Street sentence example

street
  • He walked up the street to the next block.
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  • Lots of the folks on the street had poor teeth and most of their clothes were practically rags.
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  • The whole street was full of clouds of black smoke.
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  • She looked up and down the street.
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  • She walked up the street to a better vantage point, curious to see what he hit.
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  • Stay away from the southeast and northwest street corners.
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  • You park on the street where you can find a place.
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  • She saw the flash of a street lamp.
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  • The first considerable house in Southport (an inn for the reception of sea-bathers) was built in 1791, and soon after other houses were erected on the site now known as Lord Street, but the population in 1809 was only loo.
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  • It was once the western tower of the church of St Eloi, from which it is now separated by a street.
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  • Lamplighters used to light street lamps every night, before the accursed electricity came along.
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  • He climbed in, maneuvering it through the crowded street.
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  • Shivering, she pulled out her phone to call her father as she made her way towards the street.
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  • Sofia stuffed Dr. Bylun's paper into her empty cup, tossed it, and joined the onlookers lining the street.
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  • Her headache was now a migraine, and she shielded her eyes against the light from the street that filtered past her honeycomb blinds.
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  • He strolled up to them as if he was on a city street, not alone in the Colorado woods.
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  • Dean planned to send a patrol car by later to pick up some clothes but his trip home passed within a block of Parsons Street and on an impulse, he drove by the building.
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  • There was no street sign, but according to the map, it had to be the correct road.
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  • In five minutes, the hot blonde from down the street would jog by.
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  • Once on the street, Dean put up a halting hand.
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  • Taran led her down a street lined with small inns before spotting the one marked as Memon said.
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  • Hilden's gruff voice broke into her thoughts as he trotted out of the hold into the street.
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  • She breathed deeply and trailed him through the alley to the main street.
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  • He waited until he reached the street outside and let loose a roar of emotion.
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  • A full head and shoulders taller than other kids his age, he had lost the ability to work with the rest of the street urchins.
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  • His eyes spotted the form he sought, and he wove his way through the crowd, trailing her down a quiet side street.
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  • She was in her mid-teens with a silver A charm on her necklace that reflected the yellow street light.
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  • Jessi watched her cousin walk away then break into a run as she crossed the street and headed towards the bookstore.
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  • He became king of Northumbria and extended his territories as far as Watling Street.
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  • The site was five acres, and the building is described in the letters patent " as a fitting and noble college mansion in honour of the most glorious Virgin Mary and St Bernard in Northgates Street outside the Northgate of Oxford."
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  • To mitigate a steep ascent, a central carriage-way, 200 yds, long, is cut along the main street to a depth of 15 ft., the opposite terraces being connected by a bridge.
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  • The broad Oxford road forms its picturesque main street.
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  • The principal thoroughfare is comprised in Prince's Street and George Street, running straight from S.W.
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  • There may be seen the native dances and break-neck horse-racesthe riders bareback - through the main street of the village.
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  • The parish church of Greenwich, in Church Street, is dedicated to St Alphege, archbishop, who was martyred here by the Danes in 1012.
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  • It is served by the Morris & Essex division of the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western railway and by the Orange branch of the Erie (the former having three stations in the city - Grove Street, East Orange and Brick Church), and is connected with Newark, Orange and West Orange by electric line.
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  • In July 1807 another British force of eight thousand men under General Whitelock endeavoured to regain possession of Buenos Aires, but strenuous preparations had been made for resistance, and after fierce street fighting the invading army, after suffering severe losses, was compelled to capitulate.
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  • Two days of desultory street fighting ensued, during which the fleet began to bombard the city, but was compelled to desist by the interference of foreign men-of-war, on the ground that the bombardment was.
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  • The quaint architecture of the houses, many of which present their curious and handsome gables to the street, gives Stralsund an interesting and old-fashioned appearance.
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  • Of the streets, the best and widest is a long street which is still called the Street of the Knights.
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  • The Roman Watling Street crossed Shooter's Hill, and a Roman cemetery is supposed to have occupied the site of the Royal Arsenal, numerous Roman urns and fragments of Roman pottery having been dug up in the neighbourhood.
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  • They often end in a cul-de-sac. The principal street is the rue de la Kasbah, which leads up to the citadel by 497 steps.
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  • The houses, built of stone and whitewashed, are square, substantial, flat-topped buildings, presenting to the street bare walls, with a few slits protected by iron gratings in place of windows.
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  • The rue de la Marine follows the lines of a Roman street.
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  • Their descendants are known as the senior and junior branches of the family, and since 1841 each has ruled his 'own portion as a separate state, though the lands belonging to each are so intimately entangled, that even in Dewas, the capital town, the two sides of the main street are under different administrations and have different arrangements for water supply and lighting.
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  • He was educated at St John's College, Cambridge, and successively held the livings of Islington (1662), of All-Hallows the Great, Thames Street, London (1679),(1679), and of Isleworth in Middlesex (1690).
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  • He built a great temple, a hippodrome and a street of columns surrounding the city, the remains of which still arrest the attention.
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  • The hippodrome remains in the valley below, and the columns of the street of columns are in very good order.
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  • The owner of an ox which gored a man on the street was only responsible for damages if the ox was known by him to be vicious, even if it caused death.
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  • In February the Postmaster-General applied for an injunction to restrain the company from opening any street or public road within the county of London without the consent of the Postmaster - General and the London County Council, which injunction was granted in July.
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  • The Neapolitans reached Bologna on the 17th of May, but in the meantime a dispute had broken out at Naples between the king and parliament as to the nature of the royal oath; a cry of treason was raised by a group of factious youngsters, barricades were erected and street fighting ensued (May Is).
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  • Lord Salisbury and Waddington at the instance of Bismarck, that, when convenient, France should occupy Tunisia, an agreement afterwn.rds confirmed (with a reserve as to the eventual attitude of Italy) in despatches exchanged in July and August 1878 between the Quai dOrsay and Downing Street.
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  • With some associates he hired a room in the neighbouring Cato Street, collected arms and made ready to fall upon Harrowby's guests.
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  • While preserving most of the ancient features of its High Street, the town has tended to become a suburb of the capital, its fine beach and golf course hastening this development.
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  • Near the tolbooth stands the market cross, a stone column with a unicorn on the top supporting the burgh arms. At the west end of High Street is a statue of David Macbeth Moir ("Delta," 1798-1851), Musselburgh's most famous son.
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  • The registry of the citizens, the suppression of litigation, the elevation of public morals, the care of minors, the retrenchment of public expenses, the limitation of gladiatorial games and shows, the care of roads, the restoration of senatorial privileges, the appointment of none but worthy magistrates, even the regulation of street traffic, these and numberless other duties so completely absorbed his attention that, in spite of indifferent health, they often kept him at severe labour from early morning till long after midnight.
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  • Queen Street, the principal thoroughfare, leads inland from the main dock, and contains the majority of the public buildings.
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  • But the open space where is now a memorial fountain was the Rother market, and Rother Street preserves its name.
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  • In Henley Street, close by, is the house in which the poet was born, greatly altered in external appearance, being actually two halftimbered cottages connected.
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  • Shakespeare may have attended the grammar school attached to the old guildhall in Church Street.
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  • High Street, the principal business thoroughfare, is 100 ft.
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  • Congress Street, the principal thoroughfare, extends along the middle of the peninsula north-east and south-west and from one end of it to the other, passing in the middle of its course through the shopping district.
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  • The granite Customs House, extending from Fore Street to Commercial Street, is large and massive.
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  • Longfellow by the same sculptor; and where Congress Street crosses the Eastern Promenade, a monument to the first settlers, George Cleeve and Richard Tucker.
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  • On Congress Street, below the Observatory, is the Eastern Cemetery, the oldest burying ground of the city; in it are the graves of Commodore Edward Preble, and of Captain Samuel Blythe (1784-1813) and Captain William Burroughs (1785-1813), who were killed in the engagement between the British brig "Boxer" and the American brig "Enterprise," their respective ships, off this coast on the 5th of September 1813.
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  • The city has five gates, and from one of them, called Bala Khiaban gate (upper Khiaban), the main street (Khiaban), 25 yds.
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  • Upon its final acceptance as the capital, there was some activity in land speculation, but Indianapolis had only 600 inhabitants and a single street when the seat of government was removed thither in 1824.
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  • The streets are lighted with electricity; and there are electric street railways and telephones in the city.
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  • The town dates from the beginning of the r 7th century, and the older part consists of a flagged causeway called Commercial Street, running for 1 m.
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  • At right angles to this street lanes ascend the hill-side to Hillhead, where the more modern structures and villas have been built.
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  • Occupying the southern slopes of a hill on the left bank of the Earn, here crossed by a bridge, it practically consists of a main street, with narrower streets branching off at right angles.
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  • A Runic sculptured stone, believed to be of the 8th century, and the old town cross stand in High Street, but the great cattle fair, for which Crieff was once famous, was removed to Falkirk in 1770.
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  • Except at the shafts, which were sunk on proposed station sites, there was no interference with the surface of the streets or with street traffic during construction.
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  • In 1893 the construction was completed in Budapest of an underground railway with a thin, flat roof, consisting of steel beams set close together, with small longitudinal jack arches between them, the street pavement .
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  • This type has the advantage of economy in first construction, there being the minimum amount of material to be excavated, and no interference during construction with street traffic or subsurface structures; it has, however, the disadvantage of the cost of o p eration of lifts at the stations.
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  • The other extreme type is the shallow construction, where the railway is brought to the minimum distance below the street level.
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  • This system has the advantage of the greatest convenience in operation, no lifts being required, since the distance from the street surface to the station platform is about 12 to 15 ft.; it has the disadvantages, however, of necessitating the tearing up of the street surface during construction, and the readjustment of sewer, water, gas and electric mains and other subsurface structures, and of having the gradients partially dependent on the surface topography.
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  • The third type is the intermediate one between those two, followed by the Metropolitan and Metropolitan District railways, in London, where the railway has an arched roof, built usually at a sufficient distance below the surface of the street to permit the other subsurface structures to lie in the ground above the crown of the arch, and where the station platforms are from 20 to 30 ft.
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  • The cost of intra-urban railways depends not only on the type of construction, but more especially upon local conditions, such as the nature of the soil, the presence of subsurface structures, like sewers, water and gas mains, electric conduits, &c.; the necessity of permanent underpinning or temporary supporting of house foundations, the cost of acquiring land passed under or over when street lines are not followed, and, in the case of elevated railways, the cost of acquiring easements of light, air and access, which the courts have held are vested in the abutting property.
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  • Since the passing of the Light Railways Act of 1896, which did not apply to Ireland, it is possible to give a formal definition by saying that a light railway is one constructed under the provisions of that act; but it must be noted that the commissioners appointed under that act have authorized many lines which in their physical characteristics are indistinguishable from street tramways constructed under the Tramways Act, and to these the term light railways would certainly not be applied in ordinary parlance.
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  • Instead of a small house between a street and a stable-yard, I began to occupy a spacious and convenient mansion, connected on the north side with the city, and open on the south to a beautiful and boundless horizon.
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  • There still remains close to the first-named street and fronting the Corso Garibaldi a high wall built of square Roman bricks, with pillars and arched recesses in the upper portion, which goes by the name of Palazzo di Teodorico.
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  • Tooley Street, leading east from Southwark by London Bridge railway station, is well known in connexion with the story of three tailors of Tooley Street, who addressed a petition to parliament opening with the comprehensive expression "We, the people of England."
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  • The town was traversed by a well-paved street with a stone sewer, and contained several important private houses and a larger one which seems to have been FIG.
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  • The town consists of one wide street, down which a stream of water runs, extending for about 1 m., and crossed at right angles by a lesser street.
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  • Railway, street railway, telegraph and telephone franchises can be granted only by the Executive Council with the approval of the governor, and none can be operative until it has been approved by the President of the United States.
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  • In Mincing Lane are the commercial salerooms. Besides the Bank of England there are many banking houses; and the name of Lombard Street, commemorating the former money dealers of Lombardy, is especially associated with them.
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  • Honiton (Honetona, Huneton) is situated on the British Icknield Street, and was probably the site of an early settlement, but it does not appear in history before the Domesday Survey, when it was a considerable manor, held by Drew (Drogo) under the count of Mortain, who had succeeded Elmer the Saxon, with a subject population of 33, a flock of 80 sheep, a mill and 2 salt-workers.
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  • Urquhart states that he went to Mantua, became the tutor of the young prince of Mantua, Vincenzo di Gonzaga, and was killed by the latter in a street quarrel in 1582.
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  • In particular, the Roman "North Road" which ran from York through Corbridge and over Cheviot to Newstead near Melrose, and thence to the Wall of Pius, and which has largely been in use ever since Roman times, is now not unfrequently called Watling Street, though there is no old authority for it and throughout the middle ages the section of the road between the Tyne and the Forth was called Dere Street.
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  • The Yarn Market, a picturesque octagonal building with deep sloping roof, in the main street, dates from c. 1600, and is a memorial of Dunster's former important manufacture of cloth.
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  • The name of Holborn was formerly derived from Old Bourne, a tributary of the Fleet, the valley of which is clearly seen where Holborn Viaduct crosses Farringdon Street.
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  • The opening of the thoroughfares of New Oxford Street (1840) and Shaftesbury Avenue (1855) by no means wholly destroyed the character of the district.
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  • The present parish church of St Giles in the Fields, between Shaftesbury Avenue and New Oxford Street, dates from 1734, but here was situated a leper's hospital founded by Matilda, wife of Henry I., in i ioi.
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  • Among other institutions in Holborn, the British Museum, north of New Oxford Street, is pre-eminent.
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  • The Foundling Hospital, Guilford Street, was founded by Thomas Coram in 1739.
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  • The people kept the street in which he lay quiet; but medical care, the loving solicitude of friends, and the respect of all the people could not save his life.
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  • The county buildings, in Buccleuch Street, are an imposing example of the Scots Baronial style.
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  • About three-fourths of the city's total street mileage (120 m.) is paved, Belgian block or macadam being used on the principal thoroughfares.
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  • Lee, surmounting a lofty granite pedestal at the head of Franklin Street.
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  • London street and stable dung was carried to a distance by water, and appears from later writers to have been got for the trouble of removing.
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  • In the course of the next few years he wrote comparatively little, but he continued his reading, and also derived much, benefit from discussions held twice a week at Grote's house in Threadneedle Street.
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  • The legend of an indecent consecration at the Nag's Head tavern in Fleet Street seems first to have been printed by the Jesuit, Christopher Holywood, in 1604; and it has long been abandoned by reputable controversialists.
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  • The old-fashioned town, consisting chiefly of one long broad street, retains portions of its ancient walls.
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  • He died in his house in Arlington Street, London, on the 22nd of January 1763.
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  • It is divided into four wards - Church Street, Stratford-Langthorne, Plaistow and Upton.
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  • While engaged on this task he died, worn out with disease, on the 3rd of March 1703 in London, and was buried in St Helen's Church, Bishopsgate Street.
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  • Towards the close of 1840 he became minister of St John's church, Victoria Street, Edinburgh.
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  • They occupied Thomson's house and Great Island (New Castle) and built the " Great House " on what is now Water Street, Portsmouth.
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  • Atlantic Avenue, along the harbour front, was created, and Washington Street, the chief business artery, was largely remade after 1866.
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  • Washington Street, still narrow, is perhaps the most crowded and congested thoroughfare in America.
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  • Another tunnel has been added to the system, under Washington Street.
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  • The Federal Street theatre-the first regular theatrewas established in 1794, the old Puritan feeling having had its natural influence in keeping Boston behind New York and Philadelphia in this respect.
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  • The dramatic history of the city is largely associated with the Boston Museum, built in 1841 by Moses Kimball on Tremont Street, and rebuilt in 1846 and 1880; here for half a century the principal theatrical performances were given.
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  • Montgomery Field, until in 1903 the famous Boston Museum was swept away, as other interesting old places of entertainment (the old Federal Street theatre, the Tremont theatre, &c.) had been, in the course of further building changes.
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  • In 1770, on the 5th of March, in a street brawl, a number of citizens were killed or wounded by the soldiers, who fired into a crowd that were baiting a sentry.
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  • In 1872 he became vicar of St Jude's, Commercial Street, Whitechapel, and in the next year married Henrietta Octavia Rowland, who had been a co-worker with Miss Octavia Hill and was no less ardent a philanthropist than her husband.
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  • In the vicinity is the Grove Street Cemetery, in which are the graves of many famous Americans.
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  • This congruity of the miracle with divine truth and grace is the answer to Matthew Arnold's taunt about turning a pen into a pen-wiper or Huxley's about a centaur trotting down Regent Street.
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  • The town is traversed by one straight wide street with large houses, but for the most part it consists of narrow lanes.
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  • The principal street of Luxor follows the line of the ancient avenue.
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  • The famous seat of the Platonic philosophy was a gymnasium enlarged as a public park by Cimon; it lay about a mile to the north-west of the Dipylon Gate, with which it was connected by a street bordered with tombs.
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  • The beautiful choragic monument of Lysicrates, dedicated in the archonship of Euaenetus (335-334 B.C.), is the only survivor of a number of such structures which stood in the The choragic " Street of the Tripods " to the east of the Dionysiac monument theatre, bearing the tripods given to the successful of choragi at the Dionysiac festival.
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  • A portion of its western front, adorned with monolith unfluted Corinthian columns, is still standing - the familiar " Stoa of Hadrian "; another well-preserved portion, with six pilasters, runs parallel to the west side of Aeolus Street.
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  • The main part of the town extends for a mile along the broad straight Roman road, Watling Street; the high road from Luton to Tring, which crosses it in the centre of the town, representing the ancient Icknield Way.
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  • There may have been a Romano-British village on this site on the Watling Street.
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  • One of the entrances to Theobalds Park is the old Temple Bar, removed from Fleet Street, London, in 1878.
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  • The city is well built, has many fine churches and good public buildings, street cars and electric lights.
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  • A zoning law determines definitely the residential, industrial and commercial districts; 29 street widenings, openings and cut-offs were under construction in 1921.
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  • Among the best residence streets are Peachtree and West Peachtree streets to the north, and the older streets to the south of the business centre of the city - Washington Street, Whitehall, Pryor and Capitol Avenues.
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  • The city is governed by a board of aldermen and a mayor (elected biennially), who appoints most of the officials, the street and water board being the principal exception.
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  • Until 1804 he lived at the Royal Institution in Albemarle Street, London, or at a house which he rented at Brompton, and he then established himself in Paris, marrying (his first wife having died in 1792) as his second wife the wealthy widow of Lavoisier, the celebrated chemist.
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  • The church of St Giles, Cripplegate, London, was built about 1090, while the hospital for lepers at St Giles-in-the-Fields (near New Oxford Street) was founded by Queen Matilda in 1117.
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  • His goods were confiscated, his aged mother turned into the street and numbers of other members of the clan in Rome were arrested, while Giuffre Borgia led an expedition into the Campagna and seized their castles.
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  • The movement began in Birmingham in 1845, in an attempt Educa- to help the loungers at street corners; reading and tion.
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  • The society first met at James Hutton's shop, 'The Bible and Sun,' Wild Street, west of Temple Bar.
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  • Wesley's headquarters at Bristol were in the Horse Fair, where a room was built in May 1739 for two religious societies which had been accustomed to meet in Nicholas Street and Baldwin Street.
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  • In 1743 Wesley secured a west-end centre at West Street, Seven Dials, which for fifty years had a wonderful history.
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  • He had gone to Wesley's help at West Street after his ordination at Whitehall in 1757 and had been one of his chief allies ever since.
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  • This point is very near the present mosque of Nebi Daniel; and the line of the great east-west "Canopic" street only slightly diverged from that of the modern Boulevard de Rosette.
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  • But a discovery by the government of concealed arms, and an explosion at one of Emmet's depots in Patrick Street on the 16th of July, necessitated immediate action, and the 23rd of that month was accordingly fixed for the projected rising.
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  • Emmet, now seeing that the rising had become a mere street brawl, made his escape; a detachment of soldiers quickly dispersed his followers.
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  • York also possesses a large number of churches of special architectural interest, including All Saints, North Street, Early English, Decorated and Perpendicular, with a spire 120 ft.
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  • In 1353 the king took the borough of York into his own hands, "to avoid any risk of disturbance and possible great bloodshed such as has arisen before these times," and finally in the same year an agreement was brought about by Archbishop Thoresby that the whole of Bootham should be considered a suburb of York except the street called St Marygate, which should be in the jurisdiction of the abbey.
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  • Of the ancient city, which occupied the same site as the modern town, hardly anything is now visible, and the discoveries of the ancient street pavement have not been noted with sufficient care to enable us to recover the plan.
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  • Sebastiani, commanding the advanced guard, overtook the Russians in the act of evacuating Moscow, and agreed with the latter to observe a seven hours' armistice to allow the Russians to clear the town, for experience had shown the French that street fighting in wooden Russian townships always meant fire and the consequent destruction of much-needed shelter and provisions.
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  • The characteristic, but by no means attractive, street dress of the Moslem women of the better class comprises a black horse-hair visor completely covering the face and projecting like an enormous beak, the nether extremities being encased in yellow boots reaching to the knee and fully displayed by the method of draping the garments in front.
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  • Brewirg, however, is mentioned in 1331, and one tanner at least carried on business in Hare Street in 1467.
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  • Monumental Park is divided into four sections (containing about 1 acre each) by Superior Avenue and Ontario Street.
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  • The municipal street cleaning department cleans all streets by the wet process.
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  • A new street car company began operations on the 1st of November 1906, charging a 3 cent fare.
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  • In recent history the most notable events not mentioned elsewhere in this article were the elaborate celebration of the centennial of the city in 1896 and the street railway strike of 1899, in which the workers attempted to force a redress of grievances and a recognition of their union.
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  • There was a less violent street car strike in 1908, after the assumption of control by the Municipal Traction Company, which refused to raise wages according to promises made (so the employees said) by the former owner of the railway; the strikers were unsuccessful.
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  • In other parts of the world they have been recorded in multitudes that obscured passers-by on the other side of the street.
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  • His memory is appropriately kept green by a cot in the Children's Hospital, Great Ormond Street, London, which was endowed perpetually by a public subscription.
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  • It consists of Upper and Lower, the Lower practically one street.
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  • There is a privately owned electric street car service in the city.
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  • The street plan is irregular.
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  • In the Vennel (alley or small street) some ruins remain of the maison dieu, or hospitium, founded in 1256 by William of Brechin.
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  • He was the grandson of an Essex pastor, and son of John Spurgeon, Independent minister at Upper Street, Islington.
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  • His powers as a boy preacher became widely known, and at the close of 1853 he was "called" to New Park Street Chapel, Southwark.
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  • It consists principally of one long street (the Roman Watling Street) and the northern suburb of Milton, a separate urban district (pop. 7086), celebrated for its oysters, the fishery of which used to employ a large number of the inhabitants.
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  • Many old houses are also preserved, and in High Street their overhanging upper stories, supported on pillars, form a covered way for foot-passengers.
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  • Some vestiges of this celebrated monastic house, which formerly owned the famous Welsh MS. known as the "Black Book of Carmarthen," are visible between the present Priory Street and the river.
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  • In the centre is a bold rock, crowned by the castle, between which and the new town lies a ravine that once contained the Nor' Loch, but is now covered with the gardens of Princes Street.
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  • The General Register House for Scotland, begun in 1 774 from designs by Robert Adam, stands at the east end of Princes Street.
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  • Other churches having historical associations are the two Greyfriars churches, which occupy the two halves of one building; Tron church, the scene of midnight hilarity at the new year; St Cuthbert's church; St Andrew's church in George Street, whence set out, on a memorable day in 1843, that long procession of ministers and elders to Tanfield Hall which ended in the founding of the Free Church; St George's church in Charlotte Square, a good example of the work of Robert Adam.
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  • St John's Episcopal church at the west end of Princes Street was the scene of the ministrations of Dean Ramsay, and St Paul's Episcopal church of the Rev. Archibald Alison, father of the historian.
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  • The Catholic Apostolic church at the foot of Broughton Street is architecturally noticeable, and one of its features is a set of mural paintings executed byMrsTraquair.
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  • John Knox's house at the east end of High Street is kept in excellent repair, and contains several articles of furniture that belonged to the reformer.
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  • In the Music Hall in George Street, Carlyle, as lord rector of the university, delivered his stimulating address on books to the students, and Gladstone addressed the electors in his Midlothian campaigns.
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  • Of these by far the most remarkable is the Scott monument in East Princes Street Gardens, designed by George Meikle Kemp (1795-1844); it is in the form of a spiral Gothic cross with a central canopy beneath which is a seated statue of Scott with his dog " Maida " at his side, by Sir John Steell, the niches being occupied by characters in Sir Walter's writings.
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  • At the west end of George Street, in the centre of Charlotte Square, stands the Albert Memorial, an equestrian statue of the prince consort, with groups at each of the four angles of the base.
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  • In George Street are Chantrey's figures of Pitt and George IV., and a statue of Dr Chalmers; the 5th duke of Buccleuch stands beside St Giles's.
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  • In Warriston cemetery (opened in 1843) in the New Town, were buried Sir James Young Simpson, Alexander Smith the poet, Horatio McCulloch, R.S.A., the landscape painter, the Rev. James Millar, the last Presbyterian chaplain of the castle, and the Rev. James Peddie, the pastor of Bristo Street church.
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  • The older are Princes Street Gardens, covering the old Nor' Loch, Calton Hill, the Meadows and the Bruntsfield Links.
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  • The Caledonian station is Princes Street, where the through trains from the London & North-Western system of England arrive.
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  • Playfair (1789-1857), but it was not till 1883 that the building was completed by the dome, crowned by the bronze figure of Youth bearing the torch of Knowledge, on the facade in South Bridge Street.
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  • The opening up of the wide thoroughfare of Chambers Street, on the site of College Wynd and Brown and Argyll Squares, cleared the precincts of unsightly obstructions and unsavoury neighbours.
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  • The museum and lecture-rooms of the Royal College of Surgeons occupy a handsome classical building in Nicolson Street.
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  • In their hall in Queen Street are a valuable library and a museum of materia medica.
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  • This root-and-branch policy proved enormously successful, and George Watson's college, Stewart's college, Queen Street ladies' college, George Square ladies' college, Gillespie's school, and others, rapidly took a high place among the educational institutions of the city.
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  • The Royal blind asylum at Powburn in its earlier days tenanted humbler quarters in Nicolson Street.
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  • This is no longer the case, but the Lyceum theatre in Grindlay Street and the Theatre Royal at the head of Leith Walk give good performances.
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  • Variety entertainments are also in vogue, and in Nicolson Street and elsewhere there are good music halls.
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  • The central public baths in Infirmary Street, with branch establishments in other parts of the town, including Portobello, are largely resorted to, and the proximity of the Firth of Forth induces the keener swimmers to visit Granton every morning.
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  • These tall tenements on both sides of what is now High Street and Canongate are still a prominent characteristic of the Old Town.
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  • The streets were mostly very narrow, the main street from the castle to Holyrood Palace and the Cowgate alone permitting the passage of wheeled carriages.
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  • In the narrow " wynds " the nobility and gentry paid their visits in sedan chairs, and proceeded in full dress to the assemblies and balls, which were conducted with aristocratic exclusiveness in an alley on the south side of High Street, called the Assembly Close, and in the assembly rooms in the West Bow.
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  • Matters were not bettered by the Act of Union signed in a cellar in High Street in 1707, amidst the execrations of the people, and it was not till the hopes of the Jacobites were blasted at Culloden (1746) that the townsfolk began to accept the inevitable.
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  • This epoch, when grass grew even in High Street, long lingered in the popular memory as the " dark age."
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  • The creation of Princes Street, one of the most beautiful thoroughfares in the world, led to further improvement.
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  • This unsightly mass of rubbish lay for a while as an eyesore, until the happy thought arose of converting it into a broad way joining the new .oNd at Hanover Street with the Old Town at the Lawnmarket.
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  • Upon this street, which divides Princes Street and its gardens into east and west, and which received the title of the Mound, were erected the National Gallery and the Royal Institution.
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  • The Commercial, the Union and the Clydesdale banks are in George Street, the National.
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  • The principal business houses are on Mill Street; while Radcliffe Street extends along the river.
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  • The main street of the city, George Street, is 2 m.
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  • Second in importance to George Street is Pitt Street, which runs parallel to it from the Circular Quay to the railway station; Macquarie Street runs alongside the Domain and contains a number of public buildings, including the treasury, the office of public works, the houses of parliament and the mint.
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  • In Bridge Street, behind the office of public works, are the exchange and the crown lands office.
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  • At the top of King Street there is a statue of Queen Victoria and close by a statue of Prince Albert, at the entrance to Hyde Park, in which the most elevated spot is occupied by a statue of Captain Cook.
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  • Outside the north gate is a street of tombs, in some of which were found arms, vases and fine mural paintings (now in the Naples Museum).
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  • But a few weeks before, Mr Drummond, who was Sir Robert Peel's private secretary, had been shot dead in the street by a lunatic. In consequence of this, and the manifold anxieties of the time with which he was harassed, the mind of the great statesman was no doubt in a moody and morbid condition, and when he arose to speak later in the evening, he referred in excited and agitated tones to the remark, as an incitement to violence against his person.
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  • He recovered a little for a few days after his arrival in London; but on the 29th there was a relapse, and on the 2nd of April 1865 he expired peacefully at his apartments in Suffolk Street.
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  • The Ville Haute, which is reached by staircases and steep narrow thoroughfares, is intersected by a long, quiet street, bordered by houses of the 15th, 16th and 17th centuries.
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  • Oxford Street, with its handsome shops, bounds the borough on the south, crossing Regent Street at Oxford Circus; Edgware Road on the west; Marylebone Road crosses from east to west, .and from this Upper Baker Street gives access to Park, Wellington, and Finchley Roads; and Baker Street leads southward.
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  • Poor and squalid streets are found, in close proximity to the wealthiest localities, between Marylebone Road and St John's Wood Road, and about High Street in the south, the .site of the original village.
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  • The name Tyburn (q.v.) was notorious chiefly as applied to the gallows which stood near the existing junction of Edgware Road and Oxford Street (Marble Arch).
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  • They extended east of High Street as far as Harley Street, but by 1778 the ground was being built over.
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  • Another historic site is Horace Street near Edgware Road, formerly Cato Street, from which the conspiracy which bore that name was directed against the ministry in 1820.
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  • The Parkes Museum of the Sanitary Institute is in Margaret Street.
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  • StMarylebone contains a great number of hospitals, among which are the Middlesex, Mortimer Street; Throat Hospital and Dental Hospital and School, Great Portland Street; Lying-in and Ophthalmic Hospitals, Marylebone Road; Samaritan Hospital for women, Seymour Street; Consumption Hospital, Margaret Street; and the Home for incurable children, St John's Wood Road.
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  • Harley Street, between Marylebone Road and Cavendish Square, is noted as the residence of medical practitioners.
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  • Educational institutions include the Trinity and the Victoria Colleges of Music, in Manchester Square and Berners Street respectively; the Bedford College for women, and the Regent's Park Baptist College.
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  • He was president of Hampden-Sidney College from 1796 to 1807, with a short intermission (in 1801-1802), and in 1807 became pastor of Pine Street Church, Philadelphia.
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  • Close by the park there stood, until the 19th century, a house believed to have belonged to the notorious Bishop Bonner, the persecutor of Protestants in the reign of Mary; his name is still attached to a street here.
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  • The town (Fauresfeld, Faveresham) owed its early importance to its situation as a port on the Swale, to the fertile country surrounding it, and to the neighbourhood of Watling Street.
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  • Warden, at that time British resident at Bloemfontein, whose name is perpetuated in that of the principal street.
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  • It has a quaint old-fashioned appearance, many ancient houses in High Street bearing inscriptions and dates.
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  • A little east of Church Square this street opens on to Market Square, with commodious market buildings.
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  • The former Presidency, the residence of Paul Kruger, is at the western end of the street near the Spruit.
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  • Other churches in the heart of the town include the Anglican cathedral, dedicated to St Alban, and the Presbyterian Church, both in Schoemans Street, the Roman Catholic Church in Koch Street with schools, convent buildings and extensive grounds, and the new Dutch Reformed Church in Vermeulen Street.
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  • The word "kennel," a gutter, a drain in a street or road, is a corruption of the Middle English canel, cannel, in modern English "channel," from Latin canalis, canal.
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  • Since the arrest at Bond's, Fitzgerald had been in hiding, latterly at the house of one Murphy, a feather dealer, in Thomas Street, Dublin.
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  • The Wallbrook rose in a marsh in the modern district of Finsbury, and joined the Thames close to the Cannon Street railway bridge.
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  • A street named after it runs south from the Mansion House parallel with its course.
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  • The slope of Farringdon Road, where crossed by Holborn Viaduct, and of New Bridge Street, Blackfriars, marks its course exactly, and that of Fleet Street and Ludgate Hill its steep banks.
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  • It rose on the heights of Hampstead, traversed Paddington, may be traced in the course of the Serpentine lake in Hyde Park, ran parallel to and east of Sloane Street, and joined the Thames close to Chelsea Bridge.
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  • It then bears successively the names of Oxford Street, New Oxford Street and High Holborn; enters the City, becomes known as Holborn Viaduct from the fact that it is there carried over other streets which lie at a lower level, and then as Newgate Street and Cheapside.
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  • The southern highway enters Hammersmith, crosses the centre of Kensington as Kensington Road and High Street, borders Kensington Gardens and Hyde Park as Kensington Gore and Knightsbridge, with terraces of fine residences, and merges into Piccadilly.
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  • This beautiful street, with its northward branches, Park Lane, from which splendid houses overlook Hyde Park, and Bond Street, lined with handsome shops, may be said to focus the fashionable life of London.
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  • The direct line of the thoroughfare is interrupted after Piccadilly Circus (the term " circus " is frequently applied to the open space - not necessarily round - at the junction of several roads), but is practically resumed in the Strand, with its hotels, shops and numerous theatres, and continued through the City in Fleet Street, the centre of the newspaper world, and Ludgate Hill, at the head of which is St Paul's Cathedral.
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  • The northern road enters from Stratford and is called Bow Road, Mile End Road, Whitechapel Road and High Street, Whitechapel.
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  • The straight highway from the northwest which as Edgware Road joins Oxford Street at the Marble Arch (the north-eastern entrance to Hyde Park) is coincident with the Roman Watling Street.
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  • Among them, the Old Kent Road continues the southern section of Watling Street, from Dover and the south-east, through Woolwich and across Blackheath.
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  • The Portsmouth Road from the south-west is well marked as far as Lambeth, under the names of Wandsworth, High Street, St John's Hill, Lavender Hill and Wandsworth Road.
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  • The bridges in order above London Bridge are as follows, railway-bridges being bracketed - Southwark, (Cannon Street), (Blackfriars), Blackfriars, Waterloo, (Hungerford - with a footway), Westminster, Lambeth, Vauxhall, (Grosvenor), Victoria, Albert, Battersea, (Battersea), Wandsworth, (Putney), Putney and Hammersmith.
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  • It no longer forms an entrance to the park, as in 1908 a corner of the park was cut off and a roadway was formed to give additional accommodation for the heavy traffic between Oxford Street, Edgware Road and Park Lane.
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  • The church of St Mary-le-Bow, in Cheapside, is built upon a Norman crypt, and that of St Olave's, Hart Street, which was Pepys's church and contains a modern memorial to him, is of the 15th century.
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  • The Heralds' College or College of Arms, the official authority in matters of armorial bearings and pedigrees, occupies a building in Queen Victoria Street, City, erected subsequently to the great fire (1683).
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  • The Monument (1677), Fish Street Hill, City, erected from the designs of Wren in commemoration of the great fire of 1666, is a Doric column surmounted by a gilt representation of a flaming urn.
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  • Modern Cheapside merges eastward into the street called the Poultry, from the poulterers' stalls " but lately departed from thence," according to Stow, at the close of the 16th century.
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  • Cornhill, again, recalls the cornmarket " time out of mind there holden " (Stow), and Gracechurch Street was corrupted from the name of the church of St Benet Grasschurch (destroyed by the great fire, rebuilt, and removed in 1868), which was said to be derived from a herb-market held under its walls.
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  • The Jews had their quarter near the commercial centre, their presence being indicated by the street named Old Jewry, though it is probable that they did not reoccupy this locality after their expulsion in 1290.
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  • Lombard Street similarly points to the residence of Lombard merchants, the name existing when Edward II.
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  • The name Bridewell came from a well near the Fleet (New Bridge Street), dedicated to St Bride, and was attached to a house built by Henry VIII.
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  • The Minories, a street leading south from Aldgate, takes name from an abbey of nuns of St Clare (Sorores Minores) founded in 1293.
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  • The site of the house is marked by Arundel Street, Strand.
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  • The terminus of the Great Western railway is Paddington (Praed Street); and that of the London & South-Western, Waterloo, south of the Thames in Lambeth.
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  • The South-Eastern & Chatham railway has four terminal stations, all on or close to the north bank of the river - Victoria, Charing Cross,' Holborn Viaduct and Cannon Street (City).
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  • The principal terminus of the Great Eastern Railway is in Liverpool Street (City), but the company also uses Fenchurch Street (City), the terminus of the London, Tilbury & Southend railway, and St Pancras.
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  • The North London railway has a terminal station at Broad Street, City, and serves the parts of London implied by its name.
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  • The Metropolitan railway has a line from Baker Street through north-west London to Harrow, continuing to Uxbridge, while the original main line runs on to Rickmansworth, Aylesbury and Verney Junction, but has been worked by the Metropolitan and Great Central companies jointly since 1906.
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  • Experiments on a short section of the line were made in 1900, and later schemes were set on foot to electrify the District system and bring under one general control this railway, other lines in deep level " tubes " between Baker Street and Waterloo, between Charing Cross, Euston and Hampstead, and between Hammersmith, Brompton, Piccadilly, King's Cross and Finsbury Park, and the London United Tramways Company.
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  • The former company combined with the Great Western Company as regards the electrification of, and provision of stock for, the lines which they had previously worked jointly, from Edgware Road by Bishop's Road to Hammersmith, &c. The Baker Street & Waterloo railway (known as the " Bakerloo ") was opened in 1906 and subsequently extended in one direction to Paddington and in the other to the Elephant and Castle.
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  • Others are the Waterloo & City (1898) running from the terminus of the South-Western railway without intermediate stations to the Bank; the Central London (1900), from the Bank to Shepherd's Bush, Hammersmith; and the Great Northern & City (1904) from Finsbury Park (which is an important suburban junction on the Great Northern railway) to Moorgate Street.
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  • But this control does not meet the problem of actually lessening the number of vehicles in the main arteries of traffic. At such crossings as that of the Strand and Wellington Street, Ludgate Circus and south of the Thames, the Elephant and Castle, as also in the narrow streets of the City, congestion is often exceedingly severe, and is aggravated when any main street is under repair, and diversion of traffic through narrow side streets becomes necessary.
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  • At the beginning of the 20th century several important local widenings of streets were put in hand, as for example between Sloane Street and Hyde Park Corner, in the Strand and at the Marble Arch (1908).
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  • The mere control of existing traffic, local street improvements and provision of new means of communication between casual points, were felt to miss the root of the problem, and in 1903 a Royal Commission was appointed to consider the whole question of locomotion and transport in London, expert evidence being taken from engineers, representatives of the various railway and other companies, of the County Council, borough councils and police, and others.
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  • The commission reported in 1905.1 regard to street improvements the most important commis- recommendation was that of the construction of two 1903, main avenues 140 ft.
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  • A number of sub-offices of large steamship lines are congregated in Cockspur Street, Trafalgar Square, and several of the principal railway companies have local offices throughout the centre of the metropolis for the issue of tickets and the collection and forwarding of luggage and parcels.
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  • The General Post Office lies in the centre of the City on either side of the street called St Martin's le Grand.
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  • The City of London School, founded in Milk Street, Cheapside, by the City Corporation in 1835, occupies modern buildings on the Victoria Embankment.
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  • The schools of the University include University College, Gower Street, and King's College, Somerset House (with both of which preparatory schools are connected), East London College and numerous institutions devoted to special faculties both within and without London.
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  • The he Board of Education directly administers the following educational institutions - the Victoria and Albert Museum, South Kensington, with its branch at Bethnal Green, from both of which objects are lent to various institutions for educational purposes; the Royal College of Science, South Kensington, with which is incorporated the Royal School of Mines; the Geological Survey of the United Kingdom and the Museum of Practical Geology, Jermyn Street; the Solar Physics Observatory, South Kensington; and the Royal College of Art, South Kensington.
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  • At Gresham College, Basinghall Street, City, founded in 1 597 by Sir Thomas Gresham, and moved to its present site in 1843, lectures are given in the principal branches of science, law, divinity, medicine, &c.
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  • Music. - The principal educational institutions are - the Royal Academy of Music, Tenterden Street, Hanover Square; the Royal College of Music, South Kensington; Guildhall School, City, near the Victoria Embankment; London College, Great Marlborough Street; Trinity College, Manchester Square; Victoria College, Berners Street; and the Royal College of Organists, Bloomsbury.
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  • The Society of Arts, John Street, Adelphi, was established in 1754 for the encouragement of arts, manufactures and commerce.
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  • The Royal Institution, Albemarle Street, was founded in 1799, maintains a library and laboratories and promotes research in connexion with the experimental sciences.
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  • Other museums are Sir John Soane's collection in Lincoln's Inn Fields and the Museum of Practical Geology in Jermyn Street, while the scientific societies have libraries and in some cases collections of a specialized character, such as the museums of the Royal College of Surgeons, the Royal Architectural Society, and the Society of Art and the Parkes Museum of the Sanitar y Institute.
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  • There are a number of art galleries in and about Bond Street and Piccadilly, Regent Street and Pall Mall, such as the New Gallery, where periodical exhibitions are given by the New English Art Club, the Royal Society of Painters in WaterColours, the Royal Institute of Painters in Water-Colours, other societies and art dealers.
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  • The principal London theatres lie between Piccadilly and Temple Bar, and High Holborn and Victoria Street, the majority being in Shaftesbury Avenue, the Haymarket, the neighbourhood of Charing Cross and the Strand.
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  • The chief halls devoted mainly to concerts are the Royal Albert Hall, close to the South Kensington museums, and Queen's Hall in Langham Place, Regent Street.
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  • For a long time St James's Hall (demolished in 1905) between Regent Street and Piccadilly was the chief concert hall.
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  • The custom house stands on the north bank, a short distance from London Bridge, in Lower Thames Street.
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  • Among these are the Corn Exchange in Mark Lane, where the privilege of a fair was originally granted by Edward I.; the Wool Exchange, Coleman Street; the Coal Exchange, Lower Thames Street; the Shipping Exchange, Billiter Street; and the auction mart for landed property in Tokenhouse Yard.
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  • The old-established collection of second-hand book-shops in Holywell Street was only abolished by the widening of the Strand, and a large proportion then removed to Charing Cross Road.
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  • In the Strand, and more especially in Fleet Street and its offshoots, are found the offices of the majority of the most important daily newspapers and other journals.
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  • In Tottenham Court Road are the showrooms of several large upholstering and furnishing firms. Of the streets most frequented on account of their fashionable shops Bond Street, Regent Street, Oxford Street, Sloane Street and High Street, Kensington, may be selected.
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  • These extend over a great area north of Newgate Street and east of Farringdon Road.
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  • The Metropolitan police courts are fourteen in number, namely - Bow Street, Covent Garden; Clerkenwell; Great Marlborough Street (Westminster); Greenwich and Woolwich; Lambeth; Marylebone; North London, Stoke Newington Road; Southwark; South Western, Lavender Hill (Battersea); Thames, Arbour Street East (Stepney); West Ham; West London, Vernon Street (Fulham); Westminster, Vincent Square; Worship Street (Shoreditch).
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  • The headquarters of the Salvation Army are in Queen Victoria Street, City.
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  • Now no such remains have been found between Gracechurch Street and the Tower.
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  • The line from Bishopsgate ran eastward to St Giles's churchyard (Cripplegate), where it turned to the south as far as Falcon square; again westerly by Aldersgate round the site of the Greyfriars (afterwards Christ's Hospital) towards Giltspur Street, then south by the Old Bailey to Ludgate, and then down to the Thames, where Dr Edwin Freshfield suggests that a Roman fortress stood on the site of Baynard's Castle.
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  • Many ineffectual attempts have been made to connect the Watling street in the city with the great Roman road so named in medieval times.
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  • The name of the small street is evidently a corruption, and in the valuable Report of the MSS.
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  • The form Watling Street seems to occur first in 1307.
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  • Sir William Tite gave reasons for believing that Bishopsgate Street was not a Roman thoroughfare, and in the excavations at Leadenhall the basilica to which allusion has already been made was found apparently crossing the present thoroughfare of Gracechurch Street.
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  • For many centuries this district between London and Westminster was a kind of " no man's land " having certain archaic customs. Gomme in his Governance of London (1907) gives an account of the connexion of this with the old village of Aldwich, a name that survived in Wych Street, and has been revived by the London County Council in Aldwych, the crescent which leads to Kingsway.
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  • They removed to Fleet Street or the New Temple in 1184.
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  • On the suppression of the order by command of the pope the house in Fleet Street was given in 1313 by Edward II.
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  • Christ Church, Newgate Street, occupies the site of the choir of the great church of the Greyfriars.
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  • The house of the Austin Friars or Friars Eremites was founded in Broad Street Ward in 1253.
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  • The Friars of the Blessed Virgin of Mount Carmel or Carmelites or Whitefriars came to London in 1241, and made their home on land between Fleet Street and the Thames given by Edward I.
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  • Besides the four chief orders of friars there were the Crutched Friars in the parish of St Olave, Hart Street (about 1298), and the Friars of the Sac first outside Aldersgate (about 1257) and afterwards in the Old Jewry.
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  • There is a reminder of them in the names of Jewry Street near the former and of Jewin Street near the latter place.
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  • Jewin Street was built on the site of the burying-place of the Jews before the expulsion.
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  • Crosby Hall, in Bishopsgate Street, then lately built, was made the lodging of the Protector.
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  • The Strand was filled with noble mansions washed by the waters of the Thames, but the street, if street it could be called, was little used by pedestrians.
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  • St Giles's was literally a village in the fields; Piccadilly was " the waye to Redinge," Oxford Street " the way to Uxbridge," Covent Garden an open field or garden, and Leicester Fields lammas land.
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  • Fleet Street was the show-place of London, in which were exhibited a constant succession of puppets, naked Indians and strange fishes.
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  • The " Mermaid " is sometimes described as in Bread Street, and at other times in Friday Street and also in Cheapside.
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  • We are thus able to fix its exact position; for a little to the west of Bow church is Bread Street, then came a block of houses, and the next thoroughfare was Friday Street.
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  • It was in this block that the " Mermaid " was situated, and there appear to have been entrances from each street.
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  • What makes this fact still more certain is the circumstance that a haberdasher in Cheapside living "'twixt Wood Street and Milk Street," two streets on the north side opposite Bread and Friday Streets, described himself as " over against the Mermaid tavern in Cheapside."
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  • The Mitre in Fleet Street, so intimately associated with Dr Johnson, also existed at this time.
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  • At the Mermaid Ben Jonson had such companions as Shakespeare, Raleigh, Beaumont, Fletcher, Carew, Donne, Cotton and Selden, but at the Devil in Fleet Street, where he started the Apollo Club, he was omnipotent.
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  • Great Queen Street, Lincoln's Inn Fields, was built about 1629, and named in honour of Henrietta Maria.
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  • Evelyn's plan differed from Wren's chiefly in proposing a street from the church of St Dunstan's in the East to the cathedral, and in having no quay or terrace along the river.
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  • In 1772 all beyond Portland Chapel in Great Portland Street was country.
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  • In 1737 the Fleet ditch between Holborn Bridge and Fleet Bridge was covered over, and Stocks Market was removed from the site of the Mansion House to the present Farringdon Street, and called Fleet market.
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  • The statue of Queen Elizabeth which stood on the west side of Ludgate was purchased by Alderman Gosling and set up against the east end of St Dunstan's church in Fleet Street, where it still remains.
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  • There was a street of tents called the City Road, which was daily thronged with visitors.
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  • The fire of 1666 destroyed all the documents of the Parish Clerks Company, and in its hall in Silver Street only printed tables from about the year 1700 are to be found.
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  • Richardson; the Federal Building; the State Museum of Natural History; the galleries of the Albany Institute and Historical and Art Society, in State Street, opposite the Capitol; Harmanus Bleecker Hall, a theatre since 1898; and the Ten Eyck and Kenmore hotels.
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  • Tamworth (Tamwurda, Tammworth, Tomworth) is situated near the Roman Watling Street.
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  • It was found in a house in the Street of Tombs at Pompeii in the year 1839, and is now in the Royal Museum at Naples.
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  • He afterwards moved his works to Winchester House, Broad Street.
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  • In 1 59 2 the Broad Street works had been taken over by Jerome Bowes.
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  • During excavations in Broad Street in 1874 many fragments of glass were found.; amongst them were part of a wine-glass, a square scent-bottle and a wine-glass stem containing a spiral thread of white enamel.
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  • Slingsby for burning coal in furnaces, and coal appears to have been used in the Broad Street works.
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  • He graduated at Western Reserve College in 1864 and at Andover Theological Seminary in 1869; preached in Edinburg, Ohio, in 1869-1871, and in the Spring Street Congregational Church of Milwaukee in 5875-5879; and was professor of philosophy at Bowdoin College in 58 791881, and Clark professor of metaphysics and moral philosophy at Yale from 1881 till 5905, when he took charge of the graduate department of philosophy and psychology; he became professor emeritus in 1905.
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  • The king, realizing what street fighting in Florence would mean, at once came to terms; he contented himself with 120,000 florins, agreeing to assume the title of "Protector and Restorer of the liberty of Florence," and to give up the fortresses he had taken within two years, unless his expedition to Naples should be concluded sooner; the Medici were to remain banished, but the price on their heads was withdrawn.
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  • His father, remembering his own early difficulties, bestowed special care on his son's education, and sent him in his twelfth year to Mr Bruce's school in Percy Street, Newcastle, where he remained about four years.
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  • It consists of a single street, winding up a deep valley for about 3 m.
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  • The town consists mainly of a single street, 31 m.
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  • An electric street railway connects all the outlying districts with the ferry stations of Praia Grande and Sao Domingos.
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  • Beyond the fort are various public buildings leading to Otoo Street, the main thoroughfare, which runs two miles in a straight line to Christiansborg.
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  • This street contains a fine stone church built in 1895 for the use of the Anglican community, a branch of the Bank of British West Africa, telegraph offices and the establishments of the principal trading firms. In Victoriaborg, a suburb of Ussher Town, are the residences of the principal officials, and here a racecourse has been laid out.
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  • It was instituted in 1755 at the White Bear Inn (now St Bride's Tavern), Fleet Street, moved about 1850 to Discussion Hall, Shoe Lane, and in 1871 finally migrated to the Barley Mow Inn, Salisbury Square, E.C., its present quarters.
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  • In Coolidge's Tavern (still standing) Washington was entertained on his New England tour in 1789; and in a house recently moved from Mt Auburn Street to Marshall Street the Committee of Safety met in 1775.
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  • His arrangement of concave and plane mirrors, by which the realistic images of objects inside the house or in the street could be rendered visible though intangible, there alluded to, may apply to a camera on Cardan's principle or to a method of aerial projection by means of concave mirrors, which Bacon was quite familiar with, and indeed was known long before his time.
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  • The lower (or modern) town is connected by a curious spiral street with the upper (or old) town.