Sus sentence example

sus
  • When, as is the case among nearly all existing mammals with the exception of the members of the genera Sus (pigs), Gymnura (ratshrew), Talpa (moles) and Myogale (desmans) the number of teeth is reduced below the typical forty-four, it appears to be an almost universal rule that if one of the incisors is missing it is the second, or middle one, while the premolars commence to disappear from the front end of the series and the molars from the hinder end.
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  • Moldavia proper was divided into the upper country or T'erra de sus, and the lower country, or T'erra de josu.
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  • These were the Great Logothete (Marele Logofetu) or chancellor; the governor of Lower Moldavia - Vorniculu de t'erra de josu; the governor of Upper Moldavia - Vorniculu de t'erra de sus; the Hatman or commander - in - chief; the high chamberlain - Marele Postelnicu; the great Spathar, or sword-bearer; the great cupbearer - Marele Paharnicu; and the treasurer, or Vistiernicu, who together formed the prince's council and were known as Boiari de Svatu.
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  • As a coveted district, all kinds of natural riches are attributed to Sus, but it may be assumed that they are exaggerated.
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  • This fric tion has been greatly re duced by making the draw doors, or sluice-gates, slide on each side against a verti A cal row of free-rollers sus pended by an encircling / chain; and the working .%i/ is much facilitated by FIG.
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  • Caravans from Sus laden with copper-ware, olive oil, butter, saffron, wax, skins, dates, dried roses, &c., are sent to Marrakesh, four days' journey from Tarudant.
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  • Casi sin aliento, con el lobo pagado a sus talones, little pigs were off like a shot from there.
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  • The design and operation of all communities have consequences for local and global sus ta inability.
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  • The upper layer or soil proper consists of material which has been subjected swine, sus.
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  • In the typical genus Sus, as exemplified by domesticated pigs (see PIG) and the wild boar (see Boar), the dentition is i.
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  • There is a small pig (Sus andamanensis), important to the food of the people, and a wild cat (Paradoxurus tytleri); but the bats(sixteen species) and rats(thirteen species) constitute nearly three-fourths of the known mammals.
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  • Deer do not extend into New Guinea, in which island the genus Sus appears to have its eastern limit.
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  • The European wild boar (Sus scrof a) is distributed over Europe, northern Africa, and central and northern Asia.
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  • The Indian wild boar (Sus cristatus) is slightly taller than Sus scrota, standing some 30 to 40 in.
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  • At Gunde-Shapur in this region " sugar was prepared with art " about the time of the Arab conquest, 3 and manufacture on a large scale was carried on at Shuster, Sus and Askar-Mokram throughout the middle ages.4 It has been plausibly conjectured that the art of sugar refining, which the farther East learned from the Arabs, was developed by the famous physicians of this region, in whose pharmacopoeia sugar had an important place.
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  • The sober lists of names with which it opens; the account of the embassy, so business-like in its estimates of costs and terms, and suddenly breaking into a fervent description of how the six deputies, "prostrating themselves on the earth and weeping warm tears, begged the doge and people of Venice to have pity on Jerusalem"; the story immediately following, how the young count Thibault of Champagne, raising himself from a sickbed in his joy at the successful return of his ambassadors, "leva sus et chevaucha, et laz!
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  • A pig (Sus papuensis), a dingo, several species of mice (of which Chiruromys is a peculiar genus), a few squirrels, and a considerable number of Chiroptera (bats) inhabit the country.
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  • Madoz was distinguished from most of the politicians of his generation by the fact that in middle life he compiled what is still a book of value - a geographical, statistical and historical dictionary of Spain and its possessions oversea, Diccionario geogra Pico, estadistico y historico de Espana, y sus posesiones de Ultramar (Madrid, 1848-1850).
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  • Similar doubts have also been entertained with regard to the African bush-pigs or river-hogs, but from geographical considerations alone these are but regarded as representing a separate genus, Potamochoerus, although they are nearly allied to the verrucosus group of Sus.
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  • The milk-dentition, and even the early condition of the permanent dentition, is formed on the same general type as that of Sus, except that certain teeth are absent, the formula being 13 i cl, total 34; but as age advances all the teeth have a tendency to disappear, except the canines and the posterior molars, but these, which in some cases are the only teeth left in the jaws, attain an extraordinary development.
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  • See Domeyko, Araucania y sus habitantes (Santiago, 1846); de Ginoux, "Le Chili et les Araucans," in Bull.
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  • The molars, and more especially the last, are smaller and simpler than in the pigs of the genus Sus, but the peculiarity of this genus is the extraordinary development of the canines, or tusks, of the male.
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  • The wild hog (Sus scrofa) is found on the lower Helmund.
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  • The wild hog (Sus cristatus) is well known as affording the most exciting sport in the world - " pig-sticking."
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  • The elephant is found in the outer forests as far as the Jumna, and the rhinoceros as far as the Sarda; the spread of both of these animals as far as the Indus and into the plains of India, far beyond their present limits, is authenticated by historical records; they have probably retreated before the advance of cultivation and fire-arms. Wild pigs are common in the lower ranges, and one peculiar species of pigmy-hog (Sus salvanius) of very small size inhabits the forests at the base of the mountains in Nepal and Sikim.
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  • Most of the business of Sus is carried on at great fairs lasting eight or fifteen days, during which time all roads of approach are guaranteed safe by the tribesmen that trade may be uninterrupted.
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  • In the wild boar (Sus scrofa) the upper or hinder surface of the lower tusk, which has no enamel, inclines obliquely outwards and is broader than the outer surface.
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  • Some doubt exists whether the pygmy hog of the Nepal Terai, which is not much larger than a hare, is best regarded as a member of the typical genus, under the name of Sus salvanius or as representing a genus by itself, with the title Porcula salvania.
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