Stuttgart sentence example

stuttgart
  • Charmingly situated among vine-clad and wooded hills, Stuttgart stands at a height of nearly 900 ft.
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  • The lower, or south-eastern, part contains both the small group of streets belonging to old Stuttgart, and also the most important part of the new town.
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  • Many of them, however, are of considerable architectural importance and the revival of the Renaissance style is perhaps illustrated nowhere better than in Stuttgart.
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  • The art collections of Stuttgart are numerous and valuable.
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  • Stuttgart is the centre of the publishing trade of south Germany, and it has busy industries in everything connected with the production of books.
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  • Cannstatt, which was incorporated with Stuttgart in 1903, attracts numerous visitors owing to its beautiful situation on the Neckar and its saline and chalybeate springs.
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  • See Greinz, Eine Wanderung durch das Unterinntal (Stuttgart, 1902).
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  • 1859 Paris opera 1836 Scheibler, Stuttgart, proposed standard (440 at 69° F.).
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  • In 1842 he received a call to Tubingen, retired in 1867, and died at Stuttgart on the 8th of August 1879.
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  • He remained at Stuttgart for some years as Russian minister and confidential adviser of the crown princess.
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  • He was successively minister plenipotentiary at Cassel and Stuttgart (1852), at Turin (1853), ambassador at Rome (1857) and at Vienna (1861).
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  • (1898); Wasmann, Die psychischen Fahigkeiten der Ameisen (Stuttgart, 1899); C. Ll.
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  • More recent writers are Lohmeier, Geschichte Ostand Westpreussens (Gotha, 1880), and Prutz, Geschichte Preussens (Stuttgart, 1900).
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  • Sudenhorst's principal writings are Dorfleben im 18 Jahrhundert (Vienna, 1877); Hans Ulrich, Fiirst von Eggenberg (Vienna, 1880); Die Politik der Republic Venedig wdhrend des dreissigjdhrigen Krieges (Stuttgart, 1882-85); Venedig als Weltmacht and Weltstadt (Bielefeld, 1899 and 1906); Kriegsbilder aus der Zeit der Landsknechte (Stuttgart, 1883); Die bfentliche Meinung in Deutschland im Zeitalter Ludwigs XIV.
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  • He edited the Bibliothek deutscher Geschichte, writing for this series, Deutsche Geschichte im Zeitalter der Griindung des preussischen Konigtums (Stuttgart, 1887-94); and Deutsche Geschichte von der Auflosung des alten bis zur Griindung des neuen Reiches (Stuttgart, 1897-1905).
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  • (Berlin, 1882-84), and edited the Zeitschrift fiir allgemeine Geschichte (Stuttgart, 1884-88).
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  • In the quieter years that followed he wrote the third of his masterpieces, Franzosische Geschichte, vornehmlich im 16 and 17 Jahrhundert (Stuttgart, 1852-61), which was followed by his Englische Geschichte, vornehmlich 16 and 17 Jahrhundert (1859-68).
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  • His work is usefully supplemented by the narrative (La Prise de Constantinople) of On the bibliography of the Second Crusade see Kugler, Studien zur Geschichte des zweiten Kreuzzuges (Stuttgart, 1866).
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  • King Ludwig of Bavaria was much struck with it, and in 1864 invited Wagner, who was then at Stuttgart, to come to Munich and finish his work there.
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  • Gregorovius's Lucrezia Borgia (Stuttgart, 1874) contains a great deal of information on the Borgia family; P. Villari's Machiavelli (English translation, new ed., 1892) deals with the subject at some length.
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  • Among these may be mentioned Konrad Miller's Die ¢ltesten Weltkarten (Stuttgart, 1895-1897), which only deals with maps not influenced by the ideas of Ptolemy.
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  • After receiving his early education at the Caroline academy of Stuttgart, he entered the university of Tubingen, where he received the degree of doctor of medicine.
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  • In 1839 on Liebig's recommendation he was appointed to the chair of chemistry in the polytechnic at Stuttgart, and held it till within three years of his death, which happened at Stuttgart on the 1st of July 1885.
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  • Oncken's Lassalle (Stuttgart, 1904); another excellent work on his life and writings is George Brandes's Danish work, Ferdinand Lassalle (German translation, 4th ed., Leipzig, 1900).
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  • Meyer, Geschichte des Altertums (Stuttgart, 1901), iii.
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  • Fischer, Geschichte der Stadt Ulm (Stuttgart, 1863); Pressel, Ulmisches Urkundenbuch (Stuttgart, 1873) and Ulm and sein Munster (Ulm, 1877); Schultes, Chronik von Ulm (Stuttgart, 1881 and 1886); Hassler, Ulms Kunstgeschichte im Mittelalter (Stuttgart, 1872); and Das rote Buch der Stadt Ulm, edited by C. Mollvo (1904).
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  • Diimmler in a MS. at Stuttgart, and was published by him in " Das Martyrologium Notkers and seine Verwandten in Forschungen zur deutschen Geschichte, xxv.
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  • (Stuttgart, 1881), articles in Diet.
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  • A committee, chiefly promoted by the Wurttemberg government and the Stuttgart chamber of commerce, reported in 1901 that it was both desirable and practicable to dredge the river and to canalize it, from Esslingen down to Mannheim, and that the cost would probably be between 2 and 22 millions sterling.
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  • Hofand Staatsbibliothek Munchen and einer Anzahl anderer Bibliotheken Bayern gehalten werden (Munchen, 1909); Kiirschner, Jahrbuch der Presse (1902) Sperlings Zeitschriften Adressbuch (Stuttgart, 1910); Bibliographisches Repertorium, Berlin: Walzel-Houben, Zeitschriften der Romantik (1904); Houben, Zeitschriften des jungen Deutschlands (1906); Luck, Die deutsche Fachpresse (Tubingen, 1908).
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  • After the fall of Napoleon he took part in Wurttemberg politics, was expelled from Stuttgart and Heidelberg, and soon afterwards arrested at Frankfurt, delivered over to the Prussian authorities and condemned to fourteen years' fortress imprisonment for his alleged publication of state secrets in his memoirs.
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  • Returning to Wurttemberg in 1828, he first undertook the duties of repetent or theological tutor in Tubingen, and afterwards accepted a curacy in Stuttgart; but having in 1830 received an appointment in the royal public library at Stuttgart, he thenceforth gave himself exclusively to literature and historical science.
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  • Here Gfrdrer had manifested opinions unfavourable to Protestantism, which, however, were not openly avowed until fully developed in his church history (Allgemeine Kirchengeschichte bis Beginn des 14ten Jahrhunderts, Stuttgart, 1841-1846).
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  • In 1864 he entered the chancellery of the minister for foreign affairs at St Petersburg, and was soon afterwards attached to the Russian legation at Stuttgart, where he attracted the notice of Queen Olga of Wurttemberg.
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  • His father died in 1693, and Bengel was educated by a friend, who became a master in the gymnasium at Stuttgart.
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  • In 1703 Bengel left Stuttgart and entered the university of Tubingen, where, in his spare time, he devoted himself specially to the works of Aristotle and Spinoza, and in theology to those of Philipp Spener, Johann Arndt and August Franke.
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  • Prutz, Die konigliche AlbertusUniversitdt zu Konigsberg im 19 Jahrhundert (Konigsberg, 1894); Armstedt, Geschichte der koniglichen Hauptand Residenzstadt Konigsberg (Stuttgart, 1899); M.Schultze, Konigsberg and Ostpreussen zu Anfang 1813 (Berlin, 1901); and Gordak, Wegweiser durch Konigsberg (Konigsberg, 1904).
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  • The Epistolae, which for the modern reader greatly exceed his other works in interest, have been edited by Demetriades (Vienna, 1792) and by Glukus (Venice, 1812), the Calvitii encomium by Krabinger (Stuttgart, 1834), the De providentia by Krabinger (Sulzbach, 1835), the De regno by Krabinger (Munich, 1825), and the Hymns by Flach (Tubingen, 1875).
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  • The later editions of the earlier volumes are much enlarged and altered, and a new edition was published at Stuttgart in 1882.
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  • He was one of those ministers who, with President Ebert and Chancellor Bauer, fled from Berlin to Dresden, and afterwards to Stuttgart.
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  • For hinges, Leibbrand, of Stuttgart, uses sheets of lead about i in.
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  • Lux, Etienne Cabet and der Ikarische Kommunismus (Stuttgart, 1894).
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  • Protected by Duke Ulrich of Wurttemberg, he was appointed (January 15J3) provost of the collegiate church of Stuttgart.
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  • He died on the 11th of September 1570, and was buried in his church at Stuttgart; his grave was subsequently violated.
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  • Another brother, Christian Heinrich Pfaff (1773-1852), graduated in medicine at Stuttgart in 1793, and from 1801 till his death was professor of medicine, physics and chemistry at the university of Kiel.
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  • Various useful texts have been issued, among which those of Nestle (Novum Testamentum Graece, Stuttgart, 1904), based on a comparison of the texts of Tischendorf, WH and Weiss, and of Baljon (Novum Testamentum Graece, Groningen, 1898), are the best.
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  • Within fourteen years the following Bible societies were in active operation: the Basel Bible Society (founded at Nuremberg, 1804), the Prussian Bible Society (founded as the Berlin Bible Society, 1805), the Revel Bible Society (1807), the Swedish Evangelical Society (1808), the Dorpat Bible Society (1811), the Riga Bible Society (1812), the Finnish Bible Society (1812), the Hungarian Bible Institution (Pressburg, 1812), the Wurttemberg Bible Society (Stuttgart, 1812), the Swedish Bible Society (1814), the Danish Bible Society (1814), the Saxon Bible Society (Dresden, 1814), the Thuringian Bible Society (Erfurt, 1814), the Berg Bible Society (Eberfeld, 1814), the Hanover Bible Society (1814), the Hamburg-Altona Bible Society (1814), the Lubeck Bible Society (1814), the Netherlands Bible Society (Amsterdam, 1814).
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  • The circulation of the Scriptures by German Bible Societies during 1905 was estimated as follows :-The Prussian Bible Society (Berlin), 182,000 copies; the Wurttemberg Bible Institute (Stuttgart), 247,000; the Berg Bible Society (Eberfeld), 142,000; the Saxon Bible Society (Dresden), 44,000; the Central Bible Association (Nuremberg), 14,000; the Canstein Bible Institute (Halle), the Schleswig-Holstein Bible Society, the Hamburg-Altona Bible Society and others, together 56,000.
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  • (Specimen presented to the American Museum of Natural History by the Royal Museum of Stuttgart through Professor Eberhard Fraas.) FIG.
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  • This plate illustrates the exceptional opportunity afforded the palaeontologist through the remarkably preserved remains of Ichthyosaurs in the quarries of Holzmaden near Stuttgart, Wurttemberg, excavated for many years by Herr Bernard Hauff.
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  • He was put out of all need of money by the singular benefaction of Cotta, the well-known Stuttgart publisher, who was part-proprietor of the Constitutionnel, and made over to Thiers his dividends, or part of them.
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  • Without resigning his official position he lectured for a short time at Stuttgart, and 1 The reviews of current philosophical literature were afterwards collected, and edited under the title "Abhandlungen zur Erlauterung des Idealismus der Wissenschaftslehre" in 'Schelling's Philos.
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  • Bar, bersicht fiber die Bestcinde des koniglichen Staatsarchivs zu Hannover (Leipzig, 1900); Hannoversches Portfolio (Stuttgart, 1839-1841); and the authorities given for the history of Brunswick.
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  • Kiderlen-Wachter died at Stuttgart Dec. 30 1912.
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  • He died at Stuttgart on the 18th of February 1750.
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  • For his life and times see Tafinger, Leichenrede (Stuttgart, 1750); Prof. Abel in Moser's Patriot.
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  • See under Corfu; also P. Goessler, Leukas-Ithaka (Stuttgart, 1904).
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  • His Preussische Geschichte (4 vols., Stuttgart, 1899-1902), which is perhaps his most notable work, is an attempt to apply scientific rather than patriotic canons to a subject which has been mainly in the hands of historians with a patriotic bias.
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  • He published Grundriss der ersten Logik (Stuttgart, 1800); Ober die Gesetze der Ideenassociation (Tubingen, 1796); Briefe fiber den Ursprung der Metaphysik (Altona, 1798); Philos.
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  • See also, Recent Additions to Geological Literature, published annually by the Geological Society of London since 1893; and Neues Jahrbuch fiir Mineralogie (Stuttgart).
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  • The main centre of the silk industry is Crefeld and its neighborhood; then come Elberfeld and Barmen, Aix-la-Chapelle, as well as Berlin, Bielefeld, Chemnitz, Stuttgart and the district around Mulhausen in Alsace.
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  • The length of the Wurttemberg system is 1141 m., and is managed by a general direction in Stuttgart.
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  • These schools are as follows: Berlin (Charlottenburg), Munich, Darmstadt, Karlsruhe, Hanover, Dresden, Stuttgart, Aix-la-Chapelle, Brunswick and Danzig; in 1908 they were attended by 14,149 students (2531 foreigners), and had a teaching staff of 753.
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  • The most celebrated public libraries are those of Berlin (i,ooo,ooo volumes and 30,000 MSS.); Munich (1,000,000 volumes, 40,000 MSS.); Heidelberg (563,000 volumes, 8ooo MSS.); Göttingen (503,000 volumes, 6000 MSS.); Strassburg (760,000 volumes); Dresden (500,000 volumes, 6000 MSS.); Hamburg (municipal library, 600,000 volumes, 5000 MSS.); Stuttgart (400,000 volumes, 3500 MSS.); Leipzig (universitylibrary, 500,000 volurries, 5000 MSS.); Wurzburg (350,000 volumes); TUbingen (340,000 volumes); Rostock (318,000 volumes); Breslau (university library, 300,000 volumes, 7000 MSS.); Freiburg-im-Breisgau (250,000 volumes); Bonn (265,000 volumes); and Konigsberg (230,000 volumes, I ioo MSS.).
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  • Leipzig, Berlin and Stuttgart are the chief centres of the trade.
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  • The coinage takes place in the six mints belonging to the various states thus Berlin (Prussia), Munich (Bavaria), Dresden (in the Muldenerhtte near Freibcrg, Saxony), Stuttgart (WUrttemberg), Karlsruhe (Baden) and Hamburg (for the state of Hamburg).
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  • Ktirsc,hner, Steals- Hof- mid Kommunalhandhuch des Reiches find der Eznzelstc,aten (Leipzig, 1900); P. Hage Grundriss der deutschen Staats- und Rechtskunde (Stuttgart, 1906) and for statistical matter chiefly the following: Centraiblatl f~ des deutsche Reich.
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  • Lepsius, Geologie von Deutschland und den angrenzenden Gebieten (Stuttgart, first volume completed in 1892).
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  • A few republican members held on by it, and transferred the sittings to Stuttgart.
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  • In the elections of 1907, indeed, the Social Democratic party, owing to the unparalleled exertion of the government, had a set-back, its representation in parliament sinking to 43; but at the International Socialist Congress, which met at Stuttgart on the 18th of August, Herr Bebel was able to point oui that, in spite of its defeat at the polls, the Socialist cause had actually gained strength in the country, their total poll having increased from 3,010,771.
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  • For a fuller description of these social reforms, see the Jahrbuch fir Gesetzgebung (Leipzig, 1886, 1888 and 1894); also the annual summary of new laws in the Zeitschrift fur Staatswissenschaft (Stuttgart).
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  • Besides a large number of archaeological papers in periodicals, in the Annali of the Institute of Rome, and in the Transactions of the Berlin Academy, and several illustrated catalogues of Greek, Roman and other antiquities in the Berlin, Naples and Vatican Museums, Gerhard was the author of the following works: Antike Bildwerke (Stuttgart, 1827-1844); Auserlesene griech.
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  • Volk, Der Odenwald and seine Nachbargebiete (Stuttgart, 1900), and Windhaus, Fiihrer durch den Odenwald (Darmstadt, 1903).
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  • (Stuttgart, and Tubingen, 1840); Fiedler, Reise durch alle The'le des Konigreiches Griechenland, ii.
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  • The remaining period of the Regesta, as edited by Bohmer, is1198-1254(Stuttgart, 1849).
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  • Very valuable also is the Fontes rerum Germanicarum (Stuttgart, 1843-1868), a collection of original authorities for German history during the 13th and 14th centuries.
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  • Other collections edited by Bohmer are: Die Reichsgesetze 900-1400 (Frankfort, 1832); Wittelsbachische Regesten von der Erwerbung des Herzogtums Bayern bis zu 1340 (Stuttgart, 1 854); and Codex diplomaticus Moeno-Francofurtanus.
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  • On the removal of the school in 1775 to Stuttgart, he was, however, allowed to exchange this subject for the more congenial study of medicine.
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  • In 1780 he left the academy qualified to practise as a surgeon, and was at once appointed by the duke to an ill-paid post as doctor to a regiment garrisoned in Stuttgart.
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  • In January 1782 it was performed in the Court and National Theatre of Mannheim, Schiller himself having stolen secretly away from Stuttgart in order to be present.
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  • Schiller, embittered enough by the uncongenial conditions of his Stuttgart life, resolved on flight, and took advantage of some court festivities in September 1782 to put his plan into execution.
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  • Compare Schultze, Zur Geschichte der Litteratur g iber das Decret Gratians (1870), Die Glosse zum Decret Gratians (1872), and Geschichte der Quellen and Litteratur des kanonischen Rechts (3 vols., Stuttgart, 1875).
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  • At the grammar school of Stuttgart, where Hegel was educated between the ages of seven and eighteen, he was not remarkable.
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  • The following authorized editions of Goethe's writings appeared in the poet's lifetime: Schriften (8 vols., Leipzig, 1787-1790); Neue Schriften (7 vols., Berlin, 1792-1800); Werke (13 vols., Stuttgart, 1806-1810); Werke (20 vols., Stuttgart, 1815-1819); to which six volumes were added in 1820-1822; Werke (Vollstandige Ausgabe letzter Hand) (40 vols., Stuttgart, 1827-1830).
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  • Goethe's Nachgelassene Werke appeared as a continuation of this edition in 15 volumes (Stuttgart, 1832-1834), to which five volumes were added in 1842.
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  • These were followed by several editions of Goethe's Sdmtliche Werke, mostly in forty volumes, published by Cotta of Stuttgart.
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  • This was followed by Der Mensch and die elementarische Natur (Stuttgart and Tubingen, 1845), in three parts (Beitri ge) : (1) an historical and philosophical dissertation on the relations of mankind and the "soul of nature," largely influenced by Schelling, (2) a dissertation on the juridical side of the question, De fragmento Vegoiae, being the thesis presented for his degree, (3) a lyrical drama, Erlinde.
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  • The fruit of his long years of illness was a slender volume of lyrics, Gedichte (Stuttgart and Tubingen, 1851), good in form, but seldom inspired, and showing occasionally the influence of a morbid sensuality.
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  • There are prisons for females at Heilbronn, and for males at Ludwigsburg and Stuttgart; in Wurttemberg itself the regime is collective.
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  • See also the Recueil international des traites de siecle (1904, sqq.), by Descamps en Renault, and the following periodical publications: Das Staatsarchiv, Sammlung der officiellen Actenstiicke zur Geschichte der Gegenwart (Leipzig, commencing in 1861); Archives diplomatiques (Stuttgart, since 1821); Archives diplomatiques, recueil mensuel de diplomatie et d'histoire (Paris, since 1861); and Hertslet's British and Foreign State Papers, from the Termination of the War of 1814 to the Latest Period, compiled at the Foreign Office by the Librarian and Keeper of the Papers (London, since 1819, and still in progress).
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  • His writings include a collection of hymns (Das geistliche Blumengartlein, 1729; new edition, Stuttgart, 1868), a volume of Gebete, and another of Briefe, besides translations of the writings of the French mystics.
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  • For the chemistry of copper and its compounds see the references in the article Chemistry: Inorganic. Toxicologic and hygienic aspects are treated in Tschirsch's Das Kupfer vom Standpunkt der gerichtlichen Chemie, Toxikologie and Hygiene (Stuttgart, 1893).
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  • He was educated at the gymnasium of Stuttgart, and at the universities of Tubingen, Halle and Berlin, where he was successively influenced by Baur and Schmid, by Tholuck and Julius Muller, by Strauss and, above all, Neander.
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  • In 1865 he founded the first German Sunday School in Stuttgart.
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  • See Lohmeyer, Geschichte von Ost-und WestPreussen (Gotha, 1884); Brunneck, Zur Geschichte des Kirchen-Patronats in Ostend West-Preussen (Berlin, 1902), and Ost-Preussen, Land und Volk (Stuttgart, 1901-1902).
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  • The official life of King Charles, mainly his own composition, Aus dem Leben KOnig Karls von Rumdnien (Stuttgart, 1894-1900, 4 vols.), deals mainly with political history.
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  • There is a church in Berlin, but otherwise activity in Germany has taken shape in the German; Swedenborg Society with headquarters at Stuttgart.
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  • His chief works are: Die Entstehung der Schwurgerichte (Berlin, 1872); Zeugen and Inquisitionsbeweis der karolingischen Zeit (Vienna, 1866); Das anglonormannische Erbfolgesystem, nebst einem Excurs fiber die c lteren normannischen Coutumes (Leipzig, 1869); Zur Rechtsgeschichte der romischen and germanischen Urkunde (Berlin, 1880); Deutsche Rechtsgeschichte (Leipzig, 1887-1892); Mithio and Sperantes (Berlin, 1885); Die Landschenkungen der Merowinger and Agilolfinger (Berlin, 1885); Das Gerichtszeugnis and die frdnkische Konigsurkunde (Berlin, 1873); Forschungen zur Geschichte des deutschen and franzosischen Rechts (Stuttgart, 1894); Grundziige der deutschen Rechtsgeschichte (Leipzig, 1901).
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  • Af ter Gratian, the classic work is Schulte, Geschichte der Quellen and Literatur des.canonischen Rechts von Gratian bis auf die Gegenwart (3 vols., Stuttgart, 1875 et seq.).
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  • Fraas, of Stuttgart, has demonstrated the derivation of the whale-like Zeuglodon from the creodonts.
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  • The largest towns in the kingdom are Stuttgart (with Cann stadt), Ulm, Heilbronn, Esslingen, Reutlingen, Ludwigsburg,.
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  • The manufacturing industries assisted by the government developed rapidly during the later years of the 19th century, notably metal-working, especially such branches of it as require exact and delicate workmanship. Of particular importance are iron and steel goods, locomotives (for which Esslingen enjoys a great reputation), machinery, motor-cars, bicycles, small arms (in the Mauser factory at Oberndorf), all kinds of scientific and artistic appliances, pianos (at Stuttgart), organs and other musical instruments, photographic apparatus, clocks (in the Black Forest),.
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  • The chief commercial cities are Stuttgart, Ulm, Heilbronn and Friedrichshafen.
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  • The book trade of Stuttgart, called the Leipzig of South Germany, is very extensive.
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  • The upper chamber (Standesherren) is composed of adult princes of the blood, heads of noble families from the rank of count (Graf) upwards, representatives of territories (Standesherrschaften), which possessed votes in the old German imperial diet or in the local diet; it has also members (not more than 6) nominated by the king, 8 members of knightly rank, 6 ecclesiastical dignitaries, a representative of the university of Tubingen, and of the technical high school of Stuttgart, 2 representatives of commerce and industry, 2 of agriculture, and i of handicrafts.
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  • The latter class of members as well as those for Stuttgart are elected on the principle of proportional representation.
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  • The higher branches of learning are provided in the university of Tubingen, in the technical high school (with academic rank) of Stuttgart, the veterinary high school at Stuttgart, the commercial college at Stuttgart, and the agricultural college of Hohenheim.
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  • At all events from being the name of a castle near the village of Rothenberg, not far from Stuttgart, it was extended over the surrounding country, and as the lords of this district increased their possessions so the name covered an ever-widening area, until it reached its present denotation.
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  • He spent a great deal of money in building palaces at Stuttgart and elsewhere, and took the course, unpopular to his Protestant subjects, of fighting against Prussia during the Seven Years' War.
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  • For the history of Wurttemberg see the Wirttembergisches Urkundenbuch (Stuttgart, 1849-1907); and the Darstellungen aus der wirttembergischen Geschichte (Stuttgart, 5904 fol.).
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  • Pfister, Keinig Friedrich von Wurttemberg and seine Zeit (Stuttgart, 1888).
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  • He began life as a national school-teacher and in 1896 became a member of the staff of the Deutsches Volksblatt at Stuttgart.
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  • Karl von Gebler, who, in an able and exhaustive but somewhat prejudiced work, Galileo Galilei and die romische Curie (Stuttgart, 1876), sought to impeach the authenticity of a document of prime importance in the trial of 1633.
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  • His most important works are: Aesthetik (Leipzig, 1859; 3rd ed., 1885), supplemented by Die Kunst im Zusammenhang der Kulturentwicklung and der Ideale der Menschheit (3rd ed., 1877-1886); Die philosophische Weltanschauung der Reformationszeit (Stuttgart, 1847; 2nd ed., Leipzig, 1886), and Die sittliche Weltordnung (Leipzig, 1877; 2nd ed., 1891), in which he recognized both the immutability of the laws of nature and the freedom of the will.
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  • His letters to his wife were published by Prince Herbert Bismarck (Stuttgart, 1900).
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  • Further materials were publishes' periodically in the Bismarck-Jahrbuch, edited by Horst Kohl (Berlin, 1894-1896; Stuttgart, 1897-1899).
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  • It was first seriously assailed by Adolf Holtzmann (Untersuchungen fiber das Nib., Stuttgart, 1854), who argued that the original could not have been strophic in form - the fourth lines of the strophes are certainly often of the nature of "padding" - that it was written by Konrad (Kuonrat of the Klage), writer to Bishop Pilgrim of Passau about 970-984, and that of existing MSS.
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  • The main attraction of the center is the Stuttgart Suite which comfortably caters for sixty people and features a fully automated display wall.
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  • Marcia Haydee, the former prima ballerina of the Stuttgart Ballet, is one of the most renowned dramatic ballerinas of the twentieth century.
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  • This seems better than a Stuttgart service station surrounded by lonely truckers; I say no more.
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  • Leaving his civilian employment with the Heating Equipment Manufacturing Company in Stuttgart, he donned the field gray uniform of the German Army.
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  • Stuttgart is the headquarters of the XIII.
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  • Stuttgart seems to have originated in a stud (Stuten Garten) of the early counts of Wurttemberg, and is first mentioned in a document of 1229.
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  • After the destruction of the castle of Wurttemberg early in the 14th century, Count Eberhard transferred his residence to Stuttgart, which about 1500 became the recognized capital of Wurttemberg.
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  • In 1849 Stuttgart was the place of meeting of the assembly called the Rumpfparlament.
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  • Bach and C. Lotter, Bilder aus Alt-Stuttgart (Stuttgart, 1896); and the official Chronik der Hauptand Residenzstadt Stuttgart (1898, seq.).
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  • Gmelin, Schuld oder Unschuld des Templerordens (Stuttgart, 1893); Gachon, Pieces relatifs au debat du page Clement V avec l'empereur Henri VII (Montpellier, 1894); Lacoste, Nouvelles Etudes sur Clement V(1896); Herzog-Hauck, Realencyklopeidie, vol.
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  • (Stuttgart, 1845) and Aktenstiicke and Briefe zur Geschichte des Hauses Habsburg im Zeitalter Maximilians I.
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  • 1859 Paris opera 1836 Scheibler, Stuttgart, proposed standard (440 at 69° F.).
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  • Kugler, however, regards Albert as a copyist, somewhat in the manner of Tudebod, of an unknown writer of value, who belonged to the Lotharingian ranks during the Crusade, and settled in the kingdom of Jerusalem afterwards (see Kugler, Albert von Aachen, Stuttgart, 1885).
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  • Garve (Breslau, 1857); correspondence (Briefwechsel) with Adam Muller (Stuttgart, 1857); Briefe an Pilat (2 vols., Leipzig, 1868); Aus dem Nachlass Friedrichs von Gentz (2 vols.), edited by Count Anton Prokesch-Osten (Vienna, 1867); Aus der alten Registratur der Staats-Kanzlei: Briefe politischen Inhalts von and an Friedrich von Gentz, edited by C. von Klinkowstrom (Vienna, 1870); Depeches inedites du chev.
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  • (A.) His edition of the Greek Testament was published at Tubingen in 1734, and at Stuttgart in the same year, but without the critical apparatus.
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  • A large number of Rittera ristocratic schools (Ritt e r-Akademien) w ere founded,, beginning with the Collegium Illustre of Tubingen (1589) and ending with the Hohe Karlschule of Stuttgart (1775).
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  • The most celebrated public libraries are those of Berlin (i,ooo,ooo volumes and 30,000 MSS.); Munich (1,000,000 volumes, 40,000 MSS.); Heidelberg (563,000 volumes, 8ooo MSS.); Göttingen (503,000 volumes, 6000 MSS.); Strassburg (760,000 volumes); Dresden (500,000 volumes, 6000 MSS.); Hamburg (municipal library, 600,000 volumes, 5000 MSS.); Stuttgart (400,000 volumes, 3500 MSS.); Leipzig (universitylibrary, 500,000 volurries, 5000 MSS.); Wurzburg (350,000 volumes); TUbingen (340,000 volumes); Rostock (318,000 volumes); Breslau (university library, 300,000 volumes, 7000 MSS.); Freiburg-im-Breisgau (250,000 volumes); Bonn (265,000 volumes); and Konigsberg (230,000 volumes, I ioo MSS.).
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  • A telegram addressed by the emperor William to the presidents of the League, Generals Keim and Menges, led to their resignation; but the effect of this was largely counteracted by the presence of Prince Henry of Prussia and the king of Wurttemberg at the annual congress of the League at Stuttgart in May, while at the Colonial Congress in the autumn the necessity for a powerful navy was again one of the main themes of discussion.
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  • Diu Crone, edited by Scholl (Stuttgart, 1852), vol.
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