Surface-tension sentence examples

surface-tension
  • This drop will not spread out like the first drop, but will take the form of a flat lens with a distinct circular edge, showing that the surface-tension of what is still apparently pure water is now less than the sum of the tensions of the surfaces separating oil from air and water.

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  • If the denser body be solid we can often demonstrate this; for the liquid tends to spread itself over the surface of the solid, so as to increase the area of the surface of contact, even although in so doing it is obliged to increase the free surface in opposition to the surface-tension.

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  • Hence the liquid will rise in the tube till the weight of the vertical column between the free surface and the level of the liquid in the vessel balances the resultant of the surface-tension.

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  • In the next place, there is the surface-tension acting downwards, but at an angle a with the vertical, across the circular section of the bubble itself, whose circumference is 21ry, and the downward force is therefore 2lryT cos a.

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  • If a drop of water be allowed to form at the extremity of a fine tube, it will go on increasing until its weight overcomes the surface tension by which it clings to the tube, and then it will fall.

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  • It is possible that a correlation may be made between solubility and the energy of surface tension.

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  • tensiometer used to measure dynamic surface tension of fluids.

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  • The early writers on capillary action supposed that the diminution of capillary action was due simply to the change of density corresponding to the rise of temperature, and, therefore, assuming the surface-tension to vary as the square of the (37)?(f) =eP f (38) density, they deduced its variations from the observed dilatation of the liquid by heat.

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  • But when the surface-tension of A exceeds the sum of the tensions of the surfaces of contact of B with air and with A, it is impossible to construct the triangle of forces, so that equilibrium becomes impossible.

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  • Although throughout a certain range the surface-tension varies rapidly with the degree of contamination, it is remarkable that, as was first fully indicated by Miss Pockels,the earlier stages of contamination have little or no effect upon surface-tension.

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  • - When a series of waves is propagated on the surface of a liquid, the surface-tension has the effect of increasing the pressure at the crests of the waves and diminishing it in the troughs.

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  • Relation Of Surface-Tension To Temperature It appears from the experiments of Brunner and of Wolf on the ascent of water in tubes that at the temperature t° centigrade T =75.20 (I -0.00187t) (Brunner); =76 08 (i-o o02t-Po ooOo0415t 2), for a tube .02346cm.diameter (Wolf); = 77.34(1 -o oo181t), for a tube 03098 cm.

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  • The resultant of the internal pressure and the surface-tension is equivalent to a pressure along the axis equal to that due to a pressure p acting on a circle whose diameter is the conjugate axis of the hyperbola.

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  • With Sydney Young and others he investigated the critical state and properties of liquids and the relationship between their vapour pressures and temperature, and with John Shields he applied measurements of the surface tension of liquids to the determination of their molecular complexity.

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  • At the critical point liquid and vapour become identical, and, consequently, as was pointed out by Frankenheim in 1841, the surface tension is zero at the critical temperature.

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  • Mendeleeff endeavoured to obtain a connexion between surface energy and constitution; more successful were the investigations of Schiff, who found that the " molecular surface tension," which he defined as the surface tension divided by the weight.

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  • The relation they suspected to be of the form -yS = KT, where K is a constant analogous to R, and S the surface containing one gramme-molecule, y and T being the surface tension and temperature respectively.

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  • Acting on a principle quite different from any previously discussed is the capillary hydrometer or staktometer of Brewster, which is based upon the difference in the surface tension and density of pure water, and of mixtures of alcohol and water in varying proportions.

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  • Hence any impurity which diminishes the surface tension of the water will diminish the size of the drop (unless the density is proportionately diminished).

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  • The surface tension, on the other hand, is greater than that of pure water and increases with the salinity, according to Kriimmel, in the manner shown by the equation a=77.09+o 0221 S at o° C., where a is the coefficient of surface tension and S the salinity in parts per thousand.

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  • The surface-tension of mercury is greatly altered by slight changes in the state of the surface.

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  • Hence the numerical value of the intensity of the surface-tension is equal to the numerical value of the surface-energy per unit of surface.

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  • We must remember that since the film has two surfaces the surface-tension of the film is double the tension of the surface of the liquid of which it is formed.

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  • The Eco-Balls contain mineral oxides and act as a natural non-ionic surfactant that reduces surface tension and releases dirt.

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  • Steam actuation is also a serious possibility for micro-engineered devices, although surface tension effects caused by liquid water must be taken into account.

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  • The pulsating bubble tensiometer used to measure dynamic surface tension of fluids.

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  • It uses web hands, which are aquatic gloves that increase the surface tension of the water, as well as underwater treadmills and water weights.

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  • According to Quincke, the surface tension of pure water in contact with air at 20° C. is 81 dynes per linear centimetre, while that of alcohol is only 25.5 dynes; and a small percentage of alcohol produces much more than a proportional decrease in the surface tension when added to pure water.

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  • Buchanan, which has an arbitrary scale and can be varied in weight by placing small metal rings on the stem so as to depress the scale to any desired depth in sea-water of any salinity, the specific gravity being calculated for each reading by dividing the total weight by the immersed volume; (3) the total immersion areometer, which has no scale and the weight of which can be adjusted so that the instrument can be brought so exactly to the specific gravity of the water sample that it remains immersed, neither floating nor sinking; this has the advantage of 'eliminating the effects of surface tension and in Fridtjof Nansen's pattern is capable of great precision.

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  • In studying the dispersion of the aniline dyes, a prism with a very small refracting angle is made of two glass plates slightly inclined to each other and enclosing a very thin wedge of the dye, which is either melted between the plates, or is in the form of a solution retained in position by surface-tension.

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  • 4, when it ought properly to sink almost to the top of the stem, the surface tension of the water around the circumference of the circle of contact, AA', providing the additional support required.

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  • Smaller pieces are thrown into a bath of melted carnallite and pressed together with an iron rod, the bath being then heated until the globules of metal float to the top, when they may be removed in perforated iron ladles, through the holes in which the fused chloride can drain away, but through which the melted magnesium cannot pass by reason of its high surface tension.

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  • If, however, the energy of surface tension between the two substances were negative the surface would tend to a maximum, and complete mixture would follow.

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  • From this point of view the natural solubility of two substances involves a negative energy of surface tension between them.

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  • T, Surface tension of liquid.

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  • (1751) p. 301) introduced the very important idea of the surface-tension of liquids, which he ascribed to attractive forces, the sphere of whose action is so small " ut nullo adhuc sensu percipi potuerit."

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  • In attempting to calculate the effect of this surface-tension in determining the form of a drop of the liquid, Segner took account of the curvature of a meridian section of the drop, but neglected the effect of the curvature in a plane at right angles to this section.

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  • The idea of surface-tension introduced by Segner had a most important effect on the subsequent development of the theory.

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  • The next step is to deduce this surface-tension from a hypothesis as to the molecular constitution of the liquid and of the bodies that surround it.

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  • He applied this principle of surface-tension to the explanation of the apparent attractions and repulsions between bodies floating on a liquid.

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  • Trans., 1805, p. 65) founded the theory of capillary phenomena on the principle of surface-tension.

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  • Having applied the secondary principle of surface-tension to the various particular cases of capillary action, Young proceeded to deduce this surface-tension from ulterior principles.

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  • The form into which he threw his investigation seems to have deterred many able physicists from the inquiry into the ulterior cause of capillary phenomena, and induced them to rest content with deriving them from the fact of surface-tension.

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  • It assumes the form of a sphere under the action of surface-tension alone.

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  • The free portions of the surface then assume new forms depending on the equilibrium of surface-tension.

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  • of the phenomena of surface-tension, and showed their connexion with the experiments of Charles Tomlinson on the figures formed by oils dropped on the clean surface of water.

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  • de Chimie et de Physique, 1866-1868) applied the principles of thermodynamics to capillary phenomena, and the experiments of his son Paul were exceedingly ingenious and well devised, tracing the influence of surfacetension in a great number of very different circumstances, and deducing from independent methods the numerical value of the surface-tension.

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  • p. 620) experimented on liquid films, and showed how a film of a liquid of high surfacetension is replaced by a film of lower surface-tension.

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  • He also calculated the effect of surface-tension on the propagation of waves on the surface of a liquid, and determined the minimum velocity of a wave, and the velocity of the wind when it is just sufficient to disturb the surface of still water.

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  • This tendency of the surface to contract itself is called the surface-tension of liquids.

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  • (6) or the force arising from the surface-tension acting on a length a of the strip is Ta, so that T represents the surface-tension acting transversely on every unit of length of the periphery of the liquid surface.

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  • The method already given for the investigation of the surface-tension of a liquid, all whose dimensions are sensible, fails in the case of a liquid film such as a soap-bubble.

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  • Hence the surface-tension =e - =47rp 2 (f 0(z)dz - ce(c)).

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  • But this equation is applicable only at points in the interior, where p is not varying.] [The intrinsic pressure and the surface-tension of a uniform mass are perhaps more easily found by the following process.

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  • P. 397.] ON Surface-Tension Definition.

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  • Experimental Laws of Surface-Tension.

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  • For any given liquid surface, as the surface which separates water from air, or oil from water, the surface-tension is the same at every point of the surface and in every direction.

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  • The surface-tension diminishes as the temperature rises, and when the temperature reaches that of the critical point at which the distinction between the liquid and its vapour ceases, it has been observed by Andrews that the capillary action also vanishes.

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  • When the surface is curved, the effect of the surface-tension is to make the pressure on the concave side exceed the pressure on the convex side by T (1 /R I i /R 2), where T is the intensity of the surface-tension and R 1, R2 are the radii of curvature of any two sections normal to the surface and to each other.

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  • The edge of the drop is drawn out by the surface-tension of A with a force greater than the sum of the tensions of the two surfaces of the drop. The drop, therefore, spreads itself out, with great velocity, over the surface of A till it covers an enormous area, and is reduced to such extreme tenuity that it is not probable that it retains the same properties of surface-tension which it has in a large mass.

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  • But even when thus attenuated, the film may be proved to be present, since the surface-tension of the liquid is considerably less than that of pure water.

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  • According to the rule, water, which has the lower surface-tension, should spread upon the surface of mercury; whereas the universal experience of the laboratory is that drops of water standing upon mercury retain their compact form without the least tendency to spread.

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  • So far from spreading over the surface, as according to its lower surface-tension it ought to do, it remains suspended in the form of a lens.

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  • Hence the resultant of the surface-tension is 2l T cos a.

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  • From this the weight of a drop of any liquid of which the density and surface tension are known, can be calculated.

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  • 1899).] Phenomena arising from the Variation of the Surface-tension.- Pure water has a higher surface-tension than that of any other substance liquid at ordinary temperatures except mercury.

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  • Hence any other liquid if mixed with water diminishes its surface-tension.

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  • For example, if a drop of alcohol be placed on the surface of water, the surface-tension will be diminished from 80, the value for pure water, to 25, the value for pure alcohol.

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  • In the middle of the vessel the superficial layer recovers its strength by diffusion from below, but the film adhering to the side of the glass becomes more watery, and therefore has a higher surface-tension than the surface of the stronger wine.

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  • If this takes place more rapidly on one side of the piece of camphor than on the other side, the surface-tension becomes weaker where there is most camphor in solution, and the lump, being pulled unequally by the surface-tensions, moves off in the direction of the strongest tension, namely, towards the side on which least camphor is dissolved.

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  • The surface-tension of pure mercury is so great that it is very difficult to keep it clean, for every kind of oil or grease spreads over it at once.

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  • But the most remarkable effects of change of surface-tension are those produced by what is called the electric polarization of the surface.

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  • If the electromotive force is from the acid to the mercury the surface-tension increases; if it is from the mercury to the acid, it diminishes.

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  • He has also ccnstructed an apparatus in which this variation in the surface-tension is made to do work and drive a machine.

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  • Lord Rayleigh has shown that the fall of surface-tension begins when the quantity of oil is about the half of that required to stop the camphor movements, and he suggests that this stage may correspond with a complete coating of the surface with a single layer of molecules.] On the Forms of Liquid Films which are Figures of Revolution.

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  • We may conceive this pressure to arise from the tendency which the bubble has to contract, or in other words from the surface-tension of the bubble.

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  • The surface must therefore act like a sheet of india-rubber when extended both in length and breadth, that is, it must exert surface-tension.

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  • The intensity of this surface-tension is measured by the stress which it exerts across a line of unit length.

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  • This stress is balanced by the pressure p acting over the area of the same great circle: it is therefore equal to 2 p. To determine the intensity of the surface-tension we have to divide this quantity by the length of the line across which it acts, which is in this case the circumference of a great circle 27r.

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  • Dividing irr 2 p by this length we obtain zpr as the value of the intensity of the surface-tension, and it is plain from equation 8 that this is equal to T.

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  • To determine the relation between the surface-tension and the pressure which balances it when the form of the surface is not spherical, let us consider the following case: Let fig.

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  • In all these cases the internal pressure exceeds the external by 2T/a where a is the semi-transverse axis of the conic. The resultant of the internal pressure and the surface-tension is equivalent to a tension along the axis, and the numerical value of this tension is equal to the force due to the action of this pressure on a circle whose diameter is equal to the conjugate axis of the ellipse.

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  • But the liquid after it leaves the vessel is subject to no forces except gravity, the pressure of the air, and its own surface-tension.

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  • But the surface-tension, acting on a cylindric column of liquid whose length exceeds the limit of stability, begins to produce enlargements and contractions in the stream as soon as the liquid has left the orifice, and these inequalities in the figure of the column go on increasing till it is broken up into elongated fragments.

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  • These fragments as they are falling through the air continue to be acted on by surface-tension.

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  • Now if the displacement z be everywhere very small, the curvature in the planes parallel to xz and yz will be d 2 z/dx 2 and d 2 z/dy e respectively, and if T is the surface-tension the whole upward force will be d 2 z d2zl T (4x 2 + + (p - o) gz.

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  • The lowering of tension, which follows the condensation of the vapour, is then strikingly shown by the sudden precipitation of the water.] Ef f ect of Surface-tension on the Velocity of Waves.

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  • If the wave-length is X, the equation of the surface is y=b sin 2lrxx The pressure due to the surface tension T is p= - Td 2 = 4Ty.

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  • For waves whose length is less than X the principal force concerned is that of surface-tension.

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  • In front of this is a double series of stationary waves, the gravitation waves forming a series increasing in wave-length with their distance in front of the body, and the surface-tension waves or ripples diminishing in wave-length with their distance from the body, and both sets of waves rapidly diminishing in amplitude with their distance from the body.

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  • Thus a= 2.54 cros., or one inch very nearly.] Tables Of Surface-Tension In the following tables the units of length, mass and time are the centimetre, the gramme and the second, and the unit of force is that which if it acted on one gramme for one second would communicate to it a velocity of one centimetre per second: - Table of Surface-Tension at 20° C. (Quincke).

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  • Quincke has determined the surface-tension of a great many substances near their point of fusion or solidification.

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  • Lord Kelvin has applied the principles of Thermodynamics to determine the thermal effects of increasing or diminishing the area of the free surface of a liquid, and has shown that in order to keep the temperature constant while the area of the surface increases by unity, an amount of heat must be supplied 275 to the liquid which is dynamically equivalent to the product of the absolute temperature into the decrement of the surface-tension per degree of temperature.

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  • There was a momentary discomfort on penetrating the surface tension of the sub-space artifact.

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  • droplets of ink are formed from the break-up of liquid jets by surface tension.

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  • momentary discomfort on penetrating the surface tension of the sub-space artifact.

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  • If gravity and surface tension did not predominate, the water drops on the surface would still be spherical as well.

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  • The finer the particles the greater their surface tension and the more their moisture retention levels and vise versa.

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  • An inflation force is used at each vertex to inflate the overall model, while surface tension attempts to keep the mesh spherical.

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  • The almost spherical shape is due to the surface tension of the model.

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  • The absence of surfactant, which normally reduces the surface tension in the lungs, leads to collapse.

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  • However, as bubbles expand the internal pressure overcomes the surface tension and the bubbles grow rapidly.

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  • The model uses simulated surface tension and an inflationary force to grow from within an object and find its boundary.

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  • We propose to study fully three-dimensional free surface flows with the effect of gravity and surface tension included.

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  • It is there shown that the surface tension of a liquid may be calculated from its rise in a capillary tube by the formula y = rhs, where y is the surface tension per square centimetre, r the radius of the tube, h the height of the liquid column, and s the difference between the densities of the liquid and its vapour.

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  • According to Quincke, the surface tension of pure water in contact with air at 20° C. is 81 dynes per linear centimetre, while that of alcohol is only 25.5 dynes; and a small percentage of alcohol produces much more than a proportional decrease in the surface tension when added to pure water.

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  • The surface tension, on the other hand, is greater than that of pure water and increases with the salinity, according to Kriimmel, in the manner shown by the equation a=77.09+o 0221 S at o° C., where a is the coefficient of surface tension and S the salinity in parts per thousand.

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  • we may define T either as the surface-energy per unit of area, or as the surface-tension per unit of contour, for the numerical values of these two quantities are equal.

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  • The forces acting on the portion of liquid P 1 P 2 A 2 A 1 are - first, the horizontal pressures, - pgy i and z pgy 2; second, the surface-tension T acting at P i and P2 in directions inclined 01 and 0 2 to the horizon.

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  • An application of the finger for 20 or 30 seconds to the under surface of the vessel will then generate enough heat to lower appreciably the surface-tension, as is evidenced by the opening out of the dust and the formation of a bare spot perhaps r z in.

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  • Thus a= 2.54 cros., or one inch very nearly.] Tables Of Surface-Tension In the following tables the units of length, mass and time are the centimetre, the gramme and the second, and the unit of force is that which if it acted on one gramme for one second would communicate to it a velocity of one centimetre per second: - Table of Surface-Tension at 20° C. (Quincke).

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  • Relation Of Surface-Tension To Temperature It appears from the experiments of Brunner and of Wolf on the ascent of water in tubes that at the temperature t° centigrade T =75.20 (I -0.00187t) (Brunner); =76 08 (i-o o02t-Po ooOo0415t 2), for a tube .02346cm.diameter (Wolf); = 77.34(1 -o oo181t), for a tube 03098 cm.

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  • They are so light that they do not penetrate the surface tension of the water, which supports them.

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  • The effect of surface tension forces is particularly dramatically seen in this video clip, which shows the reflow of a BGA.

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  • Surfactant-A protective film secreted by the alveoli in the lungs that reduces the surface tension of lung fluids, allowing gas exchange and helping maintain the elasticity of lung tissue.

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