towards its head, and continually utters various and strange notes, - some, says Darwin, are "like the cooing of doves, others like the bubbling of water, and many defy all similes."
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  • Two more species of Hylactes are known, and 1 Of Spanish origin, it is intended as a reproof to the bird for the shameless way in which, by erecting its tail, it exposes its hinder parts.
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  • The female is viviparous, and the young, which, unlike the parent, are provided with a long tail, live free in water; it was formerly believed from the frequency with which the legs and feet were attacked by this parasite that the embryo entered the skin directly from the water, but it has been shown by Fedschenko, and confirmed by Manson, Leiper and others, that the larva bores its way into the body of a Cyclops and there undergoes further development.
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  • With portable cranes means must be provided to ensure the requisite stability against overturning; this is done by weighting the tail of the revolving part with heavy weights, and in steam cranes the FIG.
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  • In the members of the typical genus Lemur, as well as in the allied Hapalemur and Lepidolemur, none of the toes or fingers are connected by webs, and all have the hind-limbs of moderate length, and the tail long.
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  • The head is short and conical, the ears large, round and mostly bare, and the tail shorter than the body.
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  • A tadpole is the larva of a tailless Batrachian after the loss of the external gills and before the egress of the fore limbs (except in the aberrant Xenopus) and the resorption of the tail.
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  • What characterizes a tadpole is the conjoined globular head and body, so formed that it is practically impossible to discern the limit between the two, sharply set off from the more or less elongate compressed tail which is the organ of propulsion.
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  • Its opening, the vent, is situated either on the middle line at the base of the tail, or on the right side, as if to balance the sinistral position of the spiraculum.
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  • The tail varies much in length and shape according to the species; sometimes it is rounded at the end, sometimes more or less acutely pointed, or even terminating in a filament.
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  • The skeleton is cartilaginous, and the skull is remarkable for the very elongate suspensorium of the lower jaw; the tail remains in the notochordal condition, no cartilages being formed in this organ, which is destined to disappear with the gills.
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  • The hind limbs appear as buds at the base of the tail, and gradually attain their full development during the tadpole life.
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  • Sometimes the ventral portions of these pads form paired or un paired little ossifications, then generally described as intercentra; such are not uncommon on the tail.
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  • This, when fully developed, consists of two parts, but inserted by a single ribbon-like tendon upon the hinder surface of the femur, near the end of its first third; the caudal part, femoro-caudalis, expressed by Garrod by the symbol A, arises from transverse processes of the tail; the iliac part (accessorofemoro-caudal of Garrod, with the symbol B), arises mostly from the outer surface of the postacetabular ilium.
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  • The lymph vessels of the tail and hinder parts of the body enter the hypogastric veins; and at the point of junction, on either side, lies a small lymph heart, which often persists until maturity.
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  • On this theory the yellowbird or NorthAmerican "goldfinch," C. tristis, would seem, with its immediate allies, to rank among the highest forms of the group, and the pinegoldfinch, C. pinus, of the same country, to be one of the lowest the cock of the former being generally of a bright yellow hue, with black crown, tail and wings - the last conspicuously barred with white, while neither hens nor young exhibit any striations.
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  • They breathe by piercing the surface film with the tail, where a pair of spiracles are situated.
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  • These segments are very mobile, and as the rove-beetles run along they often curl the abdomen upwards and forwards like the tail of a scorpion.
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  • The female is a segmented, wormlike creature, spending her whole life within the body of the bee, wasp or bug on which she is parasitic. One end of her body protrudes from between two of the abdominal segments of the host; it has been a subject of dispute whether this protruded end is the head or the tail, but there can be little doubt that it is the latter.
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  • The most active form of larva found in this family resembles in shape that of a ladybird, tapering towards the tail end, and having the trunk segments protected by small firm sclerites.
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  • Closely allied to the question of safety is the problem of preventing jolting at curves; and to obtain easy running it is necessary not merely to adjust the levels of the rails in respect to one another, but to tail off one curve into the next in such a :nanner as to avoid any approach to abrupt lateral changes of direction.
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  • The oldest and commonest method of shunting is that known as " push-and-pull," or in America as " link-and-pin " or " tail " shunting.
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  • A distinctive feature is the position assumed in resting; Culex has a humpbacked attitude, while in Anopheles the proboscis, head and body are in a straight line, and in many species inclined at an angle to the wall, the tail sticking outwards.
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  • As far as can be judged, the emblems of the original Physiologus were the following: (I) the lion (footprints rubbed out with tail; sleeps with eyes open; cubs receive life only three days after birth by their father's breath); (2) the sun-lizard (restores its sight by looking at the sun); (3) the charadrius (Deut.
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  • was found a brown chat, with a good deal of white in the tail.
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  • On the 21st day of the sale of Bullock's Museum in 1819, Lot 38 is entered in the Catalogue as "The Tail Feather of a magnificent undescribed Trogon," and probably belonged to this species.
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  • The middle feathers of the tail, ordinarily concealed, as are those of the Peacock, by the uropygials, are black, and the outer white with a black base.
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  • Quite recently, another mode of budding has been described in Trypanosyllis gemmipara, where a crowd of some fifty buds arising symmetrically are produced at the tail end of the worm.
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  • The extreme length of the limbs and the absence of a tail are other features of these small apes, which are thoroughly arboreal in their habits, and make the woods resound with their unearthly cries at night.
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  • These monkeys are the African representatives of the Indo-Malay langurs (Semnopithecus), with which they agree in their slender build, long limbs and tail, and complex stomachs, although differing by the rudimentary thumb.
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  • There are two dorsal fins, the anterior near the head, composed of 11-14 feeble spines, the second near the tail with all the rays soft except the first, and behind the second dorsal five or six finlets.
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  • Every "line" of its build is designed and eminently adapted for rapid progression through the water; the muscles massed along the vertebral column are enormously developed, especially on the back and the sides of the tail, and impart to the body a certain rigidity which interferes with abruptly sideward motions of the fish.
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  • At the tip of the tail, where the growth of the animal takes place, the.
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  • in length and the tail but little less.
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  • The tail is laterally compressed, nearly naked, and scaly.
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  • Mole-rats are easily recognized by the peculiarly flattened head, in which the minute eyes are covered with skin, the wart-like ears, and rudimentary tail; they make burrows in sandy soil, and feed on bulbs and roots.
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  • Bamboorats, of which one genus (Rhizomys) is Indian and Burmese, and the other (Tachyoryctes) East African, differ by the absence of skin over the eyes, the presence of short ears, and a short, sparsely-haired tail.
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  • long, from snout to end of tail, the exserted portion of the tusk may measure 6 or 7 and occasionally 8 ft.
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  • Skeat suggests a possible connexion with Spanish rabo, tail, rabear, to wag the hind-quarters.
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  • the nose, the ears, tail and feet - are black or very dark in colour.
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  • The Eskimo dog has small, upright ears, a straight bushy tail, moderately sharp muzzle and rough coat.
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  • The larger variety of the race has a sharp muzzle, upright pointed ears, and a bushy tail generally carried over the back.
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  • The tail is thick and bushy, the feet and legs particularly strong, and there is usually a double dew-claw on each hind limb.
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  • The animal is thoroughly adapted for extreme speed, the long, rat-like tail being used in balancing the body in quick turns.
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  • The English setter should have a silky coat with the hair waved but not curly; the legs and toes should be hairy, and the tail should have a bushy fringe of hairs hanging down from the dorsal border.
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  • The colour is black or tan, and the hair of the face, body and tail is close and curly, although wavy-coated strains exist.
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  • from the tip of the nose to the root of the tail.
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  • These are large dogs, hunting by smell, with massive structure, large drooping ears, and usually smooth coats, without fringes of hair on the ears, limbs or tail.
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  • The coat is short, thick and silky, and the tail is long and tapering..
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  • The Tibetan mastiff is equally powerful, but has still larger pendent ears, a shaggy coat and a long brush-like tail.
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  • The Chinese pug is slender legged, with long hair and a bushy tail.
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  • The tail, usually applied to sheepdogs.
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  • The hair at the back of the legs and under the tail.
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  • A term for the tail, applied to a setter.
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  • montium of ornithologists, which can be distinguished by its yellow bill, longer tail and reddish-tawny throat.
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  • Usually it passes from the throat (the anterior part of which, with the whole of the under jaw, is dark) above the origin of the flipper, along the middle of the flank, and descends again to the middle line before reaching the tail.
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  • in length; and of a yellowish-red colour, with comparatively short ears and tail.
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  • The reference to "tail" is either to the expression "turn tail" in flight, or to the habit of animals dropping the tail between the legs when frightened; in heraldry, a lion in this position is a "lion coward."
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  • The highest point of elaboration in colour, pattern and form is shown by the great eye-painted tail feathers.
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  • Opisthosoma three minute and forming a slender generally-retracted tail like that of Thelyphonus.
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  • Fuchs; the ultimate origin is unknown, but a connexion has been suggested with Sanskrit puccha, tail.
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  • Foxes are likewise distinguished by their slighter build, longer and bushy tail, which always exceeds half the length of the head and body, sharper muzzle, and relatively longer body and shorter limbs.
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  • By some naturalists many of these local forms are regarded as specifically distinct, but it seems better and simpler to class them all as local phases or races of a single species primarily characterized by the white tip to the tail and the black or dark-brown hind surface of the ear.
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  • Of foxes certainly distinct specifically from the typical representative of the group, one of the best known is the Indian Vulpes bengalensis, a species much inferior in point of size to its European relative, and lacking the strong odour of the latter, from which it is also distinguished by the black tip to the tail and the pale-coloured backs of the ears.
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  • The long and bushy tail in the northern species has a white tip and a dark gland-patch near the root, but the backs of the ears are fawn-coloured.
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  • zerda) of Algeria and Egypt, in which the general colour is pale and the tip of the relatively short tail black.
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  • cama), a dark-coloured species, with a black tip to the long, bushy tail and reddish-brown ears.
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  • lagopus), a very distinct species characterized by the hairy soles of its feet, the short, blunt ears, the long, bushy tail, and the great length of the fur in winter.
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  • The scorpion, attacking the genitals of the bull, is sent by Ahriman from the lower world to defeat the purpose of the sacrifice; the dog, springing towards the wound in the bull's side, was venerated by the Persians as the companion of Mithras; the serpent is the symbol of the earth being made fertile by drinking the blood of the sacrificial bull; the raven, towards which Mithras turns his face as if for direction, is the herald of the Sun-god, whose bust is near by, and who has ordered the sacrifice; various plants near the bull, and heads of wheat springing from his tail, symbolize the result of the sacrifice; the cypress is perhaps the tree of immortality.
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  • The body is stout and thickly built; the legs are short and strong, and armed, especially the anterior pair, with long curved claws; the tail is short; and the ears are reduced to rudiments.
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  • Australia has P. conspicillatus, easily distinguished by its black tail and wingcoverts.
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  • the tail on the head-dress of this foreign Set (e.g.
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  • It must suffice, therefore, to record the Pharaoh's simple girdle (with or without a tunic) from which hangs the lion's tail, or the tail-like band suspended from the extremity of his head-dress (above), or the panther or leopard skin worn over the shoulders by the high priest at Memphis, subsequently a ceremonial dress of men of rank.
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  • The tail, in most species very short, has in others the middle feathers much elongated, and in one of the outer rectrices are attenuated and produced into threads.
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  • The paca-rana (Dinomys branicki), from the highlands of Peru, differs, among other features, by its well-developed tail and the arrangement of the spots.
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  • In the tail-rope system of haulage, best adapted for single track roads, there are two ropes - a main and a " tail " rope - winding on a pair of drums operated by an engine.
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  • in length, of which rather more than half is accounted for by the tail.
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  • On the east the Kachin, Shan and Karen hills, extending from the valley of the Irrawaddy into China far beyond the Salween gorge, form a continuous barrier and boundary, and tail off into a narrow range which forms the eastern watershed of the Salween and separates Tenasserim from Siam.
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  • to the root of the tail, while the tail itself measures from 11 to 13 in.
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  • Some of the last-named are represented with such truth of colouring and delicacy of detail that even the separate feathers of the wings and tail are well distinguished, although, as in an example in the British Museum, a human-headed hawk, the piece which contains the figure may not exceed 4 in.
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  • Except, indeed, for its relatively shorter limbs Megatherium americanum rivalled an elephant in bulk, the total length of the skeleton being 18 feet, five of which are taken up by the tail.
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  • Large chevron-bones are suspended to the vertebrae of the tail, which was massive, and probably afforded a support when the monster was sitting up. The humerus has no foramen, and the FIG.
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  • Though often spoken of as the American lion, chiefly on account of its colour, it rather resembles the leopard of the Old World in size and habits: usually measuring from nose to root of tail about 40 in., the tail being rather more than half that length.
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  • The tail is cylindrical, with some bushy elongation of the hairs near the end, but not forming a distinct tuft.
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  • The lower parts, inner surface of the limbs, throat, chin and upper lip are dirty white; the outside of the ears, particularly at their base, and a patch on each side of the muzzle black; the end of the tail dusky.
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  • The young are, when first born, spotted with dusky brown and the tail ringed.
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  • From both the latter it is distinguished by its rudimentary tail, measuring only a couple of inches in length, whence its name of Indris brevicaudatus.
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  • in length, exclusive of the tail, the indri varies considerably in colour, but is usually black, with a variable number of whitish patches, chiefly about the loins and on the fore-limbs.
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  • in length, exclusive of the long tail, and in the form of its head somewhat resembles a rabbit.
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  • The Peruvian chinchilla (C, brevicaudata) is larger, with relatively shorter ears and tail; while still larger species constitute the genus Lagidium, ranging from the Andes to Patagonia, and distinguished by having four in place of five front-toes, more pointed ears, and a somewhat differently formed skull.
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  • Its appearance is sufficiently striking - the head and lower parts, except a pectoral band, white, the former adorned with an erectile crest, the upper parts dark grey banded with black, the wings dusky, and the tail barred; but the huge bill and powerful scutellated legs most of all impress the beholder.
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  • The former bears two terminal suckers on the flattened dorsal and ventral surfaces, the latter six hooks near the tip of the tail.
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  • Caryophyllaeus is an elongated, flattened worm provided with one extremely mobile extremity, the other being drawn out during the animal's sojourn in Tubifex into a short hexacanth tail.
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  • The thicker portion develops a terminal muscular rostellum and two or four suckers, the thinner end (" tail ") is vesicular, more or less elongated, and contains the six embryonic hooks.
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  • (From Lankester's Treatise on Zoology, part iv.) the base of the tail; nervous and muscular systems arise; and finally the rostellum and suckers become completely enclosed in the sac formed by the lateral extension of the " hind-body."
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  • In most other cases the tail is not distinguishable, and the body of the larva is separable only into a scolex invaginated with a bladder (= hind-body and tail).
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  • In some genera a " urocyst " is formed, the tail of which gives rise to a new cyst and a fresh scolex.
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  • The majority of these are large and heavilybuilt ruminants, with horns present in both sexes, the muzzle broad, moist and naked, the nostrils lateral, no face-glands, and a large dewlap often developed in the males; while the tail is long and generally tufted, although in one instance longhaired throughout.
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  • The muzzle is narrow and hairy; and when faceglands are present these are small and insignificant; while the tail is short and flattened.
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  • The tail is short or rudimentary, the incisors are short, and the outer surface of the lower jaw is marked by a distinct ridge.
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  • They are comparatively small and stoutly built animals, with short, rounded ears and no tail.
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  • A very different animal is the Patagonian cavy, or mara (Dolichotis patachonica), the typical representative of a genus characterized by long limbs, comparatively large ears, and a short tail.
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  • salinicola, without the characteristic black band above the tail, inhabits the salt-plains of Argentina.
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  • The Yemen pilgrim route, known as the Haj el Kabsi, led from Sada through Asir to Tail and Mecca, but it is no longer used.
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  • The udad is distinguished by the abundant hair on the throat and fore-quarters of the rams, and the length of the tail.
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  • horizontally at the surface; they frequently appear as though anchored by the tail to a weed or other object, and possess the curious faculty of completely rotating the head so as to browse on the surface film.
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  • The cercaria is just visible to the naked eye and has an oval or discoidal body and usually a long tail of variable form.
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  • The tail may be a simple hollow muscular process or provided with stiff bristles set in transverse rows, or divided into two equally long processes, or finally it may form a large vesicular structure.
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  • In this process it is aided by the stylet with which it actively bores its way, throws off its tail FIG.
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  • The ordinary potto (P. potto) is about the size of a squirrel, but with Poultry And Poultry-Farming large staring eyes, and a mere stump of a tail; its general colour is rufous brown.
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  • from the extremity of the beak to the end of the tail, the male being slightly larger than the female.
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  • The tail is short, broad and depressed, and covered with coarse hairs, which in old animals generally become worn off from the under (From Gould's Mammals of Australia.) Platypus.
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  • Swimming is effected chiefly by the action of the broad forepaws, the hind feet and tail taking little share in locomotion in the water.
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  • lapponica, from which it chiefly differs by having the rump barred like the tail.
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  • The tail is represented by a mere stump. (R.
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  • Domestic animals have for representatives the horse (uma), a small beast with little beauty of form though possessing much hardihood and endurance; the ox (ushs)~mainly a beast of burden or draught; the pig (buta), very occasionally; the dog (mu), an unsightly and useless brute; the cat (neko), with a stump in lieu of a tail; barndoor fowl (niwa-tori), ducks (ahiro) and pigeons (hato).
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  • It is often depicted with a flowing tail, which appendix attests close observation of nature; for the mino-game, as it is called, represents a tortoise to which, in the course of many scores of years, confcrvae have attached themselves so as to form an appendage of long green locks as the creature swims about.
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  • The colour varies from earthy brown to blackish, and the greater part of the body is thinly covered with hair, and the ears and tail are fringed.
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  • YAK, the wild (and domesticated) ox of the Tibetan plateau; a species nearly allied to the bison group. The yak, Bos (POephagus) grunniens, is one of the finest and largest of the wild oxen, characterized by the growth of long shaggy hair on the flanks and under parts of the body and the well-known bushy tail.
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  • Their body is covered with small scales and the ventral scutes are mostly narrow; the tail tapering; head flat, rather short; and the eyes of small size.
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  • (5) Sea snakes are distinguished by the compressed, rudder-shaped tail.
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  • With very few exceptions, the integuments form imbricate scalelike folds arranged with the greatest regularity; they are small and pluriserial on the upper parts of the body and tail, large and uniserial on the abdomen, and generally biserial on the lower side of the tail.
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  • It is the first part which is cast off when the snake sheds its skin; this is done several times in the year, and the epidermis comes off in a single piece, being, from the mouth towards the tail, turned inside out during the process.
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  • Eyes very small; head not distinct; teeth in the upper and lower jaws; ventral scales scarcely enlarged; tail extremely short, ending obtusely and covered with peculiar scales: Uropettidae.
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  • The tail is extremely short and blunt.
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  • - Burrowing snakes of Ceylon and southern India, with a very short tail, which ends in a peculiar, often obliquely truncated, shield, hence the name.
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  • Chersydrus ranges from Madras to New Guinea; the body and tail are laterally compressed and form a ventral fold which is covered with tiny scales like the rest of the body.
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  • Calamaria of Indo-China is an example of burrowing snakes, with a short tail and small eyes; in Typhlopophis of the Philippines the eyes are concealed.
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  • - Terrestrial, with a cylindrical tail, comprising about 150 species which have been grouped into numerous genera, mostly upon very slight differences.
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  • Good descriptions and figures of all these snakes are given in Krefft's Snakes of Australia (Sydney, 1869, t 40 Several genera of the Elapinae lead a more or less burrowing life; their body is of a uniform cylindrical shape, terminating in a short tail, and covered with short polished scales; their head is short, the mouth rather narrow, and the eye small.
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  • - Tail laterally compressed; marine.
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  • notably Martinique, Guadaloupe and Santa Lucia, where it is known as the "Fer de Lance"; Mexicans call it "rabo de hueso" or bone-tail, on account of the curiously coloured and spike-like tip of the tail.
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  • It is arboreal, bright green above; the end of the prehensile tail is usually bright red.
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  • The above figure is coloured black as befits a funerary and nocturnal animal: it is more attenuated than even a greyhound, but it has the bushy tail of the fox or the jackal.
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  • The animal is ` brown,' of a shade from orange or tawny to quite blackish; the tail and feet are ordinarily the darkest, the head lightest, often quite whitish; the ears usually have a whitish rim, while on the throat there is usually a large tawny-yellowish or orange-brown patch, from the chin to the fore legs, sometimes entire, sometimes broken into a number of smaller, irregular blotches, sometimes wanting, sometimes prolonged on the whole under surface, when the animal is bicolor like a stoat in summer.
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  • The tail occasionally shows interspersed white hairs, or a white tip."
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  • Length of head and body 16 to 18 in., of tail (including been connected with the German "martern," to torment.
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  • The pekan or Pennant's marten, also called fisher marten, though there appears to be nothing in its habits to justify the appellation, is the largest of the group, the head and body measuring from 24 to 30 in., and the tail 14 to 18 in.
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  • His eyes were transferred by Hera to the tail of the peacock.
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  • The first larva is broad in front and tapers behind to a " tail " provided with two divergent processes, so that it resembles a small crustacean.
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  • When the load is being drawn out, the engine pulls directly on the main rope, coiling it on to its own drum, while the tail drum runs loose paying out its rope, a slight brake pressure being used to prevent its running out too fast.
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  • When the set arrives out bye, the main rope will be wound up, and the tail rope pass out from the drum to the end and back, i.e.
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  • twice the length of the way; the set is returned in bye, by reversing the engine, casting loose the main, and coupling up the tail drum, so that the tail rope is wound up and the main rope paid out.
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  • In dip workings the tail rope is often made to work a pump connected with the bottom pulley, which forces the water back to the cistern of the main pumping engine in the pit.
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  • This system in many respects resembles the tail rope, but has the advantage of working with one-third less length of rope for the same length of way.
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  • In Koepe's method the drum is replaced by a disk with a grooved rim for the rope, which passes from the top of one cage over the guide pulley, round the disk, and back over the second guide to the second cage, and a tail rope, passing round a pulley at the bottom of the shaft, connects the bottoms of the cages, so that the dead weight of cage, tubs and rope is completely counterbalanced at all positions of the cages, and the work of the engine is confined to the useful weight of coal raised.
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  • There is the full series of 44 teeth, generally without any gaps, and most of the bones of the skeleton are separate and complete; while, in many instances at any rate, the tail was much longer than in any existing ungulates, and the whole bodily form approximated to that of a carnivore.
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  • There is also a great seasonal change in appearance and colour in this squirrel, owing to the ears losing their tufts of hair and to the bleaching of the tail.
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  • The first or typical palm-squirrel, Funambulus palmarum, inhabits Madras, has but three light stripes on the back, and shows a rufous band on the under-side of the base of the tail.
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  • pennanti, on the other hand, there is a pair of faint additional lateral white stripes, making five in all, and the under-surface of the tail is uniformly whitish olive.
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  • haringtoni, differs as regards colour in a remarkable manner from all other known members of the group. It is a medium-sized species of a pale creamy buff colour above, lighter beneath, and with a whitish tail, while it is further characterized by the absence of the first upper premolar, which shows that it is not an albino or pale variety.
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  • BEAVER,' the largest European aquatic representative of the mammalian order Rodentia, easily recognized by its large trowel-like, scaly tail, which is expanded in the horizontal direction.
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  • In the Sciuridae the two main bones (tibia and fibula) of the lower half of the leg are quite separate, the tail is round and hairy, and the habits are arboreal and terrestrial.
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  • In the beavers or Castoridae these bones are in close contact at their lower ends, the tail is depressed, expanded and scaly, and the habits are aquatic. Beavers have webbed hind-feet, and the claw of the second hind-toe double.
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  • exclusive of the tail, which is about 10 in.
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  • plastered down by the fore-feet, and not, as often supposed, by the tail, which is employed solely as a rudder.
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  • BIRDS OF PARADISE, a group of passerine birds inhabiting New Guinea and the adjacent islands, so named by the Dutch voyagers in allusion to the brilliancy of their plumage, and to the current belief that, possessing neither wings nor feet, they passed their lives in the air, sustained on their ample plumes, resting only at long intervals suspended from the branches of lofty trees by the wire-like feathers of the tail, and drawing their food "from the dews of heaven and the nectar of flowers."
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  • The two centre tail feathers attain a length of 34 in., and, being destitute of webs, have a thin wire-like appearance.
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  • This splendid plumage, however, belongs only to the adult males, the females being exceedingly plain birds of a nearly uniform dusky brown colour, and possessing neither plumes nor lengthened tail feathers.
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  • The king bird of paradise (Cicinnurus regius) is one of the smallest and most brilliant of the group, and is specially distinguished by its two middle tail feathers, the ends of which alone are webbed, and coiled into a beautiful spiral disk of a lovely emerald green.
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  • The hindquarters are comparatively large and heavy, while the tail is long, deep and more or less laterally compressed, evidently adapted for swimming.
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  • The muzzle is naked, small glands are present on the face below the eyes, and the tail is comparatively long.
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  • The large and brightly coloured bongo (Boocercus euryceros) of the equatorial forest-districts serves in some respects to connect the bushbucks with the elands, having horns in both sexes, and a tufted tail, but a brilliant orange coat with vertical white stripes.
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  • eyes; and the tail is moderate or short.
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  • The neck is longer and more slender than in ordinary gazelles, and the tail is likewise relatively long.
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  • In running, the head and neck are thrown backwards, while the tail is turned forwards over the back.
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  • The duikers, or duikerboks (Cephalophus), of Africa, which range in size from a large hare to a fallow-deer, typify the subfamily Cephalophinae, characterized by the spike-like horns of the bucks, the elongated aperture of the face-glands, the naked muzzle, the relatively short tail, and the square-crowned upper molars; lateral hoofs being present.
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  • The long face, high crest for the horns, which are ringed, lyrate and more or less strongly angulated, and the moderately long tail, are the distinctive features of the hartebeests.
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  • long, broad at the base and narrow at the tip, suggesting an open fan or peacock's tail; (b) erect-eared barleys (var.
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  • The birds include eagles - some are called lammervangers from their occasional attacks on young lambs - vultures, hawks, kites, owls, crows, ravens, the secretary bird, cranes, a small white heron, quails, partridges, korhaans, wild geese, duck, and guineafowl, swallows, finches, starlings, the mossie or Cape sparrow, and the widow bird, noted for the length of its tail in summer.
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  • In one of the most esteemed varieties, the wing and tail feathers are at first black - a peculiarity, however, which disappears after the first moulting.
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  • The shrimps and their allies are distinguished from the larger Macrura, such as the lobsters and crayfishes, by greater development of the paddle-like limbs of the abdomen or tail, which are used in swimming.
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  • Reminiscences of the Greek signs of Gemini, Leo, Libra, Sagittarius, Capricornus and Pisces are obvious severally in the Hindu Two Faces, Lion's Tail, Beam of a Balance, Arrow, Gazelle's Head (figured as a marine nondescript) and Fish.
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  • BES, or Besas (Egyp. Bes or Besa), the Egyptian god of recreation, represented as a dwarf with large head, goggle eyes, protruding tongue, shaggy beard, a bushy tail seen between his bow legs hanging down behind (sometimes clearly as part of a skin girdle) and usually a large crown of feathers on his head.
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  • The weasel is an elegant little animal, with elongated slender body, back much arched, head small and flattened, ears short and rounded, neck long and flexible, limbs short, five toes on each foot, all with sharp, com - pressed, curved claws, tail rather short, slender, cylindrical, and pointed at the tip, and fur short and close.
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  • The upper-parts, out - side of limbs and tail, are uniform reddish brown, the under-parts white.
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  • body of the male is usually about 8 in., that of the tail 21 in.; the female is smaller.
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  • Laurenti) are close allies of the newts, but of exclusively terrestrial habits, indicated by the shape of the tail, which is not distinctly compressed.
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  • the short tail, tipped with numerous slender-stalked open quills, which make a loud rattling noise whenever the animal moves.
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  • They include three genera, of which the first is represented by the Canadian porcupine (Erethizon dorsatus), a stout, heavily-built animal, with long hairs almost or quite hiding its spines, four frontand five hind-toes, and a short, stumpy tail.
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  • The constituents of the last have often been classed as Copepoda, and among the Branchiopods must be regarded as aberrant, since the "branchial tail " implied in the name has no feet, and the actual feet are by no means obviously branchial.
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  • The Thamnocephalidae have likewise but a single species, Thamnocephalus platyurus (Packard, 1877), which justifies its title " bushy-head of the broad tail " by a singularity at each end.
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  • To the Polyphemidae, the wellknown family of the former tribe, Sars in 1897 added two remarkable genera, Cercopagis, meaning " tail with a sling," and Apagis, " without a sling," for seven species from the Sea of Azov.
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  • These extend the whole length of the tail, which is four-fifths of the body.
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  • The posterior end of the organ is positive, the anterior negative, and the current, passes from the tail to the head.
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  • The maximum shock is given when the head and tail of the Gymnotus are in contact with different points in the surface of some other animal.
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  • The ferret attains a length of about 1 4 in., exclusive of the tail, which measures 5 in.
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  • Most of these modifications are restricted to the skin, limbs, tail or tongue.
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  • In many lizards the muscles of the segments of the tail are so loosely connected and the vertebrae are so weak that the tail easily breaks off.
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  • Acrodont, Old World lizards, with laterally compressed body, prehensile tail and well developed limbs with the digits arranged in opposing, grasping bundles of two and three respectively.
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  • The skin is devoid of ossifications, but large and numerous cutaneous spines are often present, especially on the head and on the tail.
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  • The family, comprising some 200 species, with about 30 genera, shows great diversity of form; the terrestrial members are mostly flatbodied, the arboreal more laterally compressed and often with a very long tail.
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  • Their scales are mixed with larger prominent spines, which in some species are particularly developed on the tail, and disposed in whorls.
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  • The body is uniformly covered with granular scales, whilst the short, strong tail is armed with powerful spines disposed in whorls.
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  • I) is the frilled lizard (Chlamydosaurus kingi), which is restricted to Queensland and the north coast, and grows to a length of 3 ft., including the long tapering tail.
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  • It is covered with large and small spine-bearing tubercules; the head is small and the tail short.
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  • The animal, which reaches a length of more than 2 ft., is blackish-brown and yellow or orange, and on the thick tail these "warning colours" are arranged in alternate rings.
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  • The eyes and ears are concealed, the limbs are entirely absent, body and tail covered with soft, imbricating scales.
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  • They defend themselves by jerking head and tail sidewards.
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  • The other genera live in southern and in tropical Africa: Pseudocordylus, Platysaurus and Chamaesaura; the latter closely approaches the Anguidae by its snake-shaped body, very long tail and much reduced limbs, which in C. macrolepis are altogether absent.
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  • - Pleurodont; tongue very short and scaly; no osteoderms; supratemporal fossa roofed over by the cranial bones; eyes devoid of movable lids; tympanum exposed; femoral pores present; limbs and tail well developed.
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  • Tupinambis teguixin, the "tej u" of South America and the West Indies, is the largest member of the family; it reaches a length of a yard, most of which, however, belongs to the strong, whip-like tail.
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  • They defend themselves not only with their powerful jaws and sharp claws, but also with lashing strokes of the long tail.
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  • Tail extremely short.
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  • Similar osteoderms underlie the scales of the body and tail.
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  • Tiliqua of Australia, Tasmania and Malay Islands, has stout lateral teeth with rounded-off crowns; C. gigas of the Moluccas and of New Guinea is the largest member of the family, reaching a length of nearly 2 ft.; the limbs are well developed, as in Trachysaurus rugosus of Australia, which is easily recognized by the large and rough scales and the short, broad, stump-like tail.
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  • The long, pointed tail is brittle.
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  • niloticus, and these have a laterally compressed tail; others inhabit dry sandy districts, e.g.
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  • long, two-thirds belonging to the tail, distributed over the whole of Australia.
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  • In actual use this unit varied greatly: at Naucratis (29) there are groups of it at 231, 223 and others down to 208; this is the earliest form in which we can study it, and the corresponding values to these are 130 and 126, or the gold and trade varieties of the Babylonian, while the lower tail down to 208 corresponds to the shekel down to 118, which is just what is found.
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  • The upper side of the tail is buff, spotted with broken rings like the back, its under surface white with simple spots.
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  • A, Shark (Lamna cornubica), with long lobe of tail upturned.
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  • B, Ichthyosaur (Ichthyosaurus quadricissus), with fin-like paddles, long lobe of tail down-turned.
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  • C, Dolphin (Sotalia fluviatilis), with horizontal tail, fin or fluke.
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  • The under surface of the body, the legs, and tail are nearly white, without stripes.
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  • The general or typical coloration is, however, a rich tan upon the head, neck, body, outside of legs, and tail near the root.
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  • The lips, throat, breast and belly, the inside of the legs and the lower sides of tail are pure white, marked with irregular spots of black, those on the breast being long bars and on the belly and inside of legs large blotches.
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  • The tail has large black spots near the root, some with light centres, and from about midway of its length to the tip it is ringed with black.
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  • from the nose to root of tail.
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  • The average length is about 40 in., and the general tone of colour tawny mingled with black and white above and whitish below, the tail having a black tip and likewise a dark glandpatch near the root of the upper surface.
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  • History is silent respecting it from that time till the year 1456, when it passed very near to the earth: its tail then extended over 60° of the heavens, and had the form of a sabre.
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  • Having taken up the reins, the rider should stand at his horse's near (left) shoulder, facing towards the tail, and in that position hold the stirrup with his right hand for the reception of his left foot.
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  • The ears are large, and the tail rudimentary.
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  • There is no notch between the flukes, as in other whales, but the hinder part of the tail is rounded.
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  • KOXos, shortened, and ovpfi, tail), in astronomy, either of the two principal meridians of the celestial sphere, one of which passes through the poles and the two solstices, the other through the poles and the two equinoxes; hence designated as solstitial colure and equinoxial colure, respectively.
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  • Land was leased by military tenure, and until 1 739 grants were made only in male tail and alienations were forbidden.
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  • CAPYBARA, or Carpincho (Hydrochaerus capybara), the largest living rodent mammal, characterized by its moderately long limbs, partially-webbed toes, of which there are four in front and three behind, hoof-like nails, sparse hair, short ears, cleft upper lip and the absence of a tail.
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  • The second is a smaller animal than the first, with a more rounded and relatively smaller head, and the ears, hind-legs and tail shorter.
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  • saxatilis) and the diminutive Pronolagus crassicaudatus, characterized by its thick red tail.
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  • [Poecilolagus] americanus), turn white in winter; the former having long ears and the whole tail white, whereas in the latter the ears are shorter and the upper surface of the tail is dark.
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  • Distantly allied to the prairie-hare or white-tailed jack-rabbit, are several forms distinguished by having a more or less distinct black stripe on the upper surface of the tail.
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  • America, the small tapiti or Brazilian hare (Sylvilagus brasiliensis) is nearly allied to the wood-hare, but has a yellowish brown under surface to the tail.
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  • The build is stout and heavy, the limbs and tail are short, the ears moderate, the eyes minute and the feet five-toed and plantigrade.
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  • The genus which is common to the northern parts of both hemispheres is distinguished by the large cheek-pouches and by the absence or rudimentary condition of the claw of the first hind-toe, resembles Tamias in the slender form of the body, but displays great variation in the length of the tail, which may be a mere stump, or comparatively long.
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  • The following are the characters of the second sub-family, Heteromyinae: Incisors narrow; mastoid appearing largely on the top of the skull; eyes and ears moderate or large; hind-limbs and tail elongated.
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  • The Anomaluridae are characterized by having rooted cheek-teeth with shallow transverse enamel-folds, the two halves of the lower jaw movably articulated in front, very small post-orbital processes to the skull, and the presence of two rows of scales on the under surface of the base of the tail (figs.
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  • 7), which is provided with a parachute supported by a cartilaginous process arising from the olecranon of the ulna, and has well-developed ears and a moderately long tail.
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  • zenkeri (figured in the article Flying-Squirrel), is a mouse-like form, with very small ears and an extremely long tail.
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  • glis) of Europe, with a doubly vaned, bushy tail, simple stomach, and large molars with well-marked enamel-folds; the second, Muscardinus, with M.
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  • avellanarius, the common dormouse, distinguished by the cylindrical bushy tail, and thickened glandular walls of the cardiac extremity of the oesophagus; thirdly, Eliomys, containing several species, with tufted and doubly vaned tails, simple stomachs and smaller molar teeth, having concave crowns and faintly marked enamel-folds; and lastly, the African Graphiurus, represented by several species, with short cylindrical tails ending in a pencil of hairs, and very small molars almost without trace of enamel-folds.
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  • The tail and ears are generally very long; while, in correlation with the size of the latter, the auditory bullae of the skull are also large.
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  • The Turkestan Platycercomys (or Pygeretmus) has a lancet-shaped tail and no premolars; while Cardiocranus of the Nan-shan district of Central Asia has a similar type of tail, but short ears and a peculiarly triangular skull.
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  • Although sometimes short, the tail is generally long, sparsely haired and scaly.
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  • All these "rodentmoles" are thoroughly adapted to a subterranean life, the eyes and ears being small and rudimentary, as is also the tail; while the bodily form is cylindrical, and the front claws are very large and powerful.
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  • The tail is short.
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  • The Javan Pithechirus has the thumb opposable, while the Papuan Chiruromys has the tip of the tail naked above and prehensile.
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  • Vandeleuria, ranging from India to Yunnan, has flat nails on the first and fifth toes of both feet, and a very long tail; while the Indo-Malay Chiropodomys has a flat nail on the first toe of both feet and a tufted tail.
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  • Uromys differs from Mus in having the scales of the tail not overlapping, but set edge to edge, so as to form a sort of mosaic work.
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  • Gerbillus (or Tatera), with a large number of species, has a range coextensive with that of the sub-family; Pachyuromys, with two African species, has a short club-shaped tail and enormous auditory bullae; while the remaining members of the group, which are confined to North Africa, Eastern Europe and Asia, are arranged in the genera Meriones, Psainmomys and Rhombomys, the latter represented only by R.
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  • All the Bathyergidae are African, and adapted to a burrowing life, having minute ears and eyes, a short tail and the thumb armed with a large claw.
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  • The upper lip is cleft, the jugal lacks an inferior angle, the fore part of the skull is short and broad; the cheek-teeth are partially rooted, with external and internal enamel-folds, the soles of the feet are smooth, there are six pairs of teats, the clavicles are imperfect and the tail is not prehensile.
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  • is represented in all the three great continents of the Old World, and extends as far east as Flores and Celebes, the skull is swollen and convex, the spines are cylindrical, and the tail is short and covered with spines and slender-stalked open quills.
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  • The tail is generally very short, and its basal vertebrae are often fused with the sacrum.
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  • It is a large rodent known to the Tupi Indians as the paca-rana, or false paca, in allusion to the resemblance of its coloration to that of the true paca, from which it differs by its elldeveloped tail, the absence of cheek-pouches, the full development of all five toes and the wider thorax.
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  • In the true cavies, or couies, Cavia, the foreand hind-limbs are short and of subequal length, the ears are short and there is no tail.
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  • The maras (Dolichotis) have the limbs and ears long and the tail very short.
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  • in length, being the largest member of the group. It has a long tail, brown fur and red incisors, and lives in burrows near water, feeding on aquatic plants.
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  • In one kind the tail is prehensile.
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  • In Abrocoma the tail has no tuft, the ears are still larger and the lower cheek-teeth more complex than the upper ones.
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  • Petromys has a still longer and more bushy tail, and no comb to the hind-feet.
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  • From the picas the hares and rabbits (Leporidae) are distinguished by the imperfect clavicles, the more or less elongated hind-limbs, short recurved tail (absent in one case) and generally long ears.
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  • aquaticus) of the southern United States form the group Limnotragus, characterized by the harsher fur, the shorter ears, tail and hind-feet, and the complete fusion of the post-orbital process (which is so distinct in the typical hares) with the adjacent parts of the skull, so that neither notches nor perforations are developed in this region.
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  • The short-tailed rabbit of the western United States (Brachylagus idahoensis) is the sole member of a group allied in general characters to the typical Lepus, but distinguished by the unusually short tail.
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  • The spiny rabbit, separated from Lepus by Blyth in 1845 under the name of Caprolagus hispidus, is an inhabitant of Assam and the adjacent districts, and distinguished by its harsh, bristly fur and short ears and tail.
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  • The second thoracic ring is humped, and there is a spine-like horn or protuberance at the tail.
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  • This fringe of silk is placed by the attendant between two hinged boards, and whilst held firmly in these boards (called book-boards) is pulled off the machine, and is called a " strip "; the part which has been hooked round the teeth is called the " face," and the other portion the " tail."
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  • Another portion is opened out and placed tail end to the first portion; and these operations are repeated until the requisite weight is spread.
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  • Equations of this form have received a striking observational verification in so far as they predict a tail or root towards which the lines ultimately tend when s is increased indefinitely.
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  • A band might in that case fade away towards zero frequencies, and as s increases, return again from infinity with diminishing distances, the head and the tail pointing in the same direction; or with a different value of constants a band might fade away towards infinite frequencies, then return through the whole range of the spectrum to zero frequencies, and once more return with its tail near its head.
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  • A bird called moho, but actually of a different family, was the Pennula ecaudata or millsi, which had hardly any tail, and had wings so degenerate that it was commonly thought wingless.
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  • Aristomenes alone was saved, and soon reappeared at Eira: legend told how he was upheld in his fall by an eagle and escaped by grasping the tail of a fox, which led him to the hole by which it had entered.
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  • Bailak Kibdjaki, also, an Arabian writer, shows in his Merchant's Treasure, a work given to the world in 1282, that the magnetized needle, floated on water by means of a splinter of wood or a reed, was employed on the Syrian seas at the time of his voyage from Tripoli to Alexandria (1242), and adds:"They say that the captains who navigate the Indian seas use, instead of the needle and splinter, a sort of fish made out of hollow iron, which, when thrown into the water, swims upon the surface, and points out the north and south with its head and tail" (Klaproth, Lettre, p. 57).
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  • The tail is extremely short.
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  • It can be divided into three regions - (i.) head, f (ii.) trunk, and (iii.) tail, separated from one another by two transverse septa.
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  • The .- trunk contains a spacious body-cavity filled during the breeding season by the swollen ovaries, and the same is true of the tail if we substitute testes for ovaries.
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  • Along each side of the body stretches a horizontal fin and a similar flange surrounds the tail.
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  • A median mesentery running dorsoventrally supports the alimentary canal and is continued behind it into the tail, thus dividing the body cavity into two lateral halves.
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  • The two testes lie in the tail and are formed by lateral proliferations of the living peritoneal cells.
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  • They pass out through short vasa deferentia with internal ciliated funnels, sometimes an enlargement on their course - the seminal vesicles - and a minute external pore situated on the side of the tail.
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  • The two lateral lobes contain the coelom; each separates off in front a segment which forms the head and presumably then divides again to form anteriorly the trunk, and posteriorly the tail regions.
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  • Krohnia P. Langerhans, with one lateral fin on each side, extending on to the tail.
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  • Spadella P. Langerhans, with a pair of lateral fins on the tail and a thickened ectodermic ridge running back on each side from the head to the anterior end of the fin.
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  • Rats have, however, generally more rows of scales on the tail (reaching to 210 or more) than mice, in which the number does not exceed 180.
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  • norvegicus) is distinguished by its large size, brownish grey colour, short tail and ears, stout skull, and the possession of from Jo to 12 teats.
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  • rattus) is distinguishable from the brown rat by its smaller size, longer ears and tail, and glossy black colour.
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  • (I) In the Hennebique system of construction the bars are flattened at the end and split to form a "fish tail."
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  • In these animals the eyeball and the fur of the body are unpigmented, but the tips of the ear pinnae and extremities of the fore and hind limbs, together with the tail, are marked by more or less well defined colour.
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  • In some cases, as in all the varying hares, in addition to the eyes retaining their normal pigmentation, areas similar in extent and situation to those on the Himalayan rabbits also retain their pigmentation; and in the ptarmigan there is a black band on each side of the head stretching forwards and backwards from the eyeball, and the outer tail feathers are black.
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  • He, not unnaturally, includes both curassows and turkeys in one category, calling both " Pavos " (peafowls); but he carefully distinguishes between them, pointing out among other things that the latter make a wheel (hacen la rueda) of their tail, though this was not so grand or so beautiful as that of the Spanish " Pavo," and he gives a faithful though short description of the turkey.
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  • The ears are rather small, ovate and erect; and there is no external appearance of a tail.
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  • The different values of the angle of minimum deviation for rays of different refrangibilities give rise to spectral colours, the red being nearest the sun, while farther away the overlapping of the spectra forms a flaming colourless tail sometimes extending over as much as ro° to 20 °.
    0
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  • Again, a slight deviation from the ordinary formation of the tail, whose rectrices normally number 14, and present a rounded termination, has led to the belief in a species, S.
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  • A similar sound may be made by affixing those feathers to the end of a rod and drawing them rapidly downwards in the same position as they occupy in the bird's tail while it is performing the feat.
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  • A long and bushy tail, for instance, is a useful balancer and is a not uncommon feature in mammals which lead an active arboreal life.
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  • But while the banner was square the pennon, which resembled it in other respects, was either pointed or forked at its extremity, and the pencel, which was considerably less than the others, always terminated in a single tail or streamer.6 If indeed we look at the scale of chivalric subordination from another point of view, it seems to be more properly divisible into four than into three stages, of which two may be called provisional and two final.
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  • The tail is nearly square or moderately rounded.
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  • In the genus Pteroglossus, the "Aracaris" (pronounced Arassari), the sexes more or less differ in appearance, and the tail is graduated.
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  • 1), contains some 6 or 7 species, having the beak, which is mostly transversely striped, and tail shorter than in Pteroglossus.
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  • The tail is capable of free vertical motion, and controlled by strong muscles, so that, at least in the true toucans, when the bird is preparing to sleep it is reverted and lies almost flat on the back, on which also the huge bill reposes, pointing in the opposite direction.
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  • The rotation, by destroying the contacts, preserves this unequal distribution, and carries B from A to C at the same time that the tail K connects the ball with the plate C. In this situation, the electricity in B acts upon that in C, and produces the contrary state, by virtue of the communication between C and the ball; which last must therefore acquire an electricity of the same kind with that of the revolving plate.
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  • He was variously represented with one, two or (usually) three heads, often with the tail of a snake or with snakes growing from his head or twined round his body.
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  • in length, of which the tail forms a third.
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  • In colour it is usually brownish black above, with the nose, chin, cheeks and throat tending to whitish, and the under parts brownish chestnut; while the feet and tail are black and blackish.
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  • Its versatile cries and actions, as seen and heard by those who penetrate the solitude of the northern forests it inhabits, can never be forgotten by one who has had experience of them, any more than the pleasing sight of its rust-coloured tail, which an occasional gleam of sunshine will light up into a brilliancy quite unexpected by those who have only surveyed the bird's otherwise gloomy appearance in the glass-case of a museum.
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  • Used for muffs, trimmings, boas, and carriage 1 The measurements given are from nose to root of tail of average large sizes after the dressing process, which has a shrinking tendency.
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  • In the height of winter the colour is pure white with exception of the tip of tail, which is quite black.
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  • Fisher.-Size 30X12 in., tail 12 to 18 in.
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  • These animals have a dense coat of fine, long brown wool, with very long dark brown hair on the head, flanks and tail, and, in the centre, a peculiar pale oval marking.
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  • The centre of the skin between the fins is very narrow and the skins taper at each end, particularly at the tail.
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  • from nose to root of tail.
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  • The kolinski, or as it is sometimes styled Tatar sable, is the animal, the tail of which supplies hair for artists' brushes.
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  • About equal in height to a roebuck, and with a short black tail, the chamois is readily distinguishable from all other ruminants by its vertical, backwardly-hooked, black horns, which are common to males and females, although smaller in the latter.
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  • The tail is shorter than in giraffes, and not tufted at the tip. The okapi, of which the first entire skin sent to Europe was received in England from Sir H.
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  • It was even asserted at the time that Jeffreys proposed he should be whipped at the cart's tail through London.
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  • long, with a tail of about 8 in.; the general hue of the fur is grey above and black on the under parts; the head is white, with a black stripe on each side.
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  • long, and the tail no more than an inch; the fur is dark brown, with the top of the head, neck and a broad dorsal stripe, white.
    0
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  • In these the tail is much longer in proportion to the body than in the rest of the group.
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  • Then the badger's tail is split, a chain put through it, and fastened to the stake with such ability that the badger can come up to the other end of the place.
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  • There is also a tuft of elongated hairs at the end of the tail, one upon each elbow, and in most lions a copious fringe along the middle line of the under surface of the body, wanting, however, in some examples.
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  • from nose to tip of tail, following the curves of the body.
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  • 6 in., of which the tail occupies 3 ft.
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  • of the tail, which in all are hidden by their coverts, are soft.
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  • The coat is long and soft, pale silvery grey or light buff in hue, marked with black on the chest and upper parts of the limbs, with transverse stripes on the loins and rings on the tail of the same hue.
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  • In years of very favourable flood this high-level canal would not be wanted at all; the irrigation could be done from the main canal, and with this great advantage, that the main canal water would carry with it much more fertilizing matter than would be got from the tail of the highlevel canal, which left the river perhaps 25 m.
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  • works required for this system are a syphon to pass the high level under the main canal near its head, bridges fitted with sluices where each canal passes under an embankment, and an escape weir at the tail of the system, just south of the desert point, to return surplus water to the river.
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  • The neck is long, but not coarse, the ribs are deep, the loin wide and level, the tail set high, and the legs straight and set well outside the carcase.
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  • The head and legs are very short, and the body short, thick and wide; the jowl is heavy, the ears pricked, and the thin skin laden with long silky, wavy, but not curly, hair, whilst the tail is very fine.
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  • The Berkshire is a black pig with a pinkish skin, and a little white on the nose, forehead, pasterns, and tip to the tail.
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  • The whole length of the bird is from 43 to 46 in., of which, however, about 20 are due to the long cuneiform tail, while the pointed wings measure more than 30 in.
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  • The quill-feathers, both of the wings and tail, are of a dark blackish-grey.
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  • "The party of two," he said, "reminds me of the Scotch terrier, which was so covered with hair that you could not tell which was the head and which was the tail."
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  • Ammon is figured of human form, wearing on his head a plain deep circlet from which rise two straight parallel plumes, perhaps representing the tail feathers of a hawk.
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  • At some subsequent time it was transferred bodily to Canterbury, where it received numerous interpolations in the earlier part, and a few later local entries which finally tail off into the Latin acts of Lanfranc. A may therefore be dismissed.
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  • The axe was at the close of the prehistoric age a square slab of copper (7) with one sharp edge; small projecting tails then appeared at each end of the back (8), and increased until the long tail for lashing on to the handle is more than half the length of the axe in an iron one of Roman (?) age (13).
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  • In form these animals are somewhat pig-like; the body is stout, with arched back; the limbs are short and stout, armed with strong, blunt claws; the ears disproportionately long; and the tail very thick at the base and tapering gradually.
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  • The measurements of a female, taken in the flesh, were head and body 4 ft., tail 172 in.; but a large individual measured 6 ft.
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  • In colour the Cape aard-vark is pale sandy or yellow, the hair being scanty and allowing the skin to show; the northern aard-vark has a still thinner coat, and is further distinguished by the shorter tail and longer head and ears.
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  • In size it much resembles the English polecat-the length of the head and body being usually from 15 to 18 in., that of the tail to the end of the hair about 9 in.
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  • The tail is bushy, but tapering at the end.
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  • The pelage consists of a dense, soft, matted under fur, mixed with long, stiff, lustrous hairs on all parts of the body and tail.
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  • The gloss is greatest on the upper parts; on the tail the bristly hairs predominate.
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  • 18 is usually the darkest, and the tail is nearly black.
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  • In very rare instances the tail is tipped with white.
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  • and 33 in., 4nd of the tail between 11 in.
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  • The first of these is the common shoa 1 tailed field-mouse, or "field-vole," Microtus agrestis, which belongs to the typical section of the type genus, and M S is about the size of a 343 mouse, with a short stumpy body, and a Upper and Lower Molars of the Water-Rat tail about one-third the (or Water-Vole), Microtus amphibius.
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  • The tail is about half the length of the head and body, and the hind feet are long and powerful, although not webbed, and have five rounded pads on their lower surfaces.
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  • The red-backed field-mouse or "bank-vole" may be distinguished externally from the first species by its more or less rusty or rufouscoloured back, its larger ears and its comparatively longer tail, which attains to about half the length of the head and body.
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  • The muzzle is entirely hairy; the ears and tail are short; and the throat is maned.
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  • The coat is unspotted at all ages, with a whitish area in the region of the tail.
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  • The coat is remarkable for its density and compactness; the general colour of the head and upper parts being clove-brown, with more or less white or whitish grey on the under parts and inner surfaces of the limbs, while there is also some white above the hoofs and on the muzzle, and there may be whitish rings round the eyes; there is a white area in the region of the tail, which includes the sides but not the upper surface of the latter; and the tarsal tuft is generally white.
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  • ARCTURUS, the brightest star in the northern hemisphere, situated in the constellation Bootes in an almost direct line with the tail Q' and rt) of the constellation Ursa Major (Great Bear); hence its derivation from the Gr.
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  • caudata), is a much larger animal, with a longer tail.
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  • FERGUS FALLS, a city and the county-seat of Otter Tail county, Minnesota, U.S.A., on the Red river, 170 m.
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  • The ears are short and rounded; the toes of the broad feet very imperfectly separated; the tail is well developed, with a terminal tuft; and the straight hair is not woolly.
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  • Tail short.
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  • The tail is very long; and the feet have five functional toes, with complete but short metacarpals or metatarsals.
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  • obvious peculiarity is the long reptilian tail, composed of 20 vertebrae and not ending in a pygostyle.
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  • Upon these features of the tail E.
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  • - Tail of British Museum specimen.
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  • Thus Palestine lay at the gate of Arabia and Egypt, and at the tail end of a number of small states stretching up into Asia Minor; it was encircled by the famous ancient civilizations of Babylonia,.
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  • It has the same moderately long, plump body, with a low dorsal crest, the continuation of the membrane bordering the strongly compressed tail; a large thick head with small eyes without lids and with a large pendent upper lip; two pairs of well-developed limbs, with free digits; and above all, as the most characteristic feature, three large appendages on each side of the back of the head, fringed with filaments which, in their fullest development, remind one of black ostrich feathers.
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  • The body is smooth and shiny, with vertical grooves on the sides, the tail is but feebly compressed, the eye is moderately large and provided with movable lids, and the upper lip is nearly straight.
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  • There are two varieties of sheep, both having the fat tail.
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  • in length, including its tail, and weighs 3 lb.
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  • (For the characteristics of the family and of its more important generic representatives, see RoDENTIA.) In the Egyptian jerboa the length of the body is 8 in., and that of the tail, which is long, cylindrical and covered with short hair terminated by a tuft, 10 in.
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  • When about to spring, this jerboa raises its body by means of the hinder extremities, and supports itself at the same time upon its tail, while the fore-feet are so closely pressed to the breast as to be scarcely visible, which doubtless suggested the name Dipus, or twofooted.
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  • In all these antelopes long cylindrical horns are present in both sexes; the muzzle is hairy; there is no gland below the eye; the tail is long and tufted; and in the breadth of their tall crowns the upper molar-teeth resemble those of the oxen.
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  • He was born with horns, a goat's beard and feet and a tail, his person being completely covered with hair.
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  • in length, exclusive of the tail, which is half the length of the body, and stands from 10 to 12 in.
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  • long including the tail, and prettily marked with dark longitudinal stripes, and spots which have a distinctly linear arrangement.
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  • A prodigiously long tail, beetling eyebrows with long black hairs, black ears, face, feet and hands, and a general greyish-brown colour of the fur are the distinctive characteristics of the langur.
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  • These monkeys are characterized by their lank bodies, long slender limbs and tail, welldeveloped thumbs, absence of cheek-pouches, and complex stomachs.
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  • Ross's or the roseate gull, Rhodostethia rosea, forms a well-marked genus, distinguished not so much by the pink tint of its plumage (for that is found in other species) but by its small dove-like bill and wedge-shaped tail.
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  • The commonest of these have the head of a fowl, and the arms and bust of a man, and terminate in the body and tail of a serpent.
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  • The young (which on leaving the nest have not the tips of the bill crossed) are of a dull olive colour with indistinct dark stripes on the lower parts, and the quills of the wings and tail dusky.
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  • vulturina of Zanzibar, conspicuous by the bright blue in its plumage, the hackles that adorn the lower part of its neck, and its long tail.
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  • Biting its tail it symbolized the earth surrounded by the world-river.
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  • R appears in the Greek form without a tail, and V and Y are both found for the same sound.
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  • It is of medium size, with long limbs, short tail, and tawny fur spotted with black; the head and body may measure 40 in.
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  • and the tail 16 in.
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  • Selby, properly belonging, at least in the Fame Islands, to the species known by the book-name of Sandwich tern, all the others being those called sea-swallows - a name still most commonly given to the whole group throughout Britain from their long wings, forked tail and marine habit.
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  • Willemoes Suhm, which makes up for its vanished eyes by its extraordinarily elongate and dentated claws; in Psalidopus huxleyi, Wood-Mason and Alcock (1892), bristling with spikes from head to tail; in the Nematocarcinidae, with their long thread-like limbs and longer antennae; in species of Aristaeopsis reported by Chun from deep water off the east coast of Africa, bright red prawns nearly a foot long, with antennae about five times the length of the body.
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  • This name in seamen's ornithology applies to several other kinds of birds, and, though perhaps first given to those of this group, is nowadays most commonly used for the species of Tropic-Bird, the projecting middle feathers of the tail in each kind being intent, "Dunghunters."
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  • polnatorhinus (often incorrectly spelt pomarinus), about the size of a common gull, Larus canus, and presenting, irrespective of sex, two very distinct phases of plumage, one almost wholly sooty-brown, the other particoloured - dark above and white on the breast, the sides of the neck being of a glossy straw-colour, and the lower part of the neck and the sides of the body barred with brown; but a singular feature in the adults of this species is that the two median tail-feathers, which are elongated, have their shaft twisted towards the tip, so that in flight the lower surfaces of their webs are pressed together vertically, giving the bird the appearance of having a disk attached to its tail.
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  • in total length, of which the tail takes up about eleven.
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    0
  • This is also the earliest form in the Latin alphabet, but forms with the upright turned to the right as in a modern Q are found in the Republican period, while this tail becomes longer and curved in the early Empire.
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    0
  • The general colour of the fur is greyish, with a deep tinge of chestnut from the middle of the back to the root of the tail.
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  • He was tail, rawboned and awkward; his early instruction was scant; but he "read books," talked well, and so, after his admission to the bar at Richmond, Virginia, in 1797, and his removal next year to Lexington, Kentucky, he quickly acquired a reputation and a lucrative income from his law practice.
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  • with the Spanish fly, the foxes tail, &c. &c."
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  • The corners of the handkerchief were tied to the extremities of the cross, and when the body of the kite was thus formed, a tail, loop and string were added to it.
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  • Thus, the species inhabiting Sumatra, Java and Borneo are almost always much smaller than the closely allied species of Celebes and the Moluccas; the species or varieties of the small island of Amboyna are larger than the same species or closely allied forms inhabiting the surrounding islands; the species found in Celebes possess a peculiar form of wing, quite distinct from that of the same or closely allied species of adjacent islands; and, lastly, numerous species which have tailed wings in India and the western islands of the Archipelago, gradually lose the tail as we proceed eastward to New Guinea and the Pacific.
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  • Much larger specimens are recorded, but 10 feet from the tip of the nose to the end of the tail is no unusual length for a large male tiger.
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  • The groundcolour of the upper and outer parts of the head, body, limbs and tail is bright rufous fawn; and these parts are beautifully marked with transverse stripes of a dark, almost black colour.
    0
    0
  • Leopards and bears are numerous; and the sand-badger, the Arctonyx collaris of Cuvier, a small animal somewhat resembling a bear, but having the snout, eyes and tail of a hog, is found.
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    0
  • He would say sometimes to the people of the house that he was like the serpent which forms a circle with its tail in its mouth, meaning thereby that he had nothing left at the year's end.
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  • high at the shoulders), and has longer ears, a tail more scantily clothed with hair, and a shorter mane.
    0
    0
  • With the exception of the abdomen and the inside of the thighs, the whole of the surface is covered with stripes, the legs having narrow transverse bars reaching quite to the hoofs, and the base of the tail being also barred.
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  • Perhaps the most constant and obvious distinction between this species and the next is the arrangement of the stripes on the hinder part of the back, where there are a number of short transverse bands reaching to the median longitudinal dorsal stripe, and unconnected with the uppermost of the broad stripes which pass obliquely across the haunch from the flanks towards the root of the tail.
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  • In the typical form the stripes do not extend on to the limbs or tail; but there is a great variation in this respect, and as we proceed north the striping increases, till in the north-eastern E.
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  • These are P. megapodius, called El Turco by the natives, which is noticeable for its ungainly appearance and awkward gait; the P. albicollis, which inhabits barren hillsides and is called tapacollo from the manner of carrying its tail turned far forward over its back; the P. rubecula, of Chiloe, a small timid denizen of the gloomy forest, called the cheucau or chuca, whose two or three notes are believed by the superstitious natives to be auguries of impending success or disaster; and an allied species (Hylactes Tarnii, King) called the guid-guid or barking bird, whose cry is a close imitation of the yelp of a small dog.
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  • The course of the rays in the meridional section is no longer symmetrical to the principal ray of the pencil; and on an intercepting plane there appears, instead of a luminous point, a patch of light, not symmetrical about a point, and often exhibiting a resemblance to a comet having its tail directed towards or away from the axis.
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    0
  • They agree with fishes in the possession of median fins, and resemble the large majority of early fishes in their unequal-lobed (heterocercal) tail, but they have no ordinary a.v.l., c., Central.
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  • Rather smaller than a squirrel, with dusky brown fur, the tarsier has immense eyes, large ears, a long thin tail, tufted at the end, a greatly elongated tarsal portion of the foot, and disk-like adhesive surfaces on the fingers, which doubtless assist the animal in maintaining its position on the boughs.
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  • from the tip of the nose to the end of the tail.
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    0
  • from the point of the beak to the extremity of the tail, and 9 ft.
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    0
  • Rapid progression is, however, performed only by the powerful hind-limbs, the animals covering the ground by a series of immense bounds, during which the fore part of the body is inclined forwards, and balanced by the long, strong and tapering tail, which is carried horizontally backwards.
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    0
  • When not moving, they often assume a perfectly upright position, the tail aiding the two hind-legs to form a tripod, and the front-limbs dangling by the side of the chest.
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    0
  • The number of vertebrae is - in the cervical region 7, dorsal 13, lumbar 6, sacral 2, caudal varying according to the length of the tail, but generally from 21 to 25.
    0
    0
  • They are naturally timid and inoffensive, but the larger kinds when hard pressed will turn and defend themselves, sometimes killing a dog by grasping it in their fore-paws, and inflicting terrible wounds with the sharp claws of their powerful hind-legs, supporting themselves meanwhile upon the tail.
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  • The typical genus Macropus, in which the muzzle is generally naked, the ears large, the fur on the nape of the neck usually directed backwards, the claw of the fourth hind-toe very large, and the tail stout and tapering, includes a large number of species.
    0
    0
  • Nearly allied are the rock-wallabies of Australia and Tasmania, constituting the genus Petrogale, chiefly distinguished by the thinner tail being more densely haired and terminating in a tuff.
    0
    0
  • consepicillatus, constitute a genus with the same distribution as the last, and likewise with a hairy muzzle, but with a rather short, evenly furred tail, devoid of a spur.
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    0
  • Tail long, and sometimes partially prehensile when it is used for carrying bundles of grass with which these animals build their nests.
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  • 4); the tarsus is long and the tail is prehensile.
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  • REEDBUCK (Dutch rietbok), the popular name of a foxy red South African antelope (Cervicapra arundineum) of medium size, with a moderately long bushy tail, a bare gland-patch behind the ear, and in the male rather short horns which bend forwards in a regular curve.
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  • "The fashion of Greek fire was such that it came to us as great as a tun of verjuice, and the fiery tail of it was as big as a mighty lance; it made such noise in the coming that it seemed like the thunder from heaven, and looked like a dragon flying through the air; so great a light did it throw that throughout the host men saw as though it were day for the light it threw."
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  • in length, with large teeth in front, smaller teeth behind: its tail is much elongated and slender.
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    0
  • In Rhamphorhynchus there is also a rhomboidal expansion of membrane at the end of the tail.
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  • As a whole, the mandrill is characterized by heaviness of body, stoutness and strength of limb, and exceeding shortness of tail, which is a mere stump, not 2 in.
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  • at the shoulders, and to a length of about 2 ft., exclusive of its bushy tail.
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  • The jackal, like the fox, has an offensive odour, due to the secretion of a gland at the base of the tail.
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  • In art he is depicted as a vigorous old man with long hair and beard, his body terminating in a scaly tail, his breast covered with shells and seaweed.
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  • The capacious bay, formerly known as the Bay of St Lawrence from a religious house long since demolished, is protected by a sandbank that ends here, and is hence known as the Tail of the Bank.
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  • No one ever saw a bird in the air flapping its wings towards its tail.
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  • He, in fact, endeavours to prove that a bird wedges itself forward upon the air by the perpendicular vibration of its wings, the wings during their action forming a wedge, the base of which (c b e) is directed towards the head of the bird, the apex (a f) being directed towards the tail (d).
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  • The same argument is re stated in different words as under: - " If the air under the wings be struck by the flexible portions of the wings (flabella, literally fly flaps or small fans) with a motion perpendicular to the horizon, the sails (vela) and flexible portions of the wings (flabella) will yield in an upward direction and form a wedge, the point of which is directed towards the tail.
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  • d, Tail of the bird.
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  • h, Tail of artificial bird.
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  • In Penaud's artificial bird the equilibrium is secured by the addition of a tail.
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  • Thefollowing are the measurements of the model in question: - length of wing from tip to tip, 32 in.; weight of wing, tail, frame, india-rubber, &c., 73 grammes (about 22 ounces).
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  • To an axis at the stern of the car a triangular frame is attached, resembling the tail of a bird, which is also covered with canvas or oiled silk.
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  • Beneath the tail is a rudder for directing the course of the machine to the right or to the left; and to facilitate the steering a sail is stretched between two masts which rise from the car.
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  • very good idea of the arrangement - a, b, c representing the superimposed aeroplanes, d the tail, e, f the screw propellers.
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  • ft., in addition to the tail (d).
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  • The fuel used was refined gasoline, and the extreme end of the tail of the fish was utilized for a storage tank with a capacity of one quart.
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  • The hairs on the body are long, especially on the ridge of the neck and back, where they form a distinct mane, which is continued along the tail.
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  • This animal, also called the bear-cat, is allied to the palm-civets, or paradoxures, but differs from the rest of the family (Viverridae) by its tufted ears and long, bushy, prehensile tail, which is thick at the root and almost equals in length the head and body together (from 28 to 33 inches).
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  • Lynxes are found in the northern and temperate regions of both the Old and New World; they are smaller than leopards, and larger than true wild cats, with long limbs, short stumpy tail, ears tufted at the tip, and pupil of the eye linear when contracted.
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  • In this picture, which shows the crudeness of the zoological notions current in the 18th century as to both men and apes, there are set in a row four figures: (a) a recognizable orang-utan, sitting and holding a staff; (b) a chimpanzee, absurdly humanized as to head, hands, and feet; (c) a hairy woman, with a tail a foot long; (d) another woman, more completely coated with hair.
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  • The speculations as to primitive man connected with these stories diverted the British public, headed by Dr Johnson, who said that Monboddo was " as jealous of his tail as a squirrel."
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  • The lowest coccygeal vertebrae of man remain as a rudimentary tail.
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  • - Antlers rounded, usually with five or more tines, generally including a bez (second), and always a trez (third); coat of adult generally unspotted, with a large lightcoloured disk surrounding the tail; young, spotted.
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  • - Antlers smaller and simpler, four-tined, with a trez (third), but no bez (second); coat of adult spotted, at least in summer, with a white area bordered by black in the region of the tail, which is also black and white.
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  • - Antlers without a bez, but with a trez-tine, above which the beam is more or less palmated, and generally furnished with numerous snags; coat of adult spotted in summer, uniform in winter, with black and white markings in the region of the tail similar to those of Pseudaxis; young, spotted.
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  • - Lateral metacarpals as in Rangifer; antlers wanting; upper canines of males tusk-like and growing from semi-persistent pulps; cheek-teeth tall-crowned (hypsodont); tail moderate.
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  • - Lateral metacarpals as in Rangifer; antlers rather small, without a brow-tine or sub-basal snag, dichotomously forked, with the upper or posterior prong again forking; tail rudimentary; vomer not dividing posterior nasal aperture of skull.
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