Suppose sentence example

suppose
  • I suppose they're both a little artificial.
    411
    112
  • Yeah, well, I suppose it's a little tough in the winter.
    328
    135
  • I suppose it depends on the driver.
    240
    52
  • I don't suppose he'd agree.
    190
    103
  • I suppose he wanted to help.
    69
    22
    Advertisement
  • What do you suppose Paulette was doing up there by herself?
    80
    45
  • "I suppose that's the one thing that troubles me most," Lisa admitted.
    46
    21
  • Yes, I suppose, she answered.
    38
    15
  • You don't suppose Martha and Quinn went into hiding, do you?
    32
    16
  • I suppose everyone asks you, but why are you doing it?
    36
    23
    Advertisement
  • I suppose he missed those.
    29
    17
  • "A real juicy case, I suppose," Dean prodded.
    21
    11
  • I suppose no place is better than home on Christmas.
    23
    15
  • I suppose Paul recognized my name, either before or soon after we first met, back when I was a teenager.
    27
    19
  • The million dollar hunt for the Psychic Tipster was flooding the press; I suppose as intended.
    21
    14
    Advertisement
  • The reasons on which the Duc de Bassano based his refusal to deliver them to him would never have led me to suppose that that could serve as a pretext for aggression.
    11
    4
  • "I suppose you're anxious to get back on the road," Dean hinted.
    16
    10
  • I suppose you knew that, too.
    27
    21
  • If the name was not derived from that of some English locality--Saffron Walden, for instance--one might suppose that it was called originally Walled-in Pond.
    16
    10
  • "A little," Carmen responded, "but I suppose that's natural, given our relationship.
    12
    7
    Advertisement
  • I suppose it is one of the Rostovs!
    13
    9
  • If the whole activity of the leaders serves as the expression of the people's will, as some historians suppose, then all the details of the court scandals contained in the biographies of a Napoleon or a Catherine serve to express the life of the nation, which is evident nonsense; but if it is only some particular side of the activity of an historical leader which serves to express the people's life, as other so-called "philosophical" historians believe, then to determine which side of the activity of a leader expresses the nation's life, we have first of all to know in what the nation's life consists.
    13
    9
  • One couple is sleeping apart, so I suppose Ginger and Joseph are already estranged.
    8
    5
  • When I awoke and found that all was dark and still, I suppose I thought it was night, and I must have wondered why day was so long coming.
    13
    10
  • "Those who pass the examinations, I suppose," replied Kochubey, crossing his legs and glancing round.
    9
    6
    Advertisement
  • Do you suppose they don't smell you coming so quickly?
    6
    4
  • Is someone in the mine, do you suppose?
    2
    0
  • Your chief fault, my friend, is in being made of wood, and that I suppose you cannot help.
    10
    8
  • At first the piglet stuck in the neck of the vase and I thought I should get him, after all, but he wriggled himself through and fell down into the deep bottom part--and I suppose he's there yet.
    9
    7
  • Suppose we each sing a song in turn.
    18
    16
    Advertisement
  • Now, what do you suppose happens when agriculture prices shoot way up?
    13
    11
  • But the deepest ponds are not so deep in proportion to their area as most suppose, and, if drained, would not leave very remarkable valleys.
    9
    7
  • I suppose it's very interesting.
    3
    1
  • I suppose it is different things for different people - dreams or goals.
    14
    13
  • Well, it doesn't matter anyway, I suppose.
    1
    0
    Advertisement
  • I suppose it helps keep the carrier from getting attached to the baby.
    1
    0
  • The same thing you'd do if you were married, I suppose.
    1
    0
  • I suppose he was trying to protect me.
    1
    0
  • I suppose it will wait.
    1
    0
  • Many persons appear to suppose that decisions upon doubtful points can be avoided by the expedient of leaving the traditional reading in possession of the text.
    1
    0
    Advertisement
  • I suppose you feel so, too, when you gaze up to the stars in the stillness of the night, do you not?...
    5
    4
  • Somehow I had expected to see a pale, delicate child--I suppose I got the idea from Dr. Howe's description of Laura Bridgman when she came to the Institution.
    22
    21
  • I suppose she thought I'd roll over and cry in my pillow.
    0
    0
  • I suppose I could try for a while, but I'm not making any promises.
    0
    0
  • Well… I suppose you don't have to carve all of them.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Anyway, I suppose I owe him something for the three years he bossed me around.
    0
    0
  • I suppose I could use a few hours away from this place, though.
    0
    0
  • "I suppose you're right," she muttered as she headed for the door.
    0
    0
  • I suppose you get lots of skips, don't you?
    0
    0
  • I suppose that's the 64-dollar question.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Suppose it belonged to our friend?
    0
    0
  • "I suppose you folks are on your way for a vacation in Florida and just stopped off for the night," the man said with mock inno­cence.
    0
    0
  • I suppose I'll have to get a locksmith if he doesn't send me the key.
    0
    0
  • I don't suppose Mrs. Glass got a license number?
    0
    0
  • Why do you suppose they did that?
    0
    0
  • Now why do you suppose he'd interest them?
    0
    0
  • Why do you suppose he mailed it back at all?
    0
    0
  • I don't suppose it did.
    0
    0
  • Suppose he bought it pri­vate, so I started checking the old classifieds and sure enough— pay dirt—a three-year-old Pace Arrow!
    0
    0
  • Suppose, he conjectured, Cynthia was involved.
    0
    0
  • Suppose Alfred Nota and his pal Homer's break-in at Collingswood Avenue was just a cover-up and their true mission was to plant a listening device.
    0
    0
  • I suppose I better call off the hounds.
    0
    0
  • He paused and then added, "I don't suppose there's any return address on Arthur's note?"
    0
    0
  • I suppose we'll be joining 'em. When is it?
    0
    0
  • "What kind of physical shape do you suppose Byrne is in?" asked Fred as he eyed a gorgeous blonde in scarlet bike pants.
    0
    0
  • "She's out there gallivanting, I suppose," Fred snorted.
    0
    0
  • Do you suppose he's really meeting someone, or is that just an excuse to beat it?
    0
    0
  • I suppose you're pissed off and looking for an explanation.
    0
    0
  • I suppose I ought to thank you.
    0
    0
  • You're a biker, so Byrne and you struck up a conversation—and I suppose shared a few drinks.
    0
    0
  • No, I suppose the possibility of snakes does pose a bigger threat.
    0
    0
  • What do you suppose they will think about you sleeping here last night?
    0
    0
  • "I suppose it makes sense," Mums said to Carmen, "but where are you going to get one?"
    0
    0
  • I suppose it comes in handy for all kinds of surprises.
    0
    0
  • I suppose it's normal under the circumstances.
    0
    0
  • "I suppose so," he said, "and the full beard, no doubt."
    0
    0
  • I suppose she thought you were a newlywed.
    0
    0
  • I suppose it is better than a lonely dirt road on a cold day.
    0
    0
  • I suppose I should be grateful, but it's hard to take care of her when she keeps shoving money back at me.
    0
    0
  • I suppose not, but I'm still not in the mood.
    0
    0
  • I suppose you think you're real smart.
    0
    0
  • I suppose this rights your wrong, though I will never forgive you.
    0
    0
  • "I suppose I do," she said, amused.
    0
    0
  • "Like you, I suppose," she said.
    0
    0
  • Yes, I suppose for those who knew of it when they met you.
    0
    0
  • I suppose dancing that well would require a lot of practice.
    0
    0
  • I suppose the rain this week has it flowing faster.
    0
    0
  • I suppose it would be a sad memory.
    0
    0
  • I suppose that could have happened.
    0
    0
  • I suppose that's true enough.
    0
    0
  • I suppose we do.
    0
    0
  • I suppose it would be alright – if you don't think you'll get lost.
    0
    0
  • I suppose I should …" "No. I pawned this job off on you.
    0
    0
  • Well, I suppose it doesn't matter much now, does it?
    0
    0
  • I suppose not, but I don't know what else I can say.
    0
    0
  • "I suppose as well as could be expected," Felipa replied.
    0
    0
  • Oh. I suppose the atmosphere is a little depressing around here right now.
    0
    0
  • I suppose Snowball would be a common name, and she's certainly an uncommon cat.
    0
    0
  • I suppose it's getting a little embarrassing now.
    0
    0
  • Oh, well enough, I suppose.
    0
    0
  • I suppose people can get used to anything.
    0
    0
  • Why do you suppose he's so interested in me?
    0
    0
  • I suppose it would be a lot of trouble to get ready, and you must be tired.
    0
    0
  • I suppose he is... kind of.
    0
    0
  • Well enough, I suppose.
    0
    0
  • Do you suppose there are any pesticides in this water.
    0
    0
  • All right, suppose we bought a jar of live Praying Mantises at our neighborhood pest control store.
    0
    0
  • They said he was unavailable for comment, so I suppose he's a private person.
    0
    0
  • If he thinks that, why do you suppose he hit me when he thought I was going to say it?
    0
    0
  • I suppose – though I don't think I'd mind getting used to financial security.
    0
    0
  • Possibly. I suppose that didn't help things at all.
    0
    0
  • On his death-bed he is said to have requested a friend to hide his body as soon as life was extinct, and, by putting a serpent in its place, induce his townsmen to suppose that he had been carried up to heaven.
    0
    0
  • He remarks that it is impossible to suppose that the particles of mastic are in the form of bubbles.
    0
    0
  • They agree very well with experiment, and require us to suppose that the vibrations are perpendicular to the plane of polarization.
    0
    0
  • Although Mount Everest appears fairly bright at 100 miles' distance, as seen from the neighbourhood of Darjeeling, we cannot suppose that the atmosphere is as transparent as is implied in the above numbers; and, of course, this is not to be expected, since there is certainly suspended matter to be reckoned with.
    0
    0
  • Suppose now that the sphere's earth connexion is broken and that it is carried without loss of charge inside a building at zero potential.
    0
    0
  • There are reasons to suppose however that the play had been in Colwell's hands some time before it was printed, and it may well be identical with the Dyccon of Bedlam for which he took out a licence in 1562-1563, "Diccon the Bedlem" being the first of the dramatis personae of Gammer Gurton.
    0
    0
  • Abominable, unnatural as Peter's conduct to his unhappy and innocent son undoubtedly was, there is no reason to suppose that he ever regretted it.
    0
    0
  • We shall suppose they did it upon great consideration and weighing of the matter, and it would be very strange and very ill if we should disturb and set aside what has been the course for a long series of times and ages."
    0
    0
  • It may be assigned to 25 B.C. The dates of the publication of the rest are uncertain, but none of them was published before 24 B.C., and the, last not before 16 B.C. The unusual length of the second one (1402 lines) has led Lachmann and other critics to suppose that it originally consisted of two books, and they have placed the beginning of the third book at ii.
    0
    0
  • There is some reason, however, to suppose that before this the capital of the Monomotapa was situated much farther south, and it may plausibly be identified with the most extensive ruins as yet known, viz.
    0
    0
  • There is no reason to suppose the human voice has varied, during the period of which we have evidence, more than other physical attributes.
    0
    0
  • If it be true, as Bishop Alcock of Ely affirms, that Lydgate wrote a poem on the loss of France and Gascony, it seems necessary to suppose that he lived two years longer, and thus indications point to the year 1451, or thereabouts, as the date of his death.
    0
    0
  • As he put it: "Suppose there were living among my contemporaries a Confucius or a Solon, I could, according to the principles of my faith, love and admire the great man without falling into the ridiculous idea that I must convert a Solon or a Confucius."
    0
    0
  • It is quite consistent with the evidence to suppose that a seven-day week was in use in Babylonia, but each item may be explained differently, and a definite proof does not exist.
    0
    0
  • Suppose the arm c of the switch S to be in contact with 2; thin when the key is manipulated it sends alternately positive and negative currents into the line.
    0
    0
  • Suppose the key to be depressed, then a current flows through one winding of the differential relay to line and through the other winding and rheostat to earth.
    0
    0
  • Suppose, for instance, the paper ribbon to be soaked in a solution of iodide of potassium and a light contact spring made to press continuously on its surface as it is pulled forward by the mechanism.
    0
    0
  • Again, suppose groups 3 and 4 to be punched.
    0
    0
  • For simplicity we will suppose direct action.
    0
    0
  • If we suppose the cable interrupted at any place, and both sides of the gap earthed by connexion to plates, then the same conditions will still hold.
    0
    0
  • In the same year a road was constructed over the Apennines from Bon.onia to Arretium, but it is difficult to suppose that it was not until later that the Via Cassia was made, giving a direct communication between Arretium and Rome.
    0
    0
  • Thus the histological differentiation of the sporogonium of the higher mosses is one of considerable complexity; but there is here even less reason to suppose that these tissues have any homology (phylogenetic community of origin) with the similar ones met with in the higher plants.
    0
    0
  • It is possible to suppose that this condition is derived from the astelic condition already referred to, but the evidence on the whole leads to the conclusion that it has ansen byan increase in the number of the bundles within the stele, the individuality of the bundle asserting itself after its escape from the original bundle-ring of the primitive cylinder.
    0
    0
  • For instance, suppose the effect of a falling temperature is to so modify the metabolism of the cells that they fill up more and more with watery sap; as the freezing-point is reached this may result in destructive changes, and death from cold may result.
    0
    0
  • There is no reason to suppose that the peculiarities of the arctic flora are more modern than those of any other, though there is no fossil evidence to prove that it was not so.
    0
    0
  • Of this we may perhaps roughly' distinguish a higher and a lower type, according as there is either complete confidence in the divine benevolence and justice, or a disposition to suppose a certain arbitrariness or at any rate conditionality to attach to the granting of requests.
    0
    0
  • The treatise was therefore written before the birth of Boetius, if it be not a forgery; but there is no reason to suppose that the treatise was not a genuine production of the time to which it professes to belong.
    0
    0
  • In Europe there is good reason to suppose that it includes Shetland; but it is on the north-western coast of the Continent, from Jutland to the extreme north of Norway, that the greatest number are reared.
    0
    0
  • All of them lie in a state of ruin, and, from the disposition of the drums of the columns, it is impossible to suppose that their fall was due to any other cause than an earthquake.
    0
    0
  • There is good reason to suppose that the Beauforts had gone so far as to contemplate a forced abdication on the score of the king's ill-health.
    0
    0
  • It is a mistake to suppose that the question of public or private ownership will make any considerable difference in the system of rate-making adopted by a good railway.
    0
    0
  • For example, suppose it is required to start a train weighing 200 tons from rest and bring it to a speed of 30 m.
    0
    0
  • Even if the comets be indigenous to the system, they may, as many suppose, be merely ejections from the sun.
    0
    0
  • We might at first suppose that the sun was really an intensely heated body radiating out its heat as does white-hot iron, but this explanation cannot be admitted, for there is no historical evidence that the sun is growing colder.
    0
    0
  • It is reasonable to suppose that their ancestors and those of the Hindus at one time formed a single tribe somewhere in central Asia.
    0
    0
  • The missing books were apparently lost early, for there is no reason to suppose that the Arabs who translated or commented on Diophantus ever had access to more of the work than we now have.
    0
    0
  • Suppose we have selected one of the numerous subsidiary problems suggested by the general inquiry, and obtained such full and complete information about one particular industry that we of a can tabulate the wages of the workers for a long series of years.
    0
    0
  • But it would be absurd to suppose that we could reach those conclusions by simple reference to the trades themselves.
    0
    0
  • We cannot suppose that the policy of the Merchant Adventurers' Company had nothing to do with the woollen industry; that the export trade in woollen cloth was quite independent of the foreign exchanges and international trade relations in those times; that the effect on wages of the state of the currency, the influx of new silver, the character of the harvests, and many other influences can be conveniently ignored.
    0
    0
  • We cannot suppose that there occurred, at or about the commencement of the 19th century, a breach of historical continuity of such a character that institutions, customs, laws and social conventions were suddenly swept away, the bonds of society loosened, and the state and people of England dissolved into an aggregate of competing individuals.
    0
    0
  • But while we recognize these facts, we must not suppose that we have to study the action of men as though they were all enrolled in organized associations, or covered by stringent laws which were always obeyed.
    0
    0
  • No sane person would suppose that the minutes of a modern legislative body explain the steps by which legislation has been passed, or the issues really involved.
    0
    0
  • Suppose, now, we ignore the writers who were inaugurating neit methods, investigating special problems or laboriously collecting facts, and concentrate attention on the dominant school, with its long series of writers from Adam Smith to John Stuart Mill.
    0
    0
  • It is useless to suppose that this destructive criticism from within can be neutralized by generously sprinkling the pages of the classical writers with interpretation clauses.
    0
    0
  • He states that Gould suspected the alliance of these two forms " from external structure and habits alone "; otherwise one might suppose that he had obtained an intimation to that effect on one of his Continental journeys.
    0
    0
  • The Chronicler, we must suppose, altered the name because Tadmor was a city more familiar and renowned in his day, or possibly because he wished to increase the extent of Solomon's kingdom.
    0
    0
  • But it would be absurd to suppose that they are in reality pretending to be dead, because there is no reason to think they can have any knowledge of death.
    0
    0
  • Suppose a dealer buys April-May " futures " at 4d.
    0
    0
  • Bonnet, Euler, Haller, Schmid and others " suppose miracles to be already implanted in nature.
    0
    0
  • Carll as follows: " Suppose the tools to have been just run to the bottom of the well, the jars closed and the cable slack.
    0
    0
  • On Christmas day 1201, Philip, Alexius and Boniface all met at Hagenau 1 and formulated (one may suppose) a plan for the diversion of the Crusade.
    0
    0
  • There is reason to suppose that, when a wound is inflicted by the central stylet, it is envenomed by the fluid secreted in the posterior proboscidian region being at the same time expelled.
    0
    0
  • It is not necessary to suppose that the writer has here any particular case in mind.
    0
    0
  • Suppose that a pure soap without resin is to be made - a product little seen in the market - the spent lye is run off, steam is again turned on, pure water or very weak lye run in, and the contents boiled up till the whole is thin, close and clear.
    0
    0
  • So far as they are Latin versions of Arabico-Greek treatises, they must have been much remodelled in the course of translation; but there is reason to suppose that many of them, even when pretending to be translations, are really original compositions.
    0
    0
  • We may suppose that in the formation of gaseous hydrochloric acid from gaseous chlorine and hydrogen, according to the equation H2 +C1 2 = HCI+HC1, a certain amount of energy is expended in separating the atoms of hydrogen in the hydrogen molecule, and the atoms of chlorine in the chlorine molecule, from each other; but that heat is developed by the combination of the hydrogen atoms with the chlorine atoms, and that, as more energy is developed by the union of the atoms of hydrogen and chlorine than is expended in separating the hydrogen atoms from each other and the chlorine atoms from one another, the result of the action of the two elements upon each other is the development of heat, - the amount finally developed in the reaction being the difference between that absorbed in decomposing the elementary molecules and that developed by the combination of the atoms of chlorine and hydrogen.
    0
    0
  • Suppose the coefficient of association be n, i.e.
    0
    0
  • If the Hittites were Aryans, one can hardly suppose a primeval Aryan element in Anatolia.
    0
    0
  • We need not even suppose that this Manium was a chief of the Egyptian Red Sea coast or even of Sinai.
    0
    0
  • The scale of that map, as determined by the equator or centre meridian, we will suppose to be i: 125,000,000, while the encircling meridian indicates a scale of i: 80,000,000; and a " mean " scale, equal to the square root of the proportion which the area of the map bears to the actual area of a hemisphere, is r: 112,000,000.
    0
    0
  • In the formulae which follow we suppose 1 and l' to represent the latitudes, a and b the co-latitudes (90° - 1 or 90° - l'), and t the difference in longitude between them or the meridian distance, whilst D is the distance required.
    0
    0
  • From these structural and palaeontological evidences, geologists suppose that the formation of the cave was carried on simultaneously with the excavation of the valley; that the small streams, flowing down the upper ramifications of the valley, entered the western opening of the cave, and traversing the fissures in the limestone, escaped by the lower openings in the chief valley; and that the rounded pebbles found in the shingle bed were carried in by these streams. It would be only at times of drought that the cave was frequented by animals, a theory which explains the small quantity of animal remains in the shingle.
    0
    0
  • But we are not to suppose that even he, latitudinarian and innovator as he was, could have conceived the possibility of abolishing an institution so deeply rooted in the social conditions, as well as in the ideas, of his time.
    0
    0
  • It would be wrong to suppose that Lenin drew profits from the misdeeds of his associates.
    0
    0
  • To explain this result, chemists suppose that both changes can occur simultaneously, and that equilibrium results when the rate at which AB and CD are transformed into AD and CB is the same as the rate at which the reverse change goes on.
    0
    0
  • The two solutions, then, will so act on each other when mixed that they become isohydric. Let us suppose that we have one very active acid like hydrochloric, in which dissociation is nearly complete, another like acetic, in which it is very small.
    0
    0
  • It is a mistake to suppose, however, that La Chetardie took a leading part in the revolution which placed the daughter of Peter the Great on the Russian throne.
    0
    0
  • In spite of the phrase renatus in aeternum, there is no reason to suppose that the ceremony was in any way borrowed from Christianity.
    0
    0
  • Suppose n dependent variables yl, y2,���yn, each of which is a function of n independent variables x1, x2 i ���xn, so that y s = f s (x i, x 2, ...x n).
    0
    0
  • Suppose given the n equations fl= = allxl +a12x2 + � � � + annxn = 0, f2 =a21x1+a22x2+���+a2nxn =0, fn =anlxl +an2x2+��� +annxn = 0.
    0
    0
  • - Suppose f to be a product of symmetric functions f i f 2 ...f m .
    0
    0
  • Suppose the switches to be adjusted so that the effective number of turns in the variable coil is loo; the magnetizing forces in the two coils will then be equal, and if the test rod is of the same quality as the standard, the flow of induction will be confined entirely to the iron circuit, the two yokes will be at the same magnetic potential, and the compass needle will not be affected.
    0
    0
  • It would be possible to suppose, on the other hand, that new somites are only beginning to make their appearance here.
    0
    0
  • Leaving that question for consideration in connexion with the systematic statement of the characters of the various groups of Arachnida which follows on p. 475, it is well now to consider the following question, viz., seeing that Limulus and Scorpio are such highly developed and specialized forms, and that they seem to constitute as it were the first and second steps in the series of recognized Arachnida - what do we know, or what are we led to suppose with regard to the more primitive Arachnida from which the Eurypterines and Limulus and Scorpio have sprung ?
    0
    0
  • In the writings of the alchemists we find the words misy, sory, chalcanthum applied to alum as well as to iron sulphate; and the name atramentum sutorium, which ought to belong, one would suppose, exclusively to green vitriol, applied indifferently to both.
    0
    0
  • It is difficult to suppose that such a blunder was not preconcerted.
    0
    0
  • Nor do Scottish presbyterians now recognize any special class of doctors, unless we suppose that these are represented by professors of theology.
    0
    0
  • Suppose, for instance, that we wish to know how much will be left out of ios.
    0
    0
  • In the case of addition, for instance, suppose that we are satisfied that in a+b+c+d+e we may take any two, as b and c, together (association) and interchange them (commutation).
    0
    0
  • We may take it to (say) 4 places of decimals; or we may suppose it to be taken to 1000 places.
    0
    0
  • Suppose we find Q = sR+T, then we repeat the process with R and T; and so on.
    0
    0
  • Suppose, for instance, that n=5, so that we take five factors (A+a) (B+b) (C+c) (D+d) (E+e) and find their product.
    0
    0
  • Now suppose that the formula (2) has been established for every power of A+a up to the (n-i)th inclusive, so that (ii_ I) = (n- I) (r), (y I) = (n -1) (r _ l).
    0
    0
  • Suppose that there are a number of arrangements of r terms or elements, the first of which a is always either A or not-A, the second b is B or not-B, the third c is C or not-C, and so on.
    0
    0
  • (iii.) Suppose we have such a series as 2.5+5.8+8.11+ ...
    0
    0
  • Suppose, for instance, that we require to calculate (23/13).
    0
    0
  • Denote h/x by 0, where i> e> o; and suppose further that 0< i/n I, so that the first term of the series uo+ul+u2+...
    0
    0
  • Suppose, for instance, that y=x 2; then to every rational value of x there corresponds a rational value of y, but the converse does not hold.
    0
    0
  • The next step is to suppose that fractional numbers are represented in the same way.
    0
    0
  • If a character of much longer standing (certain properties of height, length, breadth, colour, &c.) had not become fixed and congenital after many thousands of successive generations of individuals had developed it in response to environment, but gave place to a new character when new moulding conditions operated on an individual (Lamarck's first law), why should we suppose that the new character is likely to become fixed and transmitted by mere heredity after a much shorter time of existence in response to environmental stimulus ?
    0
    0
  • Now as to the phase of the secondary wave, it might appear natural to suppose that it starts from any point Q with the phase of the primary wave, so that on arrival at P, it is retarded by the amount corresponding to QP. But a little consideration will prove that in that case the series of secondary waves could not reconstitute the primary wave.
    0
    0
  • It is accordingly necessary to suppose that the secondary waves start with a phase one-quarter of a period in advance of that of the primary wave at the surface of resolution.
    0
    0
  • We may usually suppose that a large number of the outer rings are incomplete, so that the integrated term at the upper limit may properly be taken to vanish.
    0
    0
  • In the direction (suppose horizontal) for which n=o, /f=sin 0, the phases of the secondary waves range over a complete period when sin 0 =X/a, and, since all parts of the horizontal aperture are equally effective, there is in this direction a complete compensation and consequent absence of illumination.
    0
    0
  • If we suppose the diameter of the lens to be given (2R), and its focal length f gradually to increase, the original differences of phase at the image of an infinitely distant luminous point diminish without limit.
    0
    0
  • If we suppose the focal length to be 66 ft., a single lens is practically perfect up to an aperture of 1 .
    0
    0
  • If now we suppose the aperture AB to be covered by a great number of opaque strips or bars of width d, separated by transparent intervals of width a, the condition of things in the directions just spoken of is not materially changed.
    0
    0
  • Suppose now that X+SX is the wave-length for which BQ gives the principal maximum, then (mn+1)A=mn(X+SX); whence OX/X= limn.
    0
    0
  • If we now suppose half the grating cut away, so as to leave 1000 lines in half an inch, the dispersion will not be altered, while the brightness and resolving power are halved.
    0
    0
  • Suppose two similar and accurately ruled transparent gratings to be superposed in such a manner that the lines are parallel.
    0
    0
  • Let us suppose that the light is incident perpendicularly, and that the grating interval increases from the centre towards that edge which lies nearest to the spectrum under observation, and decreases towards the hinder edge.
    0
    0
  • Suppose now that the plate is introduced so as to cover half the aperture and that it retards those pulses which would otherwise arrive first.
    0
    0
  • We will next suppose that the light is transmitted by a slit, and inquire what is the effect of varying the width of the slit upon the illumination at the projection of its centre.
    0
    0
  • In the limiting case in which the medium is regarded as absolutely incompressible S vanishes; but, in order that equations (2) may preserve their generality, we must suppose a at the same time to become infinite, and replace a 2 3 by a new function of the co-ordinates.
    0
    0
  • If, instead of supposing the motion at dS to be that of the primary wave, and to be zero elsewhere, we suppose the force operative over the element dS of the lamina to be that corresponding to the primary wave, and to vanish elsewhere, we obtain a secondary wave following quite a different law.
    0
    0
  • If we suppose that the force impressed upon the element of mass D dx dy dz is DZ dx dy dz, being everywhere parallel to the axis of Z, the only change required in our equations (I), (2) is the addition of the term Z to the second member of the third equation (2).
    0
    0
  • Problems not limited to two dimensions, such for example as the shadow of a circular disk, present great difficulties, and have not hitherto been treated by a rigorous method; but there is no reason to suppose that Fresnel's results would be departed from materially.
    0
    0
  • If the Scyths came out of upper Asia, the Scythian colonists beyond the Iyrcae might be a division which had remained nearer the homeland, but in dealing with nomads we can suppose such a return as that of the Calmucks (Kalmuks) in the 18th century.
    0
    0
  • It is surely as difficult to suppose that the Davidic psalms of the first book are a selection made from a greater collection of such psalms contained in the " Director's Psalter " as it is to imagine that St Mark's Gospel is an abridgment of St, Matthew's.
    0
    0
  • Obviously the word r ' must refer to something in the music; and inasmuch as the cymbals were for the purpose of producing a volume of sound (v'#r), it is reasonable to suppose that the 1 The threefold division of the singers appears in the same list according to the Hebrew text of verse 17, but the occurrence of Jeduthun as a proper name instead of a musical note is suspicious, and makes the text of LXX.
    0
    0
  • It is therefore difficult to suppose that the Jewish Church as a whole passed through a stage in which it was felt desirable to substitute o'n'7 H in writing for n¦n'.
    0
    0
  • We need not suppose that congregations gathered together to worship away from Jerusalem, especially in times of distress, would necessarily sing the religious poems which they had collected, though it is by no means improbable that they would do so.
    0
    0
  • In the light of these circumstances - and space here forbids more than the scantiest reference - we may reasonably suppose that the first book, with the exception of Ps.
    0
    0
  • We need not suppose that the Chronicler quotes from the Psalter or vice versa, the matter which they have in common being probably derived from certain traditional songs current among the Levitical singers.
    0
    0
  • It is not too much to suppose that the executive in Pretoria had calculated that the occupation of Durban would inspire the entire Dutch nation with a spirit of unanimity which would eventually wrest South Africa' from the British.
    0
    0
  • Though the Hippocratic medicine was so largely founded on observation, it would be an error to suppose that dogma or theory had no place.
    0
    0
  • It is, however, reasonable to suppose that his commanding intellect often makes itself felt in the words of Sydenham.
    0
    0
  • It was no longer necessary to suppose that a halfconscious" anima "was directing every movement.
    0
    0
  • Pamela was entrusted with all her husband's secrets and took an active part in furthering his designs; and she appears to have fully deserved the confidence placed in her, though there is reason to suppose that at times she counselled prudence.
    0
    0
  • This has been misunderstood in many ways - the mistake going so far as in some cases to suppose that Voltaire meant Christ by this opprobrious expression.
    0
    0
  • What became of the cathedral which we may suppose to have existed in London during the later Roman period we cannot tell, but we may guess that it was destroyed by the heathen Saxons.
    0
    0
  • We must not suppose that when the city of London obtained the privilege of appointing a mayor, and a citizen could boast in 1194 that " come what may the Londoners shall have no king but their mayor," that the king did not occasionally exert his power in suspending the liberties of the city.
    0
    0
  • Suppose P tons is moved c ft.
    0
    0
  • Suppose the ship turns about an axis through F in the water-line area, perpendicular to the plane of the paper; denoting by y the distance of an element dA if the water-line area from the axis of rotation, the change of displacement is EydA tan 8, so that there is no change of displacement if EydA = o, that is, if the axis passes through the C.G.
    0
    0
  • In considering the motion of a fluid we shall suppose it non-viscous, so that whatever the state of motion the stress across any section is normal, and the principle of the normality and thence of the equality of fluid pressure can be employed, as in hydrostatics.
    0
    0
  • In the equations of uniplanar motion = dx - du = dx + dy = -v 2 ?, suppose, so that in steady motion dx I +v24 ' x = ?'
    0
    0
  • 1 = yv24, (2) y 2 y y y suppose; and in steady motion, + y 2 dx v-t ' = o, dH +y 2dy0 2P = o, so that 2 "/ y = - y2, 7 2 1,G = dH/d is a function of 1,G, say f'(> '), and constant along a stream line; dH/dv = 2qi', H -f (1/.) = constant, throughout the liquid.
    0
    0
  • As an application of moving axes, consider the motion of liquid filling the ellipsoidal case 2 y 2 z2 Ti + b1 +- 2 = I; (1) and first suppose the liquid be frozen, and the ellipsoid l3 (4) (I) (6) (9) (I o) (II) (12) (14) = 2 U ¢ 2, (15) rotating about the centre with components of angular velocity, 7 7, f'; then u= - y i +z'i, v = w = -x7 7 +y (2) Now suppose the liquid to be melted, and additional components of angular velocity S21, 522, S23 communicated to the ellipsoidal case; the additional velocity communicated to the liquid will be due to a velocity-function 2224_ - S2 b c 6 a 5 x b2xy, as may be verified by considering one term at a time.
    0
    0
  • (2) g g a g Suppose the body is kept from turning as it advances; after t seconds the C.G.
    0
    0
  • The form of apocalyptic is a literary form; for we cannot suppose that the writers experienced the voluminous and detailed visions we find in their books.
    0
    0
  • There is no reason to suppose that his punishment was unpopular.
    0
    0
  • 1 is to suppose that Paul started afresh to complete or supplement what he had already written, possibly because some fresh tidings from Philippi had reached him in the interval.
    0
    0
  • There is no reason to suppose that the architects, Bonanno and William of Innsbruck, intended that the campanile should be built in an oblique position; it would appear to have assumed it while the work was still in progress.
    0
    0
  • The French seem systematically unable to master certain sounds foreign to their own language, or sounds which they suppose to be foreign.
    0
    0
  • On the other hand the enigmatical motion of the perihelion of Mercury has not yet found any plausible explanation except on the hypothesis that the gravitation of the sun diminishes at a rate slightly greater than that of the inverse square - the most simple modification being to suppose that instead of the exponent of the distance being exactly - 2, it is - 2.000 000 161 2.
    0
    0
  • Hercu- a ineum is believed to have been destroyed by these water h was, and there is reason to suppose that similar materials a lied the cellars and lower parts of Pompeii.
    0
    0
  • 4 seems the natural completion of the passage, it is common to suppose that both copy an older prophet.
    0
    0
  • Suppose, for example, that the artist desires to produce an inlaid diaper.
    0
    0
  • And though Spencer's general position - that it is absurd to suppose that organisms after being modified by their life should give birth to offspring showing no traces of such modifications - seems the more philosophic, yet it does not dispose of the facts which go to show that most of the evidence for the direct transmission of adaptations is illusory, and that beings are organised to minimize the effects of life on the reproductive tissues, so that the transmission of the effects of use and disuse, if it occurs, must be both difficult and rare - far more so than is convenient for Spencer's psychology.
    0
    0
  • It is generally and traditionally praised, but those who have read it will be more disposed to agree with Charles Lamb, who considers it "of a vile and debasing tendency," and thinks it "almost impossible to suppose the author in earnest."
    0
    0
  • But he knew too much of the English to suppose they would Tolerate an armed invasion, and he accordingly made it clear that he would not undertake active interference unless he received a definite invitation from leading Englishmen.
    0
    0
  • Entering the army at seventeen, he left it two years afterwards; and at nineteen he produced Azemire, a two-act drama (acted in 1786), and Edgar, ou le page suppose, a comedy (acted in 1785), which were failures.
    0
    0
  • Let us suppose that a molten mixture of two substances A and B, which at a sufficiently high temperature form a uniform liquid, and which do not combine to form definite compounds, is slowly cooled until it becomes wholly solid.
    0
    0
  • It is possible to suppose a connexion between his zeal for making peace with France and a desire to forward the Pretender's interests or win support from the Jacobites.'
    0
    0
  • His chronology is fantastic and incredible; William of Newburgh justly remarks that, if we accepted the events which Geoffrey relates, we should have to suppose that they had happened in another world.
    0
    0
  • Suppose then that we have a conductor charged with electricity,we may imagine its surface to be divided up into small unequal areas, each of which carries a unit charge of electricity.
    0
    0
  • Let us then suppose a spherical shell 0 to be electrified.
    0
    0
  • Let us suppose any other surface described in the electric field so as to cut the closel y compacted tubes.
    0
    0
  • We can, however, obtain another equation called the " surface characteristic equation " as follows: - Suppose a very small area dS described on a conductor having a surface density of electrification a.
    0
    0
  • Let us then suppose that a conductor originally at zero potential has its potential raised by administering to it small successive doses of electricity dq.
    0
    0
  • Suppose that the dielectric has a constant K, then we must multiply both sides by K and the expression for the energy per unit of volume of the field is equivalent to z DE where D is the displacement or polarization in the dielectric.
    0
    0
  • Suppose a room lit by a single candle.
    0
    0
  • Suppose then we remove the negative point-charge, and let the sphere be supposed to become conductive and be connected to earth.
    0
    0
  • It is not necessary to suppose that the co-aggregated molecules are permanently associated.
    0
    0
  • It would, however, be incorrect to suppose that the translation of the text was left entirely to the individual taste of the translator.
    0
    0
  • Pirminius, who was far from being an original writer, made great use of a treatise by Martin of Braga, but substituted a Roman form of Renunciation, and refers to the Roman rite of Unction in a way which leads us to suppose that the form of creed which he substituted for Martin's form was also Roman.
    0
    0
  • Some writers suppose that the original church was in the form of a Latin cross and belonged to the 8th century.
    0
    0
  • There was reason to suppose that the inscriptions were identical in meaning; and fortunately it proved, when the inscriptions were made accessible to investigation through the efforts of Sir Henry Rawlinson, that the Persian inscription contained a large number of proper names.
    0
    0
  • The Nestorians and Jacobites at the present day suppose it to begin with the following month, or October.
    0
    0
  • We must, therefore, suppose the cycle to have begun 2397 B.C., or forty years before the reign of Yao.
    0
    0
  • Can we suppose that "the man who had read the letter" invented much of its contents, and told them to Moray, who told de Silva, and told Darnley's father, Lennox, then in or near London?
    0
    0
  • This fact, together with the extraordinarily rare occurrence of such remains and meteoric particles in globigerina ooze, although there is no reason to suppose that at any one time they are unequally distributed over the ocean floor, can only be explained on the assumption that the rate of formation of the epilophic deposits through the accumulation of pelagic shells falling from the surface is rapid enough to bury the slowgathering material which remains uncovered on the spaces where the red clay is forming at an almost infinitely slower rate.
    0
    0
  • There is a tradition that here or in England he embraced the Protestant faith; nothing in his writings would lead one to suppose so.
    0
    0
  • In these circumstances it would never have occurred to any one to doubt the genuineness of the epistle or to suppose that it had been interpolated, but for the fact that in several passages reference is made to Ignatius and his epistles."
    0
    0
  • We are compelled also to suppose that the motion assumes.
    0
    0
  • Suppose for instance that two bodies, both devoid of heat, are placed in contact with one another, and that the surface of the one is then rubbed over that of the other.
    0
    0
  • Suppose for instance that two molecules, when at rest in equilibrium, are at a distance a apart.
    0
    0
  • Let us suppose that an infinite number of exactly similar systems start simultaneously from all possible values of pi, q1,
    0
    0
  • It is not at present necessary to suppose that the molecules are those of substances in the gaseous state.
    0
    0
  • So far it has not been necessary to suppose the matter to be in the gaseous state.
    0
    0
  • We must accordingly suppose that the molecules of gases for which n =2 are of this shape.
    0
    0
  • In spite of the fact that the separation from Rome had been carried out during the sessions of a single parliament, and that there had been no opportunity for a general expression of opinion on the part of the nation, there of the is no reason to suppose that the majority of the people, thoughtful or thoughtless, were not ready to reconcile themselves to the abolition of the papal Henry supremacy.
    0
    0
  • Doubtless the king's sore financial needs had much to do with the dissolution of the abbeys and the plundering of the shrines, but there is no reason to suppose that he was not fully convinced that the monks had long outlived their usefulness and that the shrines were centres of abject superstition and ecclesiastical deceit.
    0
    0
  • Conformably with the view here presented we may suppose that the name " Boule of the Areopagus " developed from the simple term " Boule " in order to distinguish it from the new Boule, or Council of Four Hundred.
    0
    0
  • Thus regarded, it becomes reasonable to suppose that North and South America have in a broad way been developed under a succession of somewhat similar strains in the earth's crust, and that they are, in so far, favourable witnesses to the theory that there is something individual in the plan of continental growth.
    0
    0
  • And it is perhaps not arbitrary to suppose that the splendour of the ritual in Amos's time implies a tremulous anxiety that Israel's seeming prosperity under Jeroboam II.
    0
    0
  • The literary skill of Amos leads one to suppose that he had prepared in advance for this, perhaps we may say, not altogether unfortunate necessity.
    0
    0
  • Suppose, for instance, that we require the area of a circular grass-plot of measured diameter.
    0
    0
  • Suppose, for instance, that in the example given in § 20 the diameter as measured is is ft.
    0
    0
  • To illustrate the importance of the mensuration of graphs, suppose that we require the average value of u with regard to x.
    0
    0
  • Nor was Peter's behaviour to his consort in public of the outrageous character we have been led to suppose.
    0
    0
  • For, indeed, scepticism with regard to the senses is considered in the Inquiry .to be sufficiently justified by the fact that they lead us to suppose " an external universe which depends not on our perception," whereas " this universal and primary opinion of all men is soon destroyed by the slightest philosophy."
    0
    0
  • Had that dynasty been prolonged for another century, there is every reason to suppose that it would also have dealt satisfactorily with Poland's still more dangerous internal difficulties, and arrested the development of that anarchical constitution which was the ruling factor in the ruin of the Republic. Simultaneously with the transformation into a great power of the petty principalities which composed ancient Poland, another and equally momentous political transformation was proceeding within the country itself.
    0
    0
  • Others suppose him to have been an Italian, or a monk from the convent of St Gall in Switzerland.
    0
    0
  • Both versions are apparently authentic, and there seems no reason to suppose that they are not independent.
    0
    0
  • But in consequence of the humidity of the climate of England it is better to suppose the air to be (on the average) two-thirds saturated with aqueous vapour, and then the standard temperature will be reduced to 60° F., so as to secure the same standard density; the density of the air being reduced perceptibly by the presence of the aqueous vapour.
    0
    0
  • Suppose this limit is fixed at 16 tons per sq.
    0
    0
  • This muzzle velocity is about 5% greater than the 2150 f/s of the range table, so on these considerations we may suppose about 10% of work is lost by friction in the bore; this is expressed by saying that the factor of effect is f =0.9.
    0
    0
  • From an historical point of view it is characteristic of these additions that they generalize Joshua's successes, and represent the conquest of Canaan, effected under his leadership, as far more complete than the earlier narratives allow us to suppose was the case.
    0
    0
  • 10 (which places the fall of Samaria in Hezekiah's 6th year) is correct; but some scholars (as Wellhausen, Kamphausen, and Stade) suppose that the date in ver.
    0
    0
  • There is no greater mistake than to suppose that the estimate formed by the early Church of its Bible was a merely arbitrary verdict imposed by an external authority; it was the expression, and the natural expression (though following certain prescribed lines), of its real sense of the value and fundamentally divine origin of the writings which it treasured.
    0
    0
  • And there is no need at all to suppose that all the incidents which the historian masses under his account of Felix were successive: events in Emesa, Chalcis, Caesarea and Jerusalem may easily have been synchronous.
    0
    0
  • There is no reason to suppose that any considerable part of the vast area now covered by the waters of the Pacific has ever been exposed as dry land.
    0
    0
  • Unless we suppose that the latter was suddenly expanded into the stories which thenceforth persisted, it may be inferred that an old extra-canonical tradition (for which a case can be made) continued to survive the compilation of Genesis (q.v.) and ultimately assumed the various exaggerated forms now extant.
    0
    0
  • The principle on which the instrument works is as follows: Suppose any circuit, such as an electric motor, lamp or transformer, is receiving electric current; then the power given to that circuit reckoned in watts is measured by the product of the current flowing through the circuit in amperes and the potential difference of the ends of that circuit in volts, multiplied by a certain factor called the power factor in those cases in which the circuit is inductive and the current alternating.
    0
    0
  • If we may trust Vasari - but it is difficult to suppose that he was entirely correct - the exceeding value which Francia set on Raphael's art brought him to his grave.
    0
    0
  • We must not suppose that the word "prophet" had merely become more common in his time and supplanted an older synonym.
    0
    0
  • In admitting that the name was borrowed, we are not by any means shut up to suppose that the Hebrew nebhiim simply copied their Canaanite neighbours.
    0
    0
  • We cannot suppose that such a system would be invented and become general in face of the laws enforcing the 12 in.
    0
    0
  • Suppose that the ratio of 10, or any other particular number, to i is compounded of a very great number of equal ratios, as, for example, 1,000,000, then it can be shown that the ratio of 2 to i is very nearly equal to a ratio compounded of 301,030 of these small ratios, or ratiunculae, that the ratio of 3 to I is very nearly equal to a ratio compounded of 477,121 of them, and so on.
    0
    0
  • Suppose the hyperbolic logarithm of the prime number 43,867 required.
    0
    0
  • For example, suppose the logarithm of 543839 required to twelve places.
    0
    0
  • We may suppose that primitively the mouth was seated in the centre of a funnel-shaped disk, surrounded by a double wreath.
    0
    0
  • (1) Some suppose that they are excerpts from an uncanonical Gospel.
    0
    0
  • By studying the dispersion of colours in water, turpentine and crown glass Newton was led to suppose that dispersion is proportional to refraction.
    0
    0
  • It is a mistake to suppose that he regarded the stars as so many suns.
    0
    0
  • Do not, he said, think that I mean the flesh which invests and covers me, and bid you eat that; nor suppose either that I command you to drink my sensible and somatic blood.
    0
    0
  • Some scholars suppose them to have been of Achaean race, but they were more probably the aborigines of Laconia who had been enslaved by the Achaeans before the Dorian conquest.
    0
    0
  • Suppose, for instance, that some casuists held it wrong to dance on Sunday, while others held it perfectly lawful.
    0
    0
  • Then let us suppose that the inter-lamellar junctions already noted in Mytilus become very numerous, large and irregular; by them the two trellis-works of filaments would be united so as to leave only a sponge-like set of spaces between them.
    0
    0
  • Let us suppose that from a text which we will call A a copy has been made which we will call B, and from this again a copy which we will call C. If the copyist of B goes wrong once and the copyist of C twice in a hundred times, then, assuming that there is no coincidence or cancelling of errors, the relative correctness of the three texts A, B, C will be zoo (absolute correctness), 99 and 97.
    0
    0
  • The copyist may erroneously suppose that something written in the margin, between the lines or at the top or the foot of the page which he is copying, is intended to be placed in the text.
    0
    0
  • Thus, to take the latter one, if we suppose that of two editors of equal competence A requires a probability of four-fifths to admit a reading into his text and B a probability of three-fifths only, then in all the cases in which the probability lies between these two fractions B will be right seven times to A's three, while outside these limits there will be no difference between them.
    0
    0
  • To suppose this preface, presupposing many sciences, to have been written in 356, when the Meteorologica had been already commenced, would be absurd; but equally absurd would it be to reject that date on account of the preface, which even a modern author often writes long after his book.
    0
    0
  • Nor is it at all absurd to suppose that,long after he began the Meteorologica, Aristotle himself added the preface in the process of gathering his general treatises on natural science into a system.
    0
    0
  • It is a commentator's blunder to suppose that the founder of logic elaborated it into a system, and then applied it to the sciences.
    0
    0
  • Some nations, as the ancient Chaldeans and the modern Greeks, have chosen sunrise for the commencement of the day; others, again, as the Italians and Bohemians, suppose it to commence at sunset.
    0
    0
  • This Gives One Day To Be Suppressed In Sixty Four; So That If We Suppose The Months To Contain Each Thirty Days, And Then Omit Every Sixty Fourth Day In Reckoning From The Beginning Of The Period, Those Months In Which The Omission Takes Place Will, Of Course, Be The Deficient Months.
    0
    0
  • In The Gregorian Calendar This Error Is Assumed To Amount To One Day In 3121 Years Or Eight Days In 2500 Years, An Assumption Which Requires The Line Of Epacts To Be Changed Seven Times Successively At The End Of Each Period Of 300 Years, And Once At The End Of 400 Years; And, From The Manner In Which The Epacts Were Disposed At The Reformation, It Was Found Most Correct To Suppose One Of The Periods Of 2500 Years To Terminate With The Year 1800.
    0
    0
  • As An Example Of The Use Of The Preceding Tables, Suppose It Were Required To Determine The Moon'S Age On The Loth Of April 183 2.
    0
    0
  • Again, Suppose It Were Required To Find The Moon'S Age On The 2Nd Of December In The Year 1916.
    0
    0
  • 8th; for 21-13 = 8; and the paschal new moon cannot happen before the 8th; for suppose the new moon to fall on the 7th, then the full moon would arrive on the 20th, or the day before the equinox.
    0
    0
  • As An Example, Suppose It Were Required To Compute Easter For The Year 1840.
    0
    0
  • Their name is Celtic in form, and many writers suppose that the Teutoni were really a Celtic tribe, a branch of the Helvetii.
    0
    0
  • The character of Arthur as a romantic hero is, in reality, very different from that which, mainly through the popularity of Tennyson's Idylls, English people are wont to suppose.
    0
    0
  • Suppose the successive divisions of the scale to be numbered o, I, 2 ...
    0
    0
  • If we suppose the lower part of the instrument replaced by a uniform bar of the same sectional area as the stem and of volume V, the indications of the instrument will be in no respect altered, and the bottom of the bar will be at a distance of N scale-divisions below the zero of the scale.
    0
    0
  • "Suppose I or my officers were forced to take military action.
    0
    0
  • Suppose this were to happen in the Prussian cantonments.
    0
    0
  • We cannot but suppose that at a time when the number of the original band of disciples of Jesus who survived must have been becoming noticeably smaller, and all these were advanced in life, the importance of writing down that which had been orally delivered concerning the Gospel-history must have been realized.
    0
    0
  • And it is, indeed, difficult to suppose that agreement on this subject between different portions of the Church could have manifested itself at this time in the spontaneous manner that it does, except as the consequence of traditional feelings and convictions, which went back to the early part of the century, and which could hardly have arisen without good foundation, with respect to the special value of these works as embodiments of apostolic testimony, although all that came to be supposed in regard to their actual authorship cannot be considered proved.
    0
    0
  • The form in which it is given in the two Gospels is in several passages so nearly identical that we must suppose these pieces at least to have been derived immediately or ultimately from the same Greek document.
    0
    0
  • It was established, we are told, "because simple folks cannot distinguish the spiritual power from the sovereign power, and suppose that a supreme spiritual pastor is a second sovereign, the spiritual authority being regarded as higher and better than the temporal."
    0
    0
  • Metaphysical idealism is the view that everything known is mind, or some mental state or other, which some idealists suppose to require a substantial soul, others not; while all agree that body has no different being apart from mind.
    0
    0
  • - Noumenal Idealism In Germany Noumenal idealism is the metaphysics of those who suppose that all known things are indeed mental, but not all are phenomenal in the Kantian sense, because a noumenon is knowable so long as by a noumenon we mean some mental being or other which we somehow can discover beyond phenomena.
    0
    0
  • Having thus rejected all bodily mechanism, he had to suppose that reciprocal action somehow takes place between immaterial elements.
    0
    0
  • At the same time Fechner would not have us suppose that the two sides are equal; according to him, the psychical, being the psychophysical as viewed from within, is real, the physical, being the psychophysical viewed from without, is apparent; so in oneself, though nervous process and psychical process are the same, it is the psychical which is the reality of which the nervous is mere appearance; and so everywhere, spirit is the reality, body the appearance of spirit to spirit.
    0
    0
  • At the same time he does not suppose that they all require the same kind of will.
    0
    0
  • It follows that every psychical compound into which temporal and spatial ideas enter must itself be an idea; and, as time at any rate accompanies all our sensations, it follows that every psychical compound of sensations, containing as it does, always temporal, if not also spatial, ideas, must be a compound idea, and not, as nativists suppose, Schuppe for instance, a compound sensation.
    0
    0
  • As, however, he does not suppose that we have a direct perception of something resisting the organism, such as Hamilton maintained, it becomes necessary to state exactly what he means by " attuition."
    0
    0
  • One subject of universal experience, one with the subjects of individual experience, you would suppose, and that Nature as a whole is its one object.
    0
    0
  • The cause Of this anachronism has been the failure of intuitive realism and the domination of idealism, which makes short-sighted men suppose that at all events they must begin with the psychology and the psychological idealism of the day, in the false hope that on the sands of psychological idealism they may build a house of metaphysical realism.
    0
    0
  • But what he proceeds to suppose is that, having the conception, and finding that the complex of perceptions needs accounting for, we infer a real condition, e.g.
    0
    0
  • In 1589 he obtained in Geneva and Berne sums sufficient to raise an army of mercenaries for Henry III., partly by the sale of jewels, among them the "Sancy" diamond which in 1835 found its way to the Russian imperial treasure, and partly by leading the Swiss to suppose that the troops were intended for serious war against Savoy.
    0
    0
  • Just as it is absurd to suppose that man is merely earth-born, so the possibility of his ultimate destruction is inconceivable.
    0
    0
  • In contrast to his predecessor, he was a man of slow and calm deliberation, and it was natural to suppose that he was little, if at all, accessible to impulses of the moment or to the persuasions of his entourage.
    0
    0
  • Let no one suppose for an instant that the self-education I am about to commend, in respect of the things of this life, extends to any considerations of the hope set before us, as if man by reasoning could find out God.
    0
    0
  • Suppose two small smooth spherical bodies which can be regarded as particles to be brought into collision, so that the velocity of each, relative to any base which is unaffected by the collision, is suddenly changed.
    0
    0
  • It is natural to suppose it was adopted by the Greeks who accompanied Alexander's expedition.
    0
    0
  • Tyndall's own summary of the course of research on the subject was as follows: The idea of semi-fluid motion belongs entirely to Rendu; the proof of the quicker central flow belongs in part to Rendu, but almost wholly to Agassiz and Forbes; the proof of the retardation of the bed belongs to Forbes alone; while the discovery of the locus of the point of maximum motion belongs, I suppose, to me.
    0
    0
  • Let us suppose that we possess a partition such as that described above, which is permeable to the solvent but not to the solute when dissolved in it, and let us connect the solution and solvent of fig.
    0
    0
  • In his memoir of 1785 he writes: "As far as the experiments hitherto published extend, we scarcely know more of the phlogisticated part of our atmosphere than that it is not diminished by lime-water, caustic alkalies, or nitrous air; that it is unfit to support fire or maintain life in animals; and that its specific gravity is not much less than that of common air; so that, though the nitrous acid, by being united to phlogiston, is converted into air possessed of these properties, and consequently, though it was reasonable to suppose, that part at least of the phlogisticated air of the atmosphere consists of this acid united to phlogiston, yet it may fairly be doubted whether the whole is of this kind, or whether there are not in reality many different substances confounded together by us under the name of phlogisticated air.
    0
    0
  • For example, suppose it is resolved to use 2 parts of sand to i of cement, and suppose that experiment shows that in a pailful of stones two-fifths of the volume consists of voids, then 2 parts of sand (or sand with cement) will fill voids in 5 parts of stones, and the proportion of cement, sand, stones becomes 1:2:5.
    0
    0
  • An example of the latter occurs in Singapore where the vicious red spinning-ant (Oecophylla smaragdina) is mimicked by the larva of a Noctuid moth and by spiders belonging to two distinct families, namely, Saltiicus plataleoides (Salticidae) and Amyciaea forticeps (Thomisidae), there being no reason to suppose that either the moth larva or the spiders are protected forms. Mimetic aggregations of species similar to those mentioned above have been found in other countries; but the instances cited are sufficient to show how widespread are the influences of mimicry and how profoundly it has modified the insect fauna of various parts of the world.
    0
    0
  • It is a common error to suppose that baronets are hereditary knights.
    0
    0
  • (2) An application from the editor of the Encyclopaedia Britannica - who might, 1 suppose, as in Macaulay's time, almost command the services of the most eminent scholars and historians of the country - to me, a mere poet, proposing that I should contribute to that great repository of erudition the biography of Mary Queen of Scots.
    0
    0
  • It is an error to suppose that these are indicated by absolute height above the sea-level.
    0
    0
  • Suppose a fixed image of the sun to be formed on the collimator slit of this spectroscope, and a photographic plate, with its plane parallel to the plane of the solar image, to be mounted almost in contact with the camera slit.
    0
    0
  • Suppose that A' and B' are then made to change places.
    0
    0
  • Let A and C be two fixed disks, and B a disk which can be brought at will within a very short distance of either A or C. Let us suppose all the plates to be equal, and let the capacities of A and C in presence of B be each equal to p, and the coefficient of induction between A and B, or C and B, be q.
    0
    0
  • Let us also suppose that the plates A and C are so distant from each other that there is no mutual influence, and that p' is the capacity of one of the disks when it stands alone.
    0
    0
  • The action of the machine is as follows: Suppose one paper armature to be charged positively, it acts by induction on the right hand comb, causing negative electricity to issue from the comb points upon the glass revolving disk; at the same time the positive electricity passes through the closed discharge circuit to the left comb and issues from its teeth upon the part of the glass disk at the opposite end of the diameter.
    0
    0
  • The operation of the machine is as follows: Let us suppose that one of the studs on the back plate is positively electrified and one at the opposite end of a diameter is negatively electrified, and that at that moment two corresponding studs on the front plate passing opposite to these back studs are momentarily connected together by the neutralizing wire belonging to the front plate.
    0
    0
  • Carbon dioxide may have been present in the air in greater abundance in earlier periods than it is at present, but there is no reason to suppose that the percentage was appreciably higher in the Carboniferous period than it is now.
    0
    0
  • It is quite a mistake to suppose that, apart from the chlorophyll function, the physiology of the fungus-cell is fundamentally different from that of ordinary plant-cells.
    0
    0
  • The wife of Alaric is said to have been taken prisoner after this battle; and there is some reason to suppose that he was hampered in his movements by the presence with his forces of large numbers of women and children, having given to his invasion of Italy the character of a national migration.
    0
    0
  • My friends never had occasion to vindicate any one circumstance of my character and conduct; not but that the zealots, we may well suppose, would have been glad to invent and propagate any story to my disadvantage, but they could never find any which they thought would wear the face of probability.
    0
    0
  • It is therefore reasonable to suppose that the book was composed not later than the first half of the 2nd century B.C.,or (if we give the looser meaning to hair ros) even before the beginning of the century.
    0
    0
  • From the absence of scales it was held by the Jews to be unclean, and some commentators suppose it to be the serpent of Matt.
    0
    0
  • Early voyagers to West Africa applied this term to the wooden figures, stones, &c., regarded as the temporary residence of gods or spirits, and to charms. There is no reason to suppose that the word feitico was applied either to an animal or to the local spirit of a river, hill or forest.
    0
    0
  • It is a common error to suppose that the whole of African religion is embraced in the practices connected with these tutelary deities; so far from this being the case, belief in higher gods, not necessarily accompanied with worship or propitiation, is common in many parts of Africa, and there is no reason to suppose that it had been derived in every case, perhaps not in any case, from Christian or Mahommedan missionaries.
    0
    0
  • To take the simple case of the " wall " or flat plate considered by Fourier for the definition of thermal conductivity, suppose that a quantity of heat Q passes in the time T through an area A of a plate of conductivity k and thickness x, the sides of which are constantly maintained at temperatures B' and 8".
    0
    0
  • To illustrate the main features of the calculation, we may suppose that the surface is subject to a simple-harmonic cycle of temperature variation, so that the temperature at any time t is given by an equation of the form 0 - 0 0 = Asin 27rnt= A sin 27rt/T, (5) where 0 0 is the mean temperature of the surface, A the amplitude of the cycle, n the frequency, and T the period.
    0
    0
  • This, we may suppose, was the presiding conception from the first, but the design may have been variously modified in the three or four years of its execution.
    0
    0
  • Towards the south we may suppose it bounded by the Atlas range, and it.
    0
    0
  • Chariots are used in war, and fortified towns are built, though we must still suppose the houses to have consisted of a wooden framework coated with clay.
    0
    0
  • There is much discrepancy as to the ordinary food of the lammergeyer, some observers maintaining that it lives almost entirely on carrion, offal and even ordure; but there is no question of its frequently taking living prey, and it is reasonable to suppose that this bird, like so many others, is not everywhere uniform in its habits.
    0
    0
  • As, moreover, the extant Epitome is based on our Homilies, it is natural to suppose it was also the basis of earlier orthodox recensions, one or more of which may be used in certain Florilegia of the 7th century and later.
    0
    0
  • There is no reason to suppose that the physical causes whose effects we see as aurora are in existence only when aurora is visible.
    0
    0
  • If, as is now generally believed, aurora represents some form of electrical discharge, it is only reasonable to suppose that the auroral lines arise from atmospheric gases.
    0
    0
  • At Antioch itself great public works were carried out, such as were involved in the addition of a new quarter to the city, including, we may suppose, the civic council chamber which is afterwards spoken of as being here.
    0
    0
  • For we cannot suppose that he knew the longer suras by heart so perfectly that he was able after a time to lay his finger upon any particular passage.
    0
    0
  • One would suppose that the most ignorant Jew could never have mistaken Haman, the minister of Ahasuerus, for the minister of Pharaoh, as happens in the Koran, or identified Miriam, the sister of Moses, with Mary (= Mariam), the mother of Christ.
    0
    0
  • It was inevitable, however, that discrepancies should emerge between the texts of professed scholars, and as these men in their several localities were authorities on the reading of the Koran, quarrels began to break out between the levies from different districts about the true form that these initials did not belong to Mahomet's text, but might be the monograms of possessors of codices, which, through negligence on the part of the editors, were incorporated in the final form of the Koran; he now deems it more probable that they are to be traced to the Prophet himself, as Sprenger, Loth and others suppose.
    0
    0
  • Amongst these are some which there is no reason to suppose Mahomet desired to suppress.
    0
    0
  • Professor Petrie, however, thinks it best, while accepting the evidence of the Sirius date, to suppose further that a whole Sothic period of 1460 years had passed in the interval, making a total of 1650 years for the six dynasties in place of 220 years.
    0
    0
  • 4 Others suppose that the present position of ch.
    0
    0
  • Napoleon's answer was to refuse to ratify the convention of the 4th of January, and to announce his engagement to the archduchess Marie Louise in such a way as to lead Alexander to suppose that the two marriage treaties had been negotiated simultaneously.
    0
    0
  • Considering, however, that it is generally believed that Bryophyta and vascular plants are descended from an algal ancestry, it is natural to suppose that, prior to the luxuriant vegetable growths of the Carboniferous period, there must have existed an age of algae.
    0
    0
  • This problem he here solves for the first time, with the help of an Italian example: at least his design so closely repeats that of Leonardo da Vinci's famous and early destroyed equestrian statue of Francesco Sforza that we must certainly suppose him to have seen either the model itself or such a drawing of it as is still preserved byLeonardo's own hand.
    0
    0
  • There is reason to suppose that the change described takes place in two stages, the gypsum first forming orthorhombic crystals and then crystallizing in the monosymmetric system.
    0
    0
  • The burgesses, of course, had long been a relatively rich and powerful body: it is a fond delusion to suppose that they sprang into being under John Knox, though their attachment to his principles made them prominent among his disciples, while Flodden probably began to deter them from the ancient attachment to France.
    0
    0
  • Suppose that the kirk was restored by Charles to her position in 1592, with General Assemblies.
    0
    0
  • Robert Chambers, in the once famous Vestiges of Creation, interested and shocked his contemporaries by his denial of the fixity of species and his insistence on creation by progressive evolution, but had no better theory of the cause of variation than to suppose that organisms - "from the simplest and oldest to the highest and most recent" were possessed of "an inherent impulse, imparted by the Almighty both to advance them from the several grades and modify their structure as circumstances required."
    0
    0
  • A slight change in the structure or activity of a gland, by altering the internal secretion, may produce widespread alterations even in an adult organism; and we have good reason to suppose that, if compatible with viability, such minute changes would have even a greater ultimate effect if they occurred in an embryo.
    0
    0
  • It is to be noticed, however, that the Mendelian conceptions are in no sense an alternative to Darwinism; at the most they would serve to assist in explaining the mechanism of variation, and by enlarging our idea of the factors, increase the rate at which we may suppose selection to work.
    0
    0
  • It would, however, be wrong to suppose that the influence of truly Hellenic art on Phrygia began with the conquest of Alexander.
    0
    0
  • We do read frequently of kings in the accounts of their hosts; but their power may not have extended beyond the leadership of the expedition; they may have been kings ad hoc. On the other hand, the whole character of northern tradition (Teutonic and Scandinavian tradition alike) forbids us to suppose that any would be elected to that office who was not of noble or princely blood.
    0
    0
  • On the paramos of Chimborazo, Pichincha, Iliniza, &c., the relation of characteristic genera to those identical with genera in the Alpine flora of Europe is as 5 to 4; and the botanist might almost suppose himself in the Upper Engadine.
    0
    0
  • When an immigrant moved to Rome from one of the cities of the Latin league, or any city which enjoyed the jus commercii with Rome, and by the exercise of the right of voluntary exile from his own state (jus exulandi), claimed Roman citizenship, it is impossible to suppose that it was necessary for him to make application to a Roman patron to represent him in his legal transactions; for the jus commercii gave its holder the right of suing and being sued in his own person before Roman courts.
    0
    0
  • This last sentence has led some modern writers to suppose that he made two different voyages; but this is improbable; the expressions of Polybius imply that his explorations in both directions, first towards the north and afterwards towards the east, formed part of the same voyage.
    0
    0
  • Examination of titles in the Prophets and the Psalms (to say nothing of Ecclesiastes and Wisdom of Solomon) makes it evident that these have been added by late editors who were governed by vague traditions or fanciful associations or caprice, and there is no reason to suppose the titles in Proverbs to be .exceptions to the general rule.
    0
    0
  • It is by no means unreasonable to suppose that there is a fundamental Canaanite element in this population: the " hewers of wood and drawers of water " often remain undisturbed through successive occupations of a land; and there is a remarkable correspondence of type between many of the modern fellahin and skeletons of ancient inhabitants which have been recovered in the course of excavation.
    0
    0
  • It is legitimate to suppose that this attitude would have surprised Antiochus if he had heard of it.
    0
    0
  • In this case, as in that of the Edomites, it is natural to suppose that there existed already a nucleus of professing Jews which made the wholesale conversion possible.
    0
    0
  • This has been the origin of the long succession of Semitic waves - Babylonian, Assyrian, Canaanite, Hebrew, Nabataean, Moslem - that have flowed over Mesopotamia and Palestine; there is every reason to suppose that they will be followed by others, and that the Arab will remain master at the end, as he was in the beginning.
    0
    0
  • Suppose now, for the moment, that the readings of the levels k and l are identical in both observations, we have then, in the difference between the micrometer readings north and south, a measure of the difference of the two zenith distances expressed in terms of the micrometer screw; and, if the "` value of one revolution of the micrometer screw" is known in seconds of arc we have for the resulting latitude FIG.
    0
    0
  • Since Much Smaller Values Are Found For More Complex Molecules, We May Suppose That, In These Cases, The Energy Of Rotation Of A Polyatomic Molecule May Be Greater Than Its Energy Of Translation, Or Else That Heat Is Expended In Splitting Up Molecular Aggregates, And Increasing Energy Of Vibration.
    0
    0
  • It is necessary to suppose, if the analogy is to hold, that the sun is brightest when sunspots and faculae are most numerous; this is by no means unlikely.
    0
    0
  • It is a legitimate speculation to suppose that these in the reverse order are the stages in the evolution of a double star.
    0
    0
  • It seems difficult to account for the very remarkable and unsymmetrical distribution of the motions, unless we suppose that the stars form two more or less separate systems superposed; and it has been found possible by assuming two drifts with suitably assigned velocities to account very satisfactorily for the observed motions.
    0
    0
  • Davy, on the other hand, could see no reason to suppose it contained oxygen, as they surmised, and ultimately they had to accept his view of its elementary character.
    0
    0
  • There is no reason to suppose that any great evils arise from this association, and without it the execution of the many important national public works which now attest its value would have been impossible.
    0
    0
  • But it must be kept in mind that the conversion of services into rents went on very gradually, as a series of private agreements, and that it would be very wrong to suppose, as some scholars have done, that it had led to a general commutation by the middle or even the end of the 14th century.
    0
    0
  • Some suppose that we may infer from one premise by a so-called " immediate inference."
    0
    0
  • Some noOlogists suppose a mental power of forming necessary principles of deduction a priori; but fail to show how we can apply principles of mind to things beyond mind.
    0
    0
  • Some empiricists, on the other hand, suppose that induction only infers probable conclusions which are premises of probable deductions; but they give up all exact science.
    0
    0
  • Neither Mill, however, nor any of the later logicians whose theories we have quoted, has been able quite to detach judgment from conception; they all suppose that an idea, or ideas, is a condition of all judgment.
    0
    0
  • How absurd to suppose that here we pass from a particular categorical to a universal hypothetical, and then treat this very conclusion as a particular categorical to pass to a higher universal hypothetical !
    0
    0
  • This is like Aristotle's inductive syllogism in the arrangement of terms; but, while on the one hand Aristotle did not, like Wundt, confuse it with the third figure, on the other hand Wundt does not, like Aristotle, suppose it to be practicable to get inductive data so wide as the convertible premise, " All S is M, and all M is S," which would at once establish the conclusion, " All M is P."
    0
    0
  • Bradley seems to suppose that the major premise of a syllogism must be explicit, or else is nothing at all.
    0
    0
  • To the epistemologist it seemed to confuse foundation and keystone, and to suppose itself to build upon the latter in a construction illegitimately appropriative of materials otherwise accumulated.
    0
    0
  • Suppose, for simplicity, the factor-lines to be each of unit length.
    0
    0
  • But this neglects the latent heat of solution, unless we may suppose it included by writing the internal latent heat L i in place of L in Callendar's formula.
    0
    0
  • If we suppose the number of sources to increase indefinitely, so as finally to give the appearance of a luminous surface as the source of light, it is obvious that the degrees of darkness at different portions of the penumbra will also increase indefinitely; i.e.
    0
    0
  • Suppose, next, that the body which casts the shadow is a large one, such as a wall, with a hole in it.
    0
    0
  • The rites, we may suppose, have become modified and more orthodox, but none the less they are a valuable testimony to the persistence of the cult among people who still claim power over serpents and immunity from their bite, and who live hard by the home of the ancient tribe which ascribed its origin to the son of Circe."
    0
    0
  • Our hints are few of Jesus' teaching, but this much, at least, we cannot doubt unless we suppose that death took him unawares, or that his explanation of the impending fact took on some un-Jewish form; and further, that the earliest tradition misrepresents him.
    0
    0
  • The red rocks may in some cases suggest desert conditions; and there is good reason to suppose that in what are now Norway and China a glacial cold prevailed early in the period.
    0
    0
  • But many suppose that the tradition arose from confused remembrance of the use by a later author of Luke's " we " document or travel-diary.
    0
    0
  • In the latter case we must suppose either that the writer was an eye-witness, or that he wished to be thought an eye-witness.
    0
    0
  • The scientific method, then, is to consider each " miracle " on its own merits, according as we find reason to suppose that it has reached our author more or less directly.
    0
    0
  • Of course an entire epic could not be recited on a single occasion; nor can we suppose that it would be thought out from beginning to end before any part of it was presented to an audience.
    0
    0
  • Many difficulties will be obviated if we may suppose that this passage is the beginning of a different poem, the hero of which was not Beowulf the son of Ecgtheow, but his Danish namesake.
    0
    0
  • For suppose that in consequence of the displacement a point of the lamina is brought from A to B, whilst the point of the lamina which was originally at B is brought to C. Since AB, BC, are two different positions of the same line in the B C lamina they are equal, and it is evident that the rotation could have been effected by a rotation about J,
    0
    0
  • Again, suppose we have a bar AB resting with its ends on twc smooth inclined planes which face each other.
    0
    0