Sumac sentence example

sumac
  • Those are sumac bushes.
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  • Among indigenous fruit-bearing trees, shrubs and vines the state has the bird cherry, black cherry, blueberry, cranberry, raspberry, blackberry, gooseberry, strawberry, grape and black currant; and conspicuous among a very great variety of shrubs and flowering plants are the rose, dogwood, laurel, sumac, holly, winterberry, trilliums, anemones, arbutuses, violets, azaleas, eglantine, clematis, blue gentians, orange lilies, orchids, asters and golden rod.
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  • Thus the protoand per-salts of iron, as well as the protoand per-salts of tin, including also a large variety of tannin, sumac, divi-divi, chestnut, valonia, the acacias (Areca Catechu and Acacia Catechu from India), from which are obtained cutch and gambier, &c., are no longer used solely as mordants or tinctorial matters, but mainly to serve the object of converting the silk into a greatly-expanded fibre, consisting of a conglomeration of more or less of these substances."
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  • Our version includes crushed organic thyme, non-organic sumac, organic toasted sesame seeds and sea salt.
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  • Sumac berries are typically harvested and made into a medicinal tea.
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  • Sumac tea is said to be a diuretic as well as have antimicrobial properties.
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  • The berries grow on the sumac shrubs and are harvested in the fall.
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  • For current botanical and horticultural information, see Sumac.
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  • You should also avoid using any types of leaves that tend to produce allergic responses in humans, such as poison ivy, oak, or sumac.
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  • Ayurvedic practitioners suggest gargling with a mixture of water, salt, and tumeric (Curcuma longa) powder or astringents such as alum, sumac, sage, and bayberry (Myrica spp.).
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  • Poison ivy, oak, and sumac are allergic skin rashes (or Rhus dermatitis) caused by the plants of the same name.
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  • The allergic rash of poison ivy, oak, and sumac is characterized by red, weeping blisters and severe itching.
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  • Urushiol oil or resin is found in the leaves, roots, and woody parts (i.e., vines and stems) of the poison ivy, oak, and sumac plants.
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  • For that reason, even dead poison ivy, oak, or sumac plants must be handled with care.
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  • The small, woody shrubs that are poison sumac are most common in the Eastern United States.
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  • Also known as Rhus vernix or Toxicondendron vernix, poison sumac differs in appearance from the three-leaf clusters of poison ivy and oak.
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  • It can be distinguished from regular, non-poisonous sumac by its berries, which are green to white as opposed to the bright red berries of regular sumac.
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  • According to the American Academy of Dermatology, an estimated 85 percent of the population is allergic to the urushiol oil found in poison ivy, oak, and sumac.
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  • Every year up to 50 million Americans develop a poison ivy, oak, or sumac rash.
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  • While direct skin-to-plant contact with poison ivy, oak, or sumac is probably the most frequent cause of the rash, the irritants from the plants can also be passed on indirectly.
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  • Most children will not get a rash the very first time they are exposed to poison ivy, oak, or sumac, although this is when the sensitivity, or immune response, to urushiol develops.
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  • A physician can distinguish poison ivy, oak, or sumac from other allergic contact dermatitis through a brief patient interview.
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  • Treatments for the itching of poison ivy, oak, or sumac rashes range from calamine lotion and oatmeal baths to over-the-counter antihistamines and topical creams.
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  • The plant must be used shortly after exposure to poison ivy, oak, or sumac to work.
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  • Anyone who encounters this type of exposure to poison ivy, oak, or sumac should seek emergency medical care immediately.
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  • Children should be advised to stay out of areas where poison ivy, oak, or sumac is known to grow.
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  • Eliminating known poison ivy, oak, or sumac growth in the yard or garden is also an important preventative step, but eradicating the weeds can be difficult.
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  • As an alternative, landscaping fabric or another barrier can be placed over poison ivy, oak, or sumac to kill the plants and prevent future growth.
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  • Urushiol-The oil from poison ivy, oak, and sumac that causes severe itching, blistering, and rash.
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  • Poison ivy, poison oak, and poison sumac are common culprits in cases of allergic contact dermatitis.
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  • A reaction to resin produced by poison ivy, poison oak, or poison sumac is the most common source of symptoms.
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  • There's nothing worse than doing yard work in the scalding sun only to find you've stumbled upon -- and rubbed your skin against -- poison ivy, poison oak, or poison sumac.
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  • Things you may already have in your medicine cabinet to treat poison ivy, oak, or sumac include calamine lotion, Noxzema, rubbing alcohol, and Milk of Magnesia.
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  • Pushing through some sumac that she thought bordered the clearing where the building stood, she squinted up at the sun.
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  • She found a hand saw in the shed and cut down several small trees and some sumac bushes.
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  • Laurel, rhododendron, and whortleberry are common shrubs in the mountain districts, and sumac, hazel, sassafras and elder are quite widely distributed elsewhere.
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  • The sumac tree was another favorite with thick, gently curving branches, ideal for resting on.
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  • It is possible for children who are highly reactive to urushiol to grow into adults who are barely sensitive to poison ivy, oak, or sumac, regardless of how many times they have been exposed to the plant oil.
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  • The itching and discomfort of poison ivy, oak, and sumac rashes can disrupt sleep, make a child irritable and anxious, and pose a major distraction to schoolwork and other tasks that require concentration.
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  • Common culprits include poison ivy, poison oak, and poison sumac; fragrances and preservatives in cosmetics and personal care products, such latex items as gloves and condoms; and formaldehyde.
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  • She dropped the sumac bush.
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