Sullivan sentence example

sullivan
  • Miss Sullivan, whose ability as a teacher must be considered almost as marvellous as the talent of her pupil, was throughout her devoted companion.
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  • Sullivan was appointed a brigadier-general in the Continental army in June 1775 and a major-general in August 1776.
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  • In 1779 Sullivan, with about 4000 men, defeated the Iroquois and their Loyalist allies at Newtown (now Elmira), New York, on the 29th of August, burned their villages, and destroyed their orchards and crops.
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  • The principal railways are: the lines operated by the Boston & Maine system, extending along the eastern border from Brattleboro through Bellows Falls, and St Johnsbury to the Canada boundary (Vermont Valley, Sullivan County, and Connecticut & Passumpsic Rivers railways), with a line, the St Johnsbury & Lake Champlain railway, extending across the northern part of the state from Lunenburg to Maguam Bay; the Central Vermont railway (Grand Trunk system) which crosses the state diagonally from S.E.
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  • The southern part of the state was early opened to railways, the Sullivan County railway (operated by the Boston & Maine) having been opened in 1849; and in 1850 the state had 290 m.
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  • To capture this British garrison, later increased to 6000 men, the co-operation of about 10,000 men (mostly New England militia) under Major-General John Sullivan, and a French fleet carrying 4000 French regulars under Count D'Estaing, was planned in the summer of 1778.
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  • On the 9th of August Sullivan crossed to the north end of the island of Rhode Island, but as the Frenchmen were disembarking on Conanicut Island, Lord Howe arrived with the British fleet.
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  • On the death of Montgomery and the failure to take Quebec the army retreated to Crown Point, and its commander, General John Sullivan, was superseded by General Horatio Gates.
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  • He was also one of the officers of the force defeated by General John Sullivan in the engagement at Newtown (Elmira), N.Y., on the 29th of August 1779.
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  • Another class of percussive coal-cutters of American origin is represented by the Harrison, Sullivan and Ingersoll-Sergeant machines, which are essentially large rock-drills without turning gear for the cutting tool, and mounted upon a pair of wheels placed so as to allow the tool to work on a forward slope.
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  • His father, James Clinton (1736-1812), served as a captain of provincial troops in the French and Indian War, and as a brigadier-general in the American army in the War of Independence, taking part in Montgomery's attack upon Quebec in 1775, unsuccessfully resisting at Fort Montgomery, along the Hudson, in 1777 the advance of Sir Henry Clinton, accompanying General John Sullivan in 177 9 in his expedition against the Iroquois in western New York, and in 1781 taking part in the siege of Yorktown, Virginia.
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  • The state has a forest preserve also in the Catskill region (in Delaware, Greene, Sullivan and Ulster counties) of 110,964 acres, and there are wood-lots on many farms throughout the state that produce commercial timber.
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  • In retaliation a punitive expedition under Generals John Sullivan and James Clinton in 1779 destroyed the Iroquois towns, and dealt the Indian confederacy a blow from which it never recovered.
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  • In May 1888 she attended a performance of Sir Arthur Sullivan's Golden Legend at the Albert Hall, and in August she visited Glasgow to open the magnificent new municipal buildings, remaining for a couple of nights at Blythswood, the seat of Sir Archibald Campbell.
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  • A second raid was made against Richmond early in August 1777; and on the 22nd of the same month American troops under General John Sullivan fought the British at several places, inflicted a loss of about 200 killed, wounded and prisoners and destroyed considerable quantities of stores.
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  • But General John Sullivan (1740-1795) was at that time president of the state, and on the next day he, with 2000 or more militia and volunteers, captured 39 of the leaders and suppressed the revolt without bloodshed.
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  • During the summer General John Sullivan marched with a large force against the Indians (all the Iroquois tribes except the Oneidas and part of the Tuscaroras siding with the British during the war) and against the Loyalists of western New York, who had been committing great depredations along the frontier; and on the 29th of August he inflicted a crushing defeat upon them at Newtown, on the site of the present Elmira.
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  • At Buttermilk Falls stood the principal village of the Tutelo Indians, Coreorgonel, settled in 1753 and destroyed in 1779 by a detachment of Sullivan's force.
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  • Its affectations were burlesqued in Gilbert and Sullivan's travesty Patience (1881), which practically killed by ridicule the absurdities to which it had grown.
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  • Terre Haute's industrial and commercial importance is largely due to its proximity to the valuable coal-fields of Clay, Sullivan, Park, Vermilion, Greene and Vigo counties.
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  • The famous Bunker Hill and Sullivan mines were wrecked, late in April, by union men.
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  • Of the prehistoric inhabitants of Indiana little is known, but extensive remains in the form of mounds and fortifications abound in every part of the state, being particularly numerous in Knox and Sullivan counties.
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  • The town fronts Sullivan's Cove, a picturesque bay opening into the estuary of the river Derwent, and is nearly square in form, laid out with wide streets intersecting at right angles, the chief of which are served by electric tramways.
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  • In March 1776 he took command of a palmetto fort which he had built on Sullivan's Island, off Charleston, which he held against the attack of Admiral Sir Peter Parker on the 28th of June, and which soon after the battle was renamed Fort Moultrie by the General Assembly.
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  • They are, as Mr Justice Sullivan said, an affront to justice.
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  • Determined to discover the truth she seeks the help of her former boyfriend, the aviation officer Joseph ' Sky Captain ' Sullivan.
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  • Sullivan could be temperamental; anyone who crossed him faced career disaster, and he was roundly criticized for his deadpan delivery.
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  • Keith Lindsay recently worked with legendary BBC comedy writer John Sullivan on Green Green Grass, the long-awaited follow-up to Only Fools And Horses.
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  • Ferda (Peter Sullivan) is inclined to dismiss the Plastics as long-haired layabouts who aren't engaged in what matters.
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  • Player Position Points Comment Sullivan Keeper 6 had nowt to do.
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  • Virgil Earp married Alice Sullivan in 1870 and for a time ran a sawmill in Prescott.
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  • There was machine trouble for Bjarne Pedersen prior to heat one, with his skipper Ryan Sullivan quick to bring out a replacement steed.
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  • After my teacher, Miss Sullivan, came to me, I sought an early opportunity to lock her in her room.
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  • My father was obliged to get a ladder and take Miss Sullivan out through the window--much to my delight.
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  • But Miss Sullivan did not arrive until the following March.
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  • The most important day I remember in all my life is the one on which my teacher, Anne Mansfield Sullivan, came to me.
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  • Long before I learned to do a sum in arithmetic or describe the shape of the earth, Miss Sullivan had taught me to find beauty in the fragrant woods, in every blade of grass, and in the curves and dimples of my baby sister's hand.
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  • It was so cool up in the tree that Miss Sullivan proposed that we have our luncheon there.
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  • But Miss Sullivan shook her head, and I was greatly puzzled and disappointed.
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  • I had made many mistakes, and Miss Sullivan had pointed them out again and again with gentle patience.
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  • From the beginning of my education Miss Sullivan made it a practice to speak to me as she would speak to any hearing child; the only difference was that she spelled the sentences into my hand instead of speaking them.
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  • One day, Miss Sullivan tells me, I pinned the word girl on my pinafore and stood in the wardrobe.
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  • Everything Miss Sullivan taught me she illustrated by a beautiful story or a poem.
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  • I cannot explain the peculiar sympathy Miss Sullivan had with my pleasures and desires.
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  • Miss Sullivan tried to teach me to count by stringing beads in groups, and by arranging kintergarten straws I learned to add and subtract.
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  • The first Christmas after Miss Sullivan came to Tuscumbia was a great event.
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  • Every one in the family prepared surprises for me, but what pleased me most, Miss Sullivan and I prepared surprises for everybody else.
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  • Miss Sullivan and I kept up a game of guessing which taught me more about the use of language than any set lessons could have done.
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  • Miss Sullivan taught me to take all the care of my new pet.
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  • One day Miss Sullivan attracted my attention to a strange object which she had captured basking in the shallow water.
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  • I had never crossed it until one day Mildred, Miss Sullivan and I were lost in the woods, and wandered for hours without finding a path.
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  • Even this became less and less intelligible until the time when Miss Sullivan began to teach me.
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  • Miss Fuller and Miss Sullivan could understand me, but most people would not have understood one word in a hundred.
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  • It astonished me to find how much easier it is to talk than to spell with the fingers, and I discarded the manual alphabet as a medium of communication on my part; but Miss Sullivan and a few friends still use it in speaking to me, for it is more convenient and more rapid than lip-reading.
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  • I had made my homeward journey, talking constantly to Miss Sullivan, not for the sake of talking, but determined to improve to the last minute.
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  • He believed, or at least suspected, that Miss Sullivan and I had deliberately stolen the bright thoughts of another and imposed them on him to win his admiration.
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  • I was brought before a court of investigation composed of the teachers and officers of the Institution, and Miss Sullivan was asked to leave me.
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  • Miss Sullivan had never heard of "The Frost Fairies" or of the book in which it was published.
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  • For two years he seems to have held the belief that Miss Sullivan and I were innocent.
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  • Miss Sullivan and I were at that time in Hulton, Pennsylvania, visiting the family of Mr. William Wade.
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  • Miss Sullivan sat beside me at my lessons, spelling into my hand whatever Mr. Irons said, and looking up new words for me.
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  • I went there in October, 1894, accompanied by Miss Sullivan.
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  • He, who made every one happy in a beautiful, unobtrusive way, was most kind and tender to Miss Sullivan and me.
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  • Each day Miss Sullivan went to the classes with me and spelled into my hand with infinite patience all that the teachers said.
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  • Some of the girls learned to speak to me, so that Miss Sullivan did not have to repeat their conversation.
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  • Just before the books came, Mr. Gilman had begun to remonstrate with Miss Sullivan on the ground that I was working too hard, and in spite of my earnest protestations, he reduced the number of my recitations.
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  • In the end the difference of opinion between Mr. Gilman and Miss Sullivan resulted in my mother's withdrawing my sister Mildred and me from the Cambridge school.
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  • Miss Sullivan and I spent the rest of the winter with our friends, the Chamberlins in Wrentham, twenty-five miles from Boston.
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  • Miss Sullivan interpreted his instruction.
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  • The college authorities did not allow Miss Sullivan to read the examination papers to me; so Mr. Eugene C. Vining, one of the instructors at the Perkins Institution for the Blind, was employed to copy the papers for me in American braille.
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  • Before we began the story Miss Sullivan explained to me the things that she knew I should not understand, and as we read on she explained the unfamiliar words.
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  • As soon as my examinations were over, Miss Sullivan and I hastened to this green nook, where we have a little cottage on one of the three lakes for which Wrentham is famous.
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  • After the play Miss Sullivan took me to see him behind the scenes, and I felt of his curious garb and his flowing hair and beard.
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  • Elsie Leslie, the little actress, was in Boston, and Miss Sullivan took me to see her in "The Prince and the Pauper."
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  • As a child I loved to sit on his knee and clasp his great hand with one of mine, while Miss Sullivan spelled into the other his beautiful words about God and the spiritual world.
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  • He had invited Miss Sullivan and me to call on him one Sunday afternoon.
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  • My fingers lighted upon a beautiful volume of Tennyson's poems, and when Miss Sullivan told me what it was I began to recite:
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  • One beautiful summer day, not long after my meeting with Dr. Holmes, Miss Sullivan and I visited Whittier in his quiet home on the Merrimac.
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  • Miss Sullivan began to teach Helen Keller on March 3rd, 1887.
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  • In this account of the picnic we get an illuminating glimpse of Miss Sullivan's skill in teaching her pupil during play hours.
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  • Toward the end of May Mrs. Keller, Helen, and Miss Sullivan started for Boston.
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  • During the summer Miss Sullivan was away from Helen for three months and a half, the first separation of teacher and pupil.
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  • When the Perkins Institution closed for the summer, Helen and Miss Sullivan went to Tuscumbia.
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  • Helen and Miss Sullivan returned to the Perkins Institution early in November.
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  • Before a teacher was found for Tommy and while he was still in the care of Helen and Miss Sullivan, a reception was held for him at the kindergarten.
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  • There is a hiatus of several months in the letters, caused by the depressing effect on Helen and Miss Sullivan of the "Frost King" episode.
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  • At the end of June Miss Sullivan and Helen went home to Tuscumbia.
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  • In March Helen and Miss Sullivan went North, and spent the next few months traveling and visiting friends.
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  • In a prefatory note which Miss Sullivan wrote for St. Nicholas, she says that people frequently said to her, "Helen sees more with her fingers than we do with our eyes."
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  • In February Helen and Miss Sullivan returned to Tuscumbia.
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  • In the fall Helen and Miss Sullivan entered the Wright-Humason School in New York, which makes a special of lip-reading and voice-culture.
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  • When the Wright-Humason School closed for the summer, Miss Sullivan and Helen went South.
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  • The college authorities would not permit Miss Sullivan to read the examination papers to me; so Mr. Eugene C. Vining, one of the instructors at the Perkins Institution for the Blind, was employed to copy the papers for me in braille.
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  • Miss Sullivan always sat beside me, and told me what the teachers said.
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  • In the German class Miss Sullivan interpreted to me as well as she could what the teacher said.
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  • Miss Sullivan, who is an excellent critic, made suggestions at many points in the course of composition and revision.
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  • Moreover, Miss Sullivan does not see why Miss Keller should be subjected to the investigation of the scientist, and has not herself made many experiments.
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  • When a psychologist asked her if Miss Keller spelled on her fingers in her sleep, Miss Sullivan replied that she did not think it worth while to sit up and watch, such matters were of so little consequence.
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  • When she is in a new place, especially an interesting place like Niagara, whoever accompanies her--usually, of course, Miss Sullivan--is kept busy giving her an idea of visible details.
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  • Miss Sullivan, who knows her pupil's mind, selects from the passing landscape essential elements, which give a certain clearness to Miss Keller's imagined view of an outer world that to our eyes is confused and overloaded with particulars.
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  • Her manuscripts seldom contain typographical errors when she hands them to Miss Sullivan to read.
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  • Even people who know her fairly well have written in the magazines about Miss Sullivan's "mysterious telegraphic communications" with her pupil.
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  • Miss Sullivan and others who live constantly with the deaf can spell very rapidly--fast enough to get a slow lecture, not fast enough to get every word of a rapid speaker.
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  • Miss Sullivan says that both she and Miss Keller remember "in their fingers" what they have said.
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  • Miss Sullivan writes in a letter of 1891:
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  • The names of Laura Bridgman and Helen Keller will always be linked together, and it is necessary to understand what Dr. Howe did for his pupil before one comes to an account of Miss Sullivan's work.
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  • For Dr. Howe is the great pioneer on whose work that of Miss Sullivan and other teachers of the deaf-blind immediately depends.
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  • Miss Sullivan knew at the beginning that Helen Keller would be more interesting and successful than Laura Bridgman, and she expresses in one of her letters the need of keeping notes.
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  • There are two other reasons why Miss Sullivan's records are incomplete.
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  • For this report Miss Sullivan prepared, in reluctant compliance with the request of Mr. Anagnos, an account of her work.
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  • Of this report Miss Sullivan wrote in a letter dated October 30, 1887:
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  • As Mr. Anagnos was the head of a great institution, what he said had much more effect than the facts in Miss Sullivan's account on which he based his statements.
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  • In a year after she first went to Helen Keller, Miss Sullivan found herself and her pupil the centre of a stupendous fiction.
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  • Teachers of the deaf proved a priori that what Miss Sullivan had done could not be, and some discredit was reflected on her statements, because they were surrounded by the vague eloquence of Mr. Anagnos.
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  • For this report Miss Sullivan wrote the fullest and largest account she has ever written; and in this report appeared the "Frost King," which is discussed fully in a later chapter.
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  • Although Miss Sullivan is still rather amused than distressed when some one, even one of her friends, makes mistakes in published articles about her and Miss Keller, still she sees that Miss Keller's book should include all the information that the teacher could at present furnish.
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  • These letters were written to Mrs. Sophia C. Hopkins, the only person to whom Miss Sullivan ever wrote freely.
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  • In these letters we have an almost weekly record of Miss Sullivan's work.
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  • Many people have thought that any attempt to find the principles in her method would be nothing but a later theory superimposed on Miss Sullivan's work.
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  • Miss Anne Mansfield Sullivan was born at Springfield, Massachusetts.
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  • Miss Sullivan's talents are of the highest order.
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  • It was Dr. Howe who, by his work with Laura Bridgman, made Miss Sullivan's work possible: but it was Miss Sullivan who discovered the way to teach language to the deaf-blind.
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  • It must be remembered that Miss Sullivan had to solve her problems unaided by previous experience or the assistance of any other teacher.
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  • The impression that Miss Sullivan educated Helen Keller "under the direction of Mr. Anagnos" is erroneous.
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  • No one interferes with Miss Sullivan's plans, or shares in her tasks.
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  • Here follow in order Miss Sullivan's letters and the most important passages from the reports.
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  • Some of her opinions Miss Sullivan would like to enlarge and revise.
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  • In her reports Miss Sullivan speaks of "lessons" as if they came in regular order.
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  • It is always: "Oh, Miss Sullivan, please come and tell us what Helen means," or "Miss Sullivan, won't you please explain this to Helen?
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  • This extract from one of Miss Sullivan's letters is added because it contains interesting casual opinions stimulated by observing the methods of others.
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  • Miss Sullivan's second report brings the account down to October 1st, 1888.
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  • During the next two years neither Mr. Anagnos, who was in Europe for a year, nor Miss Sullivan wrote anything about Helen Keller for publication.
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  • From Miss Sullivan's part of this report I give her most important comments and such biographical matter as does not appear elsewhere in the present volume.
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  • These extracts Mr. Anagnos took from Miss Sullivan's notes and memoranda.
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  • Here begins Miss Sullivan's connected account in the report of 1891:
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  • There has been much discussion of such of Miss Sullivan's statements and explanations as have been published before.
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  • Miss Sullivan has begun where Dr. Howe left off.
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  • By experiment, by studying other children, Miss Sullivan came upon the practical way of teaching language by the natural method.
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  • And this is Miss Sullivan's great discovery.
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  • All day long in their play-time and work-time Miss Sullivan kept spelling into her pupil's hand, and by that Helen Keller absorbed words, just as the child in the cradle absorbs words by hearing thousands of them before he uses one and by associating the words with the occasion of their utterance.
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  • Why not, says Miss Sullivan, make a language lesson out of what they were interested in?
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  • Miss Sullivan never needlessly belittled her ideas or expressions to suit the supposed state of the child's intelligence.
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  • It is true that a teacher with ten times Miss Sullivan's genius could not have made a pupil so remarkable as Helen Keller out of a child born dull and mentally deficient.
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  • And the fact remains that she was taught by a method of teaching language to the deaf the essential principles of which are clearly expressed in Miss Sullivan's letters, written while she was discovering the method and putting it successfully into practice.
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  • Miss Sullivan is a person of extraordinary power.
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  • Miss Sullivan's vigorous, original mind has lent much of its vitality to her pupil.
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  • If Miss Keller is fond of language and not interested especially in mathematics, it is not surprising to find Miss Sullivan's interests very similar.
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  • There is, then, a good deal that Miss Sullivan has done for Miss Keller which no other teacher can do in just the same way for any one else.
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  • To have another Helen Keller there must be another Miss Sullivan.
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  • When Miss Sullivan went out in the barnyard and picked up a little chicken and talked to Helen about it, she was giving a kind of instruction impossible inside four walls, and impossible with more than one pupil at a time.
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  • It was, then, to a good subject that Miss Sullivan brought her devotion and intelligence, and fearless willingness to experiment.
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  • Miss Sullivan's methods were so good that even without the practical result, any one would recognize the truth of the teacher's ideas.
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  • Miss Sullivan has in addition a vigorous personality.
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  • This difficulty and some others may be corrected when she and Miss Sullivan have more time.
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  • Miss Sullivan's account in her address at Chautauqua, in July, 1894, at the meeting of The American Association to Promote the Teaching of Speech to the Deaf, is substantially like Miss Keller's in points of fact.
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  • It is a clumsy and unsatisfactory way of receiving communication, useless when Miss Sullivan or some one else who knows the manual alphabet is present to give Miss Keller the spoken words of others.
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  • Indeed, when some friend is trying to speak to Miss Keller, and the attempt is not proving successful, Miss Sullivan usually helps by spelling the lost words into Miss Keller's hand.
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  • President Roosevelt had little difficulty last spring in making Miss Keller understand him, and especially requested Miss Sullivan not to spell into her hand.
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  • The ability to read the lips helps Miss Keller in getting corrections of her pronunciation from Miss Sullivan and others, just as it was the means of her learning to speak at all, but it is rather an accomplishment than a necessity.
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  • In this, as in all other things, Miss Sullivan has been the wise teacher.
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  • If Miss Sullivan wrote fine English, the beauty of Helen Keller's style would, in part, be explicable at once.
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  • But the extracts from Miss Sullivan's letters and from her reports, although they are clear and accurate, have not the beauty which distinguishes Miss Keller's English.
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  • Any one who has tried to write knows what Miss Keller owes to the endless practice which Miss Sullivan demanded of her.
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  • For it was Dr. Bell who first saw the principles that underlie Miss Sullivan's method, and explained the process by which Helen Keller absorbed language from books.
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  • I asked Miss Sullivan to go at once to see Mrs. Hopkins and ascertain the facts in the matter.
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  • On Miss Sullivan's return to Brewster, she read to Helen the story of "Little Lord Fauntleroy," which she had purchased in Boston for the purpose.
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  • The episode had a deadening effect on Helen Keller and on Miss Sullivan, who feared that she had allowed the habit of imitation, which has in truth made Miss Keller a writer, to go too far.
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  • In these years the fear came many times to Miss Sullivan lest the success of the child was to cease with childhood.
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  • Stevenson, whom Miss Sullivan likes and used to read to her pupil, is another marked influence.
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  • Miss Sullivan had put out the light and gone away, thinking I was sound asleep.
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  • At last sleep surprised me, and when Miss Sullivan returned she found me wrapped in a blanket by the hearth.
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  • He had a regular role in the Channel Four soap opera Brookside as Jack Sullivan.
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  • If you'd like to choose a gender-neutral name, this approach works well since names like Sullivan, Finnegan, or Delaney are appropriate for both sexes.
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  • Tom made several appearances on the Ed Sullivan Show and became a somewhat regular fixture in Las Vegas.
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  • In addition to his infomercials, which made him a household name, Mays was the co-star of the Discovery Channel reality TV series Pitchmen, which followed Mays and fellow advertising star Anthony Sullivan (Sully).
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  • On a side note, Forbes Magazine estimates that Mays, along with his partner, Anthony "Sully" Sullivan, contributed to over $1 billion in sales of the products they pitched.
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  • The show starred Harry Anderson as a night court judge, and Markie Post played public defender Christine Sullivan.
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  • After representing California in the Miss Teenage USA pageant, Valentine drew the attention of variety show host Ed Sullivan.
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  • Back in 1993, contractor Tom Sullivan began buying unused and excess wood flooring from other contractors.
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  • Three years later, Sullivan opened his first Lumber Liquidators store.
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  • The original CPAP masks were developed in the early 1980s by Dr. Colin Sullivan, the Australian researcher who led the team that developed the first CPAP machine.
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  • Starring Anne Bancroft and Patty Duke, The Miracle Worker tells the story of Hellen Keller, a blind and deaf girl who is taught to communicate by a woman named Annie Sullivan.
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  • Dr. Greyson documented a case where a 55-year-old truck driver named Al Sullivan had a near death experience during a triple by-pass surgery.
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  • Barbara Knox - In 1964, Knox played the role of Rita Littlewood, who is now known as Rita Sullivan.
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  • The Echoes played the most popular British invasion hits of the day, which suited Joel fine as he had decided, like so many others, that he wanted to be a rock musician after seeing The Beatles on the Ed Sullivan Show.
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  • He only decided he wanted to be a musician after seeing The Beatles on The Ed Sullivan Show.
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  • The cast of the second season is mentored by Jaime King (who has starred in films like My Bloody Valentine), along with director Tim Sullivan.
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  • The girls are judged by John Homa (who stayed on from the first season of the show), James Gunn and Tim Sullivan himself.
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  • Chloe Tells Clark She Knows His Secret - For five years, Chloe Sullivan investigated the weird and the meteor-infected, she learned his secret during the fourth season, but kept it to herself, hoping Clark would eventually trust her.
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