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sterne

sterne

sterne Sentence Examples

  • 2), Thomas Day (author of Sandford and Merton), Sterne, Warburton, Hutcheson, Beattie, John Wesley, Whitfield, Adam Smith, Millar, Robertson, Dr Johnson, Paley, Gregory, Gilbert Wakefield, Bishop Porteus, Dean Tucker.

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  • Richard Sterne, 1664-1683.

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  • Possessed of easy means and being of hospitable disposition, he kept open house for Helvetius, D'Alembert, Diderot, Condillac, Turgot, Buffon, Grimm, Hume, Garrick, Wilkes, Sterne, and for a time J.

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  • LAURENCE STERNE (1713-1768), English humorist, was the son of Roger Sterne, an English officer, and great-grandson of an archbishop of York.

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  • The familiarity thus acquired with military life and character stood Sterne in good stead when he drew the portraits of Uncle Toby and Corporal Trim.

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  • Young Sterne took orders, and through this uncle's influence obtained in 17 3 8 the living of Sutton-in-the-Forest, some 8 m.

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  • Sutton was Sterne's residence for twenty uneventful years.

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  • from Sutton, but Sterne, in spite of his double duties, seems to have been a frequent visitor there, and to have found in his not too strait-laced friend a highly congenial companion.

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  • Stevenson's various occasional sallies in verse and prose - his Fables for Grown Gentlemen (1761-1770), his Crazy Tales (1762), and his numerous skits at the political opponents of Wilkes, among whose "macaronies" he numbered himself - were collected after his death, and it is impossible to read them without being struck with their close family resemblance in spirit and turn of thought to Sterne's work, inferior as they are in literary genius.

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  • Without Stevenson, Sterne would probably have been a more decorous parish priest, but he would probably never have written Tristram Shandy or left any other memorial of his singular genius.

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  • In 1 747 Sterne published a sermon preached in York under the title of The Case of Elijah.

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  • For the last eight years of his life after this sudden leap out of obscurity we have a faithful record of Sterne's feelings and movements in letters to various persons, published in 1 775 by his sole child and daughter, Lydia Sterne de Medalle, and in the Letters from Yorick to Eliza (1766-1767), also published in 1775.

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  • Sterne's clerical character was far from being universally injured by his indecorous freaks as a humorist: Lord Fauconberg presented the author of Tristram Shandy with the perpetual curacy of Coxwold.

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  • For two years in succession Sterne kept his bargain with himself to provide two volumes a year.

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  • This despatched, Sterne turned to a new project, which had probably been suggested by the ease and freedom with which he had moved through the travelling volume in Tristram.

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  • The Sentimental Journey through France and Italy was intended to be a long work: the plan admitted of any length that the author chose, but, after seeing the first two volumes through the press in the early months of 1768, Sterne's strength failed him, and he died in his lodgings at 41 Old Bond Street on the 18th of March, three weeks after the publication.

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  • Sterne's character defies analysis in brief space.

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  • But the reader who cares to have an opinion about Sterne should hesitate till he has read and re-read in various moods considerable portions of Sterne's own writing.

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  • A revised edition of Mr Percy Fitzgerald's Life of Sterne, containing much new information, appeared in 1896.

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  • There is also a valuable study of Sterne by M.

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  • Paul Stapfer (1870, 2nd ed., 1882); and many fresh particulars as to Sterne's relations with his wife and daughter, and also with the lady known as "Eliza" (Mrs Elizabeth Draper), are collected in Mr Sidney Lee's article in the Did.

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  • Sterne's original journal to Mrs Draper ("The Bramine's Journal"), after she had gone back to India, and extending from the 13th of April to the 4th of August 1767, is now in the department of MSS., British Museum (addit.

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  • A convenient edition of Sterne's works, edited by Professor George Saintsbury, was issued in six volumes in 1894.

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  • Cross, The Life and Times of Laurence Sterne (New York, 1909); and Walter Sichel, Sterne: a Study (1910).

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  • Richard Sterne >>

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  • Anne was particularly amenable to the influence of priestly and female favourites, and it must be considered a proof of the strong interest made for Swift that she was eventually persuaded to appoint him to the deanery of St Patrick's, Dublin, vacant by the removal of Bishop Sterne to Dromore.

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  • Oxford he did not find wholly congenial to his intensely earnest spirit, but he read hard, and, as he afterwards said, "Plato, Aristotle, Butler, Thucydides, Sterne, Jonathan Edwards, passed like the iron atoms of the blood into my mental constitution."

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  • RICHARD STERNE (c. 1596-1683), English divine, archbishop of York, was born at Mansfield, Nottinghamshire, and was educated at the free-school in that town and at Trinity College, Cambridge.

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  • 2), Thomas Day (author of Sandford and Merton), Sterne, Warburton, Hutcheson, Beattie, John Wesley, Whitfield, Adam Smith, Millar, Robertson, Dr Johnson, Paley, Gregory, Gilbert Wakefield, Bishop Porteus, Dean Tucker.

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  • Richard Sterne, 1664-1683.

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  • Possessed of easy means and being of hospitable disposition, he kept open house for Helvetius, D'Alembert, Diderot, Condillac, Turgot, Buffon, Grimm, Hume, Garrick, Wilkes, Sterne, and for a time J.

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  • ster), and sterne, or stern (cf.

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  • LAURENCE STERNE (1713-1768), English humorist, was the son of Roger Sterne, an English officer, and great-grandson of an archbishop of York.

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  • The familiarity thus acquired with military life and character stood Sterne in good stead when he drew the portraits of Uncle Toby and Corporal Trim.

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  • Young Sterne took orders, and through this uncle's influence obtained in 17 3 8 the living of Sutton-in-the-Forest, some 8 m.

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  • Sutton was Sterne's residence for twenty uneventful years.

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  • from Sutton, but Sterne, in spite of his double duties, seems to have been a frequent visitor there, and to have found in his not too strait-laced friend a highly congenial companion.

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  • Stevenson's various occasional sallies in verse and prose - his Fables for Grown Gentlemen (1761-1770), his Crazy Tales (1762), and his numerous skits at the political opponents of Wilkes, among whose "macaronies" he numbered himself - were collected after his death, and it is impossible to read them without being struck with their close family resemblance in spirit and turn of thought to Sterne's work, inferior as they are in literary genius.

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  • Without Stevenson, Sterne would probably have been a more decorous parish priest, but he would probably never have written Tristram Shandy or left any other memorial of his singular genius.

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  • In 1 747 Sterne published a sermon preached in York under the title of The Case of Elijah.

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  • In 1759 he wrote a skit on a quarrel between Dean Fountayne and Dr Topham, a York lawyer, over the bestowal of an office in the gift of the archbishop. This sketch, in which Topham figures as Trim the sexton, and the author as Lorry Slim, gives an earnest of Sterne's powers as a humorist.

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  • For the last eight years of his life after this sudden leap out of obscurity we have a faithful record of Sterne's feelings and movements in letters to various persons, published in 1 775 by his sole child and daughter, Lydia Sterne de Medalle, and in the Letters from Yorick to Eliza (1766-1767), also published in 1775.

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  • Sterne's clerical character was far from being universally injured by his indecorous freaks as a humorist: Lord Fauconberg presented the author of Tristram Shandy with the perpetual curacy of Coxwold.

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  • For two years in succession Sterne kept his bargain with himself to provide two volumes a year.

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    0
  • This despatched, Sterne turned to a new project, which had probably been suggested by the ease and freedom with which he had moved through the travelling volume in Tristram.

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    0
  • The Sentimental Journey through France and Italy was intended to be a long work: the plan admitted of any length that the author chose, but, after seeing the first two volumes through the press in the early months of 1768, Sterne's strength failed him, and he died in his lodgings at 41 Old Bond Street on the 18th of March, three weeks after the publication.

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  • Sterne's character defies analysis in brief space.

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  • But the reader who cares to have an opinion about Sterne should hesitate till he has read and re-read in various moods considerable portions of Sterne's own writing.

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  • Dr Ferriar, in his Illustrations of Sterne (published in 1798), pointed out several unacknowledged plagiarisms from Rabelais, Burton and others; but it is only fair to the critic to say that he was fully aware that they were only plagiarisms of material, and do not detract in the slightest from Sterne's reputation as one of the greatest of literary artists.

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  • A revised edition of Mr Percy Fitzgerald's Life of Sterne, containing much new information, appeared in 1896.

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  • There is also a valuable study of Sterne by M.

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  • Paul Stapfer (1870, 2nd ed., 1882); and many fresh particulars as to Sterne's relations with his wife and daughter, and also with the lady known as "Eliza" (Mrs Elizabeth Draper), are collected in Mr Sidney Lee's article in the Did.

    0
    0
  • Sterne's original journal to Mrs Draper ("The Bramine's Journal"), after she had gone back to India, and extending from the 13th of April to the 4th of August 1767, is now in the department of MSS., British Museum (addit.

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  • A convenient edition of Sterne's works, edited by Professor George Saintsbury, was issued in six volumes in 1894.

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    0
  • Cross, The Life and Times of Laurence Sterne (New York, 1909); and Walter Sichel, Sterne: a Study (1910).

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  • Richard Sterne >>

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  • His coarseness, moreover, disgusting as it is, has nothing of the corruption of refined voluptuousness about it, and nothing of the sniggering indecency which disgraces men like Pope, like Voltaire, and like Sterne.

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  • Anne was particularly amenable to the influence of priestly and female favourites, and it must be considered a proof of the strong interest made for Swift that she was eventually persuaded to appoint him to the deanery of St Patrick's, Dublin, vacant by the removal of Bishop Sterne to Dromore.

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  • Oxford he did not find wholly congenial to his intensely earnest spirit, but he read hard, and, as he afterwards said, "Plato, Aristotle, Butler, Thucydides, Sterne, Jonathan Edwards, passed like the iron atoms of the blood into my mental constitution."

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  • RICHARD STERNE (c. 1596-1683), English divine, archbishop of York, was born at Mansfield, Nottinghamshire, and was educated at the free-school in that town and at Trinity College, Cambridge.

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  • As Sterne says: 'We don't love people so much for the good they have done us, as for the good we have done them.'

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