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steward

steward

steward Sentence Examples

  • Today, I was asked by the steward how many men fought on the eastern wall, and I could not tell him.

  • A daughter's estate was usually managed for her by her brothers, but if they did not satisfy her, she could appoint a steward.

  • In this place his tact and temper, his dexterity and discrimination, enabled him to do good service, and he was rewarded with Walpole's friendship, a Garter and the place of lord high steward.

  • Mansel, and in 1618 James Howell, author of Epistolae Ho-elianae, was acting as steward.

  • The first seems to have been that founded in 1709 with Richard Estcourt, the actor, as steward.

  • LORD HIGH STEWARD.

  • came to the throne he appointed his young son Thomas, afterwards duke of Clarence, to the office of steward.

  • Notwithstanding the irregular origin of the steward's court, for which Henry VII.

  • On the impeachment of Strafford the lords themselves appointed Arundel to be high steward.

  • The steward's court also differed in certain other particulars from the high court of parliament.

  • Lord Delamere was tried in 1685 in the steward's court; since then all trials of peers have taken place before the lords in parliament.

  • The most recent trial was that of Earl Russell in 1901, when Lord Chancellor Halsbury was made lord high steward.

  • See also the various works on Coronations for the steward's services on these occasions.

  • Afterwards, as is shown by his will, Holinshed served as steward to Thomas Burdet of Bramcott, Warwickshire, and died about 1580.

  • Their descent is traced to a Breton immigrant, Alan the son of Flaald, which Flaald was a brother of Alan, steward (or seneschal) of Dol in Brittany.

  • By the daughter of Ernulf de Hesdin (in Picardy), a Domesday baron, he was father of at least three sons: Jordan, who succeeded to the family office of steward of Dol; William, who inherited Mileham and other estates in England, and who founded the great baronial house of Fitz Alan (afterwards earls of Arundel); and Walter, who was made by David I.

  • steward (dapifer) or seneschal of Scotland.

  • Walter, his grandson, third steward, was appointed by Alexander II.

  • Alexander, fourth steward, the eldest son of Walter, third steward, inherited by his marriage with Jean, granddaughter of Somerled, the islands of Bute and Arran, and on the 2nd of October 1263 led the Scots against Haakon IV., king of Norway, at Largs.

  • James Stewart, the elder son of Alexander, fourth steward, succeeded his father in 1283, and, after distinguishing himself in the wars of Wallace and of Bruce, died in 1309.

  • His son Walter, sixth steward, who had joint command with Sir James Douglas of the left wing at the battle of Bannockburn, married Marjory, daughter of Robert the Bruce, and during the latter's absence in Ireland was entrusted with the government of the kingdom.

  • So far as the limited information at our disposal enables us to form an opinion, the responsibility both for the internal peace of the village, and for its obligations to the outside world, seems to have lain with the lord or his steward (gerefa, villicus) from the beginning.

  • Among ecclesiastical buildings are remains of two monastic foundations - the priory of St Botolph, founded early in the 12th century for Augustinian canons, of which part of the fine Norman west front (in which Roman bricks occur), and of the nave arcades remain; and the restored gateway of the Benedictine monastery of St John, founded by Eudo, steward to William II.

  • On the 2 9 th of November 1538 he was created Baron Audley of Walden; and soon afterwards presided as lord steward at the trials of Henry Pole, Lord Montacute, and of the unfortunate marquess of Exeter.

  • In consequence of the success of these early enterprises his following largely increased, several of the more patriotic nobles - including the steward of Scotland, Sir Andrew Moray, Sir John de Graham, Douglas the Hardy, Wishart, bishop of Glasgow, and others - having joined him.

  • in 1666, laying down a formal borough constitution under a mayor, 2 aldermen, 24 capital burgesses and a high steward.

  • The abbey was founded in 1163 as a Cluniac monastery by Walter Fitzalan, first High Steward of Scotland, the ancestor of the Scottish royal family of Stuart, and dedicated to the Virgin, St James, St Milburga of Much Wenlock in Shropshire (whence came the first monks) and St Mirinus (St Mirren), the patron-saint of Paisley, who is supposed to have been a contemporary of St Columba.

  • The chapel contains the tombs of abbot John Hamilton and of the children of the 1st lord Paisley, and the recumbent effigy of Marjory, daughter of Robert Bruce, who married Walter, the Steward, and was killed while hunting at Knock Hill between Renfrew and Paisley (1316).

  • In 1380-1381 at an inquisition into the liberties of Corfe Castle, the jurors declared that from time immemorial the constable and his steward had held all pleas and amerciaments except those of the mayor's court of Pie Powder, but that the town had judgment by fire, water and combat.

  • He held many college offices, becoming successively lecturer in Greek (1651), mathematics (1653),andhumanity('655), praelector (1657), junior dean (1657), and college steward (1659 and 1660); and according to the habit of the time, he was accustomed to preach in his college chapel and also at Great St Mary's before the university, long before he took holy orders.

  • The bishop appointed the last borough bailiff in 1681, and though the inhabitants in 1772 petitioned for a bailiff the town remained under a steward and grassmen until the 19th century.

  • Egypt was the vast estate of Pharaoh, and the vizier was the steward of it.

  • in 1624, and instituted a mayor, 8 aldermen, 16 capital burgesses, a high steward, common-clerk and other officers.

  • The borough was governed by two bailiffs, both elected at the court leet of the lord of the manor, one by his steward, the other by a borough.

  • The germ of a parliament existed in the crown vassals and the royal officials - chancellor, steward, constable, marischal and the rest - with bishops, priors, earls, barons and other probi homines.

  • At this assembly were Bruce, earl of Annandale; Robert de B rus, earl of Carrick (later king), his son; Comyn, earl of Buchan; John Baliol; and James the Steward of Scotland, of the house of FitzAlan.

  • Percy and Clifford led the English forces to suppress him, and (7th July) made terms with the bishop, the Steward and Robert Bruce, who submitted; but Wallace held out in Ettrick Forest.

  • On hearing of Warenne's advance, Wallace occupied the Abbey Craig at Stirling, commanding the narrow bridge over the Forth; the Steward and Lennox attempted pacific negotiations; a brawl occurred; and next day (11th of September) the English crossed Stirling bridge, marched back again, recrossed, and were attacked in deploying from the bridge.

  • The Scottish horsemen fled from the English cavalry, but the archers of Ettrick fought and died round Sir John Stewart of Bonhill, brother of the Steward.

  • Bruce had but five hundred horse, under Keith the Marischal; Douglas led the levies of his own district and Ettrick Forest; Randolph commanded the men of Moray; Walter Steward, those of the south-western shires; and Angus Og brought to the Scottish standard the light-footed men of the Isles, and, probably, of Lochaber, Moidart, and the western coast in general.

  • He married his daughter, Marjory, to the Steward, and from this union came the Stewart (Stuart) dynasty.

  • The invasion of Ireland by Edward Bruce failed (1315-1318), and Edward fell in battle: after which (1318) parliament settled the crown in the Steward's line, failing male descendants of Robert Bruce.

  • Some took part with Sir Andrew Murray, son of a companion of Wallace, and with the Steward, who contrived to occupy the castle of Dunbarton, the key of western Scotland.

  • Moray, the last male representative of Randolph, with the Constable and Earl Marischal of Scotland, was slain; the Steward made his escape: and, henceforth, the childless David regarded his heir, the Steward, with jealousy and suspicion.

  • The Steward, during the king's captivity, was regent, and the Douglas of Liddesdale (the son of Archibald and nephew of the Good Lord James) drove the English out of Douglasdale, Teviotdale and the forest of Ettrick.

  • In May 1363 David put down a rising headed by the Steward, and then, in October, went to London, where he and the earl of Douglas made arrangements by which the countries were to be united under Edward III.

  • Possibly David had, as one motive for his scheme, the very dubious legitimacy of the children of the Steward, a probable cause of civil war and a disputed succession.

  • He had also private reasons for disliking the Steward, who was on bad terms with the widow, Margaret Logie (by birth a Drummond), whom David had married on the death of his first wife.

  • For nearly two centuries each reign began with a long royal minority, increasing the power and multiplying the resolved to stand by the Steward and the blood of Bruce, preferred the heavy taxation and the turbulence inevitable under such a king as David to union under an English prince.

  • But the necessary taxation was resisted by various nobles, including John of the Isles (1368), who had married a daughter of the Steward.

  • settlement of the crown in his female line, than the undisputed acceptance of the Steward's children as heirs to the throne.

  • 24) and the parable of the Unjust Steward (Luke xvi.

  • (1316-1390), called "the Steward," king of Scotland, was a son of Walter, the steward of Scotland (d.

  • Soon after the infant David became king in 1329, the Steward began to take a prominent part in the affairs of Scotland.

  • Having handed over the duties of government to David, the Steward escaped from the battle of Neville's Cross in 1346, and was again chosen regent while the king was a captive in England.

  • Accused, probably without truth, of desertion at Neville's Cross, the Steward as heir-apparent was greatly chagrined by the king's proposal to make Edward III.

  • Everyone born of villein stock belonged to his master and was bound to undertake any service which might be imposed on him by the master's or the steward's command.

  • The governing body consisted of a high steward, deputy steward, two water-bailiffs and 28 burgesses, but the cdrporation was abolished by the Municipal Corporation Act of 1883, and a Local Board was formed, which, under the Local Government Act, gave place in 1894 to an urban district council.

  • Before this date it was under the superintendence of a constable appointed by the steward of the lord of the manor.

  • " In this capacity William Fitz-Osbern, the steward of Normandy, and Odo of Bayeux, acted during the Conqueror's visit to the continent in 1067; they were left, according to William of Poitiers, the former to govern the north of England, the latter to hold rule in Kent, vice sua; Florence of Worcester describes them as "custodes Angliae," and Ordericus Vitalis gives to their office the name of " praefectura."

  • It would seem most probable that William Fitz-Osbern at least was left in his character of steward, and that the Norman seneschalship was thus the origin of the English justiciarship " (Stubbs's Constitutional History, i.

  • One outstanding case, however, that of Dr Steward,' casts some suspicion on all the others.

  • The terms of Buckingham's note' concerning it might easily have aroused doubts; and we find that the further course of the action was to all appearances exactly accommodated to Dr Steward, who 4 A position which Bacon in some respects approved.

  • By this charter the burgesses acquired the right of nominating annually two of their number for the office of portreeve so that the lord's steward might select one of them to exercise the office, an arrangement which continued till 1835; the bailiff's functions were defined and curtailed, and the lord's chancery was to be continually kept open for all requiring writs, and in Gower - not wherever the lord might happen to be.

  • Democrat1835-1840William Woodbridge Whig1840-1841James Wright Gordon (acting)„1841-1842John Steward Barry..

  • „1848-1850John Steward Barry..

  • Amongst them, actually or potentially, are the grand steward (0yas oircovo,uos), who serves him as deacon in the liturgy and presents candidates for orders; the grand visitor (µryas oaKEAAaptos), who superintends the monasteries; the sacristan (o - KEvocAuAa); the chancellor (X apr041,Xa), who superintends ecclesiastical causes; the deputyvisitor (o rou caKEAAiov), who visits the nunneries; the protonotary (7rpwrovorapcos); the logothete (Aoy06Erns), a most important lay officer, who represents the patriarch at the Porte and elsewhere outside; the censer-bearer, who seems to be also a kind of captain of the guard (Kavarpio-cos or Kavvrp11vQLos); the referendary (pEckpevSapcos); the secretary (i)7rown L uoyp x4wv); the chief syndic (7rpwrEK&Kos), 1 The numbers have varied from time to time.

  • He studied law and history at Leiden from 1606 to 1609, and in June of the latter year received from Prince Maurice of Orange the appointment of steward of Muiden, bailiff of Gooiland, and lord of Weesp, a joint office of great emolument.

  • The steward of the court acted as judge, presiding wholly in a judicial character, the ministerial acts being executed by the bailiff.

  • dated 1622 instituted two bailiffs, fourteen capital burgesses, four justices of the peace, a high steward and under steward, two serjeantsat-mace and a court of record.

  • The office of mayor was created between the years 1350-1352, and an inquisition of 1392 records that the mayor held a court of pie-powder and governed the town in the absence of the steward.

  • The necessary officers of a forest are a steward, verderers, foresters, regarders, agisters and woodwards.

  • Here they were on safe ground, for the misdeeds of Lord Latimerthe kings chamberlain, Lord Nevillehis steward, Richard Lyonshis financial agent, and Alice Perrershis greedy and shameless mistress, had been so flagrant that it was hard for Lancaster to Ov~hn~ defend them.

  • being now on the throne, Leicester secured the earldom of Lancaster and his brother's lands, becoming also steward of England; he knighted the young king and was the foremost Table Of The Principal Descendants Of John Of Gaunt.

  • He was steward of England and one of the original knights of the order of the garter.

  • Like the thrifty steward he was, he saw with growing concern the waste of the national resources and the strain upon commerce, with a public debt swollen to what then seemed the desperate sum of £400,000,000.

  • In 354 B.C. Eubulus became steward of the treasury.

  • The temporal chief had his steward who superintended the collection of his rents and tributes; in like manner the coarb of a religious sept had his airchinnech (Anglo-Irish erenach, herenach), whose office was generally, but not necessarily, hereditary.

  • Colbert, an agent of Le Tellier, the honest steward of Mazarins dishonest fortunes, had a future opened to him by cornert the fall of Fouquet (1661).

  • All men of political influence were either in open opposition or, when they belonged to the Conservative parties, were holding aloof in disgust at the predominance of the queens favorites, Gonzales Brabo, a mere ruffian, and Marion, her steward, whose position in the palace was perfectly well known.

  • and Elizabeth, but before 1580, when an ordinance was drawn up for the government of the borough, the corporation had considerably developed, including a high steward, recorder, mayor, 6 aldermen, 20 common councillors, a town clerk and a crier of the court; and the new charter granted by Charles II.

  • The government was by the steward and bailiffs of the bishop of Winchester, assisted by constables, wardmen and other officers.

  • The name of the steward of Abram's establishment is given in Genesis xv.

  • His father's favourites were exiled; foreigners were ousted from public positions and their places taken by natives; and important economies were effected, which earned for John George the surname of Oekonom, or steward.

  • Before 1482 the burgesses were holding the town at a fee farm rent of twenty marks, but the abbot still had practical control of the town, and his steward presided over the court at which the bailiffs were chosen.

  • After the Dissolution the manor with the markets and fairs and other privileges was granted to Sir Philip Hoby, who increased his power over the town by persuading the burgesses to agree that, after they had nominated six candidates for the office of bailiff, the steward of the court instructed by him should indicate the two to be chosen.

  • About 1160 Walter Fitzalan, the first high steward of Scotland, built a castle on an eminence by the side of the Clyde (still called Castle Hill), the original seat of the royal house of Stewart.

  • Today, I was asked by the steward how many men fought on the eastern wall, and I could not tell him.

  • Genesis chapter 40 (TEV) 1 Some time later the king of Egypt's wine steward and his chief baker offended the king.

  • catamaran compared an excellent steward.

  • Little diamond began twin-hulled catamaran compared an excellent steward.

  • Generally mitigating circumstances for failure to complete require to be considered by the Door Steward Registration Panel.

  • In Twelfth Night, also by Shakespeare, a trick is played on Malvolio, a steward to the rich countess Olivia.

  • The Steward reads Prayers in the Family twice a Day, and maintains an exemplary decorum in the House.

  • We have no whole oats, " the Steward replied, with much deference.

  • He became steward of the local Working Men's Club and after attending evening classes he became a pit deputy.

  • dick morris steward for waiter tall ship no.

  • He was employed as an electrical fitter at GEC Industrial Controls and became a Shop Steward and a Site Convenor.

  • The Court Steward and his Ladies of the Court entertain you in song accompanied by the harpist.

  • Piers Steward took 5 for 4 including a hat trick.

  • The group included keyboardist McKinley Horton, drummer Daryl Burgee and fellow Heaven & Earth vocalist Keith Steward.

  • made by THE OFFICIAL STEWARD IN THE COLLECTING RING.

  • Island tour i than dick morris steward for waiter tall ship no.

  • They must be informed of their right to be accompanied by a fellow employe or representative, shop steward or trade union official.

  • His duties as Steward required him to be so and in his diary he frequently employs Latin words and terms drawn from legal phraseology.

  • Can you arrange to meet with your steward or workplace rep to talk about how to take the issue forward?

  • Witness administered restoratives, and wanted to get a cab to take him home, but STEWARD would not let him.

  • Thought to have become Arthur's steward, definitely a hero in battle, a humorous is slightly scatty character.

  • shop steward or trade union official.

  • However, after I was elected shop steward we began a recruitment exercise in January 2000.

  • That's exactly what Tesco stock controller Kimberley Leighton did last year when she became a shop steward.

  • Their decision came after BECTU issued an ultimatum threatening strike action in support of a suspended shop steward.

  • shop steward involved in the Hackney struggle, explained how many workers were drawing this conclusion through their struggle.

  • A senior shop steward asked to do a health and safety inspection on the conveyor involved.

  • Norma, a former shop steward in the Health Service, was a proud trade unionist all her life.

  • The six included the shop steward and three employees from the food essences section and one other shop steward.

  • I was berating people as tho I was a trade union shop steward!

  • Simon Cawdell sounds like the incumbents ' shop steward.

  • It is certainly not my intention to sound like the ' incumbant's shop steward!

  • shop steward for many years.

  • The stewards within an NHS region elect a regional steward.

  • And the lord commended the unjust steward, because he had done wisely.

  • Among them were the chief steward of the vessel.

  • Emergency vehicles attending the site should be met by the person in charge of safety or a senior steward.

  • Alumni there are prices ever starting by the funnel including twice-a-day steward.

  • Mr Cairns is a full time shop steward within Coventry City on behalf of the TGWU.

  • Your cabin steward will be able to answer any questions you may have.

  • However, there were certain functions which the lord steward was obliged to undertake whenever parliament was in being.

  • I was berating people as tho I was a trade union shop steward!

  • In 1998 also, I was a volunteer steward on the festival camp site.

  • steward of the manor.

  • stipendiary steward in whose territory the alleged breach of rules has taken place.

  • Local inquiries Local inquiries are conducted by the area stipendiary steward in whose territory the alleged breach of rules has taken place.

  • unjust steward, when he owed a hundred, bade him set down fifty.

  • He was also appointed steward to the countess Szapary, a widow with large estates, and as her representative had a seat in the county assembly.

  • A landowner who did not manage his own estate placed it in the hands of a steward (major), who superintended the working of the estate and collected its revenues.

  • If he had several estates, he appointed a chief steward, who managed the whole of the estates and was called the major domus.

  • OLIVER CROMWELL (1599-1658), lord protector of England, was the 5th and only surviving son of Robert Cromwell of Huntingdon and of Elizabeth Steward, widow of William Lynn.

  • Cromwell was perhaps arrested in his project by his succession in 1636 to the estate of his uncle Sir Thomas Steward, and to his office of farmer of the cathedral tithes at Ely, whither he now removed.

  • "I doubt not to say," declared his steward Maidston, "it drank up his spirits, of which his natural constitution afforded a vast stock, and brought him to his grave."

  • John Maidston, Cromwell's steward, gives the "character of his person."

  • The tenant, or steward, usually had other land of his own.

  • A daughter's estate was usually managed for her by her brothers, but if they did not satisfy her, she could appoint a steward.

  • In 1693 he presided in great state as lord high steward at the trial of Lord Mohun; and on the 4th of May 1694 he was created duke of Leeds.'

  • But just as the king appoints judges to hear placita coram rege ipso, and the feudal lord appoints his seneschal or steward, so the bishop appoints his official.

  • High steward at Richard's crowning, the duke bore the crown and rode as marshal into Westminster Hall.

  • A charter of incorporation given by Elizabeth in 1558 vested the government in a portreeve, a steward and twelve burgesses, the continuance of the corporation being subject to the port and harbour being kept in repair.

  • Her uncle, the duke of Norfolk, presided as lord steward, and gave sentence, weeping, that his niece was to be burned or beheaded as pleased the king.

  • The miners of Derbyshire formed an independent community under the jurisdiction of a steward and barmasters, who held two Barmote courts every year.

  • The bishop of Glasgow, James the steward, and Sir Alexander Lindesay became sureties for Bruce until he delivered his daughter Marjorie as a hostage.

  • Soon afterwards she married Walter the steward (d.

  • The death of his brother and his daughter rendered a resettlement of the crown advisable, and it was settled on his grandson, Robert, son of Marjorie and Walter the steward, in case Bruce died without sons, with a provision as to the regency in case of a minor heir in favour of Randolph.

  • In September 1319 an attempt to recover Berwick was repelled by Walter the steward, and Bruce took occasion of a visit to compliment his son-in-law and raise the walls 10 ft.

  • It has long been extinct in the British Isles, where it once abounded, but traces have been found of its survival in Chartley Forest, Staffordshire, in an entry of 1683 in an account-book of the steward of the manor, and it possibly remained till much later in the more remote parts of Scotland and Ireland (J.

  • The supervision of the whole order was vested in a "Board of Erin," meeting quarterly in England, Ireland or Scotland, and at each meeting arranging a new code of signals and passwords, which were communicated to the national delegate in the United States by the steward of a transatlantic steamship, and thence were transmitted to the various subdivisions.

  • The founder of their greatness was Humphrey III., who in the latter years of Henry I., makes his appearance as a dapifer, or steward, in the royal household.

  • We must distinguish from the later slavery at Rome what Mommsen calls " the old, in some measure innocent slavery, under which the farmer tilled the land along with his slave, or, if he possessed more land than he could manage, placed the slave - either as a steward, or as a sort of lessee obliged to render up a portion of the produce - over a detached farm.

  • Romford was included in the liberty of Havering-atte-Bower, which until 1892 had a jurisdiction of its own distinct from that of the county, with a high steward, magistrates, clerk of the peace, coroner and quarter sessions.

  • We may also mention, as matter of historical interest, the case before the high steward and the House of Lords which arose out of the duel fought on Wimbledon Common between the earl of Cardigan and Captain Harvey Tuckett.

  • The Beauchamps of Elmley, Worcestershire, the greatest house of the name, were founded by the marriage of Walter de Beauchamp with the daughter of Urise d'Abetot, a Domesday baron, which brought him the shrievalty of Worcestershire, the office of a royal steward, and large estates.

  • In this place his tact and temper, his dexterity and discrimination, enabled him to do good service, and he was rewarded with Walpole's friendship, a Garter and the place of lord high steward.

  • In 1777, however, the count resumed the ancient position of his family in the electoral college, and regained the office of steward which he retained until the formal dissolution of the empire in 1806.

  • Mansel, and in 1618 James Howell, author of Epistolae Ho-elianae, was acting as steward.

  • appointed him steward of his household; but these marks of favour did not prevent him from making a compact with some other noblemen to gain supreme influence in the royal council.

  • He was reinforced by his uncle Thomas, earl of Worcester, who, although steward to the household of the prince of Wales, joined his family in rebellion.

  • The only other fact preserved by Thucydides is that Athens appointed a board called the Hellenotamiae (ra,aias, steward) to watch over and administer the treasury of the league, which for some twenty years was kept at Delos, and to receive the contributions (06pos) of the allies who paid in money.

  • He served as steward in several families of position, latterly in that of the duke of Somerset, who ultimately obtained for him the post of riding purveyor to the master of the horse, a sinecure worth about 200 a year.

  • 1 Theodotus, "the first steward of the New Prophecy," was a fellow-worker with Montanus, and almost certainly a prophet.

  • At Rotterdam he lived, he says in a letter to his steward Wheelock, at the rate of less than £200 a year, and yet had much "to dispose of and spend beyond convenient living."

  • Kingsbridge was never represented in parliament or incorporated by charter, the government being by a portreeve, and down to the present day the steward of the manor holds a court leet and court baron and appoints a portreeve and constables.

  • Although it was not until the development of its mineral wealth that it attained to commercial importance, it is a place of some antiquity, and formed the dowry of Marjory, Robert Bruce's daughter, who married Walter, the hereditary steward of Scotland, in 1315.

  • Sale, music; Mr Westall, history; and Mr Thomas Steward, the writing master of Westminster School, instructed her in penmanship.

  • The royal residences and grounds used to be under the control of four different officials - the lord chamberlain, the lord steward, the master of the horse and the commissioners of woods and forests.

  • Baron Stockmar, describing the confusion fostered by this state of things, said The lord steward finds the fuel and lays the fire; the lord chamberlain lights it.

  • The lord chamberlain provides the lamps; the lord steward must clean, trim and light them.

  • It returned two members to parliament in 1302, but no charter of incorporation was issued until that of Elizabeth in 1590, instituting a common council of a mayor and eighteen burgesses, three of whom were to be elected capital burgesses, with a recorder, steward of the borough court, two sergeants-at-mace, and a court of record every three weeks on Monday.

  • Thus, to defend her immense possessions in Volhynia and Podolia, she converted the castles of Bar and Krzemieniec into first-class fortresses, and placed the former in the hands of her Silesian steward, who acquitted himself so manfully of his charge r that "the Tatars fell away from the frontier all the days of Pan Pretficz," and a large population settled securely beneath the walls of Bar, henceforth known as "the bastion of Podolia."

  • The first seems to have been that founded in 1709 with Richard Estcourt, the actor, as steward.

  • The earl of Perth is hereditary steward of Strathearn.

  • MORMAOR, or Mormaer (from two Gaelic words mor, great, and maor, a steward or bailiff), a title used to designate the rulers of the seven provinces into which Celtic Scotland, i.e.

  • Each separate community had its own oeconomus or steward, who was subject to a chief oeconomus stationed at the head establishment.

  • Hester Johnson, Swift's "Stella," was the daughter of Temple's steward, whose cottage still stands.

  • LORD HIGH STEWARD.

  • The Lord High Steward of England, who must not be confused with the Lord Steward, ranks as the first of the great officers of state.

  • The household of the Norman and Angevin kings of England included certain persons of secondary rank, styled dapifers, seneschals or stewards (the prototypes of the lord steward), who were entrusted with domestic and state duties; the former duties were those of purveyors and sewers to the king, the latter were undefined.

  • de Montfort; how he served as steward at the coronation of Eleanor, queen of Henry III., is described in the Exchequer Red Book.

  • The office of steward in France, then recently suppressed, had for some time been the highest office of state in that kingdom, and Simon de Montfort appears to have considered that his hereditary stewardship entitled him to high official position in England; and after his victory at Lewes he repeatedly figures as steward of England in official documents under the great seal.

  • Edmund was succeeded by Thomas, earl of Lancaster, who received a fresh grant of the stewardship to himself and the heirs of his body from Edward II.; and this earl it was who, during the weak administration of the lastmentioned king, first put forward in a celebrated tract the claim of the steward to be the second personage in the realm and supreme judge in parliament, a claim which finds some slight recognition in the preamble to the statute passed against the Despencers in the first year of Edward III.

  • Minutes of these proceedings, in which the duke is stated to have sat "as steward of England," were enrolled by his order.

  • has been followed on all subsequent occasions, except that in modern times it has been the practice to appoint commissioners instead of a steward to superintend this court.

  • In 1397 John of Gaunt created a notable precedent in support of the steward's claim to be supreme judge in parliament by presiding at the trial of the earl of Arundel and others.

  • came to the throne he appointed his young son Thomas, afterwards duke of Clarence, to the office of steward.

  • No permanent steward was ever again created; but a steward was always appointed for coronations to perform the various ceremonial services associated with the office, and, until the Court of Claims was entrusted to commissioners, to preside over that court.

  • Also, in the 15th century, it gradually became the custom to appoint a steward pro hac vice to preside at the trial, or at the proceedings upon the attainder of a peer in parliament; and later, to preside over a court, called the court of the, lord high steward, for the trial of peers when parliament was not sitting.

  • The court of the lord high steward seems to have been first definitely instituted in 1499 for the trial of Edward Plantagenet, earl of Warwick; only two years earlier Lord Audley had been condemned by the court of chivalry, a very different and unpopular tribunal.

  • Notwithstanding the irregular origin of the steward's court, for which Henry VII.

  • The practice of appointing a steward on these occasions to execute judgment upon a peer was kept up till 1477, when George, duke of Clarence, was attainted, and then dropped.

  • Under the Stuarts the criminal jurisdiction of parliament was again resorted to, and when the proceedings against a peer were founded on indictment the appointment of a steward followed as a matter of settled practice.

  • On the impeachment of Strafford the lords themselves appointed Arundel to be high steward.

  • In Danby's case a commission under the great seal issued in the common form adopted for the court of the steward; this was recalled, and the rule agreed to by a joint committee of both houses that a steward for trials of peers upon impeachments was unnecessary.

  • But, as such an appointment was obviously convenient, the lords petitioned for a steward; and a fresh commission was accordingly issued in an amended form, which recited the petition, and omitted words implying that the appointment was necessary.

  • The preference given to the steward's court was largely due to the practice, founded upon the Southampton case, of summoning only a few peers selected by the steward, a practice which made it easy for the king to secure a conviction.

  • The steward's court also differed in certain other particulars from the high court of parliament.

  • For example, it was ruled by Lord Chancellor Jeffreys, as steward at the trial of Lord Delamere, that, in trials of peers which take place during the recess of parliament in the steward's court, the steward is the judge of the court, the court is held before him, his warrant convenes the prisoner to the bar, his,summons convenes the peers for the trial, and he to determine by his sole authority all questions of law that arise in the course of the trial, but that he is to give no vote upon the issue of guilty or not guilty; during a session of parliament, on the contrary, all the peers are both triers and judges, and the steward is only as chairman of the court and gives his vote together with the other lords.

  • Lord Delamere was tried in 1685 in the steward's court; since then all trials of peers have taken place before the lords in parliament.

  • The most recent trial was that of Earl Russell in 1901, when Lord Chancellor Halsbury was made lord high steward.

  • The steward is addressed as "his grace," he has a rod of office, and the commission appointing him is dissolved according to custom by breaking this rod.

  • A court of claims sat and a steward was appointed for the coronation of Edward VII.; and during the procession in Westminster Abbey the duke of Marlborough, as steward, carried "St Edward's crown" in front of the bearer of the Bible (the bishop of London), who immediately preceded the king; this function of the steward is of modern origin.

  • The steward's ancient and particular services at coronations are practically obsolete; the full ceremonies, procession from Westminster Hall and banquet in which he figured prominently, were abandoned on the accession of William IV.

  • For the early history of the steward see L.

  • Vernon-Harcourt, His Grace the Steward and Trial of Peers (1907); for the later history of the office see Sir E.

  • See also the various works on Coronations for the steward's services on these occasions.

  • He was a minister for fifty-five years, and served the Bible Christians as editor, missionary treasurer, book steward and three times president of conference.

  • Afterwards, as is shown by his will, Holinshed served as steward to Thomas Burdet of Bramcott, Warwickshire, and died about 1580.

  • Their descent is traced to a Breton immigrant, Alan the son of Flaald, which Flaald was a brother of Alan, steward (or seneschal) of Dol in Brittany.

  • By the daughter of Ernulf de Hesdin (in Picardy), a Domesday baron, he was father of at least three sons: Jordan, who succeeded to the family office of steward of Dol; William, who inherited Mileham and other estates in England, and who founded the great baronial house of Fitz Alan (afterwards earls of Arundel); and Walter, who was made by David I.

  • steward (dapifer) or seneschal of Scotland.

  • Walter, his grandson, third steward, was appointed by Alexander II.

  • Alexander, fourth steward, the eldest son of Walter, third steward, inherited by his marriage with Jean, granddaughter of Somerled, the islands of Bute and Arran, and on the 2nd of October 1263 led the Scots against Haakon IV., king of Norway, at Largs.

  • James Stewart, the elder son of Alexander, fourth steward, succeeded his father in 1283, and, after distinguishing himself in the wars of Wallace and of Bruce, died in 1309.

  • His son Walter, sixth steward, who had joint command with Sir James Douglas of the left wing at the battle of Bannockburn, married Marjory, daughter of Robert the Bruce, and during the latter's absence in Ireland was entrusted with the government of the kingdom.

  • Carlyle refers to the opinion of genealogists that Cromwell "was indubitably either the ninth or the tenth or some other fractional part of half a cousin of Charles Stuart," but this has been completely exploded by Walter Rye in the Genealogist (" The Steward Genealogy and Cromwell's Royal Descent," new series, vol.

  • So far as the limited information at our disposal enables us to form an opinion, the responsibility both for the internal peace of the village, and for its obligations to the outside world, seems to have lain with the lord or his steward (gerefa, villicus) from the beginning.

  • Among ecclesiastical buildings are remains of two monastic foundations - the priory of St Botolph, founded early in the 12th century for Augustinian canons, of which part of the fine Norman west front (in which Roman bricks occur), and of the nave arcades remain; and the restored gateway of the Benedictine monastery of St John, founded by Eudo, steward to William II.

  • On the 2 9 th of November 1538 he was created Baron Audley of Walden; and soon afterwards presided as lord steward at the trials of Henry Pole, Lord Montacute, and of the unfortunate marquess of Exeter.

  • In consequence of the success of these early enterprises his following largely increased, several of the more patriotic nobles - including the steward of Scotland, Sir Andrew Moray, Sir John de Graham, Douglas the Hardy, Wishart, bishop of Glasgow, and others - having joined him.

  • in 1666, laying down a formal borough constitution under a mayor, 2 aldermen, 24 capital burgesses and a high steward.

  • The abbey was founded in 1163 as a Cluniac monastery by Walter Fitzalan, first High Steward of Scotland, the ancestor of the Scottish royal family of Stuart, and dedicated to the Virgin, St James, St Milburga of Much Wenlock in Shropshire (whence came the first monks) and St Mirinus (St Mirren), the patron-saint of Paisley, who is supposed to have been a contemporary of St Columba.

  • The chapel contains the tombs of abbot John Hamilton and of the children of the 1st lord Paisley, and the recumbent effigy of Marjory, daughter of Robert Bruce, who married Walter, the Steward, and was killed while hunting at Knock Hill between Renfrew and Paisley (1316).

  • In 1380-1381 at an inquisition into the liberties of Corfe Castle, the jurors declared that from time immemorial the constable and his steward had held all pleas and amerciaments except those of the mayor's court of Pie Powder, but that the town had judgment by fire, water and combat.

  • He held many college offices, becoming successively lecturer in Greek (1651), mathematics (1653),andhumanity('655), praelector (1657), junior dean (1657), and college steward (1659 and 1660); and according to the habit of the time, he was accustomed to preach in his college chapel and also at Great St Mary's before the university, long before he took holy orders.

  • The bishop appointed the last borough bailiff in 1681, and though the inhabitants in 1772 petitioned for a bailiff the town remained under a steward and grassmen until the 19th century.

  • Egypt was the vast estate of Pharaoh, and the vizier was the steward of it.

  • in 1624, and instituted a mayor, 8 aldermen, 16 capital burgesses, a high steward, common-clerk and other officers.

  • The borough was governed by two bailiffs, both elected at the court leet of the lord of the manor, one by his steward, the other by a borough.

  • The germ of a parliament existed in the crown vassals and the royal officials - chancellor, steward, constable, marischal and the rest - with bishops, priors, earls, barons and other probi homines.

  • At this assembly were Bruce, earl of Annandale; Robert de B rus, earl of Carrick (later king), his son; Comyn, earl of Buchan; John Baliol; and James the Steward of Scotland, of the house of FitzAlan.

  • The Lanercost contemporary chronicler writes that the bishop of Glasgow and the Steward began the broil, and called in Wallace as the leading brigand in the country-side.

  • Percy and Clifford led the English forces to suppress him, and (7th July) made terms with the bishop, the Steward and Robert Bruce, who submitted; but Wallace held out in Ettrick Forest.

  • On hearing of Warenne's advance, Wallace occupied the Abbey Craig at Stirling, commanding the narrow bridge over the Forth; the Steward and Lennox attempted pacific negotiations; a brawl occurred; and next day (11th of September) the English crossed Stirling bridge, marched back again, recrossed, and were attacked in deploying from the bridge.

  • The Scottish horsemen fled from the English cavalry, but the archers of Ettrick fought and died round Sir John Stewart of Bonhill, brother of the Steward.

  • The Scottish cause seemed stronger than ever, under Bruce, the Steward, the Red Comyn and Lamberton, but in June 1300 Edward mustered a splendid array, and took Carlaverock castle, but, on the arrival of the archbishop of Canterbury with a letter from the pope approving of the Scottish cause, he granted a truce till Whitsuntide 1301.

  • Bruce had but five hundred horse, under Keith the Marischal; Douglas led the levies of his own district and Ettrick Forest; Randolph commanded the men of Moray; Walter Steward, those of the south-western shires; and Angus Og brought to the Scottish standard the light-footed men of the Isles, and, probably, of Lochaber, Moidart, and the western coast in general.

  • He married his daughter, Marjory, to the Steward, and from this union came the Stewart (Stuart) dynasty.

  • The invasion of Ireland by Edward Bruce failed (1315-1318), and Edward fell in battle: after which (1318) parliament settled the crown in the Steward's line, failing male descendants of Robert Bruce.

  • Some took part with Sir Andrew Murray, son of a companion of Wallace, and with the Steward, who contrived to occupy the castle of Dunbarton, the key of western Scotland.

  • Moray, the last male representative of Randolph, with the Constable and Earl Marischal of Scotland, was slain; the Steward made his escape: and, henceforth, the childless David regarded his heir, the Steward, with jealousy and suspicion.

  • The Steward, during the king's captivity, was regent, and the Douglas of Liddesdale (the son of Archibald and nephew of the Good Lord James) drove the English out of Douglasdale, Teviotdale and the forest of Ettrick.

  • In May 1363 David put down a rising headed by the Steward, and then, in October, went to London, where he and the earl of Douglas made arrangements by which the countries were to be united under Edward III.

  • Possibly David had, as one motive for his scheme, the very dubious legitimacy of the children of the Steward, a probable cause of civil war and a disputed succession.

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