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sympathy

sympathy

sympathy Sentence Examples

  • I've received too much sympathy in the last few weeks.

    1932
    177
  • His sympathy only made matters worse and she hiccupped.

    1803
    65
  • He expressed sympathy for the bomb victims.

    274
    138
  • I realize in most ways Edith isn't deserving of too much sympathy, but I still think of her as a tragic figure.

    141
    41
  • I realize in most ways Edith isn't deserving of too much sympathy, but I still think of her as a tragic figure.

    141
    41
  • "You look it," suggested the young man, in a voice made anxious by an ever-ready sympathy.

    132
    88
  • I offer my deepest sympathy to his family, also to the band which I hope will carry on, given time to reflect.

    111
    56
  • She has a large, generous sympathy and absolute fairness of temper.

    110
    42
  • The committee was in sympathy with the aspirations of Every Child Matters.

    95
    49
  • Pierre did not answer, but looked cordially into the Frenchman's eyes whose expression of sympathy was pleasing to him.

    73
    30
  • The teachers were in sympathy with the aims and ethos of the school.

    68
    34
  • At a personal level, therefore, I have the utmost sympathy for staff employed by British Waterways facing a reorganization.

    43
    26
  • No one expressed any sympathy for Billie and Willie, not even Baratto.

    41
    24
  • Those attending a conference abroad tend to be the envy of their colleagues so complaints about such trials and tribulations elicit little sympathy.

    39
    19
  • Perhaps we feel some sympathy with the elder son.

    36
    31
  • It wasn't her intent to solicit sympathy from anyone, much less her paying guests.

    34
    21
  • Please accept my sincere sympathy in the loss of your Pepper.

    33
    35
  • Every little pine needle expanded and swelled with sympathy and befriended me.

    28
    26
  • If you want to discuss sympathy, think about poor me, pining away for a hot time and getting nada.

    27
    20
  • He was anxiously sensitive about the opinion of others, eager for their sympathy and regard, and, in general, impressionable to their influence.

    26
    19
  • They require guidance and sympathy far more than instruction.

    26
    27
  • The funeral was an excellent forum for sympathy tributes.

    26
    28
  • His mother was a woman of sturdy character and with a keen sense of humor and tender sympathy.

    25
    22
  • We can't expect a sympathy vote from the Russians.

    25
    27
  • When you can point out why this set of donors deserve some sympathy, I might agree with you.

    24
    24
  • What they have in common is an instinctive sympathy for the characters.

    23
    32
  • Their personal sympathy for each other continued to the end, though at the outset at least their political views differed.

    22
    20
  • Their personal sympathy for each other continued to the end, though at the outset at least their political views differed.

    22
    20
  • The Prime Minister began the event by expressing sympathy with the people of Russia following last week's school siege.

    22
    26
  • My heartfelt sympathy is extended to the family circle.

    22
    52
  • Designed to protect heretics from the secret and summary methods of the Inquisition, it certainly had his sympathy and approval.

    20
    17
  • He looked around, and in the direct, respectful, wondering gaze fixed upon him he read sympathy with what he had said.

    19
    17
  • I extend sympathy on behalf of all members of the company to Norma and David at this sad time.

    18
    20
  • He failed to engender enough sympathy for Phillip Gellburg, a mistake which cannot be blamed on the script.

    18
    21
  • Her logic and her sympathy are in excellent balance.

    17
    16
  • But apparently the coachman's sympathy was not enough for Peter, and he turned on the box toward his master.

    17
    19
  • A pregnant woman can evoke sympathy, even when they are criminals.

    16
    27
  • "I had come so near to you... and to all your family that I thought you would not consider my sympathy misplaced, but I was mistaken," and suddenly her voice trembled.

    16
    34
  • Her sympathy is of the swift and ministering sort which, fortunately, she has found so often in other people.

    15
    12
  • I cannot explain the peculiar sympathy Miss Sullivan had with my pleasures and desires.

    15
    14
  • As a thinker, he shows little sympathy with that strain of medieval mysticism which is to be observed in all the poetry of his contemporaries.

    15
    22
  • To them and to a few friends with whom she is in closest sympathy she writes with intimate frankness whatever she is thinking about.

    14
    13
  • In sympathy with this Platonism, the medieval church began by assuming the entire mutual harmony of faith and reason.

    13
    17
  • The princess looked at him, not grasping what he was saying, but cheered by the expression of regretful sympathy on his face.

    12
    18
  • Child as I was, I at once felt the tenderness and sympathy which endeared Dr. Bell to so many hearts, as his wonderful achievements enlist their admiration.

    12
    22
  • I also knew Mr. Charles Dudley Warner, the most delightful of story-tellers and the most beloved friend, whose sympathy was so broad that it may be truly said of him, he loved all living things and his neighbour as himself.

    11
    16
  • Sometimes when she recalled his looks, his sympathy, and his words, happiness did not appear impossible to her.

    10
    19
  • Berg hurriedly jumped up, kissed her hand, asked about her health, and, swaying his head from side to side to express sympathy, remained standing beside her.

    8
    17
  • It was, for instance, asserted that he caused women who showed any sympathy with the insurgents to be whipped.

    8
    22
  • We think of you so, so often! and our hearts go out to you in tenderest sympathy; and you know better than this poor letter can tell you how happy we always are to have you with us!

    7
    13
  • Ramballe, with genuine distress and sympathy in his face, went up to Pierre and bent over him.

    7
    17
  • It was my teacher's genius, her quick sympathy, her loving tact which made the first years of my education so beautiful.

    7
    18
  • Helen expressed a great deal of sympathy, and at every opportunity during the day she would find Pearl and carry the burden from place to place.

    6
    18
  • Sarah eyed her with sympathy.

    0
    0
  • After a solid hour of the child crying, I wondered if the mother read about the abandoned child, perhaps with a fleeting hint of sympathy.

    0
    0
  • Unlike her father, this creature was capable of sympathy.

    0
    0
  • Westlake's eyes met Dean's in knowing sympathy.

    0
    0
  • Don't vote for me out of sympathy.

    0
    0
  • She waved back, wondering how the most damning of them all was also the only who seemed anywhere able to feel sympathy.

    0
    0
  • His fierceness took her breath away, and the dark circles beneath his eyes drew her sympathy.

    0
    0
  • "Hey," Weller said, his tone conveyed a surprising note of sympathy.

    0
    0
  • The kind man's face held a hint of sympathy.

    0
    0
  • Dean's multiplication table of 44, the number of rented apartments, wasn't perfect, but that num­ber times even a reasonable monthly rental lessened any sympathy he might have felt for the woman's financial plight.

    0
    0
  • When the world wasn't expressing sympathy for the old man, they were looking for details on Billie Wassermann, his butt-brand, and all the gory details of the fat twin's execution.

    0
    0
  • Sometimes it was easier to accept his disappointment than sympathy.

    0
    0
  • Hortensius, and he had the sympathy and support of several of the leading Roman nobles.

    0
    0
  • Much influenced by Melchior Hofman, he had no sympathy with the fanatic violence of the Minster faction.

    0
    0
  • Wherever we were wounded and stricken her heart bled in sympathy, and all our maladies and miseries evoked from her a lyric wail."

    0
    0
  • Assured by Sir James Hudson of the sympathy of England, he began active preparations for the expedition to Marsala.

    0
    0
  • Liberated by an amnesty, Garibaldi returned once more to Caprera amidst general sympathy.

    0
    0
  • Her .own predilections led her to literature; and in her society Propertius found the intellectual sympathy and encouragement which were essential for the development of his powers.

    0
    0
  • About the same time, having shown too open sympathy with the revolutionary or reforming tendencies of 1848, he was for; olitical reasons obliged to leave Berlin and retire to the seclusion of Wiirzburg, the medical school of which profited enormously by his labours as professor of pathological anatomy, and secured a wide extension of its reputation.

    0
    0
  • Henry More, who had given it a modified sympathy in the lifetime of the author, became its opponent in later years; and Cudworth differed from it in most essential points.

    0
    0
  • Thucydides alone shows sympathy with Pericles, though, as J.

    0
    0
  • The Annales, which are in seven books, deal with the history of Bavaria in conjunction with general history from the earliest times to 1460, and the author shows a strong sympathy for the Empire in its struggle with the Papacy.

    0
    0
  • Like another Socrates, he taught them to know themselves, repressing vanity, encouraging the despondent, and attaching all alike by his unobtrusive sympathy.

    0
    0
  • As an indication of sympathy with Presbyterianism,.

    0
    0
  • In 1808 Moratin was involved in the fall of Godoy, but in 1811 accepted the office of royal librarian under Joseph Bonaparte - a false step, which alienated from him all sympathy and compelled him to spend his last years in exile.

    0
    0
  • In 1863 he moved in the House of Commons a resolution of sympathy with the Poles, and two months later was made a junior lord of the admiralty.

    0
    0
  • Here, too, he published, in 1531, his most important work, the Chronica, Zeitbuch and Geschichtsbibel, largely a compilation on the basis of the Nuremberg Chronicle (1493), and in its treatment of social and religious questions connected with the Reformation, exhibiting a strong sympathy with heretics, and an unexampled fairness to all kinds of freedom in opinion.

    0
    0
  • His breadth of human sympathy led him to positions which the comparative study of religions has made familiar, but for which his age was unprepared.

    0
    0
  • When reason rises to the conception of universal order, when actions are submitted, by the exercise of a sympathy working necessarily and intuitively to the idea of the universal order, the good has been reached, the true good, good in itself, absolute good.

    0
    0
  • The heroism of the prisoners, and Silvio Pellicos account of his imprisonment (Le mie Prigioni), did much to enlist the sympathy of Europe for the Italian cause.

    0
    0
  • He had little sympathy with Liberalism and abhorred revolution, but his hatred of Austria and his resentment at the galling tutelage to which she subjected him had gained strength year by year.

    0
    0
  • Many of the republicans and Mazzinians joined it, but Mazzini himself regarded it with no sympathy.

    0
    0
  • The king, too, was in close sympathy with the societys aims, but for the present it was necessary to hide this attitude from the eyes of the Powers, whose sympathy Cavour could only hope to gain by professing hostility to everything that savoured of revolution.

    0
    0
  • But, in spite of the sympathy of the king, Dl e attempt to raise armed bands in Venetia had no success, and wa became clear that the foreigner could only be driven from the of ninsula by regular war.

    0
    0
  • Whereas in the past the strikes had been purely local and due to local conditions, they now appeared of more general and political character, and the sympathy strike came to be a frequent and undesirable addition to the ordinary economic agitation.

    0
    0
  • Then the Turin gas men struck, and a general sympathy strike broke out in that city in consequence, which resulted in scenes of violence, lasting two days.

    0
    0
  • But Osiander's house had another attraction of a different kind from theological sympathy.

    0
    0
  • Mill's Logic, and with fuller sympathy in W.

    0
    0
  • When the port of Boston was closed by Great Britain in 1774 the bell of the old First Parish Church (Unitarian) of Portland (built 1740; the present building dates from 1825) was muffled and rung from morning till night, and in other ways the town showed its sympathy for the patriot cause.

    0
    0
  • He was also out of sympathy with the meeting at Annapolis in 1786.

    0
    0
  • Reports of territorial encroachments aroused much sympathy with Liberia in America and led in February 1909 to the appointment by President Roosevelt of a commission which visited Liberia in the summer of that year to investigate the condition of the country.

    0
    0
  • This may be called the rationalistic solution; with sympathy in Christ's ethical teaching, there is relief at minimizing his great claim.

    0
    0
  • Finally, a band of loo marched from Basel to Avignon to the court of Pope Clement VI., who, in spite of the sympathy shown them by several of his cardinals, condemned the sect as constituting a menace to the priesthood.

    0
    0
  • This different treatment shows the feeling of the poet - the feeling for which he seeks to evoke our inmost sympathy - to oscillate between the belief that an awful crime brings with it its awful punishment (and it is sickening to observe how the argument by which the Friar persuades Annabella to forsake her evil courses mainly appeals to the physical terrors of retribution), and the notion that there is something fatal, something irresistible, and therefore in a sense self-justified, in so dominant a passion.

    0
    0
  • During the first years of the French Revolution Catherine's sympathy with philosophic liberalism rapidly evaporated, and the European sovereigns to the democratic movement; but she carefully abstained from joining the Coalition, and waited patiently for the moment when the complications in western Europe would give her an opportunity of solving independently the Eastern Question in accordance with Russian interests.

    0
    0
  • The mutual assurances of unbounded confidence, admiration and sympathy, if there was any genuine sincerity in them, represented merely a transient state of feeling.

    0
    0
  • Thus, in spite of his academic sympathy with liberal ideas, he became, together with Metternich, a champion of political stagnation, and co-operated willingly in the reactionary measures against the revolutionary movements in Germany, Italy and Spain.

    0
    0
  • Nicholas was a blunt soldier incapable of comprehending his brother's sentimental sympathy with liberalism.

    0
    0
  • All these undertakings, in which the humane, liberal-minded autocrat received the sympathy, support and co-operation of the more enlightened of his subjects, were successfully accomplished.

    0
    0
  • The assassination of the minister of the interior Plehve, on the 14th of July, by the revolutionist Sazonov was remarkable as a of the symptom mainly owing to the widespread sympathy of the European press of all shades of opinion with War.

    0
    0
  • Even the remnant of the " Cadets " had by this time renounced their sympathy with Polish aspirations, and in the matter of Finland the Duma proved itself even more imperial than the emperor himself.

    0
    0
  • Barclay had, however, no sympathy with the anti-clerical diatribes of John Skelton, whom he more than once attacks.

    0
    0
  • He was a son of the 18th century; he had studied with sympathy Locke and Montesquieu; no one appreciated more keenly than he did political liberty and the freedom of an Englishman.

    0
    0
  • In the following gubernatorial campaign this was made an issue by his Democratic opponent, who appealed to those in sympathy with the strikers.

    0
    0
  • Meanwhile the Anabaptists obtained a footing in Silesia, and suspicions of Schwenkfeld's sympathy with them were aroused.

    0
    0
  • The Albigenses have received much sympathy, as being a kind of pre-Reformation Protestants; but it is now recognized that their tenets were an extreme form of Manichaeism.

    0
    0
  • He was by nature soft-hearted, so that he often shed tears through warm sympathy....

    0
    0
  • The people were presumably out of sympathy with hellenizers, whether they belonged to the house of Onias or that of Tobiah.

    0
    0
  • But there was an outstanding feud between him and them; and his first act as ethnarch was to remove the high priest on the ground of his sympathy with the rebels.

    0
    0
  • Exception has been taken to a certain lack of sympathy with the Jews, especially the rabbis, which has been detected in the author.

    0
    0
  • The English Jews " gradually substituted for the personal protection of the crown, the sympathy and confidence of the nation " (L.

    0
    0
  • His reply, while stating that his government would safeguard the interests of the Mussulmans, left open the question of the attitude of the powers, complicated now by sympathy with reformed Turkey.

    0
    0
  • Stolypin was for some time in sympathy with that programme, and even contemplated the formation of a Ministry strengthened by leaders of public opinion, of whom Guchkov, Count Heyden and N.

    0
    0
  • The rebellion of the colonies was making rapid progress, and Howe was known to be in sympathy with the colonists.

    0
    0
  • Though in sympathy with the Covenanters, the town was the scene of few incidents comparable to those which took place in the northern parts of the shire.

    0
    0
  • Meanwhile Shamyl had roused the Lesghian tribes farther east and begun his twenty years' struggle for freedom, a struggle which called forth the sympathy and admiration of nearly the whole of Europe.

    0
    0
  • The utter exhaustion of his people in the course of a hopeless struggle with Holland, France and England was seen by him with sympathy, but he considered it an unavoidable misfortune and not the result of his own errors, since he could not be expected to renounce his rights or to desert the cause of God and the Church.

    0
    0
  • Derby, however, was always royalist in sympathy, and did not finally surrender till 1646; in 1659 it rebelled against Richard Cromwell, and in 1745 entertained the young Pretender.

    0
    0
  • He was so affected by this proof of universal sympathy with his misfortunes that he went home, fell sick and died.

    0
    0
  • The plea of the last named on behalf of Corsica served to enlist the sympathy of Napoleon in his wider speculations, and so helped to bring about that mental transformation which merged Buonaparte the Corsican in Bonaparte the Jacobin and Napoleon the First Consul and Emperor.

    0
    0
  • Encouraged by the sympathy of all patriotic Germans and the newly found energy of its own subjects, the House of Habsburg now began to prepare for war.

    0
    0
  • He turned his attention to the lagoon of Venice, which had been steadily growing in commercial and maritime importance, and had, on the whole, shown a sympathy for Byzantium rather than for the Franks.

    0
    0
  • God for him is the creator and ruler of the world, but hardly more; he is the master of a vast machine that grinds out human destinies without sympathy with man and without visible regard for what man deems justice - a being to be acknowledged as lord, not one to be loved.

    0
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  • Even to those who are in sympathy with III.

    0
    0
  • The most noticeable feature of recent Moravian history has been the active sympathy of its inhabitants with the anti-Teutonic home-rule agitation of the Bohemian Czechs.

    0
    0
  • This symbol harmonizes with the fact that the two rings are in complete sympathy, the one responding to every change made in the other.

    0
    0
  • Beethoven, we know, lost sympathy with his early works as he grew older; but that was because his later works absorbed his interest, not because his early works misrepresented his ideals.

    0
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  • A great friend of Erasmus, whom he invited to Cambridge, whilst earnestly working for a reformation of abuses, he had no sympathy with those who attacked doctrine; and he preached at Paul's Cross (12th of May 1521) at the burning of Luther's books.

    0
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  • Sympathy was, however, soon aroused for the emperor, who was treated as a prisoner, and a second assembly was held at Nimwegen in October 830 when, with the concurrence of his sons Pippin and Louis, he was restored to power and Judith returned to court.

    0
    0
  • Sympathy was again felt for Louis, and when the younger Louis had failed to induce Lothair to treat the emperor in a more becoming fashion, he and Pippin took up arms on behalf of their father.

    0
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  • Voltaire (Dictionnaire Philosoplzique, " Quaker," " Toleration ") described the body, which attracted his curiosity, his sympathy and his sneers, with all his brilliance.

    0
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  • As Paley says, he loves " to record their fidelity to their masters, their sympathy in the trials of life, their gratitude for kindness and considerate treatment, and their pride in bearing the character of honourable men..

    0
    0
  • Whilst the fathers agree with the Stoics of the 2nd century in representing slavery as an indifferent circumstance in the eye of religion and morality, the contempt for the class which the Stoics too often exhibited is in them replaced by a genuine sympathy.

    0
    0
  • He had no sympathy with the Old Lutherans and their strict orthodoxy - on the contrary he was friendly with the Reformed congregations, and with George Whitefield and the Tennents.

    0
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  • Lassalle, a democrat of the most advanced type, saw that an opportunity had come for asserting a third great cause - that of the working men - which would outflank the liberalism of the middle classes, and might even command the sympathy of the government.

    0
    0
  • Even Bishop Ketteler of Mainz had declared his sympathy for the cause he advocated.

    0
    0
  • Moreover, the Porte was thrown into a suspicious mood by the contrast between the friendly language of the western powers and the active sympathy of the western peoples for the Greeks, who were supported by volunteers and money drawn from all Europe.

    0
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  • Nicholas even hoped for the active sympathy of Britain.

    0
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  • Between mother and daughter there was, however, little sympathy.

    0
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  • He took up the cause of the deposed king Mataafa with extreme ardour, and he wrote a book, A Footnote to History: Eight Years of Trouble in Samoa (1892), in the endeavour to win over British sympathy to his native friends.

    0
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  • This is a consequence of the false stability of portraiture, since in life the unceasing movement of light in the eyes, the mobility of the mouth, and the sympathy and sweetness which radiated from all the features, precluded the faintest notion of want of sincerity.

    0
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  • His earliest publications, beginning with A Syllabus of Plane Algebraical Geometry (1860) and The Formulae of Plane Trigonometry (1861), were exclusively mathematical; but late in the year 1865 he published, under the pseudonym of "Lewis Carroll," Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, a work that was the outcome of his keen sympathy with the imagination of children and their sense of fun.

    0
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  • Men of Pinckney's type were not in sympathy with the progressive democratic spirit of America, and they began to withdraw from politics after about 1800.

    0
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  • When the struggle between the colonies and the mother country began, although he felt much sympathy for the former, his opposition to any form of obstruction to the Stamp Act and other measures, and his denunciation of a resort to force created a breach between him and his parish, and in a fiery farewell discourse preached after the opening of hostilities he declared that no power on earth should prevent him from praying and shouting "God save the King."

    0
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  • As far as purity of diction, fine wit, crushing satire against a debased and ignorant clergy, and a general sympathy with suffering humanity are concerned, Omar certainly reminds us of the great Frenchman; but there the comparison ceases.

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  • The little book promptly aroused widespread interest, some cordial sympathy and much vehement opposition; whilst its large companion the Etudes evangeliques, containing the course on the parables and four sections of his coming commentary on the Fourth Gospel, passed almost unnoticed.

    0
    0
  • Though patrician in sympathy, he saw the necessity of making concessions to the plebeians and was instrumental in passing the Licinian laws.

    0
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  • Literature - modern as well as ancient - occupied his attention; one of his works was a translation of four parts of Clarissa; and translations of some of the then current English paraphrases on biblical books manifested his sympathy with a school which, if not very learned, attracted him by its freer air.

    0
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  • The experiment of republican government had proved so discreditable, and had so wearied the country of cabals, that men hitherto known for their sympathy with democratic principles became more monarchical than the regent himself; and under this influence a movement to give the regency into the hands of the princess Donna Januaria, now in her 18th year, was set on foot.

    0
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  • This policy received the approval and sympathy of the majority of Brazilians, but naturally met with bitter opposition from the military element.

    0
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  • It was one of the first universities to admit women students to its classes and degrees, and its alumni are brought into close bonds of sympathy and activity by a students' union.

    0
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  • Intended to evolve a history of jurisprudence from the truthful portraits of England's greatest lawyers, it merely exhibits the ill-digested results of desultory learning, without a trace of scientific symmetry or literary taste, without a spark of that divine imaginative sympathy which alone can give flesh and spirit to the dead bones of the past, and without which the present 1 See thereon J.

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  • Gladstone, in the early days of English sympathy with the South, said that he had "made a nation" - bore himself in his most responsible position during the gigantic conflict which ensued, cannot here be related in detail.

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  • Such treatment aroused the sympathy of the Southern people, who regarded him as a martyr to their cause, and in a great measure restored him to that place in their esteem which by the close of the war he had lost.

    0
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  • In the period of national poverty and depression that followed this event, a puritanical spirit came into vogue which was little in sympathy with Holberg's dramatic or satiric genius.

    0
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  • In 1780 he began the study of law under Thomas Jefferson, then governor of Virginia, and between the two there developed an intimacy and a sympathy that had a powerful influence upon Monroe's later career.

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  • Drouyn de Lhuys, the French minister of foreign affairs, made his death the subject of a special despatch, desiring the French ambassador to express to the government "the mournful sympathy and truly national regret which the death, as lamented as premature, of Richard Cobden had excited on that side of the Channel."

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  • During his primacy (1616-1637), when he had the whole influence of the court, and the sympathy and the assistance of the Catholic world behind him, he put the finishing touches to his life's labour by founding a great Catholic university at Nagyszombat (1635), and publishing a Hungarian translation of the Bible to counteract the influence of Gaspar Karoli's widely spread Protestant version.

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  • From henceforth the military and civil authorities, as represented by Kossuth and Gdrgei, were hopelessly out of sympathy with each other, and the breach widened till all effective co-operation became impossible.

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  • Knatchbull-Hugessen, The Political Evolution of the Hungarian Nation (2 vols., London, 1908), strongly Magyar in sympathy; R.

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  • Moritz Cantor has suggested that at one time there existed two schools, one in sympathy with the Greeks, the other with the Hindus; and that, although the writings of the latter were first studied, they were rapidly discarded for the more perspicuous Grecian methods, so that, among the later Arabian writers, the Indian methods were practically forgotten and their mathematics became essentially Greek in character.

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  • Their first public pronouncement was an appeal to the British Parliament and nation (May 1915) for sympathy with the cause of Yugoslav unity and the dissolution of Austria-Hungary.

    0
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  • Finding himself out of sympathy with monastic life, he fled in 1783 to North Germany, and settled in Weimar, where he became Wieland's collaborateur on the German Mercury, and eventually his son-in-law.

    0
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  • Viljoen's commando, with which Pretorius was in sympathy, was known as the Volksleger, or Army of the People.

    0
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  • On the following day, the 7th of January, Sir Hercules telegraphed again through the British agent, who was then at Johannesburg, saying: " That if the Uitlanders do not comply with my request they will forfeit all claims to sympathy from Her Majesty's government and from British subjects throughout the world, as the lives of Jameson and the prisoners are now practically in their hands."

    0
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  • The author is in sympathy with Christianity, but is himself an adherent of the stoic philosophy.

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  • To the official support, which never failed him, Damasus endeavoured to join the popular sympathy.

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  • In October 1848 Cibrario was made senator, and after the battle of Novara (March 1849), when Charles Albert abdicated and retired to a monastery near Oporto, Cibrario and Count Giacinto di Collegno were sent as representatives of the senate to express the sympathy of that body with the fallen king.

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  • In Scotland, Brown so far won the sympathy of the students that riotous conflicts took place between his partisans and opponents.

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  • Yet on the whole, even from the beginning, the revolt was useful in that it shook the position of the "learned physician," who took a literary, fastidious and meditative rather than an experimental interest in his profession, and, as in great part a descendant of the humanists, was never in full sympathy with experimental science.

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  • But bodily defect is largely a result of evil circumstances, in the prevention of which the physician is not unsuccessfully engaged, and the growth of sympathy means a stronger cement of the social structure.

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  • Once prime minister, his personal popularity proved to be a powerful unifying influence in a somewhat heterogeneous party; and though the illness and death (August 30, 1906) of his wife (daughter of General Sir Charles Bruce), whom he had married in 1860, made his constant attendance in the House of Commons impossible, his domestic sorrow excited widespread sympathy and appealed afresh to the affection of his political followers.

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  • He addresses him as an equal; he expresses sympathy with the prominent part he played in public life, and admiration for his varied accomplishments, but on his own subject claims to speak to him with authority.

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  • But his poetical sympathy was not limited to the poets of Greece.

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  • No one shows a truer humanity and a more tender sympathy with natural sorrow.

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  • His knowledge, his sympathy, his enthusiasm soon made themselves felt everywhere; the ruridecanal conferences of clergy became a real force, and the church in Cornwall was inspired with a vitality that had never been possible when it was part of the unwieldy diocese of Exeter.

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  • Marguerite Arouet, of whom her younger brother was very fond, married early, her husband's name being Mignot; the elder brother, Armand, was a strong Jansenist, and there never was any kind of sympathy between him and Francois.

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  • His peculiar fashion of attacking the popular beliefs of his time has also failed to secure the approval of some who had very little sympathy with those beliefs.

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  • Most judgments:of Voltaire have been unduly coloured by sympathy with or dislike of what may be briefly called his polemical side.

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  • When sympathy and dislike are both discarded or allowed for, he remains one of the most astonishing, if not exactly one of the most admirable, figures of letters.

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  • Zumalacarregui had no sympathy with the liberal principles which were spreading in Spain, and became noted as what was called a Servil or strong Royalist.

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  • With the breadth and depth of the Saviour's sympathy, which are so fully exhibited in this Gospel, we may connect the clearness with which His true humanity is here portrayed.

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  • The principle of perfection is a new one, at once more rational and comprehensive than benevolence and sympathy, which in our view places Ferguson as a moralist above all his predecessors."

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  • Hutcheson's theory of universal benevolence and Smith's idea of sympathy he combines under the law of society.

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  • The opposition and ridicule with which Booth's work was for many years received gave way, towards the end of the 19th century, to very widespread sympathy as his genius and its results were more fully realized.

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  • He was Puritan to the core, with a tenacious memory, a strength of will bordering upon obstinacy, and a want of sympathy with human nature.

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  • y the district of Iquitos met with small sympathy, and was speedily crushed.

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  • Such sympathy with youthful hope, in union with industry and intelligence, shows that Comte's dry and austere manner veiled the fires of a generous social emotion.

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  • Although this Great Being evidently exceeds the utmost strength of any, even of any collective, human force, its necessary constitution and its peculiar function endow it with the truest sympathy towards all its servants.

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  • Looking at the problem in this way, even a moralist who does not expect theology to be the instrument of social revival, might still ask whether the sympathetic instincts will not necessarily be already developed to their highest point, before people will be persuaded to accept the religion, which is at the bottom hardly more than sympathy under a more imposing name.

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  • And there is no more extraordinary thing in the history of opinion than the perversity with which Comte has succeeded in clothing a philosophic doctrine, so intrinsically conciliatory as his, in a shape that excites so little sympathy and gives so much provocation.

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  • It is odd that this irregular poem, with its copious and varied music, its splendid sweep of emotion, its unfailing richness of texture - this poem in which Tennyson rises to heights of human sympathy and intuition which he reached nowhere else, should have been received with bitter hostility, have been styled "the dead level of prose run mad," and have been reproved more absurdly still for its "rampant and rabid bloodthirstiness of soul."

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  • At Darmstadt he made the acquaintance of Caroline Flachsland, to whom he soon became betrothed, and who for the rest of his life supplied him with that abundance of consolatory sympathy which his sensitive and rather querulous nature appeared to require.

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  • In reply to a question in the House of Commons, Lord Palmerston accepted and adopted Gladstone's statement, expressed keen sympathy with the cause which he had espoused, and sent a copy of his letter to the queen's representative at every court of Europe.

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  • He received an address of sympathy from the consistory of Anduze, and a provision was voted for him by the Union Protestante Liberale, to enable him to continue his preaching.

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  • Within the English Church men with whom he had both personal and religious sympathy rose - Whately, of whom he said, " We know no living writer who has proved so little and disproved so much ";2 and Thomas Arnold, " a man who could be a hero without romance ";3 F.

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  • These students, confronted by i strong reaction in favor of pure Japanese art, have fought manfully to win public sympathy, and though their success is not yet crowned, it is not impossible that an Occidental school may ultimately be established.

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  • Yet as a high-minded patriot Dlugosz had no sympathy whatever with Olesnicki's opposition to Casimir's Prussian policy, and steadily supported the king during the whole course of the war with the Teutonic knights.

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  • Both of these are original and indispensable, but egoism has the priority, since there must be egoistic pleasure somewhere before there can be altruistic sympathy with it.

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  • The Monophysites had the sympathy of the emperor Anastasius, and were finally successful in ousting Flavian in 512 and replacing him by their partisan Severus.

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  • But he was insubordinate; his sympathy: with the American colonies, which were now beginning to resist the claims of the mother country to tax them, made him intolerable to the king and he was dismissed in February 1 774.

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  • To Harley himself he was bound by gratitude and by a substantial agreement in principle, but with the rest of the Tory ministry he had no sympathy.

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  • The two latter pictures were marked by the rhythm of line and luxury of colour which are among the most constant attributes of his art, and may be regarded as his first dreams of Oriental beauty, with which he afterwards showed so great a sympathy.

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  • This was Andre, who had come on a visit of sympathy.

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  • In 1744 he had been very busy assisting in the negotiations for the establishment of the new "broad bottom" administration, and showed no sympathy for the Jacobite expedition in 1745.

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  • He lived and wrote only to amuse his contemporaries, and thus, although more popular in his lifetime and more fortunate than any of the older authors in the ultimate survival of a large number of his works, he is less than any of the great writers of Rome in sympathy with either the serious or the caustic spirit in Latin literature.

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  • Latin literature ceased to be in close sympathy with the popular spirit, either politically or as a form of amusement, but became the expression of the ideas, sentiment and culture of the aristocratic governing class.

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  • The higher poetical imagination had appeared only in Ennius, and had been called forth in him by sympathy with the grandeur of the national life and the great personal qualities of its representative men.

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  • The Sabellian races of central and eastern Italy and the Italo-Celtic and Venetian races of the north, in whom the poetic susceptibility of Italy was most manifest two generations later, were not, until after the Social war, sufficiently in sympathy with Rome, and were probably not as yet sufficiently educated to induce them to contribute their share to the national literature.

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  • He avoids not only every unusual but every superfluous word; and, although no writing can be more free from rhetorical colouring, yet there may from time to time be detected a glow of sympathy, like the glow of generous passion in Thucydides, the more effective from the reserve with which it betrays itself whenever he is called on to record any act of personal heroism or of devotion to military duty.

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  • For that work the Augustan age, as the end of one great cycle of events and the beginning of another, was eminently suited, and a writer who, by his gifts of imagination and sympathy, was perhaps better fitted than any other man of antiquity for the task, and who through the whole of this period lived a life of literary leisure, was found to do justice to the subject.

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  • The homeliest details of the farmer's work are transfigured through the poet's love of nature; through his religious feeling and his pious sympathy with the sanctities of human affection; through his patriotic sympathy with the national greatness; and through the rich allusiveness of his art to everything in poetry and legend which can illustrate and glorify his theme.

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  • And, though he cannot unroll before us the page of heroic action with the power and majesty of Homer, yet by the sympathy with which he realizes the idea of Rome, and by the power with which he has used the details of tradition, of local scenes, of religious usage, to embody it, he has built up in the form of an epic poem the most enduring and the most artistically constructed monument of national grandeur.

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  • He had not only become reconciled to the new order of things, but was moved by his intimate friendship with Maecenas to aid in raising the world to sympathy with the imperial rule through the medium of his lyrical inspiration, as Virgil had through the glory of his epic art.

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  • In his sympathy with the life and beliefs of the country people he shows an affinity both to the idyllic spirit and to the piety of Virgil.

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  • The value of the work consists not in any power of critical investigation or weighing of historical evidence but in the intense sympathy of the writer with the national ideal, and the vivid imagination with which under the influence of this sympathy he gives life to the events and personages, the wars and political struggles, of times remote from his own.

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  • His appreciation of Grant, and his sympathy with the chagrin he suffered after this battle, cemented the friendship between the two.

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  • He was one of the greatest of Scottish religious leaders, a man of wide sympathy and high ideals.

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  • Booth was assisted by his wife, Catherine Booth, a woman of remarkable gifts, who won for the new movement the sympathy of many among the cultured classes.

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  • With him, however, Manning found less sympathy than with his predecessor, though Manning's advocacy of the claims of labour attracted Leo's attention, and influenced the encyclical which he issued on the subject.

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  • The very intensity of that phase of modern thought which declaims fervently against all creeds, and would maintain what George Eliot called " the right of the individual to general haziness," is likely to draw all Christian thinkers nearer to one another in sympathy through acceptance of the Apostles' Creed as the common basis of Christian thought.

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  • How shall we state his point of departure from the middle ages, his sympathy with prevalent classical enthusiasms, his divination of a new period?

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  • The Austrians had long tried to obtain influence in the town, especially when its support of the Protestant cause attracted the sympathy of the Swiss.

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  • Edward, The History of Texas (Cincinnati, 1836), slightly pro-Mexican in sympathy; H.

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  • This newly-formed sympathy with the English reformer did not, in the first instance at least, involve Huss in any conscious opposition to the established doctrines of Catholicism, or in any direct conflict with the authorities of the church; and for 1 From which the name Huss, or more properly Hus, an abbreviation adopted by himself about 1396, is derived.

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  • This newly-formed sympathy with the English reformer did not, in the first instance at least, involve Hus in any conscious opposition to the established doctrines of Catholicism, or in any direct conflict with the authorities of the church; and for several years he continued to act in full accord with his archbishop (Sbynjek, or Sbynko, of Hasenburg).

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  • But it was only slowly that the growing sympathy of Huss with Wycliffe unfavourably affected his relations with his colleagues in the priesthood.

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  • The journey, which appears to have been undertaken with the usual passport, and under the protection of several powerful Bohemian friends (John of Chlum, Wenceslaus of Duba, Henry of Chlum) who accompanied him, was a very prosperous one; and at almost all the halting-places he was received with a consideration and enthusiastic sympathy which he had hardly expected to meet with anywhere in Germany.

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  • In the subsequent years Mantineia still found opportunity to give the Athenians covert help, and during the Corinthian War (394387) scarcely disguised its sympathy with the anti-Spartan league.

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  • In this manner Martin Luther, with the hearty sympathy of a considerable number of his countrymen, publicly proclaimed and illustrated his repudiation of the papal government under which western Europe had lived for centuries.

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  • The extraordinary popularity of Erasmus is a sufficient (1464- indication that his attitude of mind was viewed with sympathy by the learned, whether in France, England, Germany, Spain or Italy.

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  • g vinism finally triumphed in the Confession of Dordrecht, 1572, since Calvin's system of church government did not, like Luther's, imply the sympathy of the civil authorities.

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  • This large class of " dissenters " found themselves as little at home under a Protestant as under a Catholic regime, and have until recently been treated with scant sympathy by historians of the Church.

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  • Parliament in retaliation closed the port of Boston (1774), a proceeding which only aroused more bitter feeling in the country towns and enlisted the sympathy of the other colonies.

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  • Her leading politicians were out of sympathy with the conduct of national affairs (in the conduct of foreign relations, the distribution of political patronage, naval policy, the question of public debt) from 1804 - when Jefferson's party showed its complete supremacy - onward; and particularly after the passage of the Embargo Act of 1807, which caused great losses to Massachusetts commerce, and, so far from being accepted by her leaders as a proper diplomatic weapon, seemed to them designed in the interests of the Democratic party.

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  • Though the vast ultimate consequences of this sudden appearance of the great western republic in the arena of international politics were not realized even by those in sympathy with Monroe's action, the weight of the United States thrown into the scale on the side of Great Britain made any effective protest by the European powers impossible; Russia, Austria and Prussia contented themselves with joining in a mild expression of regret that the action of Great Britain "tended to encourage that revolutionary spirit it had been found so difficult to control in Europe."

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  • In ethics Diihring follows Comte in making sympathy the foundation of morality.

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  • A strong writer and thinker, his spirit was essentially unifying and sympathetic, in an age when these qualities won little sympathy.

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  • Especially from England did they receive sympathy and help. An English clergyman, Dr Gilly, visited the valleys in 1823, and by his writings on the Vaudois church attracted considerable attention, so that he was enabled to build a college at La Torre.

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  • St Paul anxiously promoted friendly intercourse and sympathy between the scattered Ecclesiae; but the unity of the universal Ecclesia as he contemplated it does not belong to this region: it is a bulk of theology and religion, not a fact of what we call ecclesiastical politics."

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  • Their weakness as a denomination has lain latterly in their very catholicity of sympathy.

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  • Herzl was stirred by sympathy for the misery of Jews under persecution, but he was even more powerfully moved by the difficulties experienced under conditions of assimilation.

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  • He remained in opposition from 1848 till 1854, holding together under difficult circumstances an unpopular party with which he was not entirely in sympathy.

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  • After this disaster he issued a third Mississippi Valley novel, The Tragedy of Pudd'nhead Wilson, in 1894, and in 1896 another historical romance, Personal Recollections of Joan of Arc, wherein the maid is treated with the utmost sympathy and reverence.

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  • And Origen is still full of spontaneous sympathy with its pervading allegorism.

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  • Warned by the sympathy excited in Saxony by the revolutionary events at Paris in 1848, the king dismissed his reactionary ministry, and a Liberal cabinet took its place in March 1848.

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  • "If the sovereign power is to be understood in this fuller, less abstract sense, if we mean by it the real determinant of the habitual obedience of the people, we must look for its sources much more widely and deeply than the analytical jurists do; it can no longer be said to reside in a determinate person or persons, but in that impalpable congeries of the hopes and fears of a people bound together by common interest and sympathy, which we call the common will" (Green's Works, 2.404).

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