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stephenson

stephenson

stephenson Sentence Examples

  • Among public buildings, the Stephenson memorial hall (1879), containing a free library, art and science class-rooms, a theatre and the rooms of the Chesterfield Institute, commemorates George Stephenson, the engineer, who resided at Tapton House, close to Chesterfield, in his later life; he died here in 1848, and was buried in Trinity church.

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  • As used by George Stephenson on the Stockton & Darlington and Whitstable & Canterbury lines they weighed 28 lb per yard.

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  • On the Stockton & Darlington railway, which was authorized by parliament in 1821, animal power was at first proposed, but on the advice of Stephenson, its engineer, steam-engines were adopted.

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  • At its opening, on the 27th of September 1825, a train of thirtyfour vehicles, making a gross load of about go tons, was drawn by one engine driven by Stephenson, with a signalman on horseback in advance..

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  • The directors having offered a prize of £500 for the best engine, trials were held on a finished portion of the line at Rainhill in October 1829, and three engines took part - the Rocket of George and Robert Stephenson, the Novelty of John Braithwaite and John Ericsson, and the Sanspareil of Timothy Hackworth.

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  • long, from Carbondale to Honesdale, Pennsylvania, Horatio Allen ordered three locomotives from Messrs Foster & Rastrick, of Stourbridge, and one from George Stephenson.

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  • Baldwin, the founder of the famous Baldwin Locomotive Works in Philadelphia, built his first engine, Old Ironsides, for the Philadelphia, Germantown & Morristown railroad; first tried in November 1832, it was modelled on Stephenson's Planet, and had a single pair of driving wheels at the firebox end and a pair of carrying wheels under the smoke-box.

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  • All types of valves are with few exceptions operated by a link motion, generally of the Stephenson type, occasionally of the Allan type or the Gooch type, or with some form of radial gear as the Joy gear or the Walschaert gear, though the latter gear has characteristics which ally it with the link motions.

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  • The Stephenson link motion is used almost universally in England and America, but it has gradually been displaced by the Walschaert gear on the continent of Europe, and to some extent in England by the Joy gear.

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  • The lead is variable in the Stephenson link motion, whilst in the Walschaert and the Joy gears it is constant.

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  • Christopher C. Stephenson, Rep., 1887-1889.1 Frank Bell, Rep., 1890.

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  • 15 1863; but his work and interests subsequently lay at Newcastle (where he served an apprenticeship as moulder at Robert Stephenson & Co.'s works), and in the county of Durham.

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  • Much valuable information will be found in John Stephenson Rowntree: His Life and Work (1908).

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  • ROBERT STEPHENSON (1803-1859), English engineer, only son of George Stephenson, was born at Willington Quay on the 16th of October 1803.

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  • Fremont is on the site of a favourite abode of the Indians, and a trading post was at times maintained here; but the place is best known in history as the site of Fort Stephenson, erected during the War of 1812, and on the 2nd of August 1813 gallantly and successfully defended by Major George Croghan (1791-1849), with 160 men, against about T000 British and Indians under Brigadier-General Henry A.

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  • The credit for the success of the Conway and Britannia bridges must be divided between the engineers, Robert Stephenson and William Fairbairn, and used for railway bridges in England after the construction of the Conway and Menai bridges, and it was in the discussions arising during their design that the proper function of the vertical web between the top and bottom flanges of a girder first came to be understood.

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  • He was associated with Sir William Fairbairn in an important series of experiments on cast iron, and his help was sought by Robert Stephenson in regard to the forms and dimensions of the tubes for the Britannia bridge.

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  • A Life of George Fox, by Dr Thomas Hodgkin; The Fells of Swarthmoor Hall, by Maria Webb; and The Life and Character of George Fox, by John Stephenson Rowntree, are valuable.

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  • No work has been dearer to Methodists than that of the National Children's Home and Orphanage founded by Dr Bowman Stephenson in 1869.

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  • Gregory, who in 1900 succeeded Dr Stephenson, has seen remarkable progress in all departments of the great institution under his care.

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  • "Sisters of the People" and deaconesses, for whom there is a training home at Ilkley, founded by Dr Stephenson in 1902, have also done much to help in these modern developments of Methodism.

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  • The engineer of the tubular bridge was Robert Stephenson, who was assisted by Sir William Fairbairn and Eaton Hodgkinson.

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  • The authorities in Egypt, headed by General Stephenson, subsequently fupported by the Admiral Lord John Hay, who sent a naval)fflcer to examine the river as far as Dongola, were unanimous n favor of the Suakin-Berber route.

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  • General Stephenson still urged the Suakin-Berber route, and was informed on the 26th of August that Lord Wolseley would be appointed to take over the command in Egypt for the purposes of the expedition, for which a vote of credit had been taken in the House of Commons on the 5th of August.

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  • Sir Frederick Stephenson, commanding the British army of occupation.

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  • This bridge was designed by Robert Stephenson and opened by Queen Victoria in 1850.

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  • The average elevation above sea-level is about 600 ft.; the highest elevation is Charles Mound (1257 ft.), on the IllinoisWisconsin boundary line, one of a chain of hills that crosses Jo Daviess, Stephenson, Winnebago, Boone and McHenry counties.

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  • Among other engineers, Telford and Stephenson favoured the project of converting Wallasey Pool into a great basin for shipping; but, largely owing to the fears of Liverpool lest a formidable rival should thus be created, it was not until 1843 that parliamentary powers were obtained, and the work entrusted to James Rendel, who finished it in less than five years.

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  • The district has many associations with the famous engineer George Stephenson, born at Wylam, 3 m.

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  • The rationalistic movement, headed by Magnus Stephenson, a patriotic, narrow-minded lawyer, did little good as far as church reform went, but was accompanied by a more successful effort to educate the people.

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  • In 1826 he went to London, at first on leave of absence from his regiment, and in partnership with John Braithwaite constructed the "Novelty," a locomotive engine for the Liverpool & Manchester railway competition at Rainhill in 1829, when the prize, however, was won by Stephenson's "Rocket."

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  • Stephenson.

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  • Stephenson's catoptric illuminator (1879), may also be mentioned.

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  • - Stephenson'S Binocular Microscope Fig.

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  • General Stephenson, who was in command of the British troops in Egypt, wished to send a brigade at once to Dongola, but he was overruled, and it was not until the beginning of November that the British relief force was ready to start from Wadi Halfa under the command of Lord Wolseley.

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  • bolstered by the arrival of the entire private client department from Stephenson Harwood in 2004.

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  • Charles Russell was significantly bolstered by the arrival of the entire private client department from Stephenson Harwood in 2004.

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  • The width of the bridge was increased by an ingenious contrivance of the late David Stephenson, Esq. architect.

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  • distemper epidemic Ailsa Hall and Catriona Stephenson explain why harbor seals have been dying in their thousands.

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  • Heidi Stephenson and Natasha Langridge Twenty leading contemporary dramatists discuss their work from the perspective of being both writers and women.

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  • Sergeant Stephenson glanced over to the male and saw a black handgun in his right hand.

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  • ingenious contrivance of the late David Stephenson, Esq. architect.

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  • Swedish inventor and engineer who came to England in 1826 and built a competitor to Stephenson's Rocket, then patented a screw propeller.

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  • In J. Stephenson (ed.) Mentoring - the new panacea?

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  • Metropolitan Police Deputy Commissioner Paul Stephenson said the alleged plotters had intended " mass murder on an unimaginable scale " .

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  • Stephenson's link motion, an Ashford type steam reverser and Ross pop safety valves were fitted.

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  • The new streetcars were financed by John Mason, a wealthy banker, and built by an Irish contractor, John Stephenson.

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  • became an apprentice wheelwright in South Shields, befriending the young George Stephenson.

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  • Among public buildings, the Stephenson memorial hall (1879), containing a free library, art and science class-rooms, a theatre and the rooms of the Chesterfield Institute, commemorates George Stephenson, the engineer, who resided at Tapton House, close to Chesterfield, in his later life; he died here in 1848, and was buried in Trinity church.

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  • As used by George Stephenson on the Stockton & Darlington and Whitstable & Canterbury lines they weighed 28 lb per yard.

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  • Richard Trevithick, indeed, had in 1804 tried a high-pressure steam locomotive, with smooth wheels, on a plate-way near Merthyr Tydvil, but it was found more expensive than horses; John Blenkinsop in 1811 patented an engine with cogged wheel and rack-rail which was used, with commercial success, to convey coal from his Middleton colliery to Leeds; William Hedley in 1813 built two locomotives - Puffing Billy and Wylam Dilly - for hauling coal from Wylam Colliery, near Newcastle; and in the following year George Stephenson's first engine, the Blucher, drew a train of eight loaded wagons, weighing 30 tons, at a speed of 4 m.

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  • On the Stockton & Darlington railway, which was authorized by parliament in 1821, animal power was at first proposed, but on the advice of Stephenson, its engineer, steam-engines were adopted.

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  • At its opening, on the 27th of September 1825, a train of thirtyfour vehicles, making a gross load of about go tons, was drawn by one engine driven by Stephenson, with a signalman on horseback in advance..

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  • The directors having offered a prize of £500 for the best engine, trials were held on a finished portion of the line at Rainhill in October 1829, and three engines took part - the Rocket of George and Robert Stephenson, the Novelty of John Braithwaite and John Ericsson, and the Sanspareil of Timothy Hackworth.

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  • long, from Carbondale to Honesdale, Pennsylvania, Horatio Allen ordered three locomotives from Messrs Foster & Rastrick, of Stourbridge, and one from George Stephenson.

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  • Baldwin, the founder of the famous Baldwin Locomotive Works in Philadelphia, built his first engine, Old Ironsides, for the Philadelphia, Germantown & Morristown railroad; first tried in November 1832, it was modelled on Stephenson's Planet, and had a single pair of driving wheels at the firebox end and a pair of carrying wheels under the smoke-box.

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  • Large quantities of embanking were sunk in the moss, and, when the engineer, George Stephenson, after a month's vigorous operations, had made up his estimates, the apparent work done was sometimes less than at the beginning of the month.

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  • All types of valves are with few exceptions operated by a link motion, generally of the Stephenson type, occasionally of the Allan type or the Gooch type, or with some form of radial gear as the Joy gear or the Walschaert gear, though the latter gear has characteristics which ally it with the link motions.

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  • The Stephenson link motion is used almost universally in England and America, but it has gradually been displaced by the Walschaert gear on the continent of Europe, and to some extent in England by the Joy gear.

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  • The lead is variable in the Stephenson link motion, whilst in the Walschaert and the Joy gears it is constant.

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  • Christopher C. Stephenson, Rep., 1887-1889.1 Frank Bell, Rep., 1890.

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  • 15 1863; but his work and interests subsequently lay at Newcastle (where he served an apprenticeship as moulder at Robert Stephenson & Co.'s works), and in the county of Durham.

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  • Battles were fought at Fort Meigs (1813) and Fort Stephenson (Fremont, 1813) and Commodore Oliver Hazard Perry's naval victory on Lake Erie in 1813 was on the Ohio side of the boundary line.

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  • Stephen; The Society of Friends, its Faith and Practice, and other works by John Stephenson Rowntree, A Dynamic Faith and other works by Rufus M.

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  • Much valuable information will be found in John Stephenson Rowntree: His Life and Work (1908).

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  • ROBERT STEPHENSON (1803-1859), English engineer, only son of George Stephenson, was born at Willington Quay on the 16th of October 1803.

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  • See The Story of the Life of George Stephenson, including a Memoir of his Son Robert Stephenson, by Samuel Smiles (1857; new ed., 1873); Jeaffreson, Life of Robert Stephenson (2 vols., 1864); and Smiles 's Lives of British Engineers, vol.

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  • Fremont is on the site of a favourite abode of the Indians, and a trading post was at times maintained here; but the place is best known in history as the site of Fort Stephenson, erected during the War of 1812, and on the 2nd of August 1813 gallantly and successfully defended by Major George Croghan (1791-1849), with 160 men, against about T000 British and Indians under Brigadier-General Henry A.

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  • The credit for the success of the Conway and Britannia bridges must be divided between the engineers, Robert Stephenson and William Fairbairn, and used for railway bridges in England after the construction of the Conway and Menai bridges, and it was in the discussions arising during their design that the proper function of the vertical web between the top and bottom flanges of a girder first came to be understood.

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  • He was associated with Sir William Fairbairn in an important series of experiments on cast iron, and his help was sought by Robert Stephenson in regard to the forms and dimensions of the tubes for the Britannia bridge.

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  • A Life of George Fox, by Dr Thomas Hodgkin; The Fells of Swarthmoor Hall, by Maria Webb; and The Life and Character of George Fox, by John Stephenson Rowntree, are valuable.

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  • No work has been dearer to Methodists than that of the National Children's Home and Orphanage founded by Dr Bowman Stephenson in 1869.

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  • Gregory, who in 1900 succeeded Dr Stephenson, has seen remarkable progress in all departments of the great institution under his care.

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  • "Sisters of the People" and deaconesses, for whom there is a training home at Ilkley, founded by Dr Stephenson in 1902, have also done much to help in these modern developments of Methodism.

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  • The engineer of the tubular bridge was Robert Stephenson, who was assisted by Sir William Fairbairn and Eaton Hodgkinson.

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  • The authorities in Egypt, headed by General Stephenson, subsequently fupported by the Admiral Lord John Hay, who sent a naval)fflcer to examine the river as far as Dongola, were unanimous n favor of the Suakin-Berber route.

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  • General Stephenson still urged the Suakin-Berber route, and was informed on the 26th of August that Lord Wolseley would be appointed to take over the command in Egypt for the purposes of the expedition, for which a vote of credit had been taken in the House of Commons on the 5th of August.

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  • Sir Frederick Stephenson, commanding the British army of occupation.

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  • This bridge was designed by Robert Stephenson and opened by Queen Victoria in 1850.

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  • The average elevation above sea-level is about 600 ft.; the highest elevation is Charles Mound (1257 ft.), on the IllinoisWisconsin boundary line, one of a chain of hills that crosses Jo Daviess, Stephenson, Winnebago, Boone and McHenry counties.

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  • Among other engineers, Telford and Stephenson favoured the project of converting Wallasey Pool into a great basin for shipping; but, largely owing to the fears of Liverpool lest a formidable rival should thus be created, it was not until 1843 that parliamentary powers were obtained, and the work entrusted to James Rendel, who finished it in less than five years.

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  • The district has many associations with the famous engineer George Stephenson, born at Wylam, 3 m.

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  • The rationalistic movement, headed by Magnus Stephenson, a patriotic, narrow-minded lawyer, did little good as far as church reform went, but was accompanied by a more successful effort to educate the people.

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    0
  • In 1826 he went to London, at first on leave of absence from his regiment, and in partnership with John Braithwaite constructed the "Novelty," a locomotive engine for the Liverpool & Manchester railway competition at Rainhill in 1829, when the prize, however, was won by Stephenson's "Rocket."

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  • Stephenson's catoptric illuminator (1879), may also be mentioned.

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  • Stephenson's stereoscopic microscope (fig.

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  • - Stephenson'S Binocular Microscope Fig.

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  • General Stephenson, who was in command of the British troops in Egypt, wished to send a brigade at once to Dongola, but he was overruled, and it was not until the beginning of November that the British relief force was ready to start from Wadi Halfa under the command of Lord Wolseley.

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  • Stephenson 's link motion, an Ashford type steam reverser and Ross pop safety valves were fitted.

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  • The new streetcars were financed by John Mason, a wealthy banker, and built by an Irish contractor, John Stephenson.

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  • Became an apprentice wheelwright in South Shields, befriending the young George Stephenson.

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  • In Henry Thew Stephenson's extensive article on Elizabethan Fashion, he explains that the commoner in Elizabethan England would emulate the nobles but with less elaboration and using "cheaper materials."

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  • Jon Stephenson von Tetzchner, CEO of Opera, said that the company started development of an Opera web browser for the iPhone, but the development was halted when they discovered that Apple would not allow it.

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  • Some argue that Neal Stephenson's Snow Crash, while otherwise fitting the definition of 'Cyberpunk', actually defines a new genre, 'postcyberpunk'.

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  • Uniforms symbolize character development and citizenship training, and in the words of the Scouting Movement founder Robert Stephenson Smyth Baden-Powel, "...makes all feel that they are members with one another of one great brotherhood."

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