Syracuse sentence examples

syracuse
  • of Syracuse had placed there about 470 B.C., owing to the same cause.

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  • ARCHIMEDES (c. 287 -212 B.C.), Greek mathematician and inventor, was born at Syracuse, in Sicily.

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  • He was the son of Pheidias, an astronomer, and was on intimate terms with, if not related to, Hiero, king of Syracuse, and Gelo his son.

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  • Thus he devised for Hiero engines of war which almost terrified the Romans, and which protracted the siege of Syracuse for three years.

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  • Archimedes died at the capture of Syracuse by Marcellus, 212 B.C. In the general massacre which followed the fall of the city, Archimedes, while engaged in drawing a mathematical figure on the sand, was run through the body by a Roman soldier.

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  • It was founded (perhaps on the site of an early Sicanian settlement) by colonists from Gela about 582 B.C., and, though the lastest city of importance founded by the Greeks in Sicily, soon acquired a position second to that of Syracuse alone, owing to its favourable situation for trade with Carthage and to the fertility of its territory.

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  • In the struggle between Syracuse and Athens (415-413) the city remained absolutely neutral.

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  • Syracuse Caltagirone, Noto, Piazza-Armerina.

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  • It must be observed that the name Italians was at one time confined to the Oenotrians; indeed, according to Antiochus of Syracuse (apud Dion.

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  • His troops had captured Messina after a bombardment which earned him the sobriquet of King Bomba; Catania and Syracuse fell soon after, hideous atrocities being everywhere committed with his sanction.

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  • ARETHUSA, in Greek mythology, a nymph who gave her name to a spring in Elis and to another in the island of Ortygia near Syracuse.

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  • The probable origin of the story is the part traditionally taken in the foundation of Syracuse by the Iamidae of Olympia, who identified the spring Arethusa with their own river Alpheus, and the nymph with Artemis Alpheiaia, who was worshipped at Ortygia.

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  • He fell, however, in 407 in an attempt to enter Syracuse, and, as a result of the treaty of 405 B.C., Selinus became absolutely subject to Carthage, and remained so until its destruction at the close of the first Punic War, when its inhabitants were transferred to Lilybaeum.

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  • In front of the wall lies a deep trench, into which several passages descend, as at the nearly contemporary fort of Euryelus above Syracuse (q.v.).

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  • of Syracuse.

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  • These ancient indications of a Minoan connexion with Sicily have now received interesting confirmation in the numerous discoveries, principally due to the recent excavations of P. Orsi, of arms and painted vases of Late Minoan fabric in Bronze Age tombs of the provinces of Syracuse and Girgenti (Agrigentum) belonging to the late Bronze Age.

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  • For a short time he worked for his father in the hardware business; in1852-1856he worked as a surveyor in preparing maps of Ulster, Albany and Delaware counties in New York, of Lake and Geauga counties in Ohio, and of Oakland county in Michigan, and of a projected railway line between Newburgh and Syracuse, N.Y.

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  • von Syrakus (Vienna, 1881), with full references to authorities in footnotes; articles Sicily and Syracuse.

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  • His son Dionysius, known as "the Younger," succeeded in 367 B.C. He was driven from the kingdom by Dion (356) and fled to Locri; but during the commotions which followed Dion's assassination, he managed to make himself master of Syracuse.

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  • See Syracuse and Timoleon; and, on both the Dionysii, articles by B.

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  • At Cyare, a fountain near Syracuse which Pluto made to spring up when he carried off his bride, the Syracusans held an annual festival in the course of which bulls were sacrificed by being drowned in the water.

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  • Its effect was to remove from Athens for a period of ten years any person who threatened the harmony and tranquillity of the body politic. A similar device existed at various times in Argos, Miletus, Syracuse and Megara, but in these cities it appears to have been introduced under Athenian influence.

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  • On the whole, the history of its effect in Athens, Argos, Miletus, Megara and Syracuse (where it was called Petalismus), furnishes no sufficient defence against its admitted disadvantages.

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  • Its form in inscriptions of Melos, Selinus, Syracuse and elsewhere in the 6th and 5th centuries suggests the influence of Aramaic forms in which the head of the letter is opened,9.

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  • Under his leadership, Tarentum fought with unvarying success against the Messapii, Lucania and even Syracuse.

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  • Gelo, son of Deinomenes, tyrant of Gela and Syracuse.

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  • From this time Gelo paid little attention to Gela, and devoted himself to the aggrandizement of Syracuse, which attained extraordinary wealth and influence.

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  • 20-38; see also SICILY: History, and SYRACUSE; for his coins see NUMISMATICS: Sicily.

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  • It was here that Dion landed in 357 B.C., when he attacked Syracuse.

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  • It is still to be seen at Syracuse, but it was probably transplanted thither at a later time, and reared only as a curiosity, as there is no notice of it to be found previous to 1674.

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  • At Syracuse also there are very extensive catacombs known as " the Grottos of St John."

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  • - Plan of the Catacombs of St John, Syracuse.

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  • - bs Plan of of St Circular marks that this cemetery " gives an Syracuse.(From Agincourt.) idea of a work executed with design and leisure, and with means v e ry different from those at command in producing the catacombs of Rome."

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  • C. Barrecca, Le Catacombe di San Giovanni in Siracusa (Syracuse, 1906).

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  • The arrests of Sims and of Shadrach in Boston in 1851; of "Jerry" M`Henry, in Syracuse, New York, in the same year; of Anthony Burns in 1854, in Boston; and of the two Garner families in 1856, in Cincinnati, with other cases arising under the Fugitive Slave Law of 1850, probably had as much to do with bringing on the Civil War as did the controversy over slavery in the Territories.

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  • of Syracuse, on an outlet of Owasco Lake.

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  • AGATHOCLES (361-289 B.C.), tyrant of Syracuse, was born at Thermae Himeraeae (mod.

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  • The son of a potter who had removed to Syracuse, he learned his father's trade, but afterwards entered the army.

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  • He was twice banished for attempting to overthrow the oligarchical party in Syracuse; in 317 he returned with an army of mercenaries under a solemn oath to observe the democratic constitution which was then set up. Having banished or murdered some Io,000 citizens, and thus made himself master of Syracuse, he created a strong army and fleet and subdued the greater part of Sicily.

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  • In 310 Agathocles, defeated and besieged in Syracuse, took the desperate resolve of breaking through the blockade and attacking the enemy in Africa.

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  • Gelon, who seized the tyranny on his death, became master of Syracuse in 485 B.C., and transferred his capital thither with half the inhabitants of Gela, leaving his brother Hiero to rule over the rest.

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  • SYRACUSE (Gr.

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  • Syracuse was the chief Greek city of ancient Sicily, and one of the earliest Greek settlements in the island.

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  • 4, p. 269) Chersicrates and Archias of Corinth, both Heraclidae, left their native city together with a band of colonists, the former stopping with half the force at Corcyra, where he expelled the Liburnians and occupied the island, while Archias proceeded to Syracuse.'

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  • 431) might suggest, the primitive kingship was retained or renewed at Syracuse, as it certainly was in some other Greek colonies.

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  • It is far more certain that Syracuse went through the usual revolutions of a Greek city.

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  • But this version implies that Megara was founded before Syracuse, which is contrary to all other authorities.

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  • The whole question of the various tales relating to the foundation of Syracuse is discussed by E.

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  • In its external development Syracuse differed somewhat from other Sicilian cities.

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  • The three together secured for Syracuse a continuous dominion to the south-east 2 The origin of the name is quite uncertain.

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  • It has been suggested that it may be Phoenician: and, again, the plural form has been thought to point perhaps to "the union of two originally distinct posts," one on the island, the other on the mainland on the hill where the ruins of the Olympieum stand, known as iroA(Xvn - the latter being the original Syracuse.

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  • of Syracuse, must have been among its earliest settlements (Freeman ii.

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  • 4 The site of Casmenae is uncertain; it was to the south-west of Syracuse, and not improbably at Spaccaforno (Freeman ii.

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  • Hippocrates, tyrant of Gela (498-491), threatened the independence of Syracuse as well as of other cities, and it was saved only by the joint intervention of Corinth and Corcyra and by the cession of the vacant territory of Camarina.

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  • In 485 the Gamori, who had been expelled by the Demos and the Sicel serfs, and had taken refuge at Casmenae, craved help of Gelo, the successor of Hippocrates, who took possession of Syracuse without opposition, and made it the seat of his power.

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  • He gave citizenship both to mercenaries and to settlers from Greece, and added to the population the inhabitants of other cities conquered by him, so that Syracuse became a city of mixed population, in which the new citizens had the advantage.

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  • Syracuse thus became a democratic commonwealth.

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  • The part of Syracuse in general Sicilian affairs has been traced in the article Sicily; but one striking scene is wholly local, when the defeated Ducetius took refuge in the hostile city (451), and the common voice of the people bade "spare the suppliant."

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  • We hear of a naval expedition to the Etruscan coast and Corsica about 453 B.C. and of the great military and naval preparations of Syracuse in 439 (Diod.

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  • Yet all that we read of Syracusan military and naval action during the former part of the Athenian siege shows how Syracuse had lagged behind the cities of old Greece, constantly practised as they were in warfare both by land and sea.

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  • The Athenian siege (415-13) is of the deepest importance for the topography of Syracuse, and it throws some light on the internal politics.

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  • Lamachus was for immediate action, and there can hardly be a doubt that Syracuse must have fallen before a sudden attack by so formidable an armament in the summer of 415.

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  • The second act of the drama may be said to open with the irretrievable blunder of Nicias in letting the Spartan Gylippus first land in Sicily, and then march at the head of a small army, partly levied on the spot, across the island, and enter Syracuse by way of Epipolae, past Euryelus.

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  • Her great deliverance and victory naturally stirred up the energies of Syracuse at home and abroad.

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  • He next, by another trick, procured from a military assembly at Leontini a vote of a bodyguard; he hired mercenaries and in 406-405 came back to Syracuse as tyrant of the city (Diod.

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  • His enemies in the army, chiefly the horsemen, reached Syracuse before him, plundered his house, and horribly maltreated his wife.

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  • In 397 Syracuse had to stand a siege from the Carthaginians under Himilco, who took up his quarters at the Olympieum, but his troops in the marshes below suffered from pestilence, and a masterly combined attack by land and sea by Dionysius ended in his utter defeat.

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  • This revolution and the peace with the Carthaginians confirmed Dionysius in the possession of Syracuse, but of no great territory beyond, as Leontini was again a separate city.

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  • It left Syracuse the one great Hellenic city of Sicily, which, however enslaved at home, was at least independent of the barbarian.

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  • In fact the free Greek cities and communities, in both Sicily and southern Italy, were sacrificed to Syracuse; there the greatness and glory of the Greek world in the West were concentrated.

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  • The mass of the population of Gela and Camarina in the disastrous year 405 had, at the prompting of Dionysius, taken refuge at Syracuse.

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  • Syracuse thus absorbed three of the chief Greek cities of Sicily.

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  • At the time of the Athenian siege Syracuse consisted of two quarters - the island and the "outer city" of Thucydides, generally known as Achradina, and bounded by the sea on the north and east, with the adjoining suburbs of Apollo Temenites farther inland at the foot of the southern slopes of Epipolae and Tyche west of the north-west corner of Achradina.

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  • Each quarter of the city had its own distinct defences, and Syracuse was now the most splendid and the best fortified of all Greek cities.

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  • All went well for a time; but Dionysius had Philistus and others about him, who were opposed to any kind of liberal reform, and the result was the banishment of Dion from Syracuse as a dangerous innovator.

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  • Of what took place in Syracuse during the next ten years we know but little.

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  • Syracuse, in its extremity, asked help from the mother-city, Corinth; and now appears on the scene one of the noblest figures in Greek history, Timoleon.

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  • To him Syracuse owed her deliverance from the younger Dionysius and from Hicetas, who held the rest of Syracuse, and to him both Syracuse and the Sicilian Greeks owed a decisive triumph over Carthage and the safe possession of Sicily west of the river Halycus, the largest portion of the island.

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  • From 343 to 337 he was supreme at Syracuse, with the hearty good will of the citizens.

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  • Syracuse rose again out of her desolation - grass, it is said, grew in her streets - and, with an influx of a multitude of new colonists from Greece and from towns of Sicily and Italy, once more became a prosperous city.

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  • In the interval of twenty years between the death of Timoleon and the rise of Agathocles to power another revolution at Syracuse transferred the government to an oligarchy of 600 leading citizens.

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  • Syracuse passed through another reign of terror; the new despot proclaimed himself the champion of popular government, and had the senate and the heads of the oligarchical party massacred wholesale.

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  • He seems to have had popular manners, for a unanimous vote of the people gave him absolute control over the fortunes of Syracuse.

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  • His wars in Sicily and Africa left him time to do something for the relief of the poorer citizens at the expense of the rich, as well as to erect new fortifications and public buildings; and under his strong government Syracuse seems to have been at least quiet and orderly.

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  • After his death in 289 comes another miserable and obscure period of revolution and despotism, in which Greek life was dying out; and but for the brief intervention of Pyrrhus in 278 Syracuse, and indeed all Sicily, would have fallen a prey to the Carthaginians.

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  • During his reign of over fifty years, ending probably in 216, Syracuse enjoyed tranquillity, and seems to have grown greatly in wealth and population.

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  • Epicydes did his best to stir up the citizens of Leontini against Rome and the Roman party at Syracuse.

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  • Marcellus, therefore, struck his first blow at Leontini, which was quickly stormed; and the tale of the horrors of the sack was at once carried to Syracuse and roused; the anger of its population, who could not but sympathize with their near neighbours, Greeks like themselves.

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  • The ships sailed away to Carthage; on their way back to Syracuse with supplies they could not get beyond Cape Pachynus owing to adverse winds, and they were confronted by a Roman fleet.

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  • Syracuse was now simply one of the provincial cities of Rome's empire, and its history is henceforward merged in that of Sicily.

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  • Syracuse has been a place of comparatively little importance since the year 878, when it was destroyed by the Saracens under Ibrahim ibn Ahmad.

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  • The medieval and modern town of Syracuse (with the exception of a new quarter which has sprung up since the construction of the railway between the station and the island) is confined to the island.

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  • wide, which is its only link with the hills to the west, had thrice proved during the Athenian siege to be the key to Syracuse.

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  • The Hexapylon plays an important part in the Roman siege of Syracuse.

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  • Not far off to the south-east is the amphitheatre, probably erected by Augustus when he founded a colony at Syracuse; it is partly cut in the rock and partly built.

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  • Xaas, stone, and Teµeiv, to cut; hence Aaroyia, quarry) of Syracuse, over too ft.

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  • But otherwise the disappearance of the edifices of ancient Syracuse is most striking.

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  • To the south of the Anapus is the hill of Polichne, on which stood the Olympieium, attributed on stylistic grounds to 581 B.C. Its monolithic St Paul tarried at Syracuse three days on his way to Rome (Acts xxviii.

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  • The hill was frequently occupied in attacks on Syracuse by the besieging force.

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  • In the hills to the west of Syracuse many Sicel villages must have existed; cemeteries of the second and third period have been found at Pantalica 15 m.

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  • Syracuse, New York >>

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  • Parker, Landmarks of Albany County (Syracuse, 1897); and Cuyler Reynolds, Albany Chronicles; or Albany Mayors and Contemporaneous Chronology (Albany, 1907).

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  • His waters were said to pass beneath the sea and rise again in the fountain Arethusa at Syracuse; such is the earlier version from which later mythologists and poets evolved the familiar myth of the loves of Alpheus and Arethusa.

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  • of Syracuse and about 85 m.

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  • Messina fell into the hands of the Carthaginians during their wars with Dionysius the elder of Syracuse (397 B.C.).

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  • During the next fifty years Messina changed masters several times, till Timoleon finally expelled the Carthaginians in 343 B.C. In the wars between Agathocles of Syracuse and Carthage, Messina took the side of the Carthaginians.

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  • of Syracuse and appealed for help to Rome, which was granted, and this led to a collision between Rome and Carthage, which ended in the First Punic War.

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  • One ship of Croton, however, fought at Salamis, though it is not recorded that Greece asked the Italiotes for help when it sent ambassadors to Gelon of Syracuse.

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  • In the war between Athens and Syracuse Magna Graecia took comparatively little part; Locri was strongly antiAthenian, but Rhegium, though it was the headquarters of the Athenians in 427, remained neutral in 415.

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  • Dionysius of Syracuse attacked them from the south; and after he defeated the Crotoniate league and destroyed Caulonia (389 B.C.), Tarentum remained the only powerful city.

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  • Antalcidas compelled the Athenians to give their assent to it only by making himself master of the Hellespont by stratagem with the aid of Dionysius the Elder of Syracuse.

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  • " Dorian " colonies, from Corinth, Megara, and the Dorian islands, occupied the southern coasts of Sicily from Syracuse to Selinus.

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  • SOPHRON, of Syracuse, writer of mimes, flourished about 43 o B.C. He was the author of prose dialogues in the Doric dialect, containing both male and female characters, some serious, others humorous in style, and depicting scenes from the daily life of the Sicilian Greeks.

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  • The maritime expansion of Corinth at this time is proved by the foundation of colonies at Syracuse and Corcyra, and the equipment of a fleet of triremes (the newly invented Greek men-of-war) to quell a revolt of the latter city.

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  • Though Syracuse remained friendly, and the colonies in the N.W.

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  • Steamers of several lines call regularly, and there is a daily mail to Syracuse.

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  • DAMOCLES, one of the courtiers of the elder Dionysius of Syracuse.

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  • wide at the base, and 16 at the top, upon the undefended eastern side: within it remains of huts were found, with pottery, tools of obsidian, &c. The objects discovered are in the museum at Syracuse.

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  • After the battle the allies retired to Syracuse, where De Ruyter died, and where their ships were mostly destroyed by the French a month later.

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  • He was consecrated on the 9th of April 1869, and thereafter lived in Syracuse.

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  • It is served by the New York Central & Hudson River, the New York, Ontario & Western, the West Shore and the Oneida (electric) railways (the last connecting with Utica and Syracuse), and by the Erie Canal.

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  • Syracuse, Sicily >>

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  • 61), Plato, then at Syracuse, pointedly ignored Aeschines, but this does not agree with Plutarch, De adulatore et amico (c. 26).

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  • The principal hop-producing counties :are Otsego, Schoharie and Madison, all of which are between Albany and Syracuse.

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  • In 1886 the New York Central & Hudson River Railroad Company leased the West Shore for a term of 475 years, and this company operates another parallel line from Syracuse to Buffalo, a line following closely the entire N.

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  • Other ports of entry are Buffalo and Dunkirk, on Lake Erie, Niagara Falls, on the Niagara river, Ogdensburg and Cape Vincent, on the St Lawrence river, Plattsburg, on Lake Champlain, Oswego, on Lake Ontario, Rochester, on the Genesee river, Albany and Syracuse in the interior, and Sag Harbor at the E.

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  • The cities having a population of 15,000 or more in 1905 were: New York City, 4,013,781; Buffalo, 376,587; Rochester, 181,666; Syracuse, 117,503; Albany, 98,374; Troy, 76,910; Utica, 62,934; Yonkers, 61,716; Schenectady, 58,387; Binghamton, 42,036; Elmira, 34,687; Auburn, 31,422; Niagara Falls, 26,560; Newburgh, 26,498; Jamestown, 26,160; Kingston, 25,556; Watertown, 2 5,447; Poughkeepsie, 25,379; Mt.

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  • In 1910 the state charitable institutions were as follows: State Soldiers' and Sailors' Home, Bath; State School for the Blind, Batavia; the Thomas Indian School, Iroquois; State Woman's Relief Corps Home, Oxford; State Hospital for the care of Crippled and Deformed Children, West Haverstraw; Syracuse State Institution for Feeble-Minded Children, Syracuse; State Hospital for the treatment of Incipient Pulmonary Tuberculosis, Ray Brook; Craig Colony for Epileptics, Sonyea; State Custodial Asylum for Feeble-Minded Women, Newark; Rome State Custodial Asylum for Unteachable Idiots, Rome; State Agricultural and Industrial School, Industry; State Training School for Girls, Hudson; Western House of Refuge, Albion; New York State Reformatory for Women, Bedford; the State Training School for Boys; and Letchworth Village, a custodial asylum for epileptics and feeble-minded.

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  • Columbia University and Cornell University (q.v.), are: Union University (1795, non-sectarian), at Schenectady; Hamilton College (1812, non-sectarian), at Clinton; Colgate University (1819, non-sectarian), at Hamilton; Hobart College (1822, non-sectarian), at Geneva: Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (1824, non-sectarian), at Troy; New York University (1832, non-sectarian), in New York City; Alfred University (1836, non-sectarian), at Alfred; Fordham University (1841, Roman Catholic), in New York City; College of St Francis Xavier (1847, Roman Catholic), in New York City; College of the City of New York (1849, city); University of Rochester (1850, Baptist), at Rochester; Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn (1854, non-sectarian), at Brooklyn; Niagara University (1856, Roman Catholic), at Niagara Falls; St Lawrence University (1858, non-sectarian), at Canton; St Bonaventure's College (1859, Roman Catholic), at St Bonaventure; St Stephen's College (1860, Protestant Episcopal), at Annandale; Manhattan College (1863, Roman Catholic), at New York City; St John's College (1870, Roman Catholic), at Brooklyn; Canisius College (1870, Roman Catholic), at Buffalo; Syracuse University (1871, Methodist Episcopal), at Syracuse; Adelphi College (1896, non-sectarian), at Brooklyn; and Clarkson School of Technology (1896, non-sectarian), at Potsdam.

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  • PHILISTUS, Greek historian of Sicily, was born at Syracuse about the beginning of the Peloponnesian War (432 B.C.).

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  • When Dion set sail from Zacynthus with the object of liberating Syracuse from the tyrannis, Philistus was entrusted with the command of the fleet, but he was defeated and put to death (356).

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  • The founders of Megara Hyblaea settled here temporarily, according to Thucydides, in the winter of 729-728 B.C., but it seems to have remained almost if not entirely uninhabited until the Athenians used it as a naval station in their attack on Syracuse early in 414 B.C. A number of tombs were excavated in 1894, containing objects belonging to a transitional stage between the second and third Sicel period, attributable roughly to r000-goo B.C., and with a certain proportion of Mycenean importations.

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  • Yet now and again he rises to the level of some heroic event, and parts of his chapter on the "Campaign of Hastings" and of his record of the wars of Syracuse and Athens, his reflections on the visit of Basil the Second to the church of the Virgin on the Acropolis, and some other passages in his books, are fine pieces of eloquent writing.

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  • In March 1086 Syracuse surrendered, and when in February 1091 Noto yielded the conquest was complete.

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  • While he gave full toleration to the Greek Churches, he created new Latin bishoprics at Syracuse and Girgenti and elsewhere, nominating the bishops personally, while he turned the archbishopric of Palermo into a Catholic see.

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  • of Syracuse, on the Black river.

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  • Antiochus of Syracuse >>

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  • Many well-defined channels, cutting across the north-sloping spurs of the plateau in the neighborhood of Syracuse, NY., mark the temporary paths of the ice-bordered outlet river.

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  • SYRACUSE, a city and the county-seat of Onondaga county, New York, U.S.A., situated at the southern end of Onondaga Lake, about 75 m.

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  • Syracuse is served by the New York Central & Hudson River, the West Shore, and the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western railways, by the Erie Canal and the Oswego Canal, which joins the Erie within the city limits, and by several electric inter-urban lines.

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  • The University block (an office building owned by Syracuse University), the Union Building, the Onondaga county savings bank and the Syracuse savings bank are among the most notable business structures; and the Onondaga, the Vanderbilt House and the Yates and St Cloud hotels are the principal hotels.

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  • Syracuse University, whose campus (of zoo acres) in the south-east part of the city commands a fine view of the lake, is a co-educational institution largely under Methodist Episcopal control, but not sectarian, which in1908-1909had 239 instructors and 3205 students (1336 in the college of liberal arts; 189 in the summer school; 62 in the library school; 933 in the college of fine arts; 147 in the college of medicine; 179 in the college of law; 401 in the college of applied science; and 78 in the teachers' college).

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  • The university was opened in 1871, when the faculty and students of Genesee College (1850) removed from Lima (New York) to Syracuse - a court-ruling made it impossible for the corporation to remove; in 1872 the Geneva medical college (1835) removed to Syracuse and became a college of the university.

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  • Other educational institutions are the Syracuse Teachers' training school, Christian Brothers' academy (Roman Catholic), St John's Catholic academy, Travis preparatory school (non-sectarian), and at Manlius (pop. 1905, 1236), a suburb, St John's military academy (Protestant Episcopal, 1869).

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  • Several educational journals are published at Syracuse.

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  • Syracuse was long the principal seat of the salt industry in America.

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  • The salt deposits at Syracuse had, however, laid the basis for another industry, the manufacture of soda-ash, which has grown to important proportions.

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  • At the village of Solvay (pop. 1905, 5196), adjoining Syracuse on the lake shore, are the largest works for the production of soda-ash in the world, giving employment to more than 3000 hands.

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  • The Syracuse region became known to Europeans through its salt deposits.

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  • In 1804 the state government, which had assumed control of the saltfields, sold to Abraham Walton of Albany, for $6550, some 250 acres, embracing the district now occupied by Syracuse's business centre, to secure money for the construction of a public road.

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  • In 1827 Syracuse became the countyseat of Onondaga county.

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  • In 1847 Salina was united to Syracuse, and the city was chartered.

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  • Syracuse has been the meeting-place of some historically important political conventions; that of 1847, in which occurred the split between the " Barnburner " and " Hunker " factions of the Democratic party, began the Free Soil movement in the state.

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  • Smith, Pioneer Times in Onondaga County (Syracuse, 1904).

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  • The former treatise (chap. 9), under the head of examples (7rapabeiyµara), gives historical examples of the unexpected in war for the years 4 0 3, 371, 35 8, concluding with the year 340, in which the Corinthians, coming with nine triremes to the assistance of the Syracusans, defeated the Carthaginians who were blockading Syracuse with 150 ships.

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  • It was founded by Syracuse in 599 B.e., but destroyed by the mother city in S52 for attempting to assert its independence.

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  • Hippocrates of Gela received its territory from Syracuse and restored the town in 492, but it was destroyed by Gelon in 484; the Geloans, however, founded it anew in 461.

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  • It seems to have been in general hostile to Syracuse, but, though an ally of Athens in 427, it gave some slight help to Syracuse in 415-413.

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  • P. Smith, History of Buffalo and Erie County (Syracuse, 1884); Publications of the Buffalo Historical Society (Buffalo, 1879 et seq.); O.

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  • At a date no doubt previous to the foundation of Syracuse it was peopled by settlers from Corinth, but it appears to have previously received a stream of emigrants from Eretria.

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  • They rendered good service at Syracuse and Arginusae; but their greatest achievement was the decisive victory at Delium over the flower of the Athenian army (424), in which both their heavy infantry and their cavalry displayed unusual efficiency.

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  • Early in the 5th century the tyrant Terillas, son-in-law of Anaxilas of Rhegium and Zancle, appealed to the Carthaginians, who came to his assistance, but were utterly defeated by Gelon of Syracuse in 480 B.C. - on the same day, it is said, as the battle of Salamis.

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  • Thrasydaeus, son of Theron of Agrigentum, seems to have ruled the city oppressively, but an appeal made to Hiero of Syracuse, Gelon's brother, was betrayed by him to Theron; the latter massacred all his enemies and in the following year resettled the town.

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  • In 415 it refused to admit the Athenian fleet and remained an ally of Syracuse.

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  • Taken in order from the west, the treasure-houses were founded by the following states: 1, Sicyon; 2, 3, unknown; 4, Syracuse (referred by Pausanias to Carthage); 5, Epidamnus; 6, Byzantium; 7, Sybaris; 8, Cyrene; 9, Selinus; 10, Metapontum; 11, Megara; 12, Gela.

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  • In 1859 he removed to Syracuse, N.Y.; in 1862 to Philadelphia, where he was pastor of the Second Reformed Dutch Church; and in 1869 to the Central Presbyterian Church in Brooklyn, where a large building known as the Tabernacle was erected for him in 1870.

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  • Cephalus, his father, was a native of Syracuse, and on the invitation of Pericles had settled at Athens.

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  • of Syracuse had sent a magnificent embassy.

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  • The archiepiscopal sees (the suffragan sees, if any, being placed after each in brackets) are Catania (Acireale), Messina (Lipari, Nicosia, Patti), Monreale (Caltanissetta, Girgenti), Palermo (Cefalu, Mazara, Trapani), Syracuse (Caltagirone, Noto, Piazza Armerina).

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  • at Syracuse on the east coast, and about 192 in.

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  • Its centre is the province of Syracuse.

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  • From Messina lines run along the northern coast to Palermo, and along the east coast via Catania to Syracuse: the latter line is prolonged along the south of the island (sometimes approaching, sometimes leaving the coast) via Canicatti as far as Aragona Caldare, Girgenti and Porto Empedocle.

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  • of Catania on the line to Syracuse) a branch line runs to Caltagirone.

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  • Of the other harbours, Porto Empedocle and Licata share with Catania most of the sulphur export trade, and the other ports of note are Marsala, Trapani, Syracuse (which shares with the roadstead of Mazzarelli the asphalt export trade).

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  • The investigations of Professor Orsi, director of the museum at Syracuse, have thrown much light on the primitive peoples of south-eastern Sicily.

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  • The chief cemeteries of this period have been found on Plemmyrium, the promontory south of Syracuse, at Cozzo Pantano, at Thapsus, at Pantalica near Palazzolo, at Cassibile, south of Syracuse, and at Molinello near Augusta.

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  • But the form of the tombs always remains the same, a small low chamber hewn in the rock, with a rectangular opening about 2 by 22 ft., out of which open other chambers, each with its separate doorway; and inhumation is adopted without exception, whereas in a Greek necropolis a low percentage of cases of 1 Leontini, Megara, Naxos, Syracuse, Zancle are all recorded as sites where the Sicel gave way to the Greek (in regard to Syracuse [q.v.] this has recently been proved to be true), while many other towns remained Sicel longer, among them Abacaenum, Agyrium, Assorus, Centuripae, Cephaloedium, Engyum, Hadranum, Halaesa, Henna, Herbessus, Herbita, Hybla Galeatis, Inessa, Kale Akte, Menaenum, Morgantina.

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  • The next year Corinth began her system of settlement in the west: Corcyra, the path to Sicily, and Syracuse on the Sicilian coast were planted as parts of one enterprise.

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  • Here, between Naxos and Syracuse, arose the Ionian cities of Leontini and Catana (728 B.C.), and the Dorian Megara Hyblaea (726 B.C.).

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  • But the greatest of the Siceliot powers, that of the Deinomenid dynasty, began at Gela in 505, and was in 485 translated by Gelo to Syracuse.

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  • But Gelo, like several later tyrants of Syracuse, takes his place - and it is the redeeming point in the position of all of them - as 1 Panaetius of Leontini (608 B.C.) is said to have been the earliest tyrant in Sicily.

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  • When the power of Hiero passed in 467 B.C. to his brother Thrasybulus the freedom of Syracuse was won by a combined movement of Greeks and Sicels, and the Greek cities gradually settled down as they had been before the tyrannies, only with a change to democracy in their constitutions.

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  • After him Sophron of Syracuse gave the Sicilian mimes a place among the forms of Greek poetry.

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  • The temple at Syracuse, which is now the metropolitan church, belongs to the earlier days of this time.

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  • His power grew, and Acragas could withstand him only by the help of Syracuse.

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  • War between Acragas and Syracuse, which arose on account of his.

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  • Roughly speaking, while the Sicels of the plain country on the east coast became subject to Syracuse, most of those in other parts of the island remained independent.

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  • Wars and con conquests between Greeks and Greeks, especially on the q p y part of Syracuse, though not wanting, have been on the whole less constant than in old Greece.

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  • drawn into alliance with one side or the other, till the main interest of Greek history gathers for a while round the Athenian attack on Syracuse.

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  • But it was only in 427 an opportunity for Athenian interference was found in a quarrel between Syracuse and Leontini and their allies.

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  • She vainly asked for help at Acragas - some say at Syracuse (Diod.

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  • The details of the great Athenian expedition (415-413) belong partly to the political history of Athens (q.v.), partly to that of Syracuse (q.v.).

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  • If Syracuse was an object of jealousy, Athens, succeeding to her dominion, creating a power too nearly alike to her own, would have provoked far greater jealousy.

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  • But after the Spartan Gylippus came, almost all the other Greek cities of Sicily were on the side of Syracuse.

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  • It reminds us of the general conditions of Greek seamanship when we find that Corcyra was the meetingplace for the allied fleet, and that Syracuse was reached only by a coasting voyage along the shores of Greek Italy.

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  • The quasi-continental character of Sicily causes Syracuse, with its havens and its island, to be looked on, in comparison with Athens, as a land power (inrapcorae, Thuc. vii.

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  • Syracuse, threatened with destruction by Athens, was saved by the zeal of her metropolis Corinth in stirring up the Peloponnesian rivals of Athens to help her, and by the advice of Alcibiades after his withdrawal to Sparta.

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  • Syracuse repaid the debt by good service to the Peloponnesian cause, and from that time the mutual influence of Sicily and old Greece is far stronger than in earlier times.

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  • Carthage, after a long period of abstention from intervention in Sicilian affairs, and the observance of a wise neutrality during the war between Athens and Syracuse, stepped in as the ally of Segesta, the enemy of her old ally Selinus.

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  • Meanwhile the revolutions of Syracuse affected the history of Sicily and of the whole Greek world.

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  • He now made the mass of the people of both towns find shelter at Syracuse.

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  • Leontini, latterly a Syracusan fort, as well as Messana and all the Sicels, were declared independent, while Dionysius was acknowledged as master of Syracuse (Diodorus xiii.

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  • He further opened new fields for Greek settlement on both sides of the Adriatic. In short, under him Sicily became for the first time the seat of a great European power, while Syracuse, as its head, became the greatest of European cities.

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  • Before the first war his home power was all but overthrown; he was besieged in Syracuse itself Jfls war ' 'with in 403; but he lived through the storm, and extended his dominion over Naxos, Catana and Leontini.

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  • Naxos was settled by Sicels; Leontini was again merged in Syracuse.

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  • Dionysius took the Phoenician stronghold of Motye; but Himilco recovered it, destroyed Messana, founded the hill-town of Tauromenium above Naxos for Sicels who had joined him, defeated the fleet of Dionysius off Catana and besieged Syracuse.

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  • Their lands were given to Locri; their citizens were taken to Syracuse, sometimes as slaves, sometimes as citizens.

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  • The time following the Dionysian tyranny was at Syracuse a time full of the most stirring local and personal interest, under her two deliverers Dion and Timoleon.

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  • The work of Timoleon (q.v.), whose headquarters were first at Tauromenium, then at Hadranum, was threefold - the immediate deliverance of Syracuse, the restoration of Sicily in general to freedom and Greek life, and the defence of the Greek cities against Carthage.

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  • Timoleon drove out all the tyrants, and it specially marks the fusion of the two races that the people of the Sicel Agyrium were admitted to the citizenship of free Syracuse.

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  • The Corinthian deliverer gave, not only Syracuse, but all Greek Sicily, a new lease of life, though a short one.

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  • The Carthaginians played off one city and party against another, and Agathocles,' following the same policy, became in 317, by treachery and massacre, undisputed tyrant of Syracuse, and spread his dominion over many other cities.

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  • Acragas, strengthened by Syracusan exiles, now stands out again as the rival of Syracuse.

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  • Agathocles, however, with Syracuse blockaded by a Carthaginian fleet, formed the bold idea of carrying the war into Africa.

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  • Carthage was hard pressed by Agathocles, while Syracuse was no;less hard pressed by Hamilcar.

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  • Meanwhile Syracuse, all but lost, had driven back Hamilcar, and had taken him prisoner in an unsuccessful attack on Euryelus, and slain him when he came again with the help of the Syracusan exile Deinocrates.

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  • But the hopes of Acragas perished when Agathocles came back from Africa, landed at Selinus, and marched to Syracuse, taking one town after another.

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  • But he now relieved Syracuse from the Carthaginian blockade; his mercenaries gained a victory over Acragas; and he sailed again for Africa, where fortune had turned against his son Archagathus, as it now did against himself.

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  • Deinocrates and Agathocles came to a kind of partnership in 304, and a peace with Carthage, with the old boundary, secured Agathocles in the possession of Syracuse and eastern Sicily (301).

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  • The exploits of Hiero had already won him the kingly title (270) at Syracuse, and he was the representative of Hellenic life and independence throughout the island.

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  • On his death (216) and the accession of his grandson Hieronymus, his dynasty was swept away by the last revolution of Greek Syracuse.

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  • The poet, himself of Syracuse, went to and fro between the courts of Hiero and Ptolemy Philadelphus; but his poetry is essentially Sicilian.

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  • The praetor, after the occupation of Syracuse, dwelled there in the palace of Hiero, as in the capital of the island.

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  • To undo this mischief Augustus planted Roman colonies at Palermo, Syracuse, Tauromenium, Thermae, Tyndaris and Catana.

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  • Ausonius could still reckon Catana and fourfold Syracuse (" quadruplices Syracusas ") among the noble cities; but Sicily is not, like Gaul, rich in relics of later Roman life, and it is now Egypt rather than Sicily that feeds Rome.

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  • The island itself was divided for financial purposes, almost as in the older times, into the two divisions of Syracuse and Lilybaeum.

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  • Saint Paul's visit to Syracuse naturally gave rise to many legends; but the Christian church undoubtedly took early root in Sicily.

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  • Panormus and Syracuse are again the headquarters of races and creeds, of creeds yet more than of races.

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  • After a war with the Lombards, after twelve days' plunder of Rome, he came on to Syracuse, where his oppressions led to his murder in 668.

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  • Then came another Saracen inroad from Alexandria, in which Syracuse was sacked (Paul.

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  • 97); but it seems plain that Euphemius or Euthymius of Syracuse, supported by his own citizens, revolted against Michael the Stammerer (820-829), and, when defeated by an imperial army, asked help of Ziyadet Allah, the Aghlabite prince of Kairawan, and offered to hold the island of him.

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  • Attacks on Syracuse failed; so did attacks on Henna - Castrum Ennae, 829-1060.

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  • Syracuse was for fifty years, not only, as of old, the bulwark of Europe, but the bulwark of Christendom.

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  • But the divisions among the Moslems helped the Christians; they won back several towns, and beat off all attacks on Syracuse and Tauromenium.

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  • In 877 began the only successful Semitic siege of Syracuse.

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  • Strange to say, as Syracuse fell in the reign of Basil the Macedonian, the Saracen occupation was completed in the reign of Nikephoros Phokas (Nicephorus Phocas), the deliverer of Crete.

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  • Town after town was delivered, first Messana, then Syracuse, then a crowd of others.

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  • Syracuse, under its amir Benarvet, held out stoutly.

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  • In 1085 Syracuse was won.

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  • King James besieged Syracuse as admiral of the Roman Church; Charles sent his son Robert in 1299 as his lieutenant in Sicily, where he gained some successes.

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  • He died, however, at Syracuse, before he reached his destination, on the 7th of June 555

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  • As late as 385 B.C. the Parians, in conjunction with Dionysius of Syracuse, founded a colony on the Illyrian island of Pharos (Diod.

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  • In Sicily there has been continuous work on Greek sites at Camarina, Catania, Messina, and Syracuse; the most important results were obtained at Syracuse.

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  • He travelled past Naples to Syracuse, then on shipboard by Cos and Samos to Ephesus, and thence through Asia Minor to Damascus and Jerusalem.

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  • Wallace, Descriptive Guide to the Adirondacks (Syracuse, 1894).

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  • In 403 B.C. it was taken by Dionysius of Syracuse, who plundered the city, sold the inhabitants into slavery and replaced them with Campanian mercenaries.

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  • Marcellus constructed a gymnasium here out of the booty of Syracuse.

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  • Gorgias was already advanced in years and rich in honours when, in 427, he visited Athens as the head of an embassy sent to solicit aid against Syracuse.

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  • The latter favoured the Sardinian alliance and the granting of the constitution, and so did the king's uncle, Leopold, count of Syracuse.

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  • He reached Syracuse on the ist of August, having during the voyage written from memory a translation of Aristotle's Topica.

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  • AUGUSTA, a seaport of the province of Syracuse, Sicily, 19 m.

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  • No`man as governor, in a short time carried his conquests as far as Fez, Tangier and Ceuta, and one of his captains even made a descent on Sicily and plundered Syracuse.

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  • del Fray Junipero Serra (Mexico, 1787), the standard contemporary source; the Craftsman (Syracuse, N.

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  • Monteleone is identical with the ancient Hipponium, said to be a Locrian colony and first mentioned in 388 B.C., when its inhabitants were removed to Syracuse by Dionysius.

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  • Restored by the Carthaginians (379), occupied by the Bruttii (356), held for a time by Agathocles of Syracuse (294), and afterwards again occupied by the Bruttii, Hipponium ultimately became as Vibo Valentia a flourishing Roman colony, founded in 239 or 192 B.C. It was important as the point where a branch from Scolacium (Squillace) on the east coast road joined the Via Popillia.

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  • He adds that there was a famous rhapsodist, Cynaethus of Chios, who was said to be the author of the Hymn to Apollo, and to have first recited Homer at Syracuse about the 69th Olympiad.

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  • The remains of a temple, devastated in ancient times (possibly by Dionysius of Syracuse in 384 B.C.), were also discovered, with fragments of Attic vases of the 5th century B.C., which had served as ex votos in it.

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  • above the railway station, and was founded by the Carthaginian Himilco in 397 B.C. for a friendly tribe of Sicels, after the destruction, by Dionysius the Elder of Syracuse, of the neighbouring city of Naxos.

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  • Keating, History of the City of Memphis and Shelby County, Tennessee (Syracuse, 1888); James Phelan, History of Tennessee (Boston, 1889).

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  • See Lewis C. Aldrich, History of Yates County, New York (Syracuse, 1892).

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  • The collapse of the Athenian power Later Wars before Syracuse (413 B.C.) induced Darius II.

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  • Syracuse was lost, but Bari was won back and those parts of Calabria which had been occupied by the Saracens.

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  • Early in life he went to Megara in Sicily, and after its destruction by Gelo (484) removed to Syracuse, where he spent the rest of his life at the court of Hiero, and died at the age of ninety or (according to a statement in Lucian, Macrobii, 25) ninety-seven.

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  • In 398 B.C. it was taken after a desperate struggle (which, owing to the height and strength of the houses, continued even after a breach had been made in the city wall) by Dionysius of Syracuse, but recovered in the next year: it was, however, abandoned by the Carthaginians, and its place taken by Lilybaeum on the mainland.

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  • of Syracuse, founded in 728 B.C. by Megarean colonists, who had previously settled successively at Trotilon, Leontini and Thapsus.

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  • In the Athenian expedition against Syracuse (415-413) Lamachus proposed (it being then deserted) to make it the Athenian base of operations; but his advice was not taken, and in the next spring the Syracusans fortified it.

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  • I, Theocritus, who wrote these songs, am of Syracuse, a man of the people, the son of Praxagoras and famed Philina.

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  • of Syracuse, in xvii.

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  • The usual view is that Theocritus went first from Syracuse to Cos, and then, after suing in vain for the favour of Hiero, took up his residence permanently in Egypt.

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  • In 1843 he presided over the Democratic state convention at Syracuse, and in1844-1845he was recognized as one of the leaders of the " Hunkers," or regular Democrats in New York, and an active opponent of the " Barnburners."

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  • Diogenes Laertius says that Anniceris ransomed Plato from Dionysius, tyrant of Syracuse, for twenty minas.

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  • He received a scanty education; worked as a carpenter in Syracuse and as a machinist in Ithaca; became interested (about 2842) in the development of the electric telegraph; and after unsuccessful or over-expensive attempts to ground the telegraph wires in 1844 solved the difficulty by stringing them on poles.

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  • As the Semitic head of Sicily, it stands opposed to Syracuse, the Greek head.

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  • The bronzes are few, but include the famous ram from Syracuse.

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  • ANTIOCHUS OF SYRACUSE, Greek historian, flourished about 420 B.C. Nothing is known of his life, but his works, of which only fragments remain, enjoyed a high reputation.

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  • Claudius Marcellus, the conqueror of Syracuse.

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  • In its original sense it does not apply either to the island of Ortygia at Syracuse, or to Ortygia near Ephesus, which also claimed the honour of having been the birthplace of the goddess.

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  • Numerous animals were sacred to her, and at Syracuse all kinds of wild beasts, including a lioness, were carried in procession in her honour.

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  • The tenet of its axial movement was held by many of his followers - in an obscure form by Philolaus of Crotona after the middle of the 5th century B.C., and more explicitly by Ecphantus and Hicetas of Syracuse (4th century B.C.), and by Heraclides of Pontus.

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  • The final success of Sparta and the capture of Athens in 405 were brought about partly by the treachery of Alcibiades, who induced the state to send Gylippus to conduct the defence of Syracuse, to fortify Decelea in northern Attica, and to adopt a vigorous policy of aiding Athenian allies to revolt.

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  • Whilst the Spanish fleet was destroyed before Syracuse by Admiral Byng, the intrigue of the Spanish ambassador Cellamare with the duke of Maine to exclude the family of Orleans from the succession on Louis XV.s death was discovered and repressed; and Marshal Berwick burned the dockyards at Pasajes in Spain.

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  • Rann, History of Warren County, Pennsylvania (Syracuse, N.Y., 1887).

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  • Thus during the Peloponnesian War it served as a naval station for the Athenians, who again in 374 B.C. endeavoured to acquire it for a similar purpose; in 357 it became the headquarters of Dion on his expedition against Syracuse.

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  • of Syracuse direct, founded by Chalcidians from Naxos in 729 B.C. It is almost the only Greek settlement not on the coast, from which it is 6 m.

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  • It was reduced to subjection in 498 B.C. by Hippocrates of Gela, and in 476 Hieron of Syracuse established here the inhabitants of Catana and Naxos.

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  • In 422 Syracuse supported the oligarchs against the people and received them as citizens, Leontini itself being forsaken.

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  • After its failure, Leontini became subject to Syracuse once more (see Strabo vi.

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  • At each end was a gate, the northern leading to the plain, the southern, at the upper end, to Syracuse.

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  • bachelor of fine arts degree for theater at Syracuse University.

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  • Extra night Syracuse 2 star guesthouse B&B, double £ 35 per person.

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  • pacifism in the twentieth century Peter Brock and Nigel Young Syracuse Universty Press.

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  • From 1810 to 1812 he travelled in France, Switzerland and Italy, and on his return to Paris published an Essai critique sur la topographic de Syracuse (1812), designed to elucidate Thucydides.

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  • In alliance with the Lucanians the Bruttii made war on the Greek colonies of the toast and seized on Vibo in 356 B.C., and, though for a time overcome by the Greeks who were aided by Alexander of Epirus and Agathocles of Syracuse, they reasserted their mastery of the town from about the beginning of the 3rd century B.C., and held it until it became a Latin colony at the end of the same century (see Corp. Inscr.

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  • DIONYSIUS (c. 432-367 B.C.), tyrant of Syracuse, began life as a clerk in a public office, but by courage and diplomacy succeeded in making himself supreme (see Syracuse).

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  • GELO, son of Deinomenes, tyrant of Gela and Syracuse.

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  • On the death of Hippocrates, tyrant of Gela (491 B.C.), Gelo, who had been his commander of cavalry, succeeded him; and in 485, his aid having been invoked by the Gamori (the oligarchical landed proprietors) of Syracuse who had been driven out by the populace, he seized the opportunity of making himself despot.

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  • "Fastened by chains of adamant" was the boastful phrase in which Dionysius described his empire; but under his son, the younger Dionysius - an easy, good-natured, unpractical man - a reaction set in amongst the restless citizens of Syracuse, which, with its vast and mixed populations, must have been full of elements of turbulence and faction.

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  • Hiero through his long reign was the stanch friend and ally of Rome in her struggles with Carthage; but his paternal despotism, under which Greek life and civilization at Syracuse had greatly flourished, was unfortunately succeeded by the rule of a man who wholly reversed his policy.

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  • of Syracuse; Etruria Circumpadana was occupied by the Gauls, the Campanian cities by the Samnites, who took Capua (see Campania) in 423, and in 396, after a ten years' siege, Veii fell to the Romans.

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  • Amongst his lost works may be mentioned: Ta µET' 'AAEavSpov, a history of the period succeeding Alexander, of which an epitome is preserved in Photius; histories of Bithynia, the Alani and the Parthian wars under Trajan; the lives of Timoleon of Syracuse, Dion of Syracuse and a famous brigand named Timoleon.

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  • of Syracuse, Sparta's ally, who with his sons received the Athenian citizenship. It is not clear that the allies officially approved this new friendship; it is certain that it was actually distasteful to them.

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  • Hammond, Life and Times of Silas Wright (Syracuse, N.Y., 1848), which was republished as vol.

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  • In the subsequent war Corinth displayed great activity in the face of heavy losses, and the support she gave to Syracuse had no little influence on the ultimate issue of the war (see Peloponnesian War).

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  • Among the most noteworthy churches of Syracuse are the Roman Catholic cathedral of the Immaculate Conception - Syracuse became the see of a Roman Catholic bishop in 1887 - and St Paul's Protestant Episcopal, the first Presbyterian, first Methodist Episcopal, Dutch Reformed and May Memorial (Unitarian) churches, the last erected in memory of Samuel Joseph May (1797-1871), a famous anti-slavery leader, pastor of the church in 1845-1868, and author of Some Recollections of Our Anti-Slavery Conflict (1873).

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  • Among the hospitals and charitable institutions are the Syracuse hospital (1872) for infectious diseases, the Hospital of the Good Shepherd (1873), the Syracuse homoeopathic hospital (1895), the Syracuse hospital for women and children (1887), St Mary's infant and maternity hospital (1900) under the Sisters of Charity, St Joseph's hospital (1869) under Sisters of the Third Order of St Francis, the Syracuse home for aged women (1852), Onondaga county orphan asylum (private; 1841), and two other orphan asylums controlled by the Sisters of Charity, and the state institution for feeble-minded children (1896).

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  • The chief towns in each of these provinces, with their communal populations in 1901, are as follow: Caltanissetta (43,023), Castrogiovanni (26,081), Piazza Armerina (24,119), Terranova (22,019), San Cataldo (18,090); Catania (146,504), Caltagirone (44,527), Acireale (35,203), Giarre (26,194), Patera) (22,857), Leonforte (21,236), Bronte (20,166), Vizzini (18,013), Agira (17,634), Nicosia (15,811),(15,811), Grammichele (15,017); Girgenti (24,872), Canicatti (24,687), Sciacca 4 (24,6 5), Licata (22,993), Favara (20,403); Messina (147,106), Racalmuto (16,028), Palma (14,384), Barcellona (24,133), Milazzo (16,214), Mistretta (14,041); Palermo (305,716), Partinico (23,668), Monreale (23,556), Termini Imerese (20,633), Bagheria (18,329), Corleone (16,350), Cefalu (14,518); Syracuse (31,807),(31,807), Modica (49,951), Ragusa (32,453), Vittoria (32,219), Comiso (25,837), Noto (22,284), Lentini (17,100), Avola (16,301), Scicli (16,220), Palazzolo Acreide (15,106) Trapani (61,448), Marsala (57,824), Alcamo (51,798), Monte S.

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  • of Nicias and the loss of thousands of men and hundreds of ships, was a blow from which Athens never recovered (see under Syracuse and Sicily).

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  • Case (ed.), History of Kansas City, Missouri (Syracuse, 1888) William Griffith, History of Kansas City (Kansas City, 1900); for industrial history, the Greater Kansas City Yearbook (1907 seq.); for all features of municipal interest, the Kansas City Annual Kansas City, 1907 seq.), prepared for the Business Men's League.

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  • One year, when I was in college at Syracuse, I went as Flav to a Halloween party.

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  • He spent several years in Syracuse, New York, before his family moved to Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.

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  • Her family moved back to the States, settling in Houston, when she was high-school age and Emme went on to graduate from Syracuse University in 1985.

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  • Situated between Syracuse and Ithaca, the resort has been a staple in the area for decades.

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  • In their first year they produced 5,000 cases of wine and it won several medals at the State Fair wine competition in Syracuse.

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  • If you love fall farm activities like pumpkin patches, hay rides and finding your way through corn mazes, then you'll probably be excited about the New Moon attraction - a huge New Moon corn maze at Black Island Farms in Syracuse, Utah.

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  • If you live near Syracuse, Utah or plan to be in the area, visit the Black Island Farms website and look up the directions.

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  • Carmelo Anthony, hailing from Brooklyn, New York, began his superstar career at Syracuse University.

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  • His one season with Syracuse awesomely showcased his talent as a big-scoring clutch player, and he quickly made the leap into the professional NBA arena.

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  • I met The Monkeys in a hotel bar in Syracuse.

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