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storey

storey

storey Sentence Examples

  • The houses are often of one storey only.

    322
    113
  • The upper storey was probably of wood.

    155
    76
  • The second storey is not added till a son marries.

    94
    55
  • Above this is a lofty third storey, pierced with a few large windows, with pointed arches once filled with tracery, which is now lost.

    83
    56
  • Owing to the prevalence of earthquakes, private houses are usually of one storey only, and are built of sun-dried bricks, white-washed.

    26
    18
  • The upper storey often recedes, leaving wide corridors under the overhanging eaves, and in the " plazas " there are frequently covered arcades.

    21
    8
  • The ordinary Venetian house was built round a courtyard, and was one storey high; on the roof was an open loggia for drying clothes; in front, between the house and the water, ran the fondamenta.

    17
    13
  • a main building with wings; the large amount of window space; the comparative flatness of the façades; the employment of a cornice to each storey; the effect of light and shade given by the balconies; and in churches by the circular pediments on the facades.

    17
    18
  • The better sort of houses in Manila have two storeys, the lower one built of brick or stone and the upper one of wood, roofed with red Spanish tile or with corrugated iron; the upper storey contains the living-rooms, and the lower has servants' rooms, store-houses, stables, carriage-houses and poultry yards.

    16
    12
  • The houses, generally of a single storey or two at most, are frequently separated from each other by rows of trees.

    16
    16
  • Its houses are of the usual central American type, constructed of adobe, rarely more than one storey high, and surrounded by courtyards with ornamental gateways.

    14
    16
  • The guru replied, "Emperor Aurangzeb, I was on the top storey of my prison, but I was not looking at thy private apartments or at thy queen's.

    12
    15
  • Towards the end of the 14th century, this façade, with its lower colonnade, upper loggia with handsome Gothic tracery, and the vast impending upper storey, which give to the whole building its striking appearance and audacious design, had been carried as far as the tenth column on the piazzetta side.

    11
    13
  • and Storey county's a little more than $250,000.

    8
    9
  • In the highest hell rules alone the grisly king Sh'dum, "the warrior"; in the storey immediately beneath is Giv, "the great"; and in the lowest is Krun or Karkum, the oldest and most powerful of all, commonly called "the great mountain of flesh" (Third rabba d'besra), but also "the first-born of darkness."

    8
    9
  • The term tenement, too, was substituted for that of storey, as the subdivision of a house, whilst in addition to inhabited and uninhabited houses, those occupied by day, but not by night, were separately recorded.

    7
    11
  • The floor of the church, built partly on the rock, partly upon foundations, and, at the east end, over a crypt, is on a level with the uppermost storey of the monastic buildings.

    6
    9
  • In the villages of the western Atlas the greater part of the upper storey consists of a sort of rough verandah.

    5
    6
  • So long as she lived, her small salon in the attic storey of the great house was a centre of attraction for many of the most illustrious personages in Europe.

    5
    7
  • So long as she lived, her small salon in the attic storey of the great house was a centre of attraction for many of the most illustrious personages in Europe.

    5
    7
  • The houses at Pompeii are generally low, rarely exceeding two storeys in height, and it appears certain that the upper storey was generally of a slight construction, and occupied by small rooms, serving as garrets, or sleeping places for slaves, and perhaps for the females of the family.

    4
    4
  • yvvacKE70v, from yvvi i, woman), that part in a Greek house which was specially reserved for the women, in contradistinction to the "andron," the men's quarters; in the larger houses there was an open court with peristyles round, and as a rule all the rooms were on the same level; in smaller houses the servants were placed in an upper storey, and this seems to have been the case to a certain extent in the Homeric house of the Odyssey.

    4
    5
  • The nave, on each side, has nine pointed arches in the basement storey, nine round arches in the triforium, and thirty-six pointed arches in the clerestory, through which an arcade is carried on both sides.

    4
    6
  • On account of the warm climate the cornices are wide, the upper storey projects over the lower, and the outer walls are fitted with sliding frames.

    3
    7
  • Brick is the ordinary building material, and the dwelling-houses are mostly of one storey.

    2
    0
  • The survey for the Truckee-Carson system was begun in 1902, with the object of utilizing the waters flowing to waste in western Nevada for the irrigation and reclamation of the adjacent arid regions in Churchill, Lyon and Storey counties.

    2
    4
  • In the production of silver Nye county ranked first in 1907 ($3,667,973, of which $3,544,7 88 was from Tonopah), Churchill county second ($432,617, from Fairview, Wonder and Stillwater), and Eureka county (with lead silver ores) and Storey county were third and fourth respectively.

    2
    4
  • The massive and richly decorated square tower in the centre of the west façade, which for centuries terminated in a temporary spire, was completed in 1890, according to the original plans, by the addition of an octagonal storey and a tall open spire (528 ft.), the loftiest ecclesiastical erection in the world, outstripping the twin spires of Cologne cathedral by 21 ft.

    2
    4
  • The eighth storey, which contains the bells, is of much smaller diameter than the rest of the tower, and has only twelve columns.

    2
    4
  • In the production of silver Nye county ranked first in 1907 ($3,667,973, of which $3,544,7 88 was from Tonopah), Churchill county second ($432,617, from Fairview, Wonder and Stillwater), and Eureka county (with lead silver ores) and Storey county were third and fourth respectively.

    2
    4
  • The basement storey has the same number of faces formed into convex flutes which are alternately angular and semicircular.

    2
    7
  • This gives access to a whole series of halls and private rooms (halls " of the Colonnades," " of the Double Axes," " Queen's Megaron" with bath-room attached and remains of the fish fresco, " Treasury " with ivory figures and other objects of art), together with extensive remains of an upper storey.

    1
    0
  • Its subject, which is of high historical value as a record of costume, represents the translation of the body of St Mark, and gives us a view of the west façade of the church as it was at the beginning of the 13th century before the addition of the ogee gables, with alternating crockets and statues, and the intermediate pinnacled canopies placed between the five great arches of the upper storey.

    1
    0
  • Ancient staircases leading to the first storey.

    1
    0
  • Two ruined staircases leading to the lower storey.

    1
    0
  • In the summer the population sleeps and dines upon the roofs, which thus constitute to all intents a third storey.

    1
    0
  • The church of St Peter has a remarkable west tower of pre-Conquest workmanship, excepting the early Norman top storey.

    1
    0
  • It has a lofty campanile, surmounted by a graceful octagonal upper storey.

    1
    0
  • high, with 37 windows in each storey.

    1
    0
  • In buildings to be used as offices, hotels, apartments, &c., it is usual in establishing the loads for the purpose of computation to assume that the columns carrying the roof and the upper storey will be called upon to sustain the full dead load due to material and the maximum computed variable load, but it is customary' to reduce the variable loads at the rate of about 5% storey by storey towards the base, until a minimum of about 20% of the entire variable load is reached, for it is evidently impossible that the building can be loaded by a densely-packed moving crowd in all of its storeys simultaneously.

    1
    1
  • The whole surface of the ponderous upper storey is covered with a diaper pattern in slabs of creamy white Istrian stone and red Verona marble, giving a delicate rosy-orange hue to the building.

    1
    2
  • The relics of the two Marks, who are said to have been buried at Saintes-Maries, are bestowed in the upper storey of the apse of the fortress-church, a remarkable building of the 12th century with crenelated and machicolated walls.

    1
    3
  • high; beneath it is a public wine-cellar, and on the first storey a grand municipal hall.

    1
    3
  • A row of gargoyles surmounts each storey of the facade, which is also ornamented by sculptured friezes.

    1
    3
  • Above this storey rise two towers of five stages, the fifth stage being formed by an octagonal cupola.

    1
    3
  • The basement storey is generally built of the soft calcareous stone of the neighbouring hills, and the upper storey, which contains the harem, of painted brick.

    1
    3
  • Three-fourths of all the buildings of the city are of one very high storey; there are but a few dozen buildings as high as four storeys.

    1
    3
  • Above this storey rise two towers of five stages, the fifth stage being formed by an octagonal cupola.

    1
    3
  • The dauphin was concealed in the fourth storey of the Tower, a wooden figure being substituted for him.

    1
    4
  • The campanile, in the Renaissance style, dates from 1451-1493, but the last storey was added at the end of the 16th century.

    1
    7
  • The campanile, in the Renaissance style, dates from 1451-1493, but the last storey was added at the end of the 16th century.

    1
    7
  • A bold projecting balcony, richly ornamented, runs round each storey.

    0
    0
  • The walls of the rooms, which stood only to the height of one storey, were from 9 to 25 ft.

    0
    0
  • The practical limit of height was reached when the sectional area of the masonry of the piers of the exterior walls in the lower storey had to be made so great, in order to support safely the weight of the dead load of the walls and floors and the accidental load imposed upon the latter in use, as to affect seriously the value of the lower storeys on account of the loss of light and floor space.

    0
    0
  • " If buildings are made fire-proof entirely, and have skeleton construction so designed that their enclosing walls do not carry the weight of the floors or roof, then their walls shall be not less than twelve inches in thickness; and provided, also, that such walls shall be thoroughly anchored to the iron skeleton, and provided, also, that, whether the weight of such walls rests upon beams or pillars, such beams or pillars must be made strong enough in each storey to carry the weight of wall resting upon them without reliance upon the walls below them.

    0
    0
  • The advantages that led to the very rapid introduction of this system were not only the power of greatly reducing the size of the piers, but the enormous facility afforded for quick construction, the small amount of materials relatively used and the proportionately small load upon the foundations, and the fact that as the walls are supported at each storey directly from the cage, the masonry can be begun at any storey independently of the masonry below it.

    0
    0
  • In buildings to be used as offices, hotels, apartments, &c., it is usual in establishing the loads for the purpose of computation to assume that the columns carrying the roof and the upper storey will be called upon to sustain the full dead load due to material and the maximum computed variable load, but it is customary' to reduce the variable loads at the rate of about 5% storey by storey towards the base, until a minimum of about 20% of the entire variable load is reached, for it is evidently impossible that the building can be loaded by a densely-packed moving crowd in all of its storeys simultaneously.

    0
    0
  • Dawes (New York, 1892); Moorfield Storey (Boston, ¶900); and George H.

    0
    0
  • One of the halls has interesting paintings of1377-1380on its wooden ceiling; and in the upper storey of the court is a splendid three-light Gothic window.

    0
    0
  • In 1499 he again planned an escape, which was to be shared by another prisoner, the unfortunate Edward of Clarence, earl of Warwick, whose cell was in the storey above his own.

    0
    0
  • It is a cruciform structure of transitional Norman and later dates, its central tower having the upper storey set diagonally upon the lower.

    0
    0
  • storey looking forward to hearing the stories which you were unable to write about!

    0
    0
  • storey short stories (partly selected from Moira Burgess, ed.

    0
    0
  • storey: - Only one single story dwelling will be allowed to be built on the plot proposed to be sold.

    0
    0
  • The houses are often of one storey only.

    0
    0
  • Externally it is an irregular octagon, each face consisting of a lower storey with a semicircular arch (in three cases occupied by a portal), with sculptures by Antelami, four tiers of small columns supporting as many continuous architraves, and forming open galleries, and above these (an addition of the Gothic period) a row of five engaged columns supporting a series of pointed arches and a cornice.

    0
    0
  • yvvacKE70v, from yvvi i, woman), that part in a Greek house which was specially reserved for the women, in contradistinction to the "andron," the men's quarters; in the larger houses there was an open court with peristyles round, and as a rule all the rooms were on the same level; in smaller houses the servants were placed in an upper storey, and this seems to have been the case to a certain extent in the Homeric house of the Odyssey.

    0
    0
  • The survey for the Truckee-Carson system was begun in 1902, with the object of utilizing the waters flowing to waste in western Nevada for the irrigation and reclamation of the adjacent arid regions in Churchill, Lyon and Storey counties.

    0
    0
  • and Storey county's a little more than $250,000.

    0
    0
  • This gives access to a whole series of halls and private rooms (halls " of the Colonnades," " of the Double Axes," " Queen's Megaron" with bath-room attached and remains of the fish fresco, " Treasury " with ivory figures and other objects of art), together with extensive remains of an upper storey.

    0
    0
  • The relics of the two Marks, who are said to have been buried at Saintes-Maries, are bestowed in the upper storey of the apse of the fortress-church, a remarkable building of the 12th century with crenelated and machicolated walls.

    0
    0
  • The dauphin was concealed in the fourth storey of the Tower, a wooden figure being substituted for him.

    0
    0
  • and the lower storey of the left wing of the Cour de la Fontaine are the work of the same architect, who also rebuilt the two-storeyed Chapelle St Saturnin.

    0
    0
  • In the highest hell rules alone the grisly king Sh'dum, "the warrior"; in the storey immediately beneath is Giv, "the great"; and in the lowest is Krun or Karkum, the oldest and most powerful of all, commonly called "the great mountain of flesh" (Third rabba d'besra), but also "the first-born of darkness."

    0
    0
  • The ordinary Venetian house was built round a courtyard, and was one storey high; on the roof was an open loggia for drying clothes; in front, between the house and the water, ran the fondamenta.

    0
    0
  • Its subject, which is of high historical value as a record of costume, represents the translation of the body of St Mark, and gives us a view of the west façade of the church as it was at the beginning of the 13th century before the addition of the ogee gables, with alternating crockets and statues, and the intermediate pinnacled canopies placed between the five great arches of the upper storey.

    0
    0
  • Towards the end of the 14th century, this façade, with its lower colonnade, upper loggia with handsome Gothic tracery, and the vast impending upper storey, which give to the whole building its striking appearance and audacious design, had been carried as far as the tenth column on the piazzetta side.

    0
    0
  • Above this is a lofty third storey, pierced with a few large windows, with pointed arches once filled with tracery, which is now lost.

    0
    0
  • The whole surface of the ponderous upper storey is covered with a diaper pattern in slabs of creamy white Istrian stone and red Verona marble, giving a delicate rosy-orange hue to the building.

    0
    0
  • a main building with wings; the large amount of window space; the comparative flatness of the façades; the employment of a cornice to each storey; the effect of light and shade given by the balconies; and in churches by the circular pediments on the facades.

    0
    0
  • The more remarkable are Sansovino's Palazzo Corner, Longhena's massive and imposing Palazzo Pesaro, the Palazzo Rezzonico, from designs by Longhena with the third storey added by Massari, Sammicheli's Palazzo Corner at San Polo, and Massari's well-proportioned and dignified Palazzo Grassi at San Samuele, built in 1740.

    0
    0
  • The Stoa consisted of a series of 21 chambers, probably shops, faced by a double colonnade, the outer columns being of the Doric order, the inner unfluted, with lotus-leaf capitals; it possessed an upper storey fronted with Ionic columns.

    0
    0
  • Ancient staircases leading to the first storey.

    0
    0
  • Two ruined staircases leading to the lower storey.

    0
    0
  • Almost without exception, they had their origin in small burial areas, the property of private persons or of families, gradually ramifying and receiving additions of one subterranean storey after another as each was required for interments.

    0
    0
  • When the original area had been mined in this way as far as was consistent with stability, a second storey of galleries was begun at a lower level, reached by a new staircase.

    0
    0
  • Of this nature is the very remarkable cemetery at Poggio Gaiella, near Chiusi, the ancient Clusium, of a portion of the principal storey of which the woodcut (fig.

    0
    0
  • - Plan of a portion of the principal storey in the Poggio Gajella.

    0
    0
  • In the summer the population sleeps and dines upon the roofs, which thus constitute to all intents a third storey.

    0
    0
  • The massive and richly decorated square tower in the centre of the west façade, which for centuries terminated in a temporary spire, was completed in 1890, according to the original plans, by the addition of an octagonal storey and a tall open spire (528 ft.), the loftiest ecclesiastical erection in the world, outstripping the twin spires of Cologne cathedral by 21 ft.

    0
    0
  • The back of the obelisk is plain, but the front and sides are subdivided into storeys by a series of bands and plates, each storey having panels sunk into it which seem to represent windows with mullions and transom.

    0
    0
  • The guru replied, "Emperor Aurangzeb, I was on the top storey of my prison, but I was not looking at thy private apartments or at thy queen's.

    0
    0
  • The principal buildings are the parish church of St Thomas (restored 1874), the church of St David (r866), a Roman Catholic church, and Baptist, Calvinistic, Methodist, Congregational and Wesleyan chapels; the intermediate and technical schools (1895), Davies's endowed (elementary) school (1789), the Gwyn Hall (1888), the town hall, with corn exchange in the basement storey, and the market-house.

    0
    0
  • The eighth storey, which contains the bells, is of much smaller diameter than the rest of the tower, and has only twelve columns.

    0
    0
  • The upper storey often recedes, leaving wide corridors under the overhanging eaves, and in the " plazas " there are frequently covered arcades.

    0
    0
  • The Palazzo della Ragione, with its great hall on the upper floor, is reputed to have the largest roof unsupported by columns in Europe; the hall is nearly rectangular, its length 2672 ft., its breadth 89 ft., and its height 78 ft.; the walls are covered with symbolical paintings in fresco; the building stands upon arches, and the upper storey is surrounded by an open loggia, not unlike that which surrounds the basilica of Vicenza; the Palazzo was begun in 1172 and finished in 1219; in 1306 Fra Giovanni, an Augustinian friar, covered the whole with one roof; originally there were three roofs, spanning the three chambers into which the hall was at first divided; the internal partition walls remained till the fire of 1420, when the Venetian architects who undertook the restoration removed them, throwing all three compartments into one and forming the present great hall.

    0
    0
  • The church of St Peter has a remarkable west tower of pre-Conquest workmanship, excepting the early Norman top storey.

    0
    0
  • It has a lofty campanile, surmounted by a graceful octagonal upper storey.

    0
    0
  • The facades of his palaces were in the lower storey only decorated by rustication, of which he made great use, while the upper part was intended to be decorated with frescoes, which (as we have said) have in most cases perished.

    0
    0
  • high; beneath it is a public wine-cellar, and on the first storey a grand municipal hall.

    0
    0
  • A row of gargoyles surmounts each storey of the facade, which is also ornamented by sculptured friezes.

    0
    0
  • The vaulting of the three portals is of exceptional depth owing to the projection of the lower storey of the facade.

    0
    0
  • Brick is the ordinary building material, and the dwelling-houses are mostly of one storey.

    0
    0
  • The term tenement, too, was substituted for that of storey, as the subdivision of a house, whilst in addition to inhabited and uninhabited houses, those occupied by day, but not by night, were separately recorded.

    0
    0
  • The floor of the church, built partly on the rock, partly upon foundations, and, at the east end, over a crypt, is on a level with the uppermost storey of the monastic buildings.

    0
    0
  • high, with 37 windows in each storey.

    0
    0
  • The houses, generally of a single storey or two at most, are frequently separated from each other by rows of trees.

    0
    0
  • The first sources of the enormous wealth he subsequently attained were his introduction of sleeping-cars for railways, and his purchase (1864) of Storey Farm on Oil Creek, where a large profit was secured from the oil-wells.

    0
    0
  • Its houses are of the usual central American type, constructed of adobe, rarely more than one storey high, and surrounded by courtyards with ornamental gateways.

    0
    0
  • The upper storey was probably of wood.

    0
    0
  • The better sort of houses in Manila have two storeys, the lower one built of brick or stone and the upper one of wood, roofed with red Spanish tile or with corrugated iron; the upper storey contains the living-rooms, and the lower has servants' rooms, store-houses, stables, carriage-houses and poultry yards.

    0
    0
  • On account of the warm climate the cornices are wide, the upper storey projects over the lower, and the outer walls are fitted with sliding frames.

    0
    0
  • the street; while the windows were generally to be found only in the upper storey, and were in all cases small and insignificant, without any attempt at architectural effect.

    0
    0
  • It was surrounded on three sides by a series of porticos supported on columns; and these porticos were originally surmounted by a gallery or upper storey, traces of the staircases leading to which still remain, though the gallery itself has altogether disappeared.

    0
    0
  • The houses at Pompeii are generally low, rarely exceeding two storeys in height, and it appears certain that the upper storey was generally of a slight construction, and occupied by small rooms, serving as garrets, or sleeping places for slaves, and perhaps for the females of the family.

    0
    0
  • The houses are almost all of one storey, built in the quaint style of southern Spain, with red-tile roofs, and the better ones with verandas and court gardens.

    0
    0
  • The basement storey is generally built of the soft calcareous stone of the neighbouring hills, and the upper storey, which contains the harem, of painted brick.

    0
    0
  • Three-fourths of all the buildings of the city are of one very high storey; there are but a few dozen buildings as high as four storeys.

    0
    0
  • The second storey is not added till a son marries.

    0
    0
  • In the villages of the western Atlas the greater part of the upper storey consists of a sort of rough verandah.

    0
    0
  • Owing to the prevalence of earthquakes, private houses are usually of one storey only, and are built of sun-dried bricks, white-washed.

    0
    0
  • The nave, on each side, has nine pointed arches in the basement storey, nine round arches in the triforium, and thirty-six pointed arches in the clerestory, through which an arcade is carried on both sides.

    0
    0
  • The purplish red of the sandstone at the base is finely modulated, through a pale pink in the second storey, to a dark orange at the summit, which harmonizes with the blue of an Indian sky.

    0
    0
  • The basement storey has the same number of faces formed into convex flutes which are alternately angular and semicircular.

    0
    0
  • Then rises a plain storey, and above it soars a partially fluted storey, the shaft of which is adorned with bands of marble and red sandstone.

    0
    0
  • A bold projecting balcony, richly ornamented, runs round each storey.

    0
    0
  • The walls of the rooms, which stood only to the height of one storey, were from 9 to 25 ft.

    0
    0
  • The practical limit of height was reached when the sectional area of the masonry of the piers of the exterior walls in the lower storey had to be made so great, in order to support safely the weight of the dead load of the walls and floors and the accidental load imposed upon the latter in use, as to affect seriously the value of the lower storeys on account of the loss of light and floor space.

    0
    0
  • " If buildings are made fire-proof entirely, and have skeleton construction so designed that their enclosing walls do not carry the weight of the floors or roof, then their walls shall be not less than twelve inches in thickness; and provided, also, that such walls shall be thoroughly anchored to the iron skeleton, and provided, also, that, whether the weight of such walls rests upon beams or pillars, such beams or pillars must be made strong enough in each storey to carry the weight of wall resting upon them without reliance upon the walls below them.

    0
    0
  • The advantages that led to the very rapid introduction of this system were not only the power of greatly reducing the size of the piers, but the enormous facility afforded for quick construction, the small amount of materials relatively used and the proportionately small load upon the foundations, and the fact that as the walls are supported at each storey directly from the cage, the masonry can be begun at any storey independently of the masonry below it.

    0
    0
  • Dawes (New York, 1892); Moorfield Storey (Boston, ¶900); and George H.

    0
    0
  • One of the halls has interesting paintings of1377-1380on its wooden ceiling; and in the upper storey of the court is a splendid three-light Gothic window.

    0
    0
  • In 1499 he again planned an escape, which was to be shared by another prisoner, the unfortunate Edward of Clarence, earl of Warwick, whose cell was in the storey above his own.

    0
    0
  • It is a cruciform structure of transitional Norman and later dates, its central tower having the upper storey set diagonally upon the lower.

    0
    0
  • and the lower storey of the left wing of the Cour de la Fontaine are the work of the same architect, who also rebuilt the two-storeyed Chapelle St Saturnin.

    0
    2
  • The more remarkable are Sansovino's Palazzo Corner, Longhena's massive and imposing Palazzo Pesaro, the Palazzo Rezzonico, from designs by Longhena with the third storey added by Massari, Sammicheli's Palazzo Corner at San Polo, and Massari's well-proportioned and dignified Palazzo Grassi at San Samuele, built in 1740.

    0
    2
  • - Plan of a portion of the principal storey in the Poggio Gajella.

    0
    2
  • The back of the obelisk is plain, but the front and sides are subdivided into storeys by a series of bands and plates, each storey having panels sunk into it which seem to represent windows with mullions and transom.

    0
    2
  • The principal buildings are the parish church of St Thomas (restored 1874), the church of St David (r866), a Roman Catholic church, and Baptist, Calvinistic, Methodist, Congregational and Wesleyan chapels; the intermediate and technical schools (1895), Davies's endowed (elementary) school (1789), the Gwyn Hall (1888), the town hall, with corn exchange in the basement storey, and the market-house.

    0
    2
  • The Palazzo della Ragione, with its great hall on the upper floor, is reputed to have the largest roof unsupported by columns in Europe; the hall is nearly rectangular, its length 2672 ft., its breadth 89 ft., and its height 78 ft.; the walls are covered with symbolical paintings in fresco; the building stands upon arches, and the upper storey is surrounded by an open loggia, not unlike that which surrounds the basilica of Vicenza; the Palazzo was begun in 1172 and finished in 1219; in 1306 Fra Giovanni, an Augustinian friar, covered the whole with one roof; originally there were three roofs, spanning the three chambers into which the hall was at first divided; the internal partition walls remained till the fire of 1420, when the Venetian architects who undertook the restoration removed them, throwing all three compartments into one and forming the present great hall.

    0
    2
  • The facades of his palaces were in the lower storey only decorated by rustication, of which he made great use, while the upper part was intended to be decorated with frescoes, which (as we have said) have in most cases perished.

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  • The vaulting of the three portals is of exceptional depth owing to the projection of the lower storey of the facade.

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  • The first sources of the enormous wealth he subsequently attained were his introduction of sleeping-cars for railways, and his purchase (1864) of Storey Farm on Oil Creek, where a large profit was secured from the oil-wells.

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  • the street; while the windows were generally to be found only in the upper storey, and were in all cases small and insignificant, without any attempt at architectural effect.

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  • It was surrounded on three sides by a series of porticos supported on columns; and these porticos were originally surmounted by a gallery or upper storey, traces of the staircases leading to which still remain, though the gallery itself has altogether disappeared.

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  • The houses are almost all of one storey, built in the quaint style of southern Spain, with red-tile roofs, and the better ones with verandas and court gardens.

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  • The purplish red of the sandstone at the base is finely modulated, through a pale pink in the second storey, to a dark orange at the summit, which harmonizes with the blue of an Indian sky.

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  • Then rises a plain storey, and above it soars a partially fluted storey, the shaft of which is adorned with bands of marble and red sandstone.

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  • The Stoa consisted of a series of 21 chambers, probably shops, faced by a double colonnade, the outer columns being of the Doric order, the inner unfluted, with lotus-leaf capitals; it possessed an upper storey fronted with Ionic columns.

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  • Almost without exception, they had their origin in small burial areas, the property of private persons or of families, gradually ramifying and receiving additions of one subterranean storey after another as each was required for interments.

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  • From the mode of destruction of the city these upper floors were in most cases crushed in and destroyed, and hence it was long believed that the houses for the most part had but one storey; but recent researches have in many cases brought to light incontestable evidence of the existence of an upper floor, and the frequent occurrence of a small staircase is in itself sufficient proof of the fact.

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  • From the mode of destruction of the city these upper floors were in most cases crushed in and destroyed, and hence it was long believed that the houses for the most part had but one storey; but recent researches have in many cases brought to light incontestable evidence of the existence of an upper floor, and the frequent occurrence of a small staircase is in itself sufficient proof of the fact.

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