Strep sentence example

strep
  • After a week I recieved a call telling me that no group b strep was present.

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  • Strep throat is common and not usually serious.

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  • If OCD results from a strep throat infection, the symptoms seem to start quickly, probably within one or two weeks.

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  • Common Questions 1. How long does treatment for strep throat usually last?

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  • This being the case, it is most unlikely that such a woman 's baby would be born with congenital strep B infection.

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  • After a week I recieved a call telling me that no group B strep was present.

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  • Strep throat is caused by bacteria, which means you need an antibiotic medication to get better.

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  • About 50-60 percent of children with HSP were diagnosed with strep throat or another upper respiratory infection two to three weeks before the onset of the vasculitis.

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  • Apart from minimizing a child's exposure to strep throat and similar upper respiratory infections, there is nothing that parents can do to prevent vasculitis in children, in that the cause(s) of these disorders are still unknown.

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  • Streptococcal (strep) infections are communicable diseases that develop when bacteria of the family Streptococcus invade parts of the body and contaminate blood or tissue.

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  • Most people have some form of strep bacteria in their body at some point.

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  • Primary strep infections invade healthy tissue and most often affect the throat.

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  • Secondary strep infections invade tissue already weakened by injury or illness.

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  • Both primary and secondary strep infections can travel from affected tissues to lymph glands, enter the bloodstream, and spread throughout the body.

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  • Group A strep (GAS) is the form of streptococcal bacteria most apt to be associated with serious illness.

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  • If untreated, however, strep throat can develop into rheumatic fever which can permanently damage the heart and other organs.

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  • Group B strep (GBS) most often affects pregnant women, infants, the elderly, and chronically ill adults.

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  • Group C strep (GCS) is a common source of infection in animals.

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  • Group D strep (GDS) is a common cause of wound infections in hospital patients.

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  • About one of five people with GAS infection develops a sore, inflamed throat and pus on the tonsils (strep throat).

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  • There are millions of cases of strep throat every year, and similar numbers of cases of relatively mild skin infections.

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  • Strep throat is most common among school-age children and people who live in group settings (for example, dorms, boarding schools, the military).

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  • Infections caused by the other types of strep are rare.

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  • If the child has a fever and sore throat, a wound that seems to be infected, a rash, is acting very sick, or has any other symptoms of strep infection, the doctor should be consulted.

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  • Strep bacteria can be obtained by swabbing the back of the throat, the vagina, the rectum, or the infected area with a piece of sterile cotton.

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  • A rapid strep test may be done to test for step throat infection.

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  • A sample may also be sent to a lab for traditional culturing, which takes from one to two days, because this form of testing is more accurate than the rapid strep test.

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  • Conventional medicine is very successful in treating strep infections.

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  • However, several alternative therapies, including homeopathy and botanical medicine, may help relieve symptoms or support the person with a strep infection.

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  • Strep throat, however, is almost never fatal, although left untreated it can result in diseases such as rheumatic fever that can affect the heart.

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  • About 10 to 15 percent of non-GAS strep infections are fatal.

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  • Washing the hands frequently, especially before eating and after using the bathroom, and keeping wounds clean can help prevent strep infection.

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  • Strep infections can develop into life-threatening or debilitating problems if not treated promptly.

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  • Many of these bacterial sore throats are cases of strep throat.

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  • This type of infection is commonly called strep throat.

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  • Anyone can get strep throat, but it is most common in school age children.

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  • If the child has had a sore throat and fever for more than 24 hours, a doctor should be contacted so a strep test can be performed.

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  • Identifying and treating strep throat within about a week is vital to preventing rheumatic fever.

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  • Since both bacterial and viral sore throat are contagious and pass easily from person to person, the doctor will seek information about whether the patient has been around other people with flu, sore throat, colds, or strep throat.

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  • If it appears that the patient may have strep throat, the doctor will do laboratory tests.

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  • The strep test is inexpensive, takes only a few minutes, and can be done in a physician's office.

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  • Untreated strep throat has the potential to cause scarlet fever, kidney damage, or rheumatic fever.

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  • Scarlet fever is a rash that complicates a bacterial throat infection called strep throat.

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  • Approximately 10 percent of all children who have strep throat develop the characteristic scarlet fever rash.

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  • Scarlet fever is caused by group A streptococcal bacteria (S. pyogenes), highly toxic microbes that can also cause strep throat, wound or skin infections, pneumonia, and serious kidney infections.

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  • The strain of streptococcus that causes scarlet fever, unlike the one that causes most strep throats, produces an erythrogenic toxin, which causes the skin to flush.

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  • A throat culture will often be performed on an individual who has a severe sore throat or known symptoms of strep throat.

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  • Strep throat occurs more often among children than adults, with incidence at peak in fall and winter when school is in session and contact with other children is highest.

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  • When strep is suspected, the throat material is cultured on blood agar that has been prepared as a broth and poured into petri dishes (plates) where it solidifies into a gel.

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  • This helps a technician identify a hemolytic strep organism visually.

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  • When strep throat is suspected, it may be screened in a quick test in the doctor's office.

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  • The test uses a strip or disc that is chemically coated with an antibody specific for the strep antigen.

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  • If strep is present, a visible reaction occurs with the antibody on the strip when combined with material from the throat.

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  • The child's immunization history should be checked to evaluate the possibility that diseases other than strep are causing the sore throat.

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  • Strep throat is highly contagious and easily spread through contact with droplets from the nose or throat.

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  • Besides other varieties of strep organisms, these organisms may include Candida albicans, which can cause thrush; Corynebacterium diphtheriae, which can cause diphtheria; and Bordetella pertussis, which can cause whooping cough.

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  • When the culture results are available and sensitivity tests indicate a more effective antibiotic, the physician will likely prescribe a new antibiotic specific for the strep or other organism identified.

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  • Impetigo caused by the bacteria called group A streptococci (also known as strep) are most common in children ages two to five.

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  • Epidemic impetigo can be caused by staph or strep bacteria and (as the name implies) is very easily passed among children.

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  • Even when impetigo is initially caused by strep bacteria, the vesicles are frequently secondarily infected with staph bacteria.

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  • Rheumatic fever (RF) is an illness that arises as a complication of untreated or inadequately treated strep throat infection.

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  • Throat infection with a member of the Group A streptococcus (strep) bacteria is a common problem among school-aged children.

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  • Other types of strep infections (such as of the skin) do not put the patient at risk for RF.

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  • Children between the ages of five and 15 are most susceptible to strep throat, and therefore most susceptible to rheumatic fever.

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  • Just as strep throat occurs most frequently in fall, winter, and early spring, so does rheumatic fever.

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  • Since 1960, it has become much less common in the United States, partially because of increasingly accurate and swift diagnosis of strep throat.

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  • Other tests can be performed to see if the patient is producing specific antibodies that are only made in response to a recent strep infection.

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  • Prevention of the development of RF involves proper diagnosis of initial strep throat infections and adequate treatment within 10 days with an appropriate antibiotic.

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  • The best way for parents to prevent rheumatic fever is to take seriously sore throats that are accompanied with fever and to take the child to a doctor to test for strep throat.

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  • Children who have had rheumatic fever need to take extra precautions to ensure they do not have repeat attacks triggered by strep infections.

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  • Tic disorders as well as OCD sometimes develop after infections (usually scarlet fever or strep throat) caused by a group of bacteria known as group A beta-hemolytic streptococci, sometimes abbreviated as GABHS.

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  • The child has recently had an episode of strep throat or other streptococcal infection.

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  • In some cases, however, the doctor may order a blood test to rule out Wilson's disease or other metabolic disorders, or order a throat culture if the child has recently had strep throat.

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  • This point is important with all types of infections, but it is especially important in strep infections, which can lead to serious heart problems if they are not cleared up completely.

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  • Once it is clear that no pneumonia, ear infection, strep throat, or other common childhood illness is present, the practitioner usually feels comfortable waiting to see if the characteristic rash of roseola begins.

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  • Streptococcus pyogenes, the bacterium that causes "strep" throat, is the most common bacterial agent responsible for tonsillitis.

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  • Depending on what type of test is used for strep, the doctor may be able to determine within a few minutes if S. pyogenes is present.

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  • The quick tests for strep are not as reliable as a laboratory culture, which can take 24 to 48 hours.

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  • Streptococcus pyogenes-A common bacterium that causes strep throat and can also cause tonsillitis.

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  • If the cause is thought to be a bacterial infection, such as strep throat, prophylactic antibiotic treatment is sometimes given once the infection has been treated to prevent recurrence.

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  • Streptococcal sore throat, or strep throat, as it is more commonly called, is a bacterial infection of the mucous membranes lining the throat or pharynx.

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  • Strep throat is caused by a type of bacteria called group A streptococci.

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  • Left untreated, strep throat may develop into rheumatic fever or other serious conditions.

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  • Although anyone can get strep throat, it is most common in school-age children.

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  • Strep throat occurs most frequently between November to April.

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  • On rare occasions, the disease is passed through food, when a food handler infected with strep throat accidentally contaminates food by coughing or sneezing.

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  • Statistically, if someone in the household is infected, one out of every four other household members may get strep throat within two to seven days.

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  • A person with strep throat suddenly develops a painful sore throat one to five days after being exposed to the streptococcus bacteria.

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  • Often a person with strep throat has bad breath.

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  • Despite these common symptoms, strep throat can be deceptive.

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  • When a rash develops, this form of strep throat is called scarlet fever.

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  • Scarlet fever is no more dangerous than strep throat and is treated the same way.

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  • Untreated strep throat can cause rheumatic fever.

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  • Although the strep throat that causes rheumatic fever is contagious, rheumatic fever itself is not.

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  • Although these diseases are caused by group A streptococci, they rarely begin with strep throat.

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  • Diagnosis of a strep throat by a doctor begins with a physical examination of the throat and chest.

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  • The doctor will also look for signs of other illness, such as a sinus infection or bronchitis, and seek information about whether the patient has been around other people with strep throat.

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  • There are two types of tests to determine if a person has strep throat.

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  • A rapid strep test can only determine the presence of streptococcal bacteria but will not tell if the sore throat is caused by another kind of bacteria.

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  • To perform a rapid strep test or a throat culture, a nurse will use a sterile swab to reach down into the throat and obtain a sample of material from the sore area.

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  • The rapid strep test has a false negative rate of about 20 percent.

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  • In other words, in about 20 percent of cases where no strep is detected by the rapid strep test, the patient actually does have strep throat.

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  • Because of this margin of error, when a rapid strep test is negative, the doctor often does a throat culture.

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  • Results of this test, called an antistreptolysin-O test, tell the doctor whether the person has recently been infected with strep bacteria.

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  • Stopping the antibiotic early can lead to a return of the strep infection.

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  • About 10 percent of the time, penicillin is not effective against the strep bacteria.

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  • Without treatment, the symptoms of strep throat begin subsiding in four or five days.

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  • Food handlers should not work for the first 24 hours after antibiotic treatment, because strep infections are occasionally passed through contaminated food.

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  • About 10 percent of strep throat cases do not respond to penicillin.

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  • An explanation for this problem may be that the person is just a carrier of strep and that something else is causing the sore throat.

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  • There is no way to prevent getting a strep throat.

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  • Children who have strep throat should be kept out of daycare, school, activities, and other public places until they have been taking their antibiotic for a full 24 hours.

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  • There may also be a link between childhood episodes of strep throat and the development of OCD.

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  • In some vulnerable children, strep antibodies attack a certain part of the brain.

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  • This point is important with all types of infections, but it is especially important with strep infections, which can lead to serious heart problems if they are not cleared up completely.

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  • In making the diagnosis, the doctor examines the affected person's eyes, ears, nose, and throat in order to rule out other diseases that may cause fever and sore throat, such as infectious mononucleosis, a sinus infection, or strep throat.

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  • Less often, the hypertrophy is due to repeated throat infections by cold viruses, strep throat, mononucleosis, and in the past, diphtheria.

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  • Strep throat-An infection of the throat caused by Streptococcus bacteria.

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  • Secondary bacterial infection may lead to middle ear infection (otitis media), bronchitis, pneumonia, sinus infection, or strep throat.

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  • Colds make people more susceptible to bacterial infections such as strep throat, middle ear infections, and sinus infections.

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  • Occasionally a cold will lead to a secondary bacterial infection that causes strep throat, bronchitis, pneumonia, sinus infection, or a middle ear infection.

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  • In addition, the Group B Strep Infection is tested for, by most practitioners in the US, between 35 and 37 weeks of pregnancy.

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  • It's also the pills you popped after oral surgery or the antibiotic your doctor prescribed to clear up last year's strep throat.

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  • This insurance company might tell the doctor that they cannot charge more than $100 for a strep throat test or they will remove the doctor from their network or not cover the additional cost.

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  • Because strep is highly contagious, family members and close contacts of individuals diagnosed with strep throat may also be advised to have throat cultures if they show signs of sore throat or other symptoms.

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  • Sometimes the organism cultured is not strep as suspected.

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