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star

star

star Sentence Examples

  • "A silent film star," Charlie said.

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  • The man with the star regarded her with his calm, expressionless eyes.

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  • No machine will ever star in a Broadway musical.

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  • The image of the star is set updn the intersections of the lines of the central cross, and the positions of the reseau-lines are read off by estimation to - of a division on the glass scale.

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  • It was a silver coin, warmed by his skin, with a circle of cuneiform symbols surrounding a star with two arrows.

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  • The colors represented the four countries of Oz, and the green star the Emerald City.

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  • None of them are five star accommodations but two are fairly comfortable.

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  • As the baby of the three, he'd always been the rock star among them.

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  • One more red conviction star could go on Lieutenant Anderson's chart.

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  • A band tooted practice blasts, someone was yelling directions through an old fashioned megaphone, which were ignored, and Suzanne, whose nightly music show serenaded the tourists, warmed up the Star Spangled Banner in a voice that needed no mike.

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  • Vinnie Baratto was the star running back for three years.

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  • I saw it myself, master, the star is fixed into the icon.

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  • Think of how the computer in the Star Trek universe was a purely factual machine.

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  • Not just that you went to a certain address but that the address was a movie theater and—based on where you sat and that you ordered tickets online—you saw Episode VII of Star Wars.

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  • "That does not sound especially pleasant," said the little man, looking at the one with the star uneasily.

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  • Like a TV star that doesn't scale back his expenses after his show is cancelled, these benefits expand, not contract, during periods of economic decline, for two main reasons.

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  • How far apart, think you, dwell the two most distant inhabitants of yonder star, the breadth of whose disk cannot be appreciated by our instruments?

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  • Slowly he took the shining star from his own brow and placed it upon that of the Princess.

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  • She nodded and accepted Evelyn's far-fetched explanations just as she might nod and temporarily accept the equally unreal world of Star Wars.

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  • The newcomer wore a blue swallow-tail coat with a cross suspended from his neck and a star on his left breast.

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  • When those are the paths people choose between in the future—a Star Trek path or a WALL·E path—some will choose one and some will choose the other.

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  • If the errors of the rectangular co-ordinates of these lines are known, the problem of determining the co-ordinates of any star-image on the plate becomes reduced to the comparatively simple one of interpolating the co-ordinates of the star relative to the sides of the 5 mm.

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  • Just then the man with the star came and stood before the Wizard.

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  • Speranski, wearing a gray swallow-tail coat with a star on the breast, and evidently still the same waistcoat and high white stock he had worn at the meeting of the Council of State, stood at the table with a beaming countenance.

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  • He carefully put a star next to the unanswered question.

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  • Its constitutional origin was analogous to that of the star chamber and the court of requests.

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  • The organizing genius of Dupleix everywhere overshadowed the native imagination, and the star of Clive had scarcely yet risen above the horizon.

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  • As the powers of the telescope were gradually developed, it was found that the finest hairs or filaments of silk, or the thinnest silver wires that could be drawn, were much too thick for the refined purposes of the astronomer, as p p they entirely obliterated the image of a star in the more powerful telescopes.

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  • She was greatly delighted with the monkeys and kept her hand on the star performer while he went through his tricks, and laughed heartily when he took off his hat to the audience.

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  • In the uniform of the Preobrazhensk regiment--white chamois-leather breeches and high boots-- and wearing a star Rostov did not know (it was that of the Legion d'honneur), the monarch came out into the porch, putting on his gloves and carrying his hat under his arm.

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  • An old gentleman wearing a star and another official, a German wearing a cross round his neck, approached the speaker.

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  • To measure distances with the Fraunhofer micrometer, the position-circle is clamped at the true position-angle of the star, and the telescope is moved by its slow motions so that the component A of the star is bisected by the fixed wire; the other component B is then bisected by the web, which is moved by the graduated head S.

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  • "Give me the Star of Royalty!" she commanded.

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  • The position-angles of double stars are reckoned from north through east, the brighter star being taken as origin.

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  • To the extent this world is a meritocracy, the most talented will be the movie star and the least talented will be hauling manure.

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  • I called him Black Beauty, as I had just read the book, and he resembled his namesake in every way, from his glossy black coat to the white star on his forehead.

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  • The young man sulked in, humbled in hoops by high school star Billy Langstrom.

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  • Next the star B is bisected by the fixed web and A by the movable one.

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  • "I thought Youngblood was the star attraction of the psychic world," Martha said as she tried to get comfortable.

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  • Names like The Morning Star, The Monte Carlo, The Clipper, The Cottage and The Club were on the west side.

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  • How did the star get into the icon?

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  • I, 2 and 3), used to bolt the head of one of the screws, and the instrument was provided with a slipping piece, giving motion to the micrometer by screws acting on two slides, one in right ascension, the other in declination, so that " either of the, webs can be placed upon either component of a double star with ease and certainty (Mem.

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  • He stood ramrod straight—a movie star, not a government employee.

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  • For the measurement of wider stars he invented his lamp-micrometer, in which the components of a double star observed with the right eye were made to coincide with two lucid points placed io ft.

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  • In 1757 he presented a telescope to the king, so accurately driven by clockwork that it would follow a star all night long.

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  • Around it were arranged, like the five points of a star, the other five brilliant balls; one being rose colored, one violet, one yellow, one blue and one orange.

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  • Kiera wasn't watching Star Wars but living it.

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  • The microscope or viewing telescope is fitted with a spider-line micrometer having two screws at right angles to each other, by means of which readings can be made first on one reseau-line, then on the star, and finally on the opposite reseau-line in both co-ordinates.

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  • 2940, Dr Repsold proposed a method of meridian observing which consists in causing a web to follow the image of a star in transit by motions communicated by the observer's hands alone, whilst electrical contacts on the drum of the micrometer screw register on the chronograph the instants corresponding to known intervals from the line of collimation.

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  • Men esteem truth remote, in the outskirts of the system, behind the farthest star, before Adam and after the last man.

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  • Katie hesitated, then strode through the main hallways, suspecting Hannah would be too star struck to notice the looks they.d certainly receive from others.

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  • The man with the star stood for a time quietly thinking over this speech.

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  • "By the way," said the man with the star, looking steadily at the Sorcerer, "you told us yesterday that there would not be a second Rain of Stones.

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  • Let's pick her while we have the chance, before the man with the star comes back.

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  • In the center was a large emerald-green star, and all over the four quarters were sewn spangles that glittered beautifully in the sunshine.

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  • Her beautiful, unselfish spirit shines out like a bright star in the night of a dark and cruel age.

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  • Now, however, I see the folly of attempting to hitch one's wagon to a star with harness that does not belong to it.

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  • He had no lambskin cap on his head, nor had he a loaded whip over his shoulder, as when Rostov had seen him on the eve of the battle of Austerlitz, but wore a tight new uniform with Russian and foreign Orders, and the Star of St. George on his left breast.

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  • A still further facility was given to the use of the filar micrometer by the introduction of clockwork, which caused the telescope automatically to follow the diurnal motion of a star, and left the observer's hands entirely at liberty.'

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  • To avoid such error Dawes used double wires, not spider webs, placing the image of the star symmetrically between these wires, as in fig.

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  • Once again, close, but no gold star.

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  • Jackson and Elisabeth spent many evenings outdoors lying on the frigid ground, stargazing, pointing out the constellations, and anticipating the occasional falling star.

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  • I think she was overwhelmed by the idea of being a star.

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  • runs mathematically straight and points almost absolutely true for the Polar star.

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  • This angle, therefore, divided by the magnifying power of the telescope gives the real angular distance of the centres of a double star.

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  • At Greenwich, Oxford and several other observatories, instead of measuring the distances of the star's image from the opposite sides of the 5 mm.

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  • This form of micrometer is of course capable of giving results of high precision, but the drawback is that the process involves a minimum of six pointings and the entering of six screw-head readings in order to measure the two co-ordinates of the star.

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  • Similarly, place the star's image in the middle of the webs moved by Y.

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  • Estimate the diameter of the star's image in terms of the 4" intervals of the movable webs.

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  • Thus, if the star's image is kept in bisection by the wire, both star and wire will appear at rest in the field of view.

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  • In the case of the original Repsold plan without clockwork the description is not quite exact, because both the process of following the object and correcting the aim are simultaneously performed; whilst, if the clockwork runs uniformly and the friction-disk is set to the proper distance from the apex of the cone, the star will appear almost perfectly at rest, and the observer has only to apply delicate corrections by differential gear - a condition which is exactly analogous to that of training a modern gun-sight upon a fixed object.

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  • For accurate measurement of the displacements of lines of stellar spectra which are produced by the relative motion of star and observer in the line of sight, a very beautiful instrument has been devised by Dr J.

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  • Hartmann overcame these and many other difficulties by directly superposing the image of the spectrogram of a star, having iron comparison lines, upon the image of a spectrogram of the sun taken also with iron comparison lines.

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  • If then the screw-value in kilometres per second is known for the neighbourhood of each of the comparison lines employed, the radial velocity of the star can be independently derived directly from coincidences made in above manner in the neighbourhood of each comparison line.

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  • This finer matter which collects in the centre of each vortex is the first matter of Descartes - it constitutes the sun or star.

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  • In course of time the star, with its expansive force diminished, suffers encroachments from the neighbouring vortices, and at length they catch it up. If the ' Princip. part ii.

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  • Such a star is a comet.

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  • But in other cases the encrusted star settles in that portion of the revolving vortex which has a velocity equivalent to its own, and so continues to revolve in the vortex, wrapped in its own firmament.

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  • Such a reduced and impoverished star is a planet; and the several planets of our solar system are the several vortices which from time to time have been swept up by the central sun-vortex.

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  • has been reached in the South Star mine.

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  • In northern Queensland copper is found throughout the Cloncurry district, in the upper basin of the Star river, and the Herberton district.

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  • de Lesseps was a member of the French Academy, of the Academy of Sciences, of numerous scientific societies, Grand Cross of the Legion of Honour and of the Star of India, and had received the freedom of the City of London.

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  • After a struggle the Protestant faction gained the upper hand, and on the 7th of February 1550 Bonner's deprivation was confirmed by the council sitting in the Star Chamber, and he was further condemned to perpetual imprisonment.

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  • The records preserved in each city were examined, topographical information was diligently collected, and the Jesuit fathers checked their triangulation by meridian altitudes of the sun and pole star and by a system of remeasurements.

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  • In the same year he was nominated a Grand Cross in the Imperial Order of the Rose of Brazil; he also held the Prussian Order "Pour le Merite," and belonged to the Legion of Honour of France and to the Order of the North Star of Sweden and Norway.

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  • The Pawnees, however, had an elaborate ritual, in which a human victim was sacrificed to the Morning Star; the blood of the victims was sprinkled on the fields, and the details of the rite are not unlike those of the Khond custom.

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  • The reaction into idolatry and Babylonian star worship in the long reign of Manasseh synchronized and was connected with vassalage 1 There is some danger in too strictly construing the language of the prophets and also the psalmists.

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  • of the California boundary lies a third important range, the Humboldt Mountains, whose highest point (Star Peak) is 9925 ft.

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  • EARTH-STAR (Geaster), in botany, a kind of puff-ball, with a distinct outer coat which, on separating from the inner, splits into several divisions, which become reflexed and spread like a star.

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  • The inner coat enveloping the spores is supported, like a ball, either with or without a stalk on the upper face of the star.

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  • Only one external source can be named: the falling of meteors into the sun must yield some heat just as a shooting star yields some heat to our atmosphere, but the question is whether the quantity of heat obtainable from the shooting stars is at all adequate for the purpose.

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  • The transition from an object of this kind to a nebulous star is very natural, while the nebulous stars pass into the ordinary stars by a few graduated stages.

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  • It is thus possible to exhibit a series of objects beginning at one end with the most diffused nebulosity and ending at the other with an ordinary fixed star or group of stars.

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  • In attempting to pronounce on the evidence with regard to Herschel's theory, we must at once admit that the transmutation of a nebula into a star has never been seen.

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  • His domestic was sounder than his foreign policy: by his development of the star chamber, by his firm administration of justice and maintenance of order, and by his repression of feudal.

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  • He strongly advocated the secession of the southern states; signed the South Carolina ordinance of secession; protested against Major Robert Anderson's removal from Fort Moultrie to Fort Sumter; sanctioned the firing upon the "Star of the West" (Jan.

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  • If I have dived therein without finding any pearls it is the fault of my star and not of the sea."

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  • Its transparency allows us to see even to the pole star, who is the central sun around whom all the heavenly bodies move.

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  • The Mandaean places of worship, being designed only for the priests and their assistants (the worshippers remaining in the forecourt), are excessively small, and very simply furnished; two windows, a door that opens towards the south so that those who enter have their faces turned towards the pole star, a few boards in the corner, and a gabled roof complete the whole structure; there is neither altar nor decoration of any kind.

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  • They have some peculiar deathbed rites: a deacon with some attendants waits upon the dying, and as death approaches administers a bath first of warm and afterwards of cold water; a holy dress, consisting of seven pieces (rasta), is then put on; the feet are directed towards the north and the head turned to the south, so that the body faces the pole star.

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  • The most brilliant star of this constellation, a-Aquilae or Altair, has a parallax of 0.23", and consequently is about eight times as bright as the sun; q-Aquilae is a short-period variable, while Nova Aquilae is a " temporary " or " new " star, discovered by Mrs Fleming of Harvard in 1899.

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  • Turner of Oxford; and the star cluster M.35 Geminorum, a fine and bright, but loose, cluster, with very little central condensation.

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  • He taught in a country school for a year, read law for a short time, worked in a newspaper office, and in 1884 became editor and proprietor of the Marion Star.

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  • newspaper was started, called Naledi ea Lesotha (Star of Basutoland).

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  • Her star was the planet Venus, and classical writers give her the epithet Caelestis and Urania.

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  • But the same relation does not hold of a satellite the mass of whose primary is not regarded as an absolutely known quantity, or of a binary star.

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  • ASTRAEA, in Greek legend, the "star maiden," daughter of Zeus and Themis, or of Astraeus the Titan and Eos, in which case she is identified with Dike.

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  • descriptions of which he had adopted for his star maps.

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  • The horizontal lines are parallels, depending upon the altitude of the pole star, the Calves of the Little Bear and the Barrow of the Great Bear above the horizon.

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  • (3-57 metres) and is hollow, the inner surface of the shell being covered with a star map, and the outer surface with a map of the world.

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  • cbW046pos, " lightbearer"), the name given to the "morning star," i.e.

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  • horizon before sunrise, and sometimes also to the "evening star," i.e.

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  • The term "day star" (so rendered in the Revised Version) was used poetically by Isaiah for the king of Babylon: "How art thou fallen from heaven, 0 Lucifer, son of the morning!

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  • Its approach was announced by the appearance of a certain star, Sirius, and as soon as that star was seen above the horizon the people hastened to remove their flocks to the higher ground and abandoned the lower pastures to the fertilizing influence of the stream.

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  • (1) A community of friars at Cambridge, in 1257, whose habit was distinguished from that of the ordinary Dominicans by a five-rayed red star (in reference to Matt.

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  • Vesper), the evening star, son or brother of Atlas.

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  • Ever afterwards he was honoured as a god, and the most brilliant star in the heavens was called by his name.

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  • Lucifer), the morning star or bringer of light, the son of Astraeus (or Cephalus) and Eos, the two stars were early identified by the Greeks.

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  • These are, as a rule, quite unadorned, a few only being decorated with rude bas-reliefs of animals, plants, weapons, the crescent and star, or, very rarely, the cross.

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  • Folwell's Minnesota, the North Star State (Boston, 1908), in the " American Commonwealth series "; E.

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  • Each discovery in turn was, according to the prevailing custom, announced to the learned world under the veil of an anagram - removed, in the case of the first, by the publication, early in 1656, of the little tract De Saturni luna observatio nova; but retained, as regards the second, until 1659, when in the Systema Saturnium the varying appearances of the so-called "triple planet" were clearly explained as the phases of a ring inclined at an angle of 28° to the ecliptic. Huygens was also in 1656 the first effective observer of the Orion nebula; he delineated the bright region still known by his name, and detected the multiple character of its nuclear star.

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  • Annual parallax is the angle between the direction in which a star appears from the earth and the direction in which it appears from the centre of the sun.

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  • For stellar parallaxes see Star; the solar parallax is discussed below.

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  • In spite of his doctrinal writings - which at the time made no little noise, so that his Compendium of Dogmatic (1760) was confiscated in Sweden, and the knighthood of the North Star was afterwards given him in reparation - it was the natural side of the Bible that really attracted him, and no man did more to introduce the modern method of studying Hebrew antiquity as an integral part of ancient Eastern life.

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  • rhabdom of a retinula of the scorpion's central eye, showing its five constituent rhabdomeres as rays of a star.

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  • a Orionis, very close to Orionis, is a very fine multiple star, described by Sir William Herschel as two sets of treble stars; more stars have been revealed by larger telescopes.

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  • 0 Orionis is a multiple star, situated in the famous nebula of Orion, one of the most beautiful in the heavens.

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  • His successor Maharao Pragmalji in recognition of his excellent administration was in 1871 honoured with the title of knight grand commander of the Star of India.

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  • In estimating theoretically the resolving power on a double star we have to consider the illumination of the field due to the superposition of the two independent images.

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  • If the angular interval between the components of a double star were equal to twice that expressed in equation (15) above, the central disks of the diffraction patterns would be just in contact.

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  • Under these conditions there is no doubt that the star would appear to be fairly resolved, since the brightness of its external ring system is too small to produce any material confusion, unless indeed the components are of very unequal magnitude.

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  • The diminution of the star disks with increasing aperture was observed by Sir William Herschel, and in 1823 Fraunhofer formulated the law of inverse proportionality.

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  • The visibility of a star is a question of brightness simply, and has nothing to do with resolving power.

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  • The latter element enters only when it is a question of recognizing the duplicity of a double star, or of distinguishing detail upon the surface of a planet.

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  • The actual formation of On account of inequalities in the atmosphere giving a variable refraction, the light from a star would be irregularly distributed over a screen.

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  • At a moment when the eye, or object-glass of a telescope, occupies a dark position, the star vanishes.

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  • A fraction of a second later the aperture occupies a bright place, and the star reappears.

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  • Failing in this, he turned to the rising star of Napoleon, believing that he had found in "the truly great man, the mighty genius which governs the fate of the world," the only force strong enough to save Germany from dissolution.

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  • olibanum of Java), corrupted in the parlance of Europe into benjamin and benzoin; camphor, produced by Cinnamomum Camphora, the "camphor laurel" of China and Japan, and by Dryobalanops aromatica, a native of the Indian Archipelago, and widely used as incense throughout the East, particularly in China; elemi, the resin of an unknown tree of the Philippine Islands, the elemi of old writers being the resin of Boswellia Frereana; gumdragon or dragon's blood, obtained from Calamus Draco, one of the ratan palms of the Indian Archipelago, Dracaena Draco, a liliaceous plant of the Canary Island, and Pterocarpus Draco, a leguminous tree of the island of Socotra; rose-malloes, a corruption of the Javanese rasamala, or liquid storax, the resinous exudation of Liquidambar Altingia, a native of the Indian Archipelago (an American Liquidambar also produces a rose-malloes-like exudation); star anise, the starlike fruit of the Illicum anisatum of Yunan and south-western China, burnt as incense in the temples of Japan; sweet flag, the root of Acorus Calamus, the bath of the Hindus, much used for incense in India.

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  • It is mentioned in a comedy entitled Ram Alley (1611) and Lilly the 2 Various changes in the names of the taverns are made in the folio edition of this play (1616) from the quarto (1601); thus the Mermaid of the quarto becomes the Windmill in the folio, and the Mitre of the quarto is the Star of the folio.

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  • After a year's imprisonment in the Tower Prynne was sentenced by the star chamber on the 17th of February 1634 to be imprisoned for life, and also to be fined f5000, expelled from Lincoln's Inn, rendered incapable of returning to his profession, degraded from his degree in the university of Oxford, and set in the pillory, where he was to lose both his ears.

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  • In 1637 he was once more in the star chamber, together with Bastwick and Burton.

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  • This was the first computation ever made of the size of a star.

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  • Isolated fireballs and star showers had been occasionally observed, but instead of being attentively watched they had been neglected, for their apparitions had filled mankind with dread, and superstition attributed to them certain malevolent influences.

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  • The ordinary shooting stars vary from the brilliancy of a firstto a sixth-magnitude star.

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  • The visible life of an ordinary shooting star is, however, comprised within one second, and it is only rarely that such short time intervals can be accurately taken.

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  • They are directed from a point in the sky near the star 7 Andromedae.

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  • Another group, the mock narcissi or star daffodils, with coronets of medium size, includes the fine and numerous varieties of N.

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  • The other heraldic signs, the crescent and the star, have evidently been added on the same supposition of an oriental origin of the family.

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  • He now began to fulfil the promise of his "Cimabue," and by such pictures as "Paolo e Francesca," "The Star of Bethlehem," "Jezebel and Ahab taking Possession of Naboth's Vineyard," "Michael Angelo musing over his Dying Servant," "A Girl feeding Peacocks," and "The Odalisque," all exhibited in 1861-1863, rose rapidly to the head of his profession.

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  • His body was picked up three days afterwards, so disfigured that it was only recognized by the star on his coat.

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  • Interesting stars are: a Aurigae or Capella (the goat), one of the brightest stars in the heavens, determined by Newall and Campbell to be a spectroscopic binary; [3 Aurigae, a star of the second magnitude also a spectroscopic binary; e Aurigae, an irregularly variable star; and Nova Aurigae, a "new" star discovered by Anderson in 1892, and afterwards found on a photographic plate exposed at Harvard in December 1891.

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  • Several fine star clusters also appear in this constellation.

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  • In 1812 Bessel measured with it the angle between the components of the double star 61 Cygni and observed the great comet of 1811.

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  • The chief objections to the method are that, as one star is in the axis of the telescope and the other displaced from it, the images are not both in focus of the eye-piece,3 and the rays from the two stars do not make the same angle with the optical axis of each segment.

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  • 10 A screen of wire gauze, placed in front of the segment through which the fainter star is viewed, was, employed by Bessel to equalize the brilliancy of the images under observation.

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  • Struve also points out that by attaching a fine scale to the focusing slide of the eye-piece, and knowing the coefficient of expansion of the metal tube, the means would be provided for determining the absolute change of the focal length of the object-glass at any time by the simple process of focusing on a double star.

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  • Having selected the most suitable one he directs the axis of the finder to the estimated middle point between the comet and the star, turns the finder-micrometer in position angle until the images of comet and star lie symmetrically between the parallel position wires, and then turns the micrometer screw (which moves the distance-wires symmetrically from the centre in opposite directions) till one wire bisects the comet and the other the star.

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  • If measures are made by placing the image of a star in the centre of the disk of a planet, the observer may have a tendency to do so systematically in error from some acquired habit or from natural astigmatism of the eye.

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  • Simi larly the prism may be used for the study and elim- " ination of personal errors depending on the angle made s by a double star with the vertical.

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  • On the 18th of May 1866 he made the first spectroscopic examination of a temporary star (Nova Coronae), and found it to be enveloped in blazing hydrogen.

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  • ALGOL, the Arabic name (signifying "the Demon") of, 6 Persei, a star of the second magnitude, noticed by G.

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  • C. Vogel's spectroscopic measures in 1889.2 Previously to each obscuration, the star was found to be moving rapidly away from the earth; its velocity then diminished to zero pari passu with the loss of light, and reversed its direction during the process of recovery.

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  • The rays of this star spend close upon a century in travelling hither.

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  • A case was preferred against him in the Star Chamber of revealing state secrets, to which was added in 1635 a charge of subornation of perjury, of which he had undoubtedly been guilty and for which he was condemned in 1637 to pay a fine of io,000, to be deprived of the temporalities of all his benefices, and to be imprisoned during the king's pleasure.

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  • In 1639 he was again condemned by the Star Chamber for libelling Laud, a further heavy fine being imposed for this offence.

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  • Ages before Assur-bani-pal reigned at Nineveh the eighth month (Marchesvan) was known as " the month of the star of the Scorpion," the tenth (Tebet) belonged to the " star of the Goat," the twelfth (Adar) to the " star of the Fish of Ea."

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  • The synodical revolution of the moon laid down the lines of the solar, its sidereal revolution those of the lunar zodiac. The first was a circlet of " full moons "; the second marked the diurnal stages of the lunar progress round the sky, from and back again to any selected star.

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  • The superfluous asterism, named Abhijit, included the bright star a Lyrae, under whose influence the gods had vanquished the Asuras.

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  • Festivals for the dead were appointed to be held under those that included but one star.

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  • A ram frequently stamped on coins of Antiochus, with head reverted towards the moon and a star (the planet Mars), signified Aries to be the lunar house of Mars.

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  • He was far less great as a ruler in the state, showing as a judge a tyrannical spirit both in the star chamber and highcommission court, threatening Felton, the assassin of Buckingham, with the rack, and showing special activity in procuring a cruel sentence in the former court against Alexander Leighton in June 1630 and against Henry Sherfield in 1634.

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  • In 1637 he took part in the sentence of the star chamber on Prynne, Bostwick and Burton, and in the same year in the prosecution of Bishop Williams. He urged Strafford in Ireland to carry out the same reforms and severities.

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  • This was followed by a long series of popular treatises in rapid succession, amongst the more important of which are Light Science for Leisure Hours and The Sun (1871); The Orbs around Us and Essays on Astronomy (1872); The Expanse of Heaven, The Moon and The Borderland of Science (1873); The Universe and the Coming Transits and Transits of Venus (1874);(1874); Our Place among Infinities (1875); Myths and Marvels of Astronomy (1877); The Universe of Stars (1878); Flowers of the Sky (1879); The Peotry of Astronomy (1880); Easy Star Lessons and Familiar Science Studies (1882); Mysteries of Time and Space and The Great Pyramid (1883); The Universe of Suns (1884); The Seasons (1885); Other Suns than Ours and Half-Hours with the Stars (1887).

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  • In September 1839 a 3-foot speculum was finished and mounted on an altazimuth stand similar to Herschel's; but, though the definition of the images was good (except that the diffraction at the joints of the speculum caused minute rays in the case of a very bright star), and its peculiar skeleton form allowed the speculum to follow atmospheric changes of temperature very quickly, Lord Rosse decided to cast a solid 3-foot speculum.

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  • His investment with the insignia of the highest grade of the Order of the Star of India appeared to give him much pleasure.

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  • In 1837 he established the Northern Star newspaper at Leeds, and became a vehement advocate of the Chartist movement.

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  • Ursae majoris is a beautiful binary star, its components having magnitudes 4 and 5; this star was one of the first to be recognized as a binary - i.e.

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  • Ursae majoris is perhaps the best known double star in the northern hemisphere, the larger component is itself a spectroscopic double.

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  • It is also invisible during moonlight and near the horizon, and the neighbourhood of a bright star or planet may interfere with its recognition.

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  • What is thus shown to be possible would, of course, be necessary if we went on, with the astronomer Kepler, to identify the star of the Magi with the conjunction of the planets Jupiter and Saturn which occurred, in the constellation Pisces, in May, October and December of 7 B.C.'

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  • took the reins, their star was in the ascendant, and Jesuit confessors, the most celebrated of whom were Francois de La Chaise and Michel Le Tellier (1643-1719), guided the policy of the king, not hesitating to take his side in his quarrel with the Holy See, which nearly resulted in a schism, nor to sign the Gallican articles.

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  • conifera; the star represents the ciliated cup connected by ciliated depressions with the groove; 5, disk of Conochilus, like the Bdelloid, but with mouth antero-dorsal, the gap postero-ventral; 6, disk of Stephanoceroscingulum broken up into setiferous lobes, groove a naked funnel, trochus a horseshoe-shaped ridge, mouth central.

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  • He dedicated to the emperor in 1603 a treatise on the "great conjunction" of that year (Judicium de trigono igneo); and he published his observations on a brilliant star which appeared suddenly (Sept.

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  • For thou wast born under a glittering star in the family of the rulers.

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  • In her grief at the destruction of the city she plucked out her hair and was changed into a comet; in another version Electra and her six sisters had been placed among the stars as the Pleiades, and the star which she represented lost its brilliancy after the fall of Troy.

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  • Some of the slightly cloudy Ceylon sapphires, usually of greyish-blue colour, display when cut with a convex face a chatoyant luminosity, sometimes forming a luminous star of six rays, whence they are called "star sapphires".

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  • corum, a double star, of magnitudes 3 and 6; this star was named Cor Caroli, or The Heart of Charles II., by Edmund Halley, on the suggestion of Sir Charles Scarborough (1616-1694), the court physician; a cluster of stars of the firth magnitude and fainter, extremely rich in variables, of the goo stars examined no less than 132 being regularly variable.

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  • In 1850 a dispute arose between France and Russia, in the name of the Latin and Greek Churches respectively, concerning the possession of the key of the chief door of the basilica, and concerning the right to place a silver star, with the arms of France, in the grotto of the Nativity.

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  • high; the city convention hall, the chamber of commerce, the builders' exchange, the Masonic temple, two state armouries, the Prudential, Fidelity Trust, White and Mutual Life buildings, the Teck, Star and Shea's Park theatres, and the Ellicott Square building, one of the largest office structures in the world; and, in Delaware Park, the Albright art gallery, and the Buffalo Historical Society building, which was originally the New York state building erected for the Pan-American Exposition held in 1901.

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  • Aberration Of Light This astronomical phenomenon may be defined as an apparent motion of the heavenly bodies; the stars describing annually orbits more or less elliptical, according to the latitude of the star; consequently at any moment the star appears to be displaced from its true position.

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  • In 1680 Jean Picard, in his Voyage d'Uranibourg, stated, as a result of ten years' observations, that Polaris, or the Pole Star, exhibited variations in its position amounting to 40" annually; some astronomers endeavoured to explain this by parallax, but these attempts were futile, for the motion was at variance with that which parallax would occasion.

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  • Flamsteed, from measurements made in 1689 and succeeding years with his mural quadrant, similarly concluded that the declination of the Pole Star was 40" less in July than in September.

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  • Hooke, in 1674, published his observations of y Draconis, a star of the second magnitude which passes practically overhead in the latitude of London, and whose observations are therefore singularly free from the complex corrections due to astronomical refraction, and concluded that this star was 23" more northerly in July than in October.

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  • There was apparently no shifting of the star, which was therefore thought to be at its most southerly point.

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  • On the 17th of December, however, Bradley observed that the star was moving southwards, a motion further shown by observations on the loth.

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  • The observations were continued, and the star was seen to continue its southerly course until March, when it took up a position some 20" more southerly than its December position.

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  • Nutation of the axis would determine a similar apparent motion for all stars: thus, all stars having the same polar distance as y Draconis should exhibit the same apparent motion after or before this star by a constant interval.

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  • One such star, however, with a right ascension nearly equal to that of -y Draconis, but in the opposite sense, was selected and kept under observation.

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  • This star was seen to possess an apparent motion similar to that which would be a consequence of the nutation of the earth's axis; but since its declination varied only one half as much as in the case of y Draconis, it was obvious that nutation did not supply the requisite solution.

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  • His conclusions may be thus summarized: (r) only stars near the solstitial colure had their maximum north and south positions when the sun was near the equinoxes, (2) each star was at its maximum positions when it passed the zenith at six o'clock morning and evening (this he afterwards showed to be inaccurate, and found the greatest change in declination to be proportional to the latitude of the star), (3) the apparent motions of all stars at about the same time was in the same direction.

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  • 2) be a star and the s observer be carried along the line AB; let SB be perpendicular to AB.

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  • If the observer be stationary at B, the star will appear in the direction BS; if, however, he traverses the distance BA in the same time as light passes from the star to his eye, the star will A B appear in the direction AS.

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  • with the earth in its orbit, the star appears to have a displacement which is at all times parallel to the motion of the observer.

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  • 3) be the sun, ABCD the earth's orbit, and s the true position of a star.

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  • Every star, therefore, describes an apparent orbit, which, if the line joining the sun and the star be perpendicular to the plane Abcd, will be exactly similar to that of the earth, i.e.

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  • intensity is zero, and this band is accompanied by a number of fainter images corresponding to the diffraction of a star image in a telescope.

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  • C. Pickering discovered in the structure of the star E Puppis a series of lines which showed a remarkable similarity to that of hydrogen having the same root.

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  • The spirit with which he pleaded before the Star Chamber in a case of The Crown v.

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  • axis of a freely suspended magnet is observed; while, in the absence of a distant mark of which the azimuth is known, the geographical meridian is obtained from observations of the transit of the sun or a star.

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  • The telescope B serves to observe the scale attached to the magnet when determining the magnetic meridian, and to observe the sun or star when determining the geographical meridian.

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  • To obtain the geographical meridian the box A is removed, and an image of the sun or a star is reflected into the telescope B by means of a small transit mirror N.

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  • The time of transit of the sun or star across the vertical wire of the telescope having been observed by means of a chronometer of which the error is known, it is possible to calculate the azimuth of the sun or star, if the latitude and longitude, of the place of observation are given.

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  • If, however, a theodolite, fitted with a telescope which can rotate about a horizontal axis and having an altitude circle, is employed, so that when observing a transit the altitude of the sun or star can be read off, then the time need only be known to within a minute or so.

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  • He speaks there of a needle carried on board ship which, being placed on a pivot, and allowed to take its own position of repose, shows mariners their course when the polar star is hidden.

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  • Guido Guinizzelli, a poet of the same period, writes: - "In those parts under the north are the mountains of lodestone, which give the virtue to the air of attracting iron; but because it [the lodestone] is far off, [it] wishes to have the help of a similar stone to make it [the virtue] work, and to direct the needle towards the star."

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  • 28-30) mentions the pointing of the magnetic needle toward the pole star.

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  • Da Buti, the Dante commentator, in 1380 says the sailors use a compass at the middle of which is pivoted a wheel of light paper to turn on its pivot, on which wheel the needle is fixed and the star (wind-rose) painted.

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  • Some of these were essays, such as his Baptized Property, an attack on serfdom; others were periodical publications, the Polyarnaya Zvyezda (or Polar Star), the Kolokol (or Bell), and the Golosa iz Rossii (or Voices from Russia).

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  • He also entered into relations with the crown prince of Sweden (Bernadotte), who conferred on him the order of the Polar Star.

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  • This enterprising and deserving man, on the completion of his journey in 1875, was rewarded by the Indian government with a pension and grant of land, and afterwards received the gold medal of the Royal Geographical Society and the Companionship of the Star of India.

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  • Star, Sehler, Dr Rubels, Polli, Cardona, Mastriani, Diez, Carus, Piderit, Burgess and P. Gratiolet.

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  • (i.) THE Garter; (ii.) THE Collar And George; (iii.) THE Lesser George And Ribbon; (1V.) Star.

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  • Generally speaking, the insignia of the " knights grand cross " consist of a star worn on the left breast and a badge, usually some form either of the cross patee or of the Maltese cross, worn suspended from a ribbon over the shoulder or, in certain cases, on days of high ceremonial from a collar.

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  • The " commanders " wear the badge from a ribbon round the neck, and the star on the breast; the " companions " have no star and wear the badge from a narrow ribbon at the button-hole.

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  • The star, badge and ribbon of the order are illustrated on Plate II., figs.

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  • (i.) Star; (ii.) Grand Cross (Mil.); (iii.) Star; (iv.) Grand Cross (Civ.) THE Thistle.

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  • (v.) Star; (vi.) Badge.

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  • (vii.) Badge; (viii.) Star.

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  • (ix.) Star; (x.) Grand Cross.

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  • The star, badge and ribbon are illustrated on Plate II., figs.

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  • The star of the knights grand cross is a seven-rayed star of silver with a small ray of gold between each, in the centre is a red St George's cross bearing a medallion of St Michael encountering Satan, surrounded by a blue fillet with the motto Auspicium melioris aevi.

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  • The Order of St Michael and St George ranks between the " most exalted " Order of the Star of India and the " most eminent " Order of the Indian Empire, of both of which the viceroy of India for the time being is officio grand master.

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  • The collar of the Star of India is composed of alternate links of the lotus flower, red and white roses and palm branches enamelled on gold, with an imperial crown in the centre; that of the Indian Empire is composed of elephants, peacocks and Indian roses.

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  • The badge, star and ribbon of the knights grand cross are illustrated on Plate III., figs.

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  • The badge is a gold medallion bearing the royal cipher and the words " For Faithful Service " in blue; for men it rests on a silver star, for women it is surrounded by a silver wreath.

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  • An illustration of the star of the grand cross is given on Plate V.

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  • The badge is an oval star with eight points, enamelled half red and white, dependent from a gold imperial crown.

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  • (i.) Grand Cross; (ii.) Star.

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  • (iii.) Badge of Knight Grand Commander; (iv.) Star.

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  • The Star Of India.

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  • (v.) Star; (vi.) Badge OF' Knight Grand Commander.

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  • for service in the Congo State: the Order of the African Star (1888), the Royal Order of the Lion (1891) and the Congo Star (1889).

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  • The ribbon is light watered blue, the collar of alternate gold elephants with blue housings and towers, the star of silver with a purple medallion bearing a silver or brilliant cross surrounded by a silver laurel wreath.

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  • The star of silver bears the black eagle on an orange ground surrounded by a silver fillet on which is the motto of the order Suum Cuique.

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  • The badge is a pale green enamelled cross resting on a' gold crown with eight rue leaves, the centre is white with the crowned monogram of the founder surrounded by a green circlet of rue; the star bears in its centre the motto Providentiae Memor.

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  • The Order of Pius was founded in 1847 by Pius IX.; there are now three classes; the badge is an eight-pointed blue star with golden flames between the rays, a white centre bears the founder's name; the ribbon is blue with two red stripes at each border.

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  • The Order of the Star of Rumania was founded in 1877, and the Order of the Crown of Rumania in 1881, both in five classes, for civil and military merit; the ribbon of the first is red with blue borders, of the second light blue with two silver stripes.

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  • in gold on a blue ground, surmounted by the imperial crown, and surrounded by a trophy of weapons and green and white flags, and a circular red and gold star with a blue St Andrew's cross.

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  • in 1882, statutes 1883, in five classes; the ribbon is blue and red; the Order of St Sava, founded 1883, also in five classes, is an order of merit for science and art; the Order of the Star of Karageorgevitch, four classes, was founded by Peter I.

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  • The native members must be already members of the Order of the Sword or the Pole Star.

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  • Vasa in 1522, and was re-established by Frederick I., with the Seraphim and the Pole Star in 1748; modifications have been made in 1798, 1814 and 1889.

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  • The Order of the Pole Star (Polar Star, North Star, the " Black Ribbon "), founded in 1748 for civil merit, has since 1844 three classes.

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  • The white cross bears a five-pointed silver star on a blue medallion.

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  • There are five classes; the badge is a silver sun of seven clustered rays, with crescent and star between each cluster; on a gold centre is the sultan's name in black Turkish lettering, surrounded by a red fillet inscribed with the words Zeal, Devotion, Loyalty; it is suspended from a red crescent and star; the ribbon is red with green borders.

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  • The badge is a gold sun with seven gold-bordered green rays; the red centre bears the crescent, and it is also suspended from a gold crescent and star; the ribbon is green bordered with red.

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  • The badge has an elaborate design; it consists of a star of purple, red, yellow, gold and silver rays, on which are displayed old Japanese weapons, banners and shields in various coloured enamels, the whole surmounted by a golden kite with outstretched wings.

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  • Wilfred Tomkinson (" Phoebe," North Star," Trident," Mansfield," Whirlwind," Myngs," Velox," Morris Moorsom Melpomene, "Tempest" and "Tetrarch" to escort the force and cover it to seaward; "Termagant," "Truculent" and "Manly" to screen the Zeebrugge monitors).

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  • a great star shell soared into the sky, which was soon thick with them shining dimly through the eddies of the smoke.

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  • She came under shrapnel fire off the mole, and as she rounded it a star shell showed up the "Intrepid" heading for the canal and the "Thetis" aground.

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  • The "Warwick," "Phoebe" and "North Star" had been cruising off the mole to screen the force from torpedo attack.

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  • The destroyer "North Star" losing her bearings in the smoke had emerged from the smoke screen and coming under a heavy fire was reduced to a sinking condition.

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  • The Beehive (so called from the shape of its cone), the Grand and the Lone Star throw up columns to a height of Zoo ft.

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  • The Star of Bethlehem.

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  • pyrenaicum, and the common Star of Bethlehem, 0.

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  • When truly adjusted the theodolite measures the horizontal angle between any two objects, however much they may differ in altitude, as the pole star and any terrestrial object.

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  • In reply to Thomas Paine's Age of Reason, he published the Age of Revelation (1790); he also published a volume entitled A Star in the West, or a Humble Attempt to Discover the Long Lost Ten Tribes of Israel (1816), in which he endeavours to prove that the American Indians may be the ten lost tribes.

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  • In 1869 a stone weighing 83* carats was found near the Orange river; this was purchased by the earl of Dudley for £25,000 and became famous as the " Star of South Africa."

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  • The Star of Este, 25 3 2 carats.

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  • The most famous Brazilian stones are: - The Star of the South, found in 1853, when it weighed 2542 carats and was sold for £40,000; when cut it weighed 125 carats and was bought by the gaikwar of Baroda for £80,000.

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  • The most famous are the following: - the Star of South Africa, or Dudley, mentioned above, 832 carats rough, 462 carats cut.

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  • Tithes were classified according to their nature as praedial, or It was his denial of the divine right of tithes that brought down the wrath of the Star Chamber upon the author.

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  • The board of trade building, the building of the Star newspaper, and several large office buildings (including the Scarritt, Long, and New York Life Insurance buildings) are worthy of mention.

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  • On the different days of the year each hour was determined by a fixed star culminating or nearly culminating in it, and the position of these stars at the time is given in the tables as in the centre, on the left eye, on the right shoulder, &c. According to the texts, in founding or rebuilding temples the north axis was determined by the same apparatus, and we may condude that it was the usual one for astronomical observations.

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  • Some chapters describe the manner in which he passes from earth to heaven and becomes a star in the firmament, others deal with the food and drink necessary for his continued existence after death, and others again with the royal prerogatives which he hopes still to enjoy; many are directed against the bites of snakes and stings of scorpions.

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  • Among them the bright star Sirius was any I in special esteem; it was a goddess Sothis (Sopde), often be 1tified by the Egyptians with Isis.

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  • According to a widely-spread doctrine of great age the deceased Egyptian was translated to the heavens, where he lived on in the form of a star.

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  • These ordinances are called, by way of distinction, new constitutions, Novellae constitutiones post codicem (veapai Star&Efs), Novels.

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  • The principal fruit of the observations was a catalogue of about a thousand stars, the places of which were determined by the methods usually employed in the 16th century, connecting a fundamental star by means of Venus with the sun, and thus finding its longitude and latitude, while other stars could at any time be referred to the fundamental star.

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  • The Hessian star catalogue was published in Lucius Barettus's Historia coelestis (Augsburg, 1668), and a number of other observations are to be found in Coeli et siderum in eo errantium observationes Hassiacae (Leiden, 1618), edited by Willebrord Snell.

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  • The number of his astronomical publications exceeds 150, but his reputation depends mainly on¢ his earlier work at Greenwich and his two great star catalogues - the Cape Catalogue for 1880 and the Radclife r 'Catalogue for 1890.

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  • Neither they nor the lesser chiefs who flourished on the lack of common law and order could be reduced by ordinary methods, and the Councils of Wales and of the North were given summary powers derived from the Roman civil law similiar to those exercised by the Star Chamber at Westminster and the court of Castle Chamber at Dublin.

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  • It was necessary for the future development of England that its governmental system should be centralized and unified, that the authority of the monarchy should be more firmly extended over Wales and the western and northern borders, and that the still existing feudal franchises should be crushed; and these objects were worth the price paid in the methods of the Star Chamber and of the Councils of the North and of Wales.

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  • This group is particularly rich in bright stars, and is full of nebulosity, but there are fewer faint stars than in equal areas of the surrounding sky; the central star is Alcyone (3rd magnitude); PleIone and Atlas are also of the 3rd magnitude.

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  • ARCTURUS, the brightest star in the northern hemisphere, situated in the constellation Bootes in an almost direct line with the tail Q' and rt) of the constellation Ursa Major (Great Bear); hence its derivation from the Gr.

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  • When there are fissures radiating in several directions it is called "star shake."

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  • He learned the letters from the transcription of a few verses in the Star of the Messiah of Petrus Niger, and, with a subsequent hint or two from Reuchlin, who also lent him the grammar of Moses Kimhi, made his way through the Bible for himself with the help of Jerome's Latin.

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  • He began journalism, through the influence of William Archer, on the reviewing staff of the Pall Mall Gazette in 1885; he then became art and musical critic: writing from 1888 to 1890 for the Star, where his articles were signed "Corno di Bassetto," and then in 1890 to 1894 for the World.

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  • In 1847 the dispute in the Church of the Nativity at Bethlehem about the right to mark with a star the birthplace of Christ became one of the prime causes of the Crimean war.

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  • The most interesting members are: a Coronae, a binary consisting of a yellow star of the 6th magnitude, and a bluish star of the 7th magnitude; R Coronae, an irregular variable star; and T Coronae or Nova Coronae, a temporary or new star, first observed in 1866.

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  • In addition to Arcturus, the brightest in the group, the most interesting stars of this constellation are: e Bootis, a beautiful double star composed of a yellow star of magnitude 3, and a blue star of magnitude 62; Bootis, a double star composed of a yellow star, magnitude 41, and a purple star, magnitude 61-; and W.

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  • Bootis, an irregularly variable star.

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  • telescope has been adjusted to focus upon a star, and to divide the diameter of the object-, glass by the diameter of the emergent pencil.

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  • this circle to measure the polar distance of any star seen in the telescope, and these readings will also be true (apart from the effects of atmospheric refraction) if we rotate the instrument through any angle on the axis A A.

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  • Thus one important attribute of an equatorially mounted telescope that, if it is directed to any fixed star, it will follow the diurnal motion of that star from rising to setting by rotation of the polar axis only.

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  • If we now attach to the polar axis a graduated circle D D, called the" hour circle,"of which the microscope or vernier R reads o h when the declination axis is horizontal, we can obviously read off the hour angle from the meridian of any star to which the telescope may be directed at the instant of observation.

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  • If the local sidereal time of the observation is known, the right ascension of the star becomes known by adding the observed hour angle to the sidereal time if the star is west of the meridian, or subtracting it if east of the meridian.

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  • Further, by causing the hour circle, and with it the polar axis, to rotate by clockwork or some equivalent mechanical contrivance, at the same angular velocity as the earth on its axis, but in the opposite direction, the telescope will, apart from the effects of refraction, automatically follow a star from rising to setting.

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  • The peculiar form of the tube is eminently suited for rigid preservation of the relative parallelism of the axes of the two telescopes, so that,;i the image of a certain selected star is retained on the intersection of two wires of the micrometer, by means of the driving clock, aided by small corrections given by the observer in right ascension and declination (required on account of irregularity in the clock movement, error in astronomical adjustment of the polar axis, or changes in the star's apparent place produced by refraction), the image of a star will continue on the same spot of the photographic film during the whole time of exposure.

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  • If then the objective tube is directed to any star, the convergent beam from the object-glass is received by the plane mirror from which it is reflected upwards along the polar axis and viewed through the hollow upper pivot.

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  • - In all the previously described types of telescope mounting the axis of the instrument is either pointed directly at the object or to the pole; in the latter case the rays from the star under observation are reflected along the polar axis by a mirror or mirrors attached to or revolving with it.

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  • The difficulty is that the automatic motion of a single mirror capable of reflecting the rays of any star continuously along the axis of a fixed horizontal telescope, requires a rather complex mechanism owing to the variation of the angle of reflexion with the diurnal motion.

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  • The mirror C D is set at such an angle as to reflect rays from the star S in the direction of the polar axis to the mirror R and thence to the horizontal telescope T.

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  • Besides these complications there is another drawback to the use of the coelostat for general astronomical work, viz., the obliquity of the angle of reflection, which can never be less than that of the declination of the star, and may be greater to any extent.

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  • Assuming, for example, that the northern star has the smaller right ascension, the instrument is first, with the aid of the stop, placed in the meridian towards the north; the verniers of the graduated circle g are set to read to the reading 40-2(Sn+Ss) where 0 is the approximate latitude of the place and Sn, Ss the declinations of the northern and southern star respectively; then the level frame h is turned till the levels k and I are in the middle of their run, and there clamped by the screw m, aided in the final adjustment by the adjoining slow motion screw shown in the figure.

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  • When the star enters the field of view its image is approximately bisected by the spider web of the micrometer n, the exact bisection being completed in the immediate neighbourhood of the meridian.

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  • The readings of the levels k and 1 and the reading of the micrometer-drum are then entered, and the observation of the northern star is complete.

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  • When the southern star enters the field the same process is repeated.

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  • - Zenith Telescope (by Warner & SwaseY) 4 - 2{(n -)+(Sn+ss)I, where - t 5 is the difference of the micrometer readings converted into arc - it being assumed that increased micrometer readings correspond with increased zenith distance of the star.

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  • The value of "one revolution of the screw in seconds of arc" can be determined either by observing at transit the difference of zenith distance of two stars of known declination in terms of the micrometer screw, the instrument remaining at rest between their transits; or by measuring at known instants in terms of the screw, the change of zenith distance of a standard star of small polar distance near the time of its greatest elongation.

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  • By the use of photography, however, it is possible to photograph the trail of a star as it transits the meridian when the telescope is directed towards the north, and another trail be similarly photographed when the telescope is directed towards the south.

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  • In this system one star is defined to be unit magnitude higher than another if its light is less in the ratio I:2 512.

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  • Heis the numbers and magnitudes of stars between the north pole and a circle 35° south of the equator are: - From the value of the light-ratio we can construct a table showing the number of stars of each magnitude which would together give as much light as a first magnitude star, viz.: - Comparing these figures with the numbers of stars of each magnitude we notice that the total light emitted by all the stars of a given magnitude is fairly constant.

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  • The best known and typical star of this class is Mira or o Ceti.

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  • This was the first variable star to be discovered, having been noticed in 1596 by David Fabricius, who thought it was a new star (a Nova).

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  • Although the periodic outbursts of light have taken place without intermission during the two and a half centuries that the star has been under observation, they are somewhat irregular.

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  • Spectroscopic observation shows that the increased light accompanies an actual physical change or conflagration in the star.

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  • X Cygni is another star of this class, remarkable for its range of magnitude.

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  • In both cases no extraneous cause can be assigned; the period seems to be inherent in the star itself and not to be determined by the revolution of a satellite (no variability of the line-of-sight motion of Mira has been found, so that it is probably not accompanied by any large companion).

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  • This class of variables is accordingly characterized by the fact that for the greater part of the period the star shines steadily with its maximum brilliancy, but fades away for a short time during each period.

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  • Ever since the variability of Algol was observed it was suspected to be due to a partial eclipse of the star by a dark body nearly as large as itself revolving round it; but the explanation remained merely a surmise until K.

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  • Vogel of Potsdam, by repeated measurements of the motion of Algol in the line of sight, showed that the star is always receding from us before the loss of light and approaching us afterwards.

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  • About 56 Algol variables were known in 1907; the variables of this class are the most difficult to detect, for the short period of obscuration may easily escape notice unless the star is watched continuously.

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  • The variable star Lyrae, which is typical of another class, was also discovered by Goodricke in 1784.

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  • A large eccentricity also produces an unsymmetrical light variation, the minimum occurring at a time not midway between two maxima; stars of this character are called Cepheid variables, after the typical star S Cephei.

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  • The latter, on the other hand, is perhaps connected by insensible gradations with the ordinary simple star.

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  • - From time to time a star, hitherto too faint to be noticeable, blazes out and becomes a prominent object, and then slowly fades into obscurity.

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  • The brightest star of all these was the famous " Tycho's star " in Cassiopeia.

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  • After three weeks it began to decline, but the star did not finally disappear until March 1574.

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  • This star was discovered by T.

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  • In the next two days it reached zero magnitude, thus becoming the brightest star in the northern heavens, but after that it rapidly decreased.

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  • In the case of this star there is evidence that the outburst must have been extremely rapid, for the region where Nova Persei appeared had been photographed repeatedly at Harvard during February, and in particular no trace of the star was found on a plate taken on the 19th of February, which showed eleventh magnitude stars.

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  • The collision theory supposes that the outburst is the result of a collision between two stars or between a star and a swarm of meteoric or nebulous matter.

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  • There is one unique star, which is of special interest as occupying rather an intermediate position between a nova and a long-period variable.

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  • This is the southern star n Argus (sometimes called i Carinae).

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  • The slowness both of the rise and decline is in great contrast with the cases the proximity is only apparent; one star may be really at a vast distance behind the other, but, being in the same line of vision, they appear close together.

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  • With the best instruments a star can be distinguished as double when the separation of the two components is a little less than 0.1".

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  • Campbell one star in every seven examined is binary.

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  • It is a legitimate speculation to suppose that these in the reverse order are the stages in the evolution of a double star.

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  • As the simple star radiates heat and contracts, it retains its angular momentum; when this is too great for the spheroidal form to persist, the star may ultimatel y separate into two components, which are driven farther and farther apart by their mutual tides.

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  • No star is altogether removed from the attractions of its neighbours, and there are cases where some sort of connexion seems to relate stars which are widely separated in space.

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  • In modern times Sirius has always been a typical white or bluish-white star, but a number of classical writers refer to it as red or fiery.

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  • - The absence of the distinctive lines of an element in the spectrum does not by any means signify that that clement is wanting or scarce in the star.

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  • The spectroscope only yields information about the thin outer envelope of the star; and even here elements may be present which do not reveal themselves, for the spectrum shown depends very greatly on the temperature and pressure.

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  • Stars of the different types are therefore not necessarily of different chemical constitution, but rather are in different physical conditions, and it is generally believed that every star in the course of its existence passes through stages corresponding to all (or most of) the different types.

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  • Thus in the first stage of a star's history we find it gradually condensing from a highly diffused gaseous state, and growing hotter as it does so.

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  • Thus in the second stage the star is still contracting, but its temperature is decreasing.

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  • The greatest temperature attained is not the same for all stars, but depends on the mass of the star.

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  • It is, however, important to bear in mind that Lane's theory is concerned with the temperature of the body of the star; the temperature of the photosphere and absorbing layers, with which we are chiefly concerned, does not necessarily follow the same law.

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  • The temperature of the photosphere at this stage has reached a maximum, and the star is new of the helium type.

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  • Then follows a gradual absorption of first the helium and then the hydrogen, the photosphere grows continually cooler, and the star passes successively through the stages exemplified by Sirius, Procyon, the Sun, Arcturus and Antares.

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  • If the latter are considered to be in an early state this presents no difficulty; but if both Antarian and carbon stars are held to be evolved from solar stars, we may consider them to be, not successive, but parallel stages of development, the chemical constitution of the star deciding whether it shall pass into the third or fourth type.

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  • In these cases evidently either the star has a greater intrinsic brilliancy per square mile of surface than the sun, or is less dense.

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  • The phenomena of long-period variables show that the surface brilliancy may vary very greatly, even in the same star.

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  • For the Algol variables it is possible to form even more direct calculations of the density, for from the duration of the eclipse an approximate estimate of the size of the star may be made.

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  • Jeans has shown that for this type of star the argument is open to theoretical objection, so that Myers's result cannot be accepted.

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  • Distances and .Parallaxes of the Stars.-As the earth traverses annually its path around the sun, and passes from one part of its orbit to another, the direction in which a fixed star is seen changes.

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  • In fact the relative positions are the same as if the earth remained fixed and the star described an orbit equal to that of the earth, but with the displacement always exactly reversed.

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  • The star thus appears to describe a small ellipse in the sky, and the nearer the star, the larger will this ellipse appear.

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  • The greatest displacement of the star from its mean position (the semi-axis major of the ellipse) is called its parallax.

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  • If 7r be the parallax, and R the radius of the earth's orbit, the distance of the star is R/sin ir.

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  • Very special precautions are required to eliminate instrumental error before we can compare observations, say, of a star on the meridian in winter at 6 p.m.

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  • with observations of the same star in summer on the meridian at 6 a.m.

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  • He chose for his purpose the binary star 61 Cygni, which was the star with the most rapid apparent motion then known and therefore likely to be fairly near us, although only of the sixth magnitude.

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  • More accurate determinations have shown that this star, which is the third brightest star in the heavens, has a parallax of 0.75", this indicates that its distance is 25,000,000,000,000 m.

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  • Nowadays the determination is more usually made by measuring the displacement of the star relatively to the stars surrounding it.

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  • The quantity determined by these methods is the relative parallax between the star measured and the stars with which it is compared.

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  • It is, however, fair to assume that the comparison stars will rarely have a parallax as great as o oi "; for it must be remembered that it is quite the exception for a star taken at random to have an appreciable parallax; particularly if a star has an ordinarily small proper motion, it is likely to be very distant.

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  • Still exceptional cases will occur where a comparison star is even nearer than the principal star; it is one of the advantages of the photographic method that it involves the use of a considerable number of comparison stars, whereas in the heliometric method usually only two stars, chosen symmetrically one on each side of the principal star, are used.

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  • Neither criterion is a guarantee that the star shall have a measurable parallax.

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  • Brightness is particularly deceptive; thus Canopus, the second brightest star in the heavens, has probably a parallax of less than 0.01 ", and so also has Rigel.

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  • If three plates (or three sets of exposures on one plate) are taken at intervals of six months, when the stars in the region have their maximum parallactic displacements, the first and third plates serve to eliminate the proper motion of the star, and the detection of a parallax is easy.

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  • Their detection is especially simple when the stereo-comparator is used; this instrument enables the two eyes to combine the images of each star on two plates into one image (as in the stereoscope); when the star has moved considerably in the interval between the taking of the two plates, it appears to stand out from the rest in relief and is at once noticed.

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  • The star with the greatest proper motion yet known was found by J.

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  • When the parallax of a star is known, we are able to infer from its proper motion its actual linear speed in miles per hour, in so far as the motion is transverse to the line of sight.

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  • The velocity in the line of sight can be determined by spectroscopic observation, so that in a few cases the motion of the star is completely known.

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  • Campbell the average velocity in space of a star is 21.2 m.

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  • It will be seen that the proper motion of any star may be regarded as made up of two components.

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  • The part of the star's apparent Speed displacement, which is due to the solar motion, is gener the Solar ally called the parallactic motion; the rest of its motion.

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  • Regarded as a linear velocity, the parallactic motion is the same for all stars, being exactly equal and opposite to the solar motion; but its amount, as measured by the corresponding angular displacement of the star, is inversely proportional to the distance of the star from the earth, and foreshortening causes it to vary as the sine of the angular distance from the apex.

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  • The speed is very nearly four radii of the earth's orbit per year; thus the annual parallactic motion is equal to four times the parallax, for a star lying in a direction 90° from the solar apex; for stars nearer the apex or antapex it is foreshortened.

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  • If it is merely the aggregate of the stars, each star or small group of stars may be a practically independent unit, its birth and development taking place without any relation to the evolution of the whole.

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  • Taking a sphere whose radius is 560 light years (a distance about equal to that of the average ninth magnitude star), it will contain: I star giving fromloo,000 to io,000 times the light of the sun 26 stars „ 1,000 „ „ 1,000 „ 100 „ 22,000 „ „ 100 „ 10 „ „ „ 140,000 „ „ IO „ I „ 430,000, ,„ I, , 0.I, , n 650,000 „ „ 0 I „ 0.01 „ .„ Whether there is an increasing number of still less luminous stars is a disputed question.

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  • The system of the "star" class as originally established provided that the prisoner never previously convicted should be kept absolutely apart, at chapel, labour, exercise and in quarters, from his less fortunate fellows who had already been imprisoned.

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  • The privilege of the "star" is only accorded after careful inquiry and reasonable proof that the individual has never before been sent to prison.

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  • It is obvious that wrongful admission into the "star" class might be fraught with mischievous consequences, and it is well known that a first sentence does not necessarily mean absolute unacquaintance with crime.

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  • The "A" or Ordinary division comprises all ordinary convicts under old rules who are still separated into the three classes of "star," intermediate and recidivist, as provided by the act of 1898.

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  • Only those never previously convicted, or known as of not habitually criminal or corrupt habits, are eligible for the "star" class.

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  • In Annam where water spirits may take the form of serpents or of human beings, two deified heroes were said to have been serpents born of a childless woman, who drank from a bowl of water into which a star had fallen.

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  • In 1910 Knud Rasmussen founded the station of Thule in North Star Bay, Wolstenholme Sound, as a trading station and a base for researches.

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  • The first in 1915 met with an accident, and had to winter in North Star Bay; the second in 1916 failed to get through Melville Bay, but the third in 1917 brought back safely those members of the expedition who had not previously returned via the Danish settlements in Greenland.

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  • Front, showing the Rete or Spider, a network of star pointers.

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  • via lactea (see Star).

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  • In 1589 he received the first substantial piece of patronage from his powerful kinsman, the reversion of the clerkship of the Star Chamber.

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  • It was at last felt necessary that the queen should in some way vindicate her proceedings, and this she at first did, contrary to Bacon's advice, by a declaration from the Star Chamber.

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  • St John was summoned before the Star Chamber for slander and treasonable language; and Bacon, ex officio, acted as public prosecutor.

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  • This court, with a jurisdiction somewhat similar to that of the Star Chamber, had originally been called into being under Edward IV.

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  • In some cases the singular is formed from the plural by the addition of -yn or -en; thus ser, " stars," seren, " star."

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  • The need of an organ for the dissemination of information, and the quickening of interest in the missionary and educational enterprises of the Triennial Convention, led Rice to establish the Latter Day Luminary (1816) and the Columbian Star, a weekly journal (1822).

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  • He appears, in the beginning of 1098, as attempting to escape from the privations of the siege of Antioch - showing himself, as Guibert of Nogent says, a " fallen star."

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  • BEDLAM, or Bethlehem Hospital, the first English lunatic asylum, originally founded by Simon FitzMary, sheriff of London, in 1247, as a priory for the sisters and brethren of the order of the Star of Bethlehem.

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  • In 1727, after a short war, he signed a treaty with the Turks, acknowledging the sultan as chief of the Moslems. But the fortunate star of Tahmasp II.

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  • On the first occasion only he extended his journey to England, and was then attended by his sadr azim, or prime minister, Mirza Husain Khan, an able and enlightened adviser, and a Grand Cross of the Star of India.

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  • The dispute was carried into the court of chancery and the star chamber.

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  • The charter of the society was revoked by the court of star chamber in the reign of Charles I., but a new one was granted by Charles II., under which the society still acts.

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  • the Rotunda, where are the ruins of the old saltpetre works; the Star Chamber, where the protrusion of white crystals through a coating of the black oxide of manganese creates an optical illusion of great beauty; the Chief City, where an area of 2 acres is covered by a vault 125 ft.

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  • To all these causes must be added - not least important in dealing with orientals - the widespread feeling since the Afghan disaster that the star of the company was in the descendant, and that there was truth in the old prophecy that the British would rule in India for a bare century from Plassey (1757).

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  • But as his star seemed rising that of his royal protector declined.

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  • He no doubt trusted that his removal to Dublin would bring relief, but here again his evil star interposed.

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  • In 1860 he removed to London, as parliamentary reporter to the Morning Star, of which he became editor in 1864.

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  • Damasonium derives its popular name, star-fruit, from the fruits spreading when ripe in the form of a star.

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  • In 1747 he decreed the abolition of serfdom, but this enactment was not carried 1 One of these, with the legend " Constantinvs Bassaraba De Brancovan D.G.Voevoda Et Princeps Valachiae Transalpinae," and having on the reverse the crowned shield of Walachia containing a raven holding a cross in its beak between a moon and a star, is engraved by Del Chiaro.

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  • At the " Blue Star " hotel in Prague also was signed the treaty which ended the war between Austria and Prussia (Aug.

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  • There is thus a turning-point in the life of every star.

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  • In some The Star.

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  • Thackeray), that is to say, not far from the star Vega in the constellation Lyra, and was moving thither at a rate of twelve miles per second.

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  • A star is said to rise one unit in magnitude when the logarithm of its brightness diminishes by 0.4.

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  • Taking as a star of magnitude I a Tauri or a Aquilae, where would the sun stand in this scale ?

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  • Several estimates have been made which agree well together; whether direct use is made of known parallaxes, or comparison is made with binaries of well-determined orbits of the same spectral type as the sun, in which therefore it may be assumed there is the same relation between mass and brilliancy (Gore), the result is found that the sun's magnitude is - 26.5, or the sun is Io n times as brilliant as a first magnitude star; it would follow that the sun viewed from a Centauri would appear as of magnitude 0.7, and from a star of average distance which has a parallax certainly less than o 1 ", it would be at least fainter than the fifth magnitude, or, say, upon the border-line for naked-eye visibility.

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  • The principal books by Beecher, besides his published sermons, are: Seven Lectures to Young Men (1844); Plymouth Collection of Hymns and Tunes (1855); Star Papers, Experiences of Art and Nature (1855); Life Thoughts (1858); New Star Papers; or Views and Experiences of Religious Subjects (1859); Plain and Pleasant Talks about Fruits, Flowers and Farming (1859); American Rebellion, Report of Speeches delivered in England at Public Meetings in Manchester, Glasgow, Edinburgh, Liverpool, and London (1864); Prayers from Plymouth Pulpit (1867); Norwood: A Tale of Village Life in New England (1867); The Life of Jesus the Christ (1871), completed in 2 vols., by his sons (1891); and Yale Lectures on Preaching (3 vols., 1872-1874).

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  • The cabal or clique which attacked the Cid had no effect whatever on the judgment of the public. All his subsequent masterpieces were received with the same ungrudging applause, and the rising star of Racine, even in conjunction with the manifest inferiority of Corneille's last five or six plays, with difficulty prevailed against the older poet's towering reputation.

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  • This fort effectively protected the city in 1814 when attacked by the British, and it was during the attack that Francis Scott Key, detained on one of the British attacking vessels, composed the " Star Spangled Banner."

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  • In imitation of the English order of the Garter, he established the knightly order of the Star, and celebrated its festivals with great display.

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  • There is nothing distinctively Turkish in the combination of crescent and star which appears on the Turkish national standard; the latter is shown by coins and inscriptions to have been an ancient Illyrian symbol, and is of course common in knightly and decorative orders.

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  • BARCOCHEBAS, BAR-COCHAB, or BAR Kokba ("son of a star"), the name given in Christian sources to one Simeon, the leader in the Jewish revolt against Rome in the time of Hadrian (A.D.

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  • 17 to him, reading not Cochab (" a star"), but Cosiba (" goes forth from Jacob"); thus Bar-cochab is a Messianic title of the "man of Cozeba" (cf.

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  • The most important item added by him to the administrative machinery of the realm was the famous Star Chamber, ~ which was licensed by the parliament of 1487.

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  • Besides the ordinary judges there were the extraordinary tribunals, the court of high commission nominated by the crown to punish ecclesiastical offenders, and the court of star chamber, composed of the privy councillors and the chief justices, and therefore also nominated by the crown, to inflict fine, imprisonment, and even corporal mutilation.

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  • The courts of star chamber and high commission and the council of the north were abolished.

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  • with Coke and many others; documentary records of various courts are exemplified in the Select Cases from the star chamber, the court of requests and admiralty courts, published by the Selden Society; and there are voluminous records of the courts of augmentations, first-fruits, wards and liveries in the Record Office.

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  • It was thus parallel to the king's council, or concilium continuum, of medieval England; while by its side, during the 15th century, stood the Kammergericht, composed of the legal members of the council, in much the same way as the Star Chamber stood beside the English council.

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  • He had been in France in 1773, where he had not only the famous vision of Marie Antoinette at Versailles, "glittering like the morning star, full of life, and splendour and joy," but had also supped and discussed with some of the destroyers, the encyclopaedists, "the sophisters, economists and calculators."

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  • As he himself wrote, "the most worthless book of a bygone day is a record worthy of preservation; like a telescopic star, its obscurity may render it unavailable for most purposes; but it serves, in hands which know how to use it, to determine the places of more important bodies."

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  • On the 23rd of September he detected near the predicted place a small star unrecorded in the map, and next evening found that it had a proper motion.

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  • An enormous increase of business, consequent upon the use of steam machinery and free-trade openings to commerce, filled the land with prosperity, and discredited all statesmanship but that which steered by the star over Manchester.

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  • Monypenny, an assistant editor of The Times (1894-1899), who was best known to the public as editor of the Johannesburg Star during the crisis of 1899-1903.

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  • eturpov, a star, and vEu€ v, to classify or arrange).

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  • Referring to special articles, Solar System, Star, Sun, MooN, &c. for a description of the various parts of the universe, we confine ourselves, at present, to setting forth a few of the most general modern conceptions of the universe.

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  • As to extent, it may be said, in a general way, that while no definite limits can be set to the possible extent of the universe, or the distance of its farthest bodies, it seems probable, for reasons which will be given under Star, that the system to which the stars that we see belong, is of finite extent.

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  • Between the orbit of Neptune and the nearest star known to us is an immense void in which no bodies are yet known to exist, except comets.

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  • But although these sometimes wander to distances considerably beyond the orbit of Neptune, it is probable that the extent of the void which separates our system from the nearest star is hundreds of times the distance of the farthest point to which a comet ever recedes.

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  • (q.) In addition to these three most usual points, we may, of course, take the centre of a planet or that of a star in order to define the position of bodies in their respective neighbourhoods.

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  • This point in our middle latitudes is between the zenith and the north horizon, near a certain star of the second magnitude familiarly known as the Pole Star.

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  • Owing to the unceasing apparent motion of the sun toward the east, the interval between two passages of the same star over the meridian is nearly four minutes less than the interval between consecutive passages of the sun.

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  • Considering the position of the vernal equinox, and also of a star on the celestial sphere, it will be seen that the interval between the transits of these two points across the meridian may be used to measure the right ascension of a star, since the latter amounts to FIG.

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  • For example, if the right ascension of a star is exactly 15°, it will pass the meridian one sidereal hour after the vernal equinox.

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  • Among the problems of theoretical astronomy we may assign the first place to the determination of orbits, which is auxiliary to the prediction of the apparent motions of a planet, satellite or star.

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  • Let the parallel dotted lines represent rays of light we regard as infinitely distant, a star for example.

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  • If the telescope is so pointed that the image of the star is seen in coincidence with the cross threads, as represented in fig.

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  • 8, then we know that the star is exactly in the line of sight of the telescope, defined as the line joining the centre of the object glass, and the point of intersection of the cross threads.

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  • Before the position of a star can be noted, it has passed away from the cross threads.

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  • Right ascensions are now determined, not by measuring the angle between one star and another, but, by noting the time between the transits of successive stars over the meridian.

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  • By revolving on this axis it follows a star in its diurnal motion, so that the star is kept in the field of view notwithstanding that motion.

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  • It was, soon after its foundation, illustrated by the labours of Aristyllus and Timocharis (c. 320-260 B.C.), who School of constructed the first catalogue giving star -positions as Alex- g g g p andria.

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  • of the brilliant star Vega; but was shifted nearly 7° to the S.

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  • The most delicate indication of an atmosphere would be through the refraction of the light of a star when seen coincident with the limb of the moon.

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  • Not the slightest change in the direction of such a star when in this position has ever been detected, and it is certain that if any occurs it can be but a minute fraction of a second of arc. As an atmosphere equal to ours in density would produce a deviation of an important fraction of a degree, it may be said that the moon can have no atmosphere exceeding in density the b b l o o that of the earth.

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  • Finally, a complete rupture took place in 1904 between the Prince and Venizelos; the Venizelist party were defeated at the polls by the personal canvassing of the Prince and the united efforts of the other Cretan party leaders, already jealous of Venizelos' rising star.

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  • Philip happened to become the most prominent and most formidable type of a danger which was already threatening Greece before his baleful star arose.

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  • The following table shows the net annual amount of excise duties received in Ireland in a series of years: Other Industries.-Shipbuilding is practically confined to Belfast, where the firm of Harland and Wolff, the builders of the great " White Star " liners, have one of the largest yards in the world, giving employment to several thousand hands.

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  • Privy seals addressed to men of wealth and position commanded their attendance at church before the deputy or the provincial president, on pain of unlimited fine and imprisonment by the Irish Star Chamber.

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  • He always retained his faith in his star.

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  • The conclusions which researches relating to it have so far reached are treated in the articles STAR; SUN; COMET; NEBULA; AURORA POLARIS, &C. (S.

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  • On the other hand, the Artemis of Arcadia, who is confused with the nymph Callisto, who, again, is said to have become a she-bear, and later a star, and the Brauronian Artemis, whose maiden ministers danced a bear-dance, are goddesses whose legend seems unnatural, .and is felt to need explanation.

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  • These survived even their defeat by the splendid human gods of Rome, and only " fled from the folding star of Bethlehem."

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  • They bear a relation to the Platonic solids similar to the relation of " star polygons " to ordinary regular polygons, inasmuch as the centre is multiply enclosed in the former and singly in the latter.

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  • Diseases and distrubances of the ordinary functions of the organs were attributed to the influence of planets or explained as due to conditions observed in a constellation or in the position of a star; and an interesting survival of this bond between astrology and medicine is to be seen in the use up to the present time of the sign of Jupiter 4., which still heads medicinal prescriptions, while, on the other hand, the influence of planetary lore appears in the assignment of the days of the week to the planets, beginning with Sunday, assigned to the sun, and ending with Saturday, the day of Saturn.

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  • Kepler, who in his youth made almanacs, and once prophesied a hard winter, which came to pass, could not help putting an astrological interpretation on the disappearance of the brilliant star of 1572, which Tycho had observed.

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  • Theodore Beza thought that this star, which in December 1573 equalled Jupiter in brilliancy, predicted the second coming of Christ.

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  • I have consulted the star of his nativity by my own rules, and find he will infallibly die upon the 29th of March next about eleven at night of a raging fever.

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  • Napoleon, as well as Wallenstein, believed in his star.

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  • In French hear, malheur, heureux, malheureux, are all derived from the Latin augurium; the expression ne sous une mauvaise etoile, born under an evil star, corresponds (with the change of toile into astre) to the word malotru, in Provençal malastrue; and son dtoile polit, his star grows pale, belongs to the same class of illusions.

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  • c. asiaticus or libycus), in which the typical colour is bay with black " points " and often a white star on the forehead, and the mane and tail are long and full.

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  • White markings on one or more of the legs, with a white star or stripe on the face, are characteristic. The long hair on the legs is not so abundant as in the Shires, and it is finer in texture.

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  • In February 1638, for the part he had taken in importing and circulating The Litany and other publications of John Bastwick and Prynne, offensive to the bishops, he was sentenced by the Star Chamber to be publicly whipped from the Fleet prison to Palace Yard, Westminster, there to stand for two hours in the pillory, and afterwards to be kept in gaol until a fine of Soo had been paid.

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  • constellatus, studded with stars; con, with, and stella, a star), in astronomy, the name given to certain groupings of stars.

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  • The Sumerians and Accadians, the non-Semitic inhabitants of the Euphrates valley prior to the Babylonians, described the stars collectively as a " heavenly flock "; the sun was the " old sheep "; the seven planets were the " old-sheep stars "; the whole of the stars had certain " shepherds, " and Sibzianna (which, according to Sayce and Bosanquet, is the modern Arcturus, the brightest star in the northern sky) was the " star of the shepherds of the heavenly herds."

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  • The Accadians bequeathed their system to the Babylonians, and cuneiform tablets and cylinders, boundary stones, and Euphratean art generally, point to the existence of a well-defined system of star names in their early history.

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  • Aglaosthenes or Agaosthenes, an early writer, knew Ursa minor as Kvv600vpa, Cynosura, and recorded the translation of Aquila; Epimenides the Cretan (c. 600 B.C.) recorded the translation of Capricornus and the star Capella; Pherecydes of Athens (c. 500-450 B.C.) recorded the legend of Orion, and stated the astronomical fact that when Orion sets Scorpio rises; Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.) and Hellanicus of Mytilene (c. 496-411 B.C.) narrate the legend of the seven Pleiades - the daughters of Atlas; and the latter states that the Hyades are named either from their orientation, which resembles v (upsilon), " or because at their rising or setting Zeus rains "; and Hecataeus of Miletus (c. 470 B.C.) treated the legend of the Hydra.

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  • Knobel, " Chronology of Star Catalogues."

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  • His star had now set for ever.

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  • One glance at the hotel bar price list sent us scampering down the street in search of a place that didn't charge a five star price for a domestic beer.

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  • Once again, close but no gold star.

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  • It was a comforting combination of the symbols belonging to his adopted brothers: the sun worn by Damian, the White God, and the star worn by Jule, the expelled immortal and eastern hemisphere's commander.

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  • He walked until he recognized the Guardians' station, a single story house nestled between two similar houses and marked by a star and an arrow – the White God's symbols – in the corner of one window.

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  • He wore an assortment of knives on his belt and a silver symbol of a star with two arrows through it that looked older than Damian's on a black choker around his neck.

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  • Disappointed her friend was leaving for somewhere across the world, she'd bought them matching necklaces featuring whimsical half moons in rose gold with a single, small, sparkling diamond of a star embedded in the moon.

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  • A famous movie star on a secret rendezvous away from her alcoholic husband, a graft-taking senator from the mid-west.

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  • He stood ramrod straight—a movie star, not a government employee.

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  • "Alas, my ambition to be a movie star has faded," Gerry said with a wry smile.

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  • She doesn't know what she wants, and she's trying to protect you both from some psycho vampire TV star.

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  • Not everything works; for example, "Rock Star" is a pretty banal song.

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  • As part of Nana's torment, in a bitterly ironic twist, former Eastender's star Hilda Braid has been taken to a nursing home with suspected dementia.

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  • You get your monies worth from your subscription at Star Archive!

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  • Julian Barrat and Noel Fielding star in this brilliantly surreal comedy of shamans, monkeys and demon nannies summoned from hell.

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  • Remember the more luminous star has an absolute magnitude that is less than a fainter star's absolute magnitude!

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  • accretes onto the white dwarf 's surface is mainly hydrogen which forms an envelope around the star.

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  • accreted matter in orbit around a star.

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  • accretebsence of jets indicates that the star is not actively accreting material from this disk.

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  • accretion flow, or thermonuclear flashes on the surface of the neutron star.

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