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swine

swine

swine Sentence Examples

  • Swine are extensively reared in many provinces.

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  • Horses, asses, cows, deer, sheep, goats, swine, cats and dogs were introduced by the early Spaniards.

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  • Horses, asses, cows, deer, sheep, goats, swine, cats and dogs were introduced by the early Spaniards.

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  • Swine is a name properly applicable to the domesticated pig, but also includes its wild relatives.

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  • Sir Richard Weston must have cultivated turnips before this; for Blith says that Sir Richard affirmed to himself that he fed his swine with them.

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  • Swine do well in all parts of the country, especially in Minas Geraes, Sao Paulo, Rio de Janeiro, Parana and Rio Grande do Sul.

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  • The breeding of goats and swine is an important industry in some regions.

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  • On these occasions the Lares were crowned with garlands, and offerings of cakes and honey, wine and incense, but especially swine, were laid before them.

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  • Great Britain had twice as many pigs as Ireland, but the swine industry is mainly.

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  • In 1901 there were 6586 cows, 3881 horses, 2468 swine and 2048 bee-hives in the canton.

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  • The exhibition of pigs at agricultural shows has to be abandoned, in consequence of swine fever regulations.

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  • Swine are reared in large numbers.

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  • Few cattle, but numbers of sheep, goats and swine are reared.

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  • Few cattle, but numbers of sheep, goats and swine are reared.

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  • Large numbers of horses, cattle, swine and poultry are reared.

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  • Swine furnish a very large proportion of the flesh diet of the people.

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  • Monmouth is situated in a good farming region, and cattle, swine and ponies are raised in the vicinity.

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  • In general, water, cows' urine and blood of swine are the materials used in ablutions.

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  • Cattle, swine and goats are raised, and the state produces coffee, sugar, cacao, beans, cereals and cheese.

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  • The Swine, in the middle, is the main channel for navigation.

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  • Between 1879 and 1892 inclusive, administration with regard to swine fever was entrusted to local authorities.

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  • Cattle and swine are reared, and dairy produce is largely exported; but the sheep of the province are small and their wool indifferent.

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  • The numbers of horses, mules, cattle and sheep increased quite steadily from 1850 to 1900, but the number of swine in 1880 and in 1900 was nearly one-third less than in 1850.

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  • Swine, which are reared in great numbers in the plains, yield the famous Westphalian hams; and the rearing of cattle and goats is important.

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  • The gain was chiefly confined to cattle, but the number of horses, sheep and swine also showed substantial increases.

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  • Stockfarming, a relatively undeveloped industry, tends to become more important, owing to the assistance which the state renders by the importation of horses, cattle, sheep and swine, from Europe and the United States, in order to improve the native breeds.

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  • Swine and poultry were used for food to a greater extent than oxen, which were bred chiefly for ploughing.

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  • The raising of swine, however, is increasing.

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  • In 1910 there were 495,000 neat cattle (285,000 milch cows), 94,000 horses (average value, $106), 229,000 sheep and 95,000 swine.

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  • The acorns of the oak possess a considerable economic importance as food for swine.

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  • In 1905 Italy exported 32,786 and imported 17,766 head of cattle; exported 33,574 and imported 6551 sheep; exported 95,995 and imported 1604 swine.

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  • The city is situated in a rich agricultural region, and is a market for grain, neat cattle, horses and swine.

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  • Little use is made of the weighbridge in selling store-cattle, sheep or swine.

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  • Provision is made, however, for all the well-known breeds of sheep and swine.

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  • A considerable quantity of timber is grown on the high lands, and the rich valley pastures support large herds of cattle, while the abundance of oaks and chestnuts favours the rearing of swine.

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  • Anatomy was as little regarded as it was in the later ancient schools, the empiric and methodic, but demonstrations of the parts of the body were given on swine.

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  • It is not even safe, according to these two fathers, to commit too much to writing; and Clement undertakes not to reveal in writing many secrets known to the initiated among his readers; otherwise the indiscreet eye of the heathen may rest on them, and he will have cast his pearls before swine.

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  • In the same year, according to the same authority, there were in the state 196,000 milch cows, 92,000 other neat cattle, 45, 000 sheep and 70,000 swine.

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  • They kept horses, cattle, sheep, goats and swine.

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  • The Spaniards found no indigenous domestic animals in the country, and introduced their own horses, cattle, sheep and swine.

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  • According to this report, which is not strictly trustworthy, there were in the republic 5,142,457 cattle, 859,217 horses, 334,435 mules, 287,991 asses, 3,424,430 sheep, 4,206,011 goats and 616,139 swine.

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  • All the typical swine are further characterized by the fact that the young are longitudinally striped with bands of dark brown and some paler tint; this striped coat disappearing in the course of a few months.

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  • (For the characteristics of this animal see Babirusa.) Extinct Swine.

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  • Cattle, sheep, swine and poultry are reared in abundance.

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  • Bacon with an excess of fat is not wanted, except in the lumber camps; consequently the farmers of Canada have cultivated a class of swine for bacon having plenty of lean and firm flesh.

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  • The great extension of the dairy business has fitted in with the rearing of large numbers of swine.

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  • Experimental work has shown that swine fattened with a ration partly of skim-milk were lustier and of a more healthy appearance than swine fattened wholly on grains.

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  • Hog cholera or swine fever has been almost eradicated.

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  • To this end experiments are conducted in the feeding of cattle, sheep and swine for flesh, the feeding of cows for the production of milk, and of poultry both for flesh and eggs.

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  • The swine seems to have been the animal sacred to him, or to have been one of the symbols under which he is represented.

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  • Here she was found by Odysseus and his companions; the latter she changed into swine, but the hero, protected by the herb moly, which n he had received from Hermes, not only forced her to restore them to their original shape, but also gained her love.

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  • The mountains afford excellent pasture, and a considerable number of cattle, sheep and swine are reared.

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  • The whole body moves forward slowly, always advancing in the swine general direction in which they originally started, but following more or less the course of the great valleys.

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  • 5 - The following abound: wild swine, hyaena, jackal, cheetah, fox; gazelle (in herds), antelope species (in the steppe); jerboa, mole, porcupine, and especially the common European rat (in the desert); bat, long-haired desert hare.

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  • The raising of sheep and swine was of considerably less relative importance in 1910 than in 1850, there being 1,882,357 sheep and 1,040,366 swine in 1850 and 1,112,000 sheep and 931,000 swine in 1910.

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  • Swine are most numerous in the south-east and south-west counties.

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  • PECCARY, the name of the New World representatives of the swine (Suidae) of the E.

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  • From those of all Old World swine or Suinae, the upper canines, or tusks, differ in having their points directed downwards, not outwards or The Collared Peccary (Dicotyles tajacu).

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  • Southward, the Danube encircles a vast fen, tenanted only by waterfowl and herds of half-wild swine, while the plain which extends to the north-east and east only grows fertile at some distance inland.

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  • the Greeks for the Turks, and that as for the heathen it was no good casting pearls before swine.

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  • The European bison, the urus, the elk and the wild swine have disappeared since Roman times.

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  • Red deer, wild swine and various other game are found in the forests.

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  • Blanford, lions are still numerous in the reedy swamps, bordering the Tigris and Euphrates, and also occur on the west flanks of the Zagros mountains and the oak-clad ranges near Shiraz, to which they are attracted by the herds of swine which feed on the acorns.

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  • Kersa, an insignificant ruin north of the last, is thought to represent the Gerasa or Gergesa of the 4th century, situated east of the lake; and the projecting spur of hill south of this ruin is conjectured to be the place where the swine "ran violently down a steep place" (Matt.

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  • The Pommersche or Oder Haff is separated from the sea by two islands, so that the river flows out by three mouths, the middle one (Swine) being the most considerable.

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  • word of the same meaning, bigge), a common name given to the domesticated swine of agricultural use.

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  • (For the zoology, see Swine.) British breeds of pigs are classified as black, white and red.

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  • Breeding swine, male and female, run most of their time at pasture and receive a liberal allowance of green food or raw roots.

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  • Coburn, Swine Husbandry (1904); R.

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  • BABIRUSA (" pig-deer"), the Malay name of the wild swine of Celebes and Buru, which has been adopted in zoology as the scientific designation of this remarkable animal (the only representative of its genus), in the form of Babirusa alfurus.

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  • (See SwINE.) (R.

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  • Swine are very rarely kept, and then almost wholly for the European inhabitants, the Copts generally abstaining from eating their meat.

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  • The co-operative system plays an important part in the industries of butter-making, poultry-farming and the rearing of swine.

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  • The trade in live sheep and swine, which was formerly important, has mostly been converted into a dead-meat trade.

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  • Owing to the lack of railway communication Jerez is of little commercial importance; its staple trade is in agricultural produce, especially in ham and bacon from the large herds of swine which are reared in the surrounding oak forests.

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  • shows the number of female swine which had a given number of "Mtiller's glands" on the right fore leg, in a sample of 2000 swine observed by Davenport in Chicago.

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  • If we take the whole number of glands in the series, and divide this by the whole number of swine, we obtain the mean number of glands per swine.

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  • See Strutt, Sports and Pastimes, who also gives an illustration, "taken from a manuscriptal painting of the 9th century in the Cotton Library," representing "a Saxon chieftain, attended by his huntsman and a couple of hounds, pursuing the wild swine in a forest."

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  • Cattle, horses, asses, sheep and swine were introduced by the Spaniards, and thrive well in some of the provinces.

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  • The large urban population of the state makes the animal products very valuable, Illinois ranking third in 1900 in the number of dairy cows, and in the farm value of dairy products; indeed, all classes of live stock, except sheep, increased in number from 1850 to 1900, and at the end of the latter year Illinois was surpassed only by Iowa in the number of horses and swine; in 1909 there were more horses in Illinois than in Iowa.

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  • His request was granted, and the swine rushed over a steep place into the lake.

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  • The dog, swine, goat and sheep were alone found upon the island by the Spanish conquerors.

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  • The worship of Zeus Olympius replaced the worship of Yahweh, and swine were offered as in the Eleusinian mysteries.

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  • In the wild state it does great damage among poultry, and frequently makes off with the young of swine and sheep. When hunted it makes a determined resistance, and emits a scent so strong as even to sicken the dogs, who nevertheless are exceedingly fond of the sport, and cannot be got to pursue any other game while the stench of the zibeth is in their nostrils.

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  • Swine are numerous but they are of a kind known in the United States as " razorbacks."

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  • The total number of neat cattle on farms and ranges in 1910 was 986,000 (including 27,000 milch cows) valued at $26,277,000; horses, 148,000, valued at $12,284,000; 1 mules, 2000, valued at $212,000; and swine, 21,000, valued at $178,000.

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  • Wild oxen of the Sunda race, not to be in any way confounded with the Malayan seladang or gaur, are rare, but the whole country swarms with wild swine, and the babirusa, a pig with curious horn-like tusks, is not uncommon.

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  • Its acorn-fed swine are celebrated throughout Spain for their hams and bacon, and large herds of sheep and goats thrive where the pasture is too meagre for cattle.

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  • In the crannog of Lagore, county Meath, there were about 150 cartloads of bones, chiefly of oxen, deer, sheep and swine, the refuse of the food of the occupants.

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  • The value of horses in 1910 was $34,561,000 (323,000 head); of mules, $7,020,000 (54,000 head); of neat cattle, $20,034,000 (875,000 head); of swine, $5,031,000 (774,000 head); of sheep, $2,036,000 (522,000 head).

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  • the Jews are forbidden to eat animals other than cloven-footed ruminants; thus the camel, coney, hare and swine were forbidden; so also any water organisms that had not fins and scales, and a large choice of birds, including swan, pelican, stork, heron and hoopoe.

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  • That such dietary restrictions were merely ceremonial and superstitious, and not intended to prevent the consumption of meats which would revolt modern tastes, is certain from the fact that the Levitical law freely allowed the eating of locusts, grasshoppers, crickets and cockroaches, while forbidding the consumption of rabbits, hares, storks, swine, &c. The Pythagoreans were forbidden to eat beans.

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  • The values of the various classes of live stock on the 1st of January 1910 were as follows: sheep, $13,714,000; milch cows, $1,125,000; other neat cattle, 815,677,000; horses, $6,251,000; mules, $632,000; swine, $272,000.

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  • USEDOM, an island of Germany, in the Prussian province of Pomerania, lying off the Baltic coast, and separated by the Swine from the island of Wollin, which together with it divides the Stettiner Haff from the open sea.

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  • There are two species of the Edentata, Dasypus and Pichiciego, the latter very rare, and one of the opossums. European animals, such as horses, cattle, sheep, swine and goats, have been introduced into the country and do well.

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  • Horse and mule breeding are carried on to a limited extent, and since the opening of the far South more attention has been given to sheep. Goats and swine are raised in small numbers on the large estates, but in Chiloe swine-raising is one of the chief occupations of the people.

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  • Horses are raised to a limited extent; also goats, sheep and swine.

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  • Large herds of swine are fed in the oak and chestnut woods of Alemtejo; sheep and goats are reared in the mountains, where excellent cheeses are made from goats' milk.

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  • Horses, cattle, sheep, goats, swine and poultry were introduced, and are now sources of food and wealth to a large part of the population.

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  • In January 1908, according to the Year-book of the Department of Agriculture, the number and farm values of live-stock were: milch cows, 69,000, valued at $2,208,000, and other neat cattle, 344,000, valued at $5,848,000; horses, 150,000, $11,250,000; sheep, 3,575,000, $12,691,000; and swine, 130,000, $910,000.

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  • The number and value of each of the various classes of live stock in the state on the 1st of January 1908 were as follows: horses, 102,000 ($11,526,000); mules, 5000 ($675,000); milch cows, 190,000 ($8,170,000); other neat cattle, 82,000 ($1,722,000); sheep, 44,000 ($220,000); swine, 155,000 ($1,555,000).

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  • In 1906 the number of horses was 507,000; of sheep, 40,000,000; of cattle, 2,340,000; and swine, 311,000.

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  • The keeping of swine in a dwelling-house, or so as to be a nuisance, is made an offence punishable by a penalty in an urban district, as also is the suffering of any waste or stagnant water to remain in any cellar, or within any dwelling-house after notice, and the allowing of the contents of any closet, privy or cesspool to overflow or soak therefrom.

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  • The number and value of other live-stock were as follows: sheep, in 1900, 3,818,423 ($10,256,488), and on January 1, 1910, 3,177,000 ($13,026,000); horses, in 1900, 115,884 ($3,396,313), and in 1910, 130,000 ($11,050,000); mules, in 1900, 2116 ($58,850), and in 1910, 3000 ($240,000); swine, in 1900, 6 5,73 2 ($ 2 93, 11 5), and in 1910, 61,000 ($549,000).

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  • Swine and pork are largely exported to Russia and Austria-Hungary.

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  • It is probable that Adonis himself was looked upon as incarnate in the swine, so that the sacrifice to him by way of expiation on special occasions of an animal which otherwise was specially sacred, and its consumption by its worshippers, was a sacramental act.

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  • The swine would be sacrificed as having caused the death of Adonis, which explains the dislike of Aphrodite for that animal.

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  • Robertson Smith (Religion of the Semites, new ed., 1894, pp. 191, 290, 411), who, regarding Adonis as the swine-god, characterizes the Adonia as an annual piacular sacrifice (of swine), "in which the sacrifice has come to be overshadowed by its popular and dramatic accompaniments, to which the Greek celebration, not forming part of the state religion, was limited."

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  • Swine are common to the whole country, and some attention has been given to the breeding of mules.

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  • They also afford feeding-ground for large herds of swine, and the hams and sausages of the Abruzzi enjoy a high reputation.

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  • The small number of swine (267,000 in 1910) is partly due to the small crop of Indian corn.

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  • Tertullian replies that " We must beware of giving the holy thing to dogs and of casting pearls before swine."

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  • " larmier," or " crumen," of antelopes and deer, the frontal gland of the muntjak and of bats of the genus Phyllorhina, the chingland of the chevrotains and of Taphozous and certain other bats, the glandular patch behind the ear of the chamois and the reedbuck, the glands on the lower parts of the legs of most deer and a few antelopes (the position of which is indicated by tufts of long and often specially coloured hair), the interdigital foot-glands of goats, sheep, and many other ruminants, the temporal gland of elephants, the lateral glands of the musk-shrew, the gland on the back of the hyrax and the peccary (from the presence of which the latter animal takes the name Dicotyles), the gland on the tails of the members of the dog-tribe, the preputial glands of the muskdeer and beaver (both well known for the use made of their powerfully odorous secretion in perfumery), and also of the swine and hare, the anal glands of Carnivora, the perineal gland of the civet (also of commercial value), the caudal glands of the fox and goat, the gland on the wing-membrane of bats of the genus Saccopteryx, the post-digital gland of the rhinoceros, &c. Very generally these glands are common to both sexes, and it is in such cases that their function as a means of mutual recognition is most evident.

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  • In the omnivorous type, as exemplified in man and monkeys, and to a less specialized degree in swine, the incisors are of moderate and nearly equal size; the canines, if enlarged, serve for other purposes than holding prey, and such enlargement is usually confined to those of the males; while the cheek-teeth have broad flattened crowns surmounted by rounded bosses, or tubercles.

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  • Artiodactyla (Ruminants, Swine, &c.).

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  • There were 1,034,000 sheep, and 1,651,000 swine.

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  • The father died five days after his son in 4 B.C. He had done much for the Jews, thanks to the favour he had won and kept in spite of all from the successive heads of the Roman state; he had observed the Law publicly - in fact, as the traditional epigram of Augustus says, "it was better to be Herod's swine than a son of Herod."

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  • Large herds of swine fatten, in summer and autumn, on the beechmast and acorns of the forests, returning in winter to the lowlands.

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  • Despite American competition and Austro-Hungarian tariffs the export of swine remains the principal branch of Servian commerce.

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  • The number of horses increased from 557,153 in 1900 to 804,000 in 1910; of mules from 117,562 to 191,000; of swine from 1,265,189 to 1,302,000; and of sheep from 88,741 to 108,000.

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  • Droves of swine under the charge of swineherds wandered through the forests; some belonged to the ri, others to lords (flaith) and others again to village communities.

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  • Large herds of swine fatten in the oak and beech forests; and dairy-farming is a thriving industry in the highlands between Agram and Warasdin, where, during the last years of the icth century, systematic attempts were made to replace the mountain pastures by clover and sown grass.

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  • Fauna.-The animal kingdom embraces, besides the usual domestic animals (as horses, cattle, sheep, swine, goats, asses, &c.), wild boars, deer, wild goats, hares, &c.; also bears, wolves, lynxes, foxes, wild cats, jackals, otters, beavers, polecats, martens, weasels and the like.

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  • The fat-tailed sheep, goats and swine have also been naturalized, as well as all kinds of domestic poultry.

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  • SWINEMUNDE, a port and seaside resort of Germany, in the Prussian province of Pomerania, situated at the east extremity of the island of Usedom, and on the left bank of the river Swine which connects the Stettiner Haff with the Baltic. Pop. (1905), 13,272.

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  • high, rises beside the new docks on the island of Wollin, on the other side of the narrow Swine.

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  • The Swine, the central and shortest passage between the Stettiner Haff and the Baltic Sea, was formerly flanked by the fishing villages of West and East Swine.

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  • Towards the beginning of last century it was made navigable for large ships, and Swinemiinde, which was founded on the site of West Swine in 1748, was fortified and raised to the dignity of a town by Frederick the Great in 1765.

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  • assigned for this decay is the fact that horse, sheep, goat and swine rearing is becoming less remunerative.

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  • Goats are mostly bred in the mountainous districts all along the Spanish side of the Pyrenees froth Biscay to Catalonia, and in Badajoz, Cceres, Ciudad Real, Granada and Leon; swine in Badajoz, Lugo, Oviedo, Cceres and Corunna.

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  • Their cannibalism seems to have been dictated by taste, for it was never associated with their religion, the sacrifices to their gods being always swine.

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  • Swine >>

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  • The value of live stock on farms and ranges on the 1st of January 1910 was as follows: horses, $36,288,000; mules, $35,670,000; milch cows, $8,828,000; other cattle, $7,797,000; swine, $8,216,000.

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  • Wild-buffaloes, swine and goats are pretty common; and most of the usual domestic animals are kept.

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  • swine dysentery can survive in mice for 180 days. Men off sick?

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  • Uses For the active immunization of sows, gilts, boars and growing pigs as an aid in the control of swine erysipelas.

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  • What should you do if you suspect swine fever?

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  • His cautionary approach was powerfully vindicated by the scandal of the 1976 ' swine flu ' epidemic in the USA 3.

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  • The collection begins with ' There was a lady lov'd a swine ' which forms the frontispiece.

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  • hammer on anvil Bloodnok: You filthy swine!

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  • husks that the swine do eat.

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  • Effect of sequential porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome aand swine influenza on the growth and performance of finishing pigs.

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  • latter-day eradication schemes for swine fever and brucellosis stemmed.

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  • pearls before swine or serve wine to win friends.

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  • Farmers are being encouraged to ensure against possible outbreaks of foot and mouth disease, sheep pox, avian influenza and swine fever.

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  • Admittedly, using vaccines in bait for foxes and wild boar, the government ist trying to control rabies and swine pest.

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  • rotten swine, Captain, sending him in there with that gorilla alone?

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  • swine's flesh was to be offered.

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  • Spears and swords of iron we leave to whose who, alas, consider human blood and swine 's blood of well-nigh equal value.

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  • swine's grease and rosewater.

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  • He said the prodigal son merely fed swine, he didn't have to chum with them.

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  • eating swine is expressly forbidden in both the Bible and the Koran.

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  • He will break the cross, kill swine, and abolish jizyah.

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  • swine vaccinated with DNA encoding foot-and mouth disease virus empty capsid proteins and the 3D RNA polymerase.

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  • How many Aristotles are herding swine, and how many swineherds wear a crown on their heads!

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  • Jesus had in fact scored a victory, although it is hidden in the gospels as the curing of the Gadarene swine.

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  • You weren't half a rotten swine, Captain, sending him in there with that gorilla alone?

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  • Fanny's time, in this interval, has been largely occupied in contending publicly with wild swine.

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  • He could be a little angel and a little swine in the same moment, but we loved him all the same.

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  • Winston Churchill. ____________________ " The purpose of English Public Schools is feeding sham pearls to real swine " .

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  • swine erysipelas.

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  • swine fever infection are reported from the Newark area.

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  • swine dysentery can survive in mice for 180 days. Men off sick?

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  • swine influenza viruses in North America.

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  • swine flu shots.

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  • swine fever outbreaks have been reported in Germany, France, Italy, Moldavia, the Czech Republic and Switzerland.

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  • The buffalo, used both for transport and in the rice-fields, and swine, the flesh of which forms an important element in the native diet, are the principal domestic animals.

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  • Large numbers of horses, cattle, swine and poultry are reared.

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  • The occupation of this region by Europeans, and the introduction of horses, asses, cattle, sheep, goats and swine, have completely changed its aspect and character.

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  • Swine, bred all over France, are more numerous in Brittany, Anjou (whence comes the well-known breed of Craon), Poitou, Burgundy, the west and north of the central plateau and Beam.

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  • In 1910 there were 495,000 neat cattle (285,000 milch cows), 94,000 horses (average value, $106), 229,000 sheep and 95,000 swine.

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  • The acorns of the oak possess a considerable economic importance as food for swine.

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  • Large herds of swine in all the great oak woods of Germany depend for their autumn maintenance on acorns; and in the remaining royal forests of England the inhabitants of the neighbouring villages yet claim their ancient right of "pannage," turning their hogs into the woods in October and November.

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  • The co-existence of the asexual encysted form and the sexually mature adult in the same host, exceptionally found in 011ulanus and other Nematodes, is the rule in Trichinella; many of the embryos, however, are extruded with the faeces, and complete the life cycle by reaching the alimentary canal of rats and swine which frequently devour human ordure Swine become infested with Trichinella in this way and also by eating the dead bodies of rats, and the parasite is conveyed to the body of man along with the flesh of "trichinized" swine.

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  • S oc cattle, 5,000,000; sheep, 6,000,ooo; goats, 1,800,000; swine, 1,8oo,ooo.

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  • Swine are extensively reared in many provinces.

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  • In 1905 Italy exported 32,786 and imported 17,766 head of cattle; exported 33,574 and imported 6551 sheep; exported 95,995 and imported 1604 swine.

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  • 3 About 64% of the value of the live stock was represented by neat cattle; 19% by sheep; to% by horses, and the remainder by mules, swine, asses, burros and goats.

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  • The city is situated in a rich agricultural region, and is a market for grain, neat cattle, horses and swine.

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  • Between 1850 and 1907 dairy cows increased from 214,231 to 330,000; other neat cattle from 519,739 to 589,000; sheer decreased from 304,929 to 181,000; swine decreased from 1,582,734 to 1,316,000; horses increased from 115,460 to 260,000, and mules from 54,547 to 279,000.

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  • Of the Ungulates, four species of rhinoceros and one of tapir are met with, besides several peculiar forms of the swine family.

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  • Swine and poultry were used for food to a greater extent than oxen, which were bred chiefly for ploughing.

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  • Swine and bees conclude this branch of the work.

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  • pens, when it is enclosed by reason of the compostying and dongyng of the catell that shall go and lye upon it both day and nighte; and if any of his thre closes that he hath for his come be worne or ware bare, than he may breke and plowe up his close that he hadde for his layse, or the close that he hadde for his commen pasture, or bothe, and sowe them with come, and let the other lye for a time, and so shall he have always reist grounde, the which will bear moche come with lytel donge; and also he shall have a great profyte of the wod in the hedges whan it is growen; and not only these profytes and advantages beforesaid, but he shall save moche more than al these, for by reason of these closes he shall save meate, drinke and wages of a shepherde, the wages of the heerdmen, and the wages of the swine herde, the which may fortune to be as chargeable as all his holle rente; and also his come shall be better saved from eatinge or destroyeng with catel.

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  • Sir Richard Weston must have cultivated turnips before this; for Blith says that Sir Richard affirmed to himself that he fed his swine with them.

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  • They were first given boiled, but afterwards the swine came to eat them raw, and would run after the carts, and pull them forth as they gathered them - an expression which conveys an idea of their being cultivated in the fields.

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  • Great Britain had twice as many pigs as Ireland, but the swine industry is mainly.

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  • Little use is made of the weighbridge in selling store-cattle, sheep or swine.

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  • Provision is made, however, for all the well-known breeds of sheep and swine.

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  • By an order of council which came into operation in December 1878, swine fever was declared to be a disease for the purposes of the act of that year.

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  • c. 43) swine fever in Great Britain was, from the 1st of November in that year, dealt with by the Board of Agriculture in the same way as pleuro-pneumonia, the slaughter of infected swine being carried out under directions from the central authority, and compensation allowed from the imperial exchequer.

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  • In it " the expression ` disease' means cattle plague (that is to say, rinderpest, or the disease commonly called cattle plague), contagious pleuropneumonia of cattle (in this act called pleuro-pneumonia), foot-and-mouth disease, sheep-pox, sheep-scab, or swine fever (that is to say, the disease known as typhoid fever of swine, soldier purples, red disease, hog cholera or swine plague)."

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  • Under the Diseases of Animals Acts 1894 and 1896 weekly returns are issued by the Board of Agriculture of outbreaks of anthrax, foot-and-mouth disease, glanders (including farcy), pleuro-pneumonia, rabies and swine fever in the counties of Great Britain; also monthly returns of outbreaks of sheep-scab.

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  • Between 1879 and 1892 inclusive, administration with regard to swine fever was entrusted to local authorities.

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  • shows the number of counties in which swine-fever existed, the number of outbreaks confirmed and the number of swine slaughtered by order of the board in each year since.

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  • What are termed " swine-fever infected areas " are scheduled by the board when and where circumstances seem to require, and the movement TABLE Xxiv.-Outbreaks of Swine Fever in Great Britain, 1894-1905.

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  • of swine within such areas is prohibited, much inconvenience to trade resulting from restrictions of this kind.

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  • Owing to the reappearance of foot-and-mouth disease in Great Britain early in 1900 the importation of cattle, sheep, goats and swine therefrom into Ireland was temporarily suspended by the authorities in the latter country.

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  • Eber), the name given to the uncastrated male of the domestic pig, and to some wild species of the family Suidae (see Swine).

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  • The number of swine was 1,964,770 in 1850; 3,285,789 in 190o; and 2,047,000 in 1910.

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  • Swine are reared in large numbers.

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  • A considerable quantity of timber is grown on the high lands, and the rich valley pastures support large herds of cattle, while the abundance of oaks and chestnuts favours the rearing of swine.

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  • Clad in Eastern paraphernalia, he officiated at the numerous sacrifices indicated by the remains of iron and bronze knives, hatchets, chains, ashes and bones of oxen, sheep, goats, swine, fowl, &c. There was pouring of libations, chanting and music, and bells and candles were employed in the service.

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  • Swine do well in all parts of the country, especially in Minas Geraes, Sao Paulo, Rio de Janeiro, Parana and Rio Grande do Sul, and domestic pork and lard are' slowly supplanting the heavily-taxed foreign products.

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  • The following table gives the mean temperature, relative humidity, and rainfall (including snow) at a series of meteorological stations during the years 1896-1900: Fauna.-The horned cattle of Hungary are amongst the finest in Europe, and large herds of swine are reared in the oak forests.

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  • The breeding of goats and swine is an important industry in some regions.

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  • Anatomy was as little regarded as it was in the later ancient schools, the empiric and methodic, but demonstrations of the parts of the body were given on swine.

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  • The upper layer or soil proper consists of material which has been subjected swine, sus.

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  • Cattle and swine are reared, and dairy produce is largely exported; but the sheep of the province are small and their wool indifferent.

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  • (See Swine and Peccary.) The Hippopotamidae are an exclusively Old World group, in which the muzzle is broad and rounded and quite unlike that of the Suidae, while the crowns of the cheek-teeth form a distinctly trefoil pattern, when partially worn, which is only foreshadowed in those of the latter.

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  • In the number of swine the state ranked eighth in 1900 with 2,665,614 head, and third in 1910 with 3,205,000 head.

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  • It is not even safe, according to these two fathers, to commit too much to writing; and Clement undertakes not to reveal in writing many secrets known to the initiated among his readers; otherwise the indiscreet eye of the heathen may rest on them, and he will have cast his pearls before swine.

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  • In the same year, according to the same authority, there were in the state 196,000 milch cows, 92,000 other neat cattle, 45, 000 sheep and 70,000 swine.

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  • The main channel follows the left side of the valley and finally expands into the Pommersches, or Stettiner Haff, which is connected with the sea by three arms, the Peene, the Swine and the Dievenow, forming the islands of Usedom and Wollin.

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  • The Swine, in the middle, is the main channel for navigation.

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  • long, affording a waterway between the Stettiner Haff and the river Swine for the largest ocean-going vessels; a new cut, 44 m.

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  • On these occasions the Lares were crowned with garlands, and offerings of cakes and honey, wine and incense, but especially swine, were laid before them.

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  • Swine furnish a very large proportion of the flesh diet of the people.

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  • Burnt wheat, barley and linseed, with many varieties of seeds and fruits, were plentifully mingled with the bones of the stag, the ox, the swine, the sheep and the goat, representing the ordinary food of the inhabitants, while remains of the beaver, the fox, the hare, the dog, the bear, the horse, the elk and the bison were also found.

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  • They kept horses, cattle, sheep, goats and swine.

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  • The gain was chiefly confined to cattle, but the number of horses, sheep and swine also showed substantial increases.

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  • The number and value respectively of the various farm animals on the 1st of January 1910 were as follows: horses, 612,000 ($64,260,000), dairy cows, 656,000 ($21,648,000); other cattle, 1,341,000 ($28,832,000); swine, 805,000 ($8,936,000); and sheep, 829,000 (83,316,000).

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  • The value of the various classes of live-stock on the 1st of January 1910 was as follows: horses, $81,168,000; mules, $I,040,000; cattle, $21,001,000; sheep, $2,484,000; swine, $2,266,000.

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  • In 1901 there were 6586 cows, 3881 horses, 2468 swine and 2048 bee-hives in the canton.

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  • In general, water, cows' urine and blood of swine are the materials used in ablutions.

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  • Cattle, swine and goats are raised, and the state produces coffee, sugar, cacao, beans, cereals and cheese.

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  • Stockfarming, a relatively undeveloped industry, tends to become more important, owing to the assistance which the state renders by the importation of horses, cattle, sheep and swine, from Europe and the United States, in order to improve the native breeds.

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  • The numbers of horses, mules, cattle and sheep increased quite steadily from 1850 to 1900, but the number of swine in 1880 and in 1900 was nearly one-third less than in 1850.

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  • In 1900 the state had 497,245 horses, 198,110 mules, 364,025 dairy cows, 755,714 other neat cattle, 1,300,832 sheep and 2,008,989 swine; in 1910 there were in Kentucky 407,000 horses, 207,000 mules, 394,000 mulch cows, 665,000 other neat cattle, 1,060,000 sheep and 989,000 swine.

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  • The Spaniards found no indigenous domestic animals in the country, and introduced their own horses, cattle, sheep and swine.

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  • The raising of swine, however, is increasing.

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  • According to this report, which is not strictly trustworthy, there were in the republic 5,142,457 cattle, 859,217 horses, 334,435 mules, 287,991 asses, 3,424,430 sheep, 4,206,011 goats and 616,139 swine.

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  • Monmouth is situated in a good farming region, and cattle, swine and ponies are raised in the vicinity.

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  • Thou hast washed in these running waters wherein dogs and swine have been cast night and day and hast cleansed and wiped the outside skin which also the harlots and flutegirls anoint and wash and wipe and beautify for the lust of men; but within they are full of scorpions and all wickedness.

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  • Swine, which are reared in great numbers in the plains, yield the famous Westphalian hams; and the rearing of cattle and goats is important.

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  • SWINE, a name properly applicable to the domesticated pig (Sus scrofa), but also including its wild relatives.

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  • The Suidae are divisible into the true Old World swine (Suinae) and the American peccaries (Dicotylinae).

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  • All the typical swine are further characterized by the fact that the young are longitudinally striped with bands of dark brown and some paler tint; this striped coat disappearing in the course of a few months.

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  • (For the characteristics of this animal see Babirusa.) Extinct Swine.

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  • Cattle, sheep, swine and poultry are reared in abundance.

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  • Bacon with an excess of fat is not wanted, except in the lumber camps; consequently the farmers of Canada have cultivated a class of swine for bacon having plenty of lean and firm flesh.

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  • The great extension of the dairy business has fitted in with the rearing of large numbers of swine.

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  • Experimental work has shown that swine fattened with a ration partly of skim-milk were lustier and of a more healthy appearance than swine fattened wholly on grains.

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  • Hog cholera or swine fever has been almost eradicated.

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  • To this end experiments are conducted in the feeding of cattle, sheep and swine for flesh, the feeding of cows for the production of milk, and of poultry both for flesh and eggs.

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  • The swine seems to have been the animal sacred to him, or to have been one of the symbols under which he is represented.

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  • Here she was found by Odysseus and his companions; the latter she changed into swine, but the hero, protected by the herb moly, which n he had received from Hermes, not only forced her to restore them to their original shape, but also gained her love.

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  • The mountains afford excellent pasture, and a considerable number of cattle, sheep and swine are reared.

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  • The whole body moves forward slowly, always advancing in the swine general direction in which they originally started, but following more or less the course of the great valleys.

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  • 5 - The following abound: wild swine, hyaena, jackal, cheetah, fox; gazelle (in herds), antelope species (in the steppe); jerboa, mole, porcupine, and especially the common European rat (in the desert); bat, long-haired desert hare.

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