Stevenson sentence example

stevenson
  • Stevenson was a fellow of Christ's College from 1559 to 1561, and is perhaps to be identified with a William Stevenson who was a fellow from 1551 to 1554.
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  • Stevenson's well-known Memoir is a sympathetic tribute to his ability and character.
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  • See Victoria County History, Berkshire; Joseph Stevenson, Chronicon Monasterii de Abingdon, A.D.
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  • Mount Vaea, which overlooks Apia and Vailima, the home of Robert Louis Stevenson, is his burial-place and bears a monument to his memory.
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  • Stevenson vividly describes the heroism of the captain and crew.
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  • Stevenson (Edinburgh, 1839), is also very important.
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  • The union of Mardin and Aleppo under the sway of these two amirs, connecting as it did Mesopotamia with Syria, marks an important stage in the revival of Mahommedan power (Stevenson, Crusades in the East, p. 109).
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  • Stevenson's The Crusaders in the East (Cambridge, 1907)is very valuable.
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  • Stevenson's Maps Illustrating the early Discovery and Exploration of America, 1502-1530 (New Brunswick, N.J., 1906).
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  • Stevenson, since dead, discovered in 1896 a small subterranean basilica in the catacomb of Santi Pietro e Marcellino on the Via Labicana, with pious acclamations on the plaster similar to those in the Papal crypt in St Calixtus.
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  • In 1873 he first met Mr Sidney Colvin, who was to prove the closest of his friends and at last the loyal and admirable editor of his works and his correspondence; and to this time are attributed several of the most valuable friendships of Stevenson's life.
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  • Stevenson made no attempt to practice at the bar, and the next years were spent in wanderings in France, Germany and Scotland.
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  • During these four years Stevenson's health, which was always bettered by life out of doors, gave him little trouble.
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  • At Fontainebleau in 1876 Stevenson had met Mrs Osbourne, the lady who afterwards became his wife; she returned to her home in California in 1878, and in August of the following year, alarmed at news of her health, Stevenson hurriedly crossed the Atlantic. He travelled, from lack of means, as a steerage passenger and then as an emigrant, and in December, after hardships which seriously affected his health, he arrived in San Francisco.
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  • In this year was published Virginibus puerisque, the earliest collection of Stevenson's essays.
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  • This did not suit him, but from March 1883 to July 1884 he was at home at a charming house called La Solitude, above Hyeres; this was in many ways to be the happiest station in the painful and hurrying pilgrimage of Stevenson's life.
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  • The Silverado Squatters was published in 1883, and also the more important Treasure Island, which made Stevenson for the first time a popular writer.
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  • In July he was brought back to England, and from this time until August 1887 Stevenson's home was at Bournemouth.
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  • In 1885 he published, after long indecision, his volume of poems, A Child's Garden of Verses, an inferior story, The Body Snatcher, and that admirable romance, Prince Otto, in which the peculiar quality of Stevenson's style was displayed at its highest.
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  • This, however, was a period of great physical prostration, so that 1886 and 1887 were perforce among the least productive years of Stevenson's life.
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  • In the early months of 1887 Stevenson was particularly ill, and he was further prostrated by being summoned in May to the deathbed of his father, who had just returned to Edinburgh from the south.
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  • Early in that year was begun The Wrong Box, a farcical romance in which Mr Lloyd Osbourne participated; Stevenson also began a romance about the Indian Mutiny, which he abandoned.
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  • Whenever the cultivation 'of his estate and the vigorous championship of his Samoan retainers gave him the leisure, Stevenson was during these years almost wholly occupied in writing romances of Scottish life.
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  • In 1893 Stevenson published the important Scottish romance of .Catriona., written as a sequel to Kidnapped, and the three tales illustrative of Pacific Ocean character, Island Nights' Entertainments.
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  • The whole family at Vailima became ill, and the final subjugation of his protege Mataafa, and the destruction of his party in Samoan politics, deeply distressed and discouraged Stevenson.
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  • Of Stevenson's daily avocations, and of the temper of his mind through these years of romantic exile, a clear idea may be obtained by the posthumous Vailima Letters, edited by Mr Sidney Colvin in 1895.
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  • His body was carried next day by sixty sturdy Samoans, who acknowledged Stevenson as their chief, to the summit of the precipitous peak of Vaea, where he had wished to be buried, and where they left him to rest for ever with the Pacific Ocean at his feet.
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  • The charm of the personal character of Stevenson and the romantic vicissitudes of his life are so predominant in the minds of all who knew him, or lived within earshot of his legend, that they made the ultimate position which he will take in the history of English literature somewhat difficult to decide.
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  • It is therefore from the point of view of its "charm" that the genius of Stevenson must be approached, and in this respect there was between himself and his hooks, his manners and his style, his practice and his theory, a very unusual harmony.
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  • There are some living who still hear in every page of Stevenson the voice of the man himself, and see in every turn of his language his flashing smile.
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  • So far, however, as it is possible to disengage one's self from this captivation, it may be said that the mingling of distinct and original vision with a singularly conscientious handling of the English language, in the sincere and wholesome self-consciousness of the strenuous artist, seems to be the central feature of Stevenson as a writer by profession.
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  • No doubt it is still by his romances that Stevenson keeps the wider circle of his readers.
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  • The personal appearance of Stevenson has often been described: he was tall, extremely thin, dark-haired, restless, compelling attention with the lustre of his wonderful brown eyes.
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  • Stevenson (1847-1900) was an accomplished art-critic, who in 1889 became professor of fine arts at University College, Liverpool; he published several works on art (Rubens, 1898; Velasquez, 1895; Raeburn, 1900).
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  • See the Letters of Stevenson to his Family (1899), with the critical and biographical preface by Mr Sidney Colvin; Vailima Letters, to Sidney Colvin (1895), and the Life of Robert Louis Stevenson by Graham Balfour (1901).
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  • A complete edition of Stevenson's works was issued at Edinburgh in 1894-1898.
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  • Among the clubs of the city are the Pacific Club, founded in 1853 as the British Club; the Scottish Thistle Club (1891), of which Robert Louis Stevenson was a member; the Hawaii Yacht Club, and the Polo, Country and University Clubs.
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  • Stevenson (The Expositor, 1902) states clearly the difficulties for those who regard ch.
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  • Stevenson when a boy used to make holiday occasionally, is a golf-course which was laid out by the Lothianburn Club.
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  • Some ill-considered imputations upon Father Damien by a Presbyterian minister produced a memorable tract by Robert Louis Stevenson (An Open Letter to the Rev. Dr Hyde, 1890).
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  • During the years1823-1826he went through the prescribed course at the divinity hall, then presided over by Dr Stevenson MacGill, and on leaving, accompanied a pupil as private tutor to Eton, where he stayed two years.
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  • These MSS are in the University Library of Cambridge, and were transcribed by Father Stevenson.
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  • These have been carefully studied by Cushing, Stevenson and Fewkes.
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  • $ Governor Stevenson resigned on the 13th of February 1871 to become U.S. Senator from Kentucky.
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  • English lurked in farms and hovels, amongst villeins and serfs, in the outlying country-districts, in the distant ' See Stevenson, Waring and Skeat, op. cit.
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  • Colonel Stevenson was meanwhile approaching with a second division from the east, and it was intended that the two should unite.
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  • Uniting with Stevenson's division, the conqueror followed up the pursuit, and brought the war to a close by a second victory at Argaum on the 29th of November, and the storming of Gawilghur on the 15th of December.
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  • Stevenson wrote: " The history of the ` Kaimiloa ' is a story of debauchery, mutiny and waste of government property."
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  • Next year Robert Stevenson modelled a tower and reported that its erection was feasible, but it was only in 1806 that parliamentary powers were obtained, and operations began in August 1807.
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  • Though John Rennie had meanwhile been associated with Stevenson as consulting engineer, the structure in design and details is wholly Stevenson's work.
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  • The best translation is that by the Rev. Joseph Stevenson, in his series of Church Historians of England (1853).
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  • His Recouvrement de Normandie, with other material on the same subject, was edited for the "Rolls" series (Chronicles and Memorials) by Joseph Stevenson in 1863.
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  • The Chronica de Mailros, preserved among the Cotton MSS., was printed at Oxford in 1684 by William Fulman and by the Bannatyne Club in 1835 under the editorship of John Stevenson.
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  • Stevenson, appealed as much to English readers as to their countrymen, patriotic as each of them was in his own way.
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  • Stevenson, "A contemporary description of the Domesday Survey" in The English Historical Review (the general index to which should be consulted) (1907).
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  • Stevenson's various occasional sallies in verse and prose - his Fables for Grown Gentlemen (1761-1770), his Crazy Tales (1762), and his numerous skits at the political opponents of Wilkes, among whose "macaronies" he numbered himself - were collected after his death, and it is impossible to read them without being struck with their close family resemblance in spirit and turn of thought to Sterne's work, inferior as they are in literary genius.
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  • Without Stevenson, Sterne would probably have been a more decorous parish priest, but he would probably never have written Tristram Shandy or left any other memorial of his singular genius.
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  • As the result of the polling in November, 292 Republican presidential electors were chosen, and 155 Democratic electors, elected in Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, and the Southern states, represented the final strength of the Bryan and Stevenson ticket.
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  • Stevenson, stands on a terrace on the southern face.
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  • Stevenson of London is said to have floated for seven hours without finding its end.
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  • The public buildings include, the Clark hospital, the Victoria infirmary convalescent home and the Stevenson institute and mechanics' library.
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  • The most important contemporary sources are Stevenson's Wars of the English in France, Whethamstead's Register, and Beckington's Letters (all in Rolls Ser.), with the various London Chronicles, and the works of Waurin and Monstrelet.
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  • Just below it is the new bridge erected in 1829 from designs by Robert Stevenson, and below this again the railway viaduct.
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  • When the democratic caucus met in closed session, the Stevenson speech was ignored.
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  • With just ten minutes gone he put the clarets in front with a goal that came straight from goalkeeper Alan Stevenson.
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  • Clark Stevenson, an English expat who is one of those who has joined this new gold rush, gives his view.
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  • Robson stars as George Stevenson, a bereaved husband who dreams of sending his wife's ashes into outer space.
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  • Meanwhile, Howard Stevenson has another tale of harrassing English cricketing legends.
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  • The meteorological observatory, with its Stevenson Screen, is atop a small rise.
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  • Defender's witness No 2 ROBERT L. STEVENSON, Aged 35, part-time factory worker, c/o 5 Glen Lane, Paisley.
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  • Whatever may be the ultimate order of reputation among his various books, or whatever posterity may ultimately see fit to ordain as regards the popularity of any of them, it is difficult to believe that the time will ever come in which Stevenson will not be remembered as the most beloved of the writers of that age which he did so much to cheer and stimulate by his example.
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  • Thomas Boston's (1676-1732) memory has been revived by the praise of Stevenson, but his zeal was far exceeded by that of John Wesley (1703-1791), who preached 40,000 sermons, and by that of George Whitefield (1714-1770).
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  • Stevenson to be as common in Samoa (see Island Nights' Entertainments) as in Strathfinlas or on the banks of Loch Awe.
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  • The young writer, as Stevenson has said, instinctively tries to copy whatever seems most admirable, and he shifts his admiration with astonishing versatility.
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  • "There is no way to become original, except to be born so," says Stevenson, and although I may not be original, I hope sometime to outgrow my artificial, periwigged compositions.
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  • Stevenson, whom Miss Sullivan likes and used to read to her pupil, is another marked influence.
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  • Scots Tory MEP Struan Stevenson today condemned the European Court of Justice 's ruling on the legality of the Food Supplements Directive.
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  • Mrs Stevenson moodily stirred in several extra spoonfuls of sugar into her coffee that was strong enough to knock out a bull elephant.
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  • The only person she could sue for negligence was David Stevenson.
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  • At the time of his death Robert Louis Stevenson was working on his unfinished masterpiece, Weir of Hermiston.
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  • Defender 's witness No 2 ROBERT L. STEVENSON, Aged 35, part-time factory worker, c/o 5 Glen Lane, Paisley.
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  • Scary Stories for Kids by Stevenson, Ambrose, Robert Louis Bierce has several great stories in one book.
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  • The most famous and thorough research was that of Dr. Ian Stevenson who spent his life collecting cases of children who could consciously remember their past lives.
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  • In a rigid scientific manner, Dr. Stevenson collected the facts from the children about the deceased person, and then worked diligently to verify whether those facts were true or not.
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  • Not only did Dr. Stevenson work on verifying over 3,000 such cases, but in many cases he even found that many birthmarks almost perfectly correlated to a wound reported on the medical records of the deceased.
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  • She then married actor Parker Stevenson in 1983.
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  • Stevenson is the father of Lillie and True, who were both adopted.
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  • William Stevenson was born at Hunwick, Durham, matriculated in 1546, took his M.A.
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  • Stevenson, who in 1892 advocated the use of the inductive system pure and simple for communication between the mainland and isolated lighthouses or islands.
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  • 4 Stevenson, however, believes that Zengi was not animated by the idea of recovering Jerusalem.
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