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suborder

suborder

suborder Sentence Examples

  • In ordinary language the name is used for any species of Siphonaptera (otherwise known as Aphaniptera), which, though formerly regarded as a suborder of Diptera, are now considered to be a separate order of insects.

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  • But the characteristic nature of the avifauna is more clearly brought out when we learn that of the 2000 species just mentioned only about 1070 belong to the higher suborder of Oscines, that means to say, nearly one-half belong to the lower suborder Clamatores.

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  • The Pupipara are also termed Eproboscidea (although they actually possess a well-developed and functional proboscis), and by some dipterists the Eproboscidea are regarded as a suborder .and contrasted as such with the rest of the Diptera, which are styled the suborder Proboscidea.

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  • With many writers it is customary to treat the fleas as a suborder of Diptera, under the title Aphaniptera or Siphonaptera.

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  • It is one of the more typical Opisthobranchs, that is to say, it belongs to the section Tectibranchia, but other members of the suborder, namely, Bulla and Actaeon (figs.

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  • The maxillo-palatals are bound together (whence the name of the " Suborder ") across the middle line, either directly or by the ossification of the nasal septum.

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  • Suborder.

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  • Rheae Hippalectryornithes Casuariiformes Casuarii Intermediate suborder: - Aepyornithiformes..

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  • Intermediate suborder: - Palamedeiformes.

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  • Ciconiiformes Suborder.

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  • Intermediate suborder:- Procellariiformes..

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  • Intermediate suborder: Aptenodytiformes.

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  • Intermediate suborder: Ichthyornithiformes .

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  • Charadriornithes(AegialOr nithes) Intermediate suborder:- Gruiformes..

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  • Intermediate suborder:- Ralliformes .

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  • cormorant (q.v.) and gannet as well as the true pelicans, and for a long while these and some other distinct groups, as the snake-birds (q.v.), frigate-birds (q.v.) and tropic-birds (q.v.), which have all the four toes of the foot connected by a web, were regarded as forming a single family, Pelecanidae; but this name has now been restricted to the pelicans only, though all are still usually associated in the suborder Steganopodes of Ciconiiform birds.

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  • The scrub which covers the low veld consists mainly of gnarled stunted thorns with flattened umbrella shaped crowns, most of the species belonging to the suborder mimoseae.

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  • COD, the name given to the typical fish of the family Gadidae, of the Teleostean suborder Anacanthini, the position of which has much varied in our classifications.

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  • But, on the ground of their air-bladder being closed, or deprived of a pneumatic duct communicating with the digestive canal, such as is characteristic of the Malacopterygians, they were removed from them and placed with the flat-fishes, or Pleuronectidae, in a suborder Anacanthini, regarded as intermediate in position between the Acanthopterygians, or spiny-finned fishes, and the Malacopterygians.

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  • The suborder Anacanthini is, nevertheless, maintained for the Muraenolepididae Gadids and two related families, Macruridae and Muraenolepididae, and may be thus defined: - Air-bladder without open duct.

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  • lus), a term applied to small wingless insects, parasitic upon birds and mammals, and belonging strictly speaking to the order Anoplura, often included among the Hemiptera, though the term is frequently extended to the bird-lice constituting the suborder Mallophaga, formerly included among the Neuroptera.

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  • AMBLYPODA, a suborder of primitive ungulate mammals, taking its name from the short and stumpy feet, which were furnished with five toes each, and supported massive pillar-like limbs.

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  • &prtos, even, and &Lktvxos, a finger or toe, "even-toed"), the suborder of ungulate mammals in which the central (and in some cases the only) pair of toes in each foot are arranged symmetrically on each side of a vertical line running through the axes of the limbs.

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  • This " leaf-footed " suborder has the appendages which follow the second maxillae variable in number, but all foliaceous and branchial.

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  • In this suborder the head is more or less distinct, the rest of the body being in general laterally compressed and covered by a bivalved test.

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  • Suborder, GEcKONES.

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  • Suborder, Chamaeleontes.

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  • Suborder, Lacertae.

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  • HYRACOIDEA, a suborder of ungulate mammals represented at the present day only by the Syrian hyrax (Procavia syriaca), the "coney" of the Bible, and its numerous African relatives, all of which may be included in the single genus Procavia (or Hyrax), and consequently in the family Procaviidae.

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  • It is now possible to define the suborder Hyracoidea as including ungulates with a centrale in the carpus, plantigrade feet, in which the first and fifth toes are reduced in greater or less degree, and clavicles and a foramen in the lower end of the humerus are absent.

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  • Suborder I.

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  • Suborder II.

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  • Suborder III.

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  • Characters of the suborder.

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  • There are only two genera in this suborder: Chaetoderma, and FIG.

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  • Sclater in 1880 placed them in a distinct order, Palamedeae, which he, however, placed next to the true Anseres, and they are now generally regarded as forming a suborder of anseriform birds.

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  • dier, &c., probably from a root dhus-, to breathe), originally the name of one of two British species, the red-deer or the fallow-deer, but now extended to all the members of the family Cervidae, in the section Pecora of the suborder Artiodactyla of the order Ungulata.

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  • Suborder i.

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  • Suborder ii.

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  • It is with the proboscidean suborder of the Ungulata to which the Sirenia are most nearly related; the nature of this relationship being described by Dr Andrews as follows: " In the first place, the occurrence of the most primitive Sirenians with which we are acquainted in the same region as the most generalized proboscidean, Moeritherium, is in favour of such a view, and this is further supported by the similarity of the brain-structure and, to some extent, of the pelvis in the earliest-known members of the two groups.

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  • Later still, in 1899 and subsequently, the bones of two other creatures of the same suborder have been discovered, one of them indicating an animal much larger than a man.

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  • In ordinary language the name is used for any species of Siphonaptera (otherwise known as Aphaniptera), which, though formerly regarded as a suborder of Diptera, are now considered to be a separate order of insects.

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  • - The second suborder of marsupials, the Paucituberculata, is exclusively South American, and typically represented by the family Epanorthidae, the majority of the members of which are extinct, their remains being found in the probably Miocene Santa Cruz beds of Patagonia, although one existing genus (Caenolestes) survives in Ecuador and Colombia.

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  • But the characteristic nature of the avifauna is more clearly brought out when we learn that of the 2000 species just mentioned only about 1070 belong to the higher suborder of Oscines, that means to say, nearly one-half belong to the lower suborder Clamatores.

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  • The Pupipara are also termed Eproboscidea (although they actually possess a well-developed and functional proboscis), and by some dipterists the Eproboscidea are regarded as a suborder .and contrasted as such with the rest of the Diptera, which are styled the suborder Proboscidea.

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  • In reality, however, the families designated Eproboscidea (Hippoboscidae, Braulidae, Nycteribiidae and .Streblidae), are not entitled to be considered as constituting either a suborder, or even a main division of the Cyclorrhapha; they are simply Cyclorrhapha much modified owing to parasitism, and in view of the closely similiar mode of reproduction in the tsetseflies the special designation Pupipara should be abandoned.

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  • With many writers it is customary to treat the fleas as a suborder of Diptera, under the title Aphaniptera or Siphonaptera.

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  • It is one of the more typical Opisthobranchs, that is to say, it belongs to the section Tectibranchia, but other members of the suborder, namely, Bulla and Actaeon (figs.

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  • The maxillo-palatals are usually elongated and lamellar, uniting with the palatals, and, bending backward along their inner edge, leave a cleft (whence the name given to the " Suborder ") between the vomer and themselves.

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  • The maxillo-palatals are bound together (whence the name of the " Suborder ") across the middle line, either directly or by the ossification of the nasal septum.

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  • Thus instead of contenting himself with terms that had met with pretty general approval, such as class, subclass, order, suborder, family, subfamily, and so on, he introduced into his final scheme other designations, " agmen," " cohors," " phalanx," and the like, which to the ordinary student of ornithology convey an indefinite meaning, if any meaning at all.

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  • Rheae Hippalectryornithes Casuariiformes Casuarii Intermediate suborder: - Aepyornithiformes..

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  • Intermediate suborder: - Palamedeiformes.

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  • Ciconiiformes Suborder.

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  • Intermediate suborder:- Procellariiformes..

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  • Intermediate suborder: Aptenodytiformes.

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  • Intermediate suborder: Ichthyornithiformes .

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  • Charadriornithes(AegialOr nithes) Intermediate suborder:- Gruiformes..

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  • Intermediate suborder:- Ralliformes .

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  • cormorant (q.v.) and gannet as well as the true pelicans, and for a long while these and some other distinct groups, as the snake-birds (q.v.), frigate-birds (q.v.) and tropic-birds (q.v.), which have all the four toes of the foot connected by a web, were regarded as forming a single family, Pelecanidae; but this name has now been restricted to the pelicans only, though all are still usually associated in the suborder Steganopodes of Ciconiiform birds.

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  • The scrub which covers the low veld consists mainly of gnarled stunted thorns with flattened umbrella shaped crowns, most of the species belonging to the suborder mimoseae.

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  • COD, the name given to the typical fish of the family Gadidae, of the Teleostean suborder Anacanthini, the position of which has much varied in our classifications.

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  • But, on the ground of their air-bladder being closed, or deprived of a pneumatic duct communicating with the digestive canal, such as is characteristic of the Malacopterygians, they were removed from them and placed with the flat-fishes, or Pleuronectidae, in a suborder Anacanthini, regarded as intermediate in position between the Acanthopterygians, or spiny-finned fishes, and the Malacopterygians.

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  • The suborder Anacanthini is, nevertheless, maintained for the Muraenolepididae Gadids and two related families, Macruridae and Muraenolepididae, and may be thus defined: - Air-bladder without open duct.

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  • lus), a term applied to small wingless insects, parasitic upon birds and mammals, and belonging strictly speaking to the order Anoplura, often included among the Hemiptera, though the term is frequently extended to the bird-lice constituting the suborder Mallophaga, formerly included among the Neuroptera.

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  • AMBLYPODA, a suborder of primitive ungulate mammals, taking its name from the short and stumpy feet, which were furnished with five toes each, and supported massive pillar-like limbs.

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  • &prtos, even, and &Lktvxos, a finger or toe, "even-toed"), the suborder of ungulate mammals in which the central (and in some cases the only) pair of toes in each foot are arranged symmetrically on each side of a vertical line running through the axes of the limbs.

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  • Huxley recognized the Psittacomorphae as forming one of the principal groups of Carinate birds, and they are now generally regarded as forming a suborder Psittaci of the Cuculiform birds (see Bird).

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  • This " leaf-footed " suborder has the appendages which follow the second maxillae variable in number, but all foliaceous and branchial.

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  • In this suborder the head is more or less distinct, the rest of the body being in general laterally compressed and covered by a bivalved test.

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  • Suborder, GEcKONES.

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  • Suborder, Chamaeleontes.

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  • Suborder, Lacertae.

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  • HYRACOIDEA, a suborder of ungulate mammals represented at the present day only by the Syrian hyrax (Procavia syriaca), the "coney" of the Bible, and its numerous African relatives, all of which may be included in the single genus Procavia (or Hyrax), and consequently in the family Procaviidae.

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  • It is now possible to define the suborder Hyracoidea as including ungulates with a centrale in the carpus, plantigrade feet, in which the first and fifth toes are reduced in greater or less degree, and clavicles and a foramen in the lower end of the humerus are absent.

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  • Suborder I.

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  • Suborder II.

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  • Suborder III.

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  • Characters of the suborder.

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  • There are only two genera in this suborder: Chaetoderma, and FIG.

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  • Sclater in 1880 placed them in a distinct order, Palamedeae, which he, however, placed next to the true Anseres, and they are now generally regarded as forming a suborder of anseriform birds.

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  • number, to a very large number, but in one suborder, the Rhizostomeae, tentacles are absent altogether (fig.

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  • In some genera the oral arms are of great length, and in the suborder Rhizostomeae they undergo concrescence to form a proboscis (fig.

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  • dier, &c., probably from a root dhus-, to breathe), originally the name of one of two British species, the red-deer or the fallow-deer, but now extended to all the members of the family Cervidae, in the section Pecora of the suborder Artiodactyla of the order Ungulata.

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  • It is with the proboscidean suborder of the Ungulata to which the Sirenia are most nearly related; the nature of this relationship being described by Dr Andrews as follows: " In the first place, the occurrence of the most primitive Sirenians with which we are acquainted in the same region as the most generalized proboscidean, Moeritherium, is in favour of such a view, and this is further supported by the similarity of the brain-structure and, to some extent, of the pelvis in the earliest-known members of the two groups.

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  • The petrels, all of which are placed in the family Procellariidae, were formerly associated with the Laridae (see GuLL), but they are now placed as the sole members of the suborder Tubinares (the name denoting the characteristic tubular structure of their nostrils) and of the order Procellariiformes (see Bird).

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  • Later still, in 1899 and subsequently, the bones of two other creatures of the same suborder have been discovered, one of them indicating an animal much larger than a man.

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