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standards

standards Sentence Examples

  • Alex was a wealthy man - rich by her standards.

  • The way I heard it, Grandma & Grandpa Barret were rolling in money and Dad wasn't up to their standards... financially.

  • He'd begun to think their recruitment standards were slipping until Jake mentioned the operation.

  • It may be awhile by earth standards.

  • You people have the lowest standards when it comes to quality of life.

  • The inn, not large by city standards, was constantly in need of attention, especially in this, the short but hectic high season.

  • In spite of him being the school jock, I still had my standards.

  • Not that I'm rich, at least not by most standards, but I was the only heir to grandmother Radisson and a great-aunt.

  • Even on this holiday, one of the busiest days of the year, traffic remained modest by urban standards.

  • Your standards are low.

  • That.s quick even by your standards.

  • Everyone was fascinated by something so exotic compared to their standards.

  • The second battle he would leave to his sisters: teaching his lifemate how to behave according to dhjan standards.

  • Just as they had reversed their direction, Edith Shipton passed them, driving down the mountain, not speeding but too fast by Dean's conservative standards.

  • Connor Poe was a handsome man by anyone's standards, however, the other three were in a league of their own.

  • In spite of her strict moral standards on premarital relationships, Carmen was obviously stirred deeply by desire.

  • But if Sunday was peaceful, at least by recent standards, Monday was anything but.

  • Although the route was relatively flat by Colorado standards, Dean learned that a body unaccustomed to elevation in the 7,000­foot range needed more oxygen to fuel its muscles.

  • It wasn't really a mountain by most people's standards.

  • Their betrothal was short by White God standards, a matter of six days.

  • And, if to satisfy these we were forced to maintain the existence of a world of moral standards, it was, thirdly, necessary to form some opinion as to the relation of these moral standards of value to the forms and facts of phenomenal existence.

  • To comprehend the real position we are forced to the conviction that the world of facts is the field in which, and that laws are the means by which, those higher standards of moral and aesthetical value are being realized; and such a union can again only become intelligible through the idea of a personal Deity, who in the creation and preservation of a world has voluntarily chosen certain forms and laws, through the natural operation of which the ends of His work are gained.

  • The tribe or mal (" mountain") is often composed of several clans (phis-i, phdrea)or baryaks (literally "standards") each under a chief or baryaktar (standard-bearer), who is, strictly speaking, a military leader; there are in each clan a certain number of elders or voivodes (Albanian kru-ye, pl.

  • In addition to the encyclical letter, nineteen resolutions were put forth, and the reports of twelve special committees are appended upon which they are based, the subjects being intemperance, purity, divorce, polygamy, observance of Sunday, socialism, care of emigrants, mutual relations of dioceses of the Anglican Communion, home reunion, Scandinavian Church, Old Catholics, &c., Eastern Churches, standards of doctrine and worship. Perhaps the most important of these is the famous "Lambeth Quadrilateral," which laid down a fourfold basis for home reunion - the Holy Scriptures, the Apostles' and Nicene creeds, the two sacraments ordained by Christ himself and the historic episcopate.

  • The subordinate standards have been numerous, though marked by striking agreement in the main body of Christian doctrine which they set forth.

  • Much has been done of late years to make these subordinate standards of reformed doctrine more generally known.

  • There is nothing in the standards of the Presbyterian Church against liturgical worship.

  • The Confession of Faith and the Larger and Shorter Catechisms are recognized and venerated standards in all the lands where British Presbyterianism, with its sturdy characteristics, has taken root.

  • The synod seems to have remained without a constitution and without subscription until 1729, when it adopted the Westminster standards.

  • The stricter party urged the adoption of the Westminster standards and conformity thereto; the broader party were unwilling to sacrifice their liberty.

  • In 1869 the Old and New Schools in the North combined on the basis of the common standards; to commemorate the union a memorial fund was raised which amounted in 1871 to $7,607,492.

  • The modes of life and standards of comfort and morality in north Italy and in Calabria are widely different; the former being far in front of the latter.

  • In 1901-1902 only 65% out of the whole number of children between six and nine years of age were registered in the lower standards of the elementary and private schools.

  • Verona, Vicenza, Padua, Treviso, Venice entered into a compact to defend their liberties; and when he came again in 1163 with a brilliant staff of German knights, the imperial cities refused to join his standards.

  • On the 2gth of June 1881 the Chamber adopted a Franchise Reform Bill, which increased the electorate from oo,ooo to 2,000,000 by lowering the fiscal qualification from 40 to 19.80 lire in direct taxation, and by extending the suffrage to all persons who had passed through the two lower standards of the elementary schools, and practically to all persons able to read and write.

  • The United States of America, with a capital of £3,059,800,000 invested in its railways on the 30th of June 1906, was easily ahead of every other country, and in 1908 the figure was increased to £ 3,443, 02 7, 68 5, of which £2,636,569,089 was in the hands of the public. On a route-mileage basis, however, the capital cost of the British railway system is far greater than that of any other country in the world, partly because a vast proportion of the lines are double, treble or even quadruple, partly because the safety requirements of the Board of Trade and the high standards of the original builders made actual construction very costly.

  • In comparing the figures, it should be noted that main line mileage in the Eastern states, as for example that of the Pennsylvania railroad and the New York, New Haven & Hartford, does not differ greatly in standards of safety or in unit cost from the best British construction, although improvement work in America is charged to income far more liberally than it has been in England.

  • There can be little doubt but that the United States would long ago have disintegrated into separate, warring republics, had they not been bound together by railways, and standards of safety were 1 These figures are derived from a total.

  • The specifications for bull-headed rails issued by the British Engineering Standards Committee in 1904 provided for a carbon-content ranging from 0-35 to 0-50%, with a phosphorus maximum of 0.075%.

  • His unexpected recovery revived his father's hopes for his education, hitherto so much neglected if judged by ordinary standards; and accordingly in January 1752 he was placed at Esher, Surrey, under the care of Dr Francis, the well-known translator of Horace.

  • More original, perhaps, is the argument in the immediately preceding work, The Destiny of Man, viewed in the Light of his Origin (1884), which is, in substance, that physical evolution is a demonstrated fact; that intellectual force is a later, higher and more potent thing than bodily strength; and that, finally, in most men and some "lower animals" there is developed a new idea of the advantageous, a moral and non-selfish line of thought and procedure, which in itself so transcends the physical that it cannot be identified with it or be measured by its standards, and may or must be enduring, or at its best immortal.

  • Pilate inaugurated his term of office by ordering his troops to enter Jerusalem at night and to take their standards with them.

  • When he marched against Aretas, his army with their standards did not enter Judaea at all; but he himself went up to Jerusalem for the feast and, on receipt of the news that Tiberius was dead, administered to the Jews the oath of allegiance to Caligula.

  • The legions set up their standards in the temple-court and hailed Titus as imperator.

  • apart, but standards in orchards should be allowed at least 30 ft., and dwarf bush trees half that distance.

  • A girls' Latin school, with the same standards as the boys' school, was established in 1878 (an outcome of the same movement that founded Radcliffe College).

  • Population.-Up to the War of Independence the population was not only American, but it was in its ideas and standards essentially Puritan; modern liberalism, however, has introduced new standards of social life.

  • Yet judged by modern standards he had an inadequate conception of the meaning of ordered research.

  • The industry is conducted upon a basis of recognized standards of quality, and testing is necessary in the interests of both refiner and consumer, as well as compulsory in connexion with the various statutory and municipal regulations.

  • In other countries the flash-point standards differ considerably, as do the storage regulations.

  • In the United States, various methods of testing and various minimum standards have been adopted.

  • Before 1905 the state provided for higher education by the Florida State College, at Tallahassee, formerly the West Florida Seminary (founded in 1857); the University of Florida, at Lake City, which was organized in 1903 by enlarging the work of the Florida Agricultural College (founded in 1884); the East Florida Seminary, at Gainesville (founded 1848 at Ocala); the normal school (for whites) at De Funiak Springs; and the South Florida Military Institute at Bartow; but in 1905 the legislature passed the Buckman bill abolishing all these state institutions for higher education and establishing in their place the university of the state of Florida and a state Agricultural Experiment Station, both now at Gainesville, and the Florida Female College at Tallahassee, which has the same standards for entrance and for graduation as the state university for men.

  • They are much addicted to gambling, and formerly were much given to fighting, though they never display that passion for war in the abstract which is characteristic of some of the white races, and their courage on the whole is not high if judged by European standards.

  • As a statesman he did something to uphold the traditional ideal of his office; as a primate he elevated the standards of clerical discipline and education.

  • These are The Reign of Christ, wherein Christ as an earthly king calls his subjects to war: and Two Standards, one of Jesus Christ and the other of Lucifer.

  • The treasury contained the moneys and accounts of the state, and also the standards of the legions; the public laws engraved on brass, the decrees of the senate and other papers and registers of importance.

  • His teaching may be described as Evangelical Arminianism and its standards are his own four volumes of sermons and his Notes on the New Testament.

  • The method, though tedious in operation, is very accurate, and is largely employed for determining the magnetic quality of bars intended to serve .as standards.

  • Electors who, e.g., had passed four standards of a secondary school, or paid 16s.

  • Electors who had passed five standards, or who paid £4, 3s.

  • The grating would in any case retain its utility for the reference of new lines to standards otherwise fixed.

  • For such standards a relative accuracy of at least one part in a million seems now to be attainable.

  • The medium of instruction in the lower standards is the mother tongue of the children.

  • Primitive adornment in its earliest stages may be divided into three classes; first the moulding of the body itself to certain local standards of beauty.

  • Raumer's style is direct, lucid and vigorous, and in his day he was a popular historian, but judged by strictly scientific standards he does not rank among the first men of his time.

  • There are nine standards of instruction,and the classes in schools correspond with these standards.

  • Looking somewhat deeper at the sources from which Old English law was derived, we shall have to modify our classification to some extent, as the external forms of publication, although important from the point of view of historical criticism, are not sufficient standards as to the juridical character of the various kinds of material.

  • For the promulgation of these views, which were confessedly at variance with the doctrines of the standards of the national church of Scotland, he was summoned (1726) before his presbytery, where in the course of the investigations which followed he affirmed still more explicitly his belief that "every national church established by the laws of earthly kingdoms is antichristian in its constitution and persecuting in its spirit," and further declared opinions upon the subject of church government which amounted to a repudiation of Presbyterianism and an acceptance of the puritan type of Independency.

  • In conjunction with Josiah Latimer Clark, with whom he entered into partnership in 1861, he invented improved methods of insulating submarine cables, and a paper on electrical standards read by them before the British Association in the same year led to the establishment of the British Association committee on that subject, whose work formed the foundations of the system still in use.

  • it is not an outcome of Japanese nature nor yet of Buddhist teaching, but is due to the stress of endeavouring to reach the standards of Western acquirement with grievously inadequate equipment, opportunities and resources.

  • But if the Japanese sculptor adopted such standards in working for foreign patrons, his market would be reduced to very narrow dimensions.

  • Sometimes he had to yield; as when he had sent the standards, by night, into the Holy City, and was besieged for five days by suppliants who had rushed to Caesarea (Jos.

  • In England the following standards are used for plate and jewelry: 375, 500, 62 5, 75 0 and 916.6, corresponding to 9, 12, 15, 18 and 22 carats, the alloying metals being silver and copper in varying proportions.

  • In France three alloys of the following standards are used for jewelry, 920, 840 and 750.

  • Now again he maintained with great warmth of conviction that his views were in close accordance with Scripture and the Anglican standards, but the council, without specifying any distinct "heresy" and declining to submit the case to the judgment of competent theologians, ruled otherwise, and he was deprived of his professorships.

  • These are common school education and the adoption of one language (English); participation in political life, which is granted to all adult males after five years' residence; and the general influence of social standards embodied in laws, institutions and customs already established.

  • Standards Department >>

  • But, however short his orthodoxy might fall if tried by the standards of any particular church, his temperament was pre-eminently religious.

  • Other standards of reference may be used in special connexions; for example, the Earth is the usual unit for expressing the relative density of the other members of the solar system.

  • He was still felt by many of his clergy and by candidates for ordination to be a rather terrifying person, and to enforce almost impossible standards of diligence, accuracy and preaching efficiency, but his manifest devotion to his work and his zeal for the good of the people rooted him deeply in the general confidence.

  • When the king went forth to war thirteen great crosses made of gold and jewels were carried in wagons before him as his standards, and each was followed by 10,000 knights and 100,000 footmen.

  • Of the French and Bavarians 11,000 men, roo guns and 200 colours and standards were taken; besides the killed and wounded, the numbers of which were large but uncertain - many were drowned in the Danube.

  • Tertullian (c. 160-240) uses it in both senses, of an oath, as in the passage of his treatise About Spectacles, where he says that no Christian " passes over to the enemy's camp without throwing away his arms, without abandoning the standards and sacraments of his chief."

  • He was recklessly impetuous in his temperament, coarse and grossly superstitious according to modern standards.

  • The situation tended to become more, rather than less, complicated, and there was every variety of reformer and every degree of conservatism, for there were no standards for those who had rejected the papal supremacy, and even those who continued to accept it differed widely.

  • No standards of weighing or measuring were known, but the parts of the body were the units, and money consisted in rare and durable vegetable and animal substances, which scarcely reached the dignity of a mechanism of exchange.

  • Toothed gearing connected with the gun mountings actuates a rack attached to the standards carrying the sights, so that any movement of the gun mounting is communicated to the sights.

  • It is difficult for a generation which has witnessed another complete revolution in the standards of artistic taste to realize the secret of David's immense popularity in his own day.

  • Judged by European standards the cost of the American census is very great.

  • Beneath his fun-making we can discern a man who is fundamentally serious, and whose ethical standards are ever lofty.

  • The very sensation created by the novelty of his methods set standards and started reforms which have greatly improved the morale of the entire force.

  • The effect of his exhortations, as well as of his personal character and public acts, upon the standards and spirit of official life in the United States, was a pronounced one in attracting to the federal service a group o men who took up their work of public office with the same spirit of enthusiasm and self-sacrifice that actuates the military volunteer in time of war.

  • In the specification for bridge material, drawn up by the British Engineering Standards Committee, it is provided that the steel shall be acid or basic open-hearth steel, containing not more than o.

  • A good many years later he was entrusted by the committee of the British Association on standards of electric resist ance with the task of deducing the mechanical equivalent of heat from the thermal effects of electric currents.

  • Individual theologians have sought to define more exactly the points on which the standards are vague.

  • But these standards proved inadequate to the emergency, for it was possible, especially by the use of the allegorical method, to interpret them in more than one way, and their apostolic origin and authority were not everywhere admitted.

  • They opened the doors of their schools to the Greek and Latin classics, but they represented the ancient masterpieces dissevered from their original historic environment, as impersonal models of taste, as isolated standards of style.

  • Other voltaic standards of electromotive force are in use, such as the Weston cadmium cell, the Helmholtz calomel cell, and the standard Daniell cell.

  • The two standards, the cubic inch and the cubic decimetre, may not be strictly comparable owing to a difference in the normal temperature (Centigrade and Fahrenheit scales) of the two units of extension, the metre and the yard.

  • National standards of length are not legally now referred to natural standards or to physical constants, but it has been shown by A.

  • In all countries the national standards of weights and measures are in the custody of the state, or of some authority administering the government of the country.

  • The standards of the British Empire, so far as they relate to the imperial and metric systems, are in the custody of the Board of Trade.

  • Scientific research is not, of course, bound by official standards.

  • For the care of these national standards the Standards Department was developed, under the direction of a Royal Commission -- See: Report Standards Commission, 1870 -- (of which the late Henry Williams Chisholm was a leading member), to conduct all comparisons and other operations with reference to weights and measures in aid of scientific research or otherwise, which it may be the duty of the state to undertake.

  • The forms of the four primary standards representing the four units of extension and mass are shown in figs.

  • With reference to the materials of which standards of length are made, it appears that the Matthey alloy iridio-platinum (90% platinum, 10% iridium) is probably of all substances the least affected by time or circumstance, and of this costly alloy, therefore, a new copy of the imperial yard has been made.

  • For ordinary standards of length Guillaume's alloy (invar) of nickel (35.7%) and steel (64.3%) is used, as it is a metal that can be highly polished, and is capable of receiving fine graduations.

  • Authoritative standards and instruments for the measurement of electricity, based on the fundamental units of the metric system, have been placed in the Electrical Laboratory of the Board of Trade.

  • In the measurement of temperature the Fahrenheit scale is still followed for imperial standards, and the Centigrade scale for metric standards.

  • At the time of the construction of the imperial standards in 1844, Sheepshanks's Fahrenheit thermometers were used; but it is difficult to say now what the true temperature then, of 62° F., may have been as compared with 62° F., or 16.667° C., of the present normal hydrogen scale.

  • A descriptive list of the verifying instruments of the Standards Department, London, has been published.

  • (See: Descriptive List of Standards and Instruments.

  • A "troy pound " and a new standard yard, as well as secondary standards, were constructed by direction of parliament in 1758-1760, and were deposited with the Clerk of the House of Commons.

  • (See: Report on Standards deposited in House of Commons, 1st Nov.

  • 1842, 1906, formerly of the Standards Department of the Board of Trade and Secretary to the Royal Commission on Standards.

  • In the absence of the actual standards of ancient times the units of measure and of weight have to be inferred from the other remains; hence unit in this division is used for any more or less closely defined amount of length or weight in terms of which matter was measured.

  • Brandis, to the basis of Assyrian standards; Mommsen, to coin weights; and P. Bortolotti to Egyptian units; but F.

  • Besides this, all their evidence is but approximate, often only stating quantities to a half or quarter of the amount, and seldom nearer than 5 or 10%; hence they are entirely worthless for all the closer questions of the approximation or original identity of standards in different countries; and it is just in this line that the imagination of writers has led them into the greatest speculations, unchecked by accurate evidence of the original standards.

  • The number of published weights did not exceed 600 of all standards in 1880; but the collections from Naucratis (28), Defenneh (29) and Memphis (44) have supplied over six times this quantity, and of an earlier age than most other examples, while existing collections have been more thoroughly examined.

  • (Note: these figures refer to the authorities at the end of this section.) It is above all desirable to make allowances for the changes which weights have undergone; and, as this has only been done for the above Egyptian collections and that of the British Museum, conclusions as to the accurate values of different standards will here be drawn from these rather than continental sources.

  • -- Though large differences may exist, the rate of general variation is but slow -- excluding, of course, all monetary standards.

  • -- From the 7th century B.C. onward, the relations of units of weight have been complicated by the need of the interrelations of gold, silver and copper coinage; and various standards have been derived theoretically from others through the weight of one metal equal in value to a unit of another.

  • That this mode of originating standards was greatly promoted, if not started, by the use of coinage we may see by the rarity of the Persian silver weight (derived from the Assyrian standard), soon after the introduction of coinage, as shown in the weights of Defenneh (29).

  • The distinction of the use of standards for trade in general, or for silver or gold in particular, should be noted.

  • 8: Legal Regulations of Measures -- Most states have preserved official standards, usually in temples under priestly custody.

  • The Hebrew "shekel of the sanctuary" is familiar; the standard volume of the apet was secured in the dromus of Anubis at Memphis (35); in Athens, besides the standard weight, twelve copies for public comparison were kept in the city; also standard volume measures in several places (2); at Pompeii the block with standard volumes cut in it was found in the portico of the forum (33); other such standards are known in Greek cities (Gythium, Panidum and Trajanopolis) (11, 33); at Rome the standards were kept in the Capitol, and weights also in the temple of Hercules (2); the standard cubit of the Nilometer was before Constantine in the Serapaeum, but was removed by him to the church (2).

  • In England the Saxon standards were kept at Winchester before A.D.

  • The oldest English standards remaining are those of Henry VII.

  • Many weights have been found in the temenos of Demeter at Cnidus, the temple of Artemis at Ephesus, and in a temple of Aphrodite at Byblus (44); and the making or sale of weights may have been a business of the custodians of the temple standards.

  • Standards Of Area -

  • Standards Of Volume.

  • There is great uncertainty as to the exact values of all ancient standards of volume -- the only precise data being those resulting from the theories of volumes derived from the cubes of feet and cubits.

  • Thus these three different reckonings agree closely, but all equally depend on the Greek and Roman standards, which are not well fixed.

  • Standards Of Weight.

  • The main series on which we shall rely here are those -- (1) from Assyria (38) about 800 B.C.; (2) from the eastern Delta of Egypt (29) (Defenneh); (3) from western Delta (28) (Naucratis); (4) from Memphis (44) -- all these about the 6th century B.C., and therefore before much interference from the decreasing coin standards; (5) from Cnidus; (6) from Athens; (7) from Corfu; and (8) from Italy (British Museum) (44).

  • But we are now able to prove that it was an independent system -- (1) by its not ranging usually over 200 grains in Egypt before it passed to Greece; (2) by its earliest example, perhaps before the 224 unit existed, not being over 208; and (3) by there being no intermediate linking on of this to the Phoenician unit in the large number of Egyptian weights, nor in the Ptolemaic coinage, in which both standards are used.

  • The Attic and Assyrian standards were used indifferently for either gold or silver.

  • In the Libra, as in most other standards, the value which happened to be first at hand for the coinage was not the mean of the whole of the weights in the country; the Phoenician coin weight is below the trade average, the Assyrian is above, the Aeginetan is below, but the Roman coinage is above the average of trade weights, or the mean standard.

  • (10) Id., Ninth Rep. of Warden of Standards (1875) (Assyrian);

  • -- The denominations of trade weights and measures at present used in the United Kingdom are represented by "Board of Trade standards," by which are regulated the accuracy of the common weights and measures handled in shops, &c.: (Board of Trade Model Regulations, 1892; Weights and Measures Acts, 1878.1889, 1892, 1893.)

  • 2: The international trade metric weights and measures (1897) handled in shops, &c., of which there are also Board of Trade standards, are set out as follows: --

  • In Code standards above the fifth, in addition to the foregoing, the table's of --

  • Instruction in the principles of the metric system, and in the advantages to be gained from uniformity in the method of forming multiples and sub-multiples of the unit, are, under this Code, to be given to the scholars in Standards IV., V., VI.

  • (1842-1906) Formerly Superintendent of the Standards Department of the Board of Trade and Secretary to the Royal Commission on Standards.

  • These works, which did much to mould the character of the German people, were set among the doctrinal standards of the Lutheran Church and powerfully influenced other compilations.

  • Calvin came to see this, and in 1542, after his experience in Strassburg, drafted a new one which was much more suitable for teaching purposes, though, judged by modern standards, still far beyond the theological range of childhood.

  • But such is not the view of the Church of England in her doctrinal standards, and there is an express rubric directing that any that remains of that which was consecrated is not to be carried out of the church, but reverently consumed.

  • (6) It has been pointed out that reservation for the sick prevails in the Scottish Episcopal Church, the doctrinal standards of which correspond with those of the Church of England.

  • The metric system of weights and measures has been adopted, but the old Spanish standards remain in general use.

  • Judged by modern standards, his description of the direction of rivers and mountain-chains seems defective, but allowance must be made for difficulties in procuring information, and for want of accurate instruments.

  • Above all we must avoid applying our own standards of taste, style and morality to the judgment of the text before us.

  • Amongst the legitimate reasons for suspecting the correctness of a text are patent contradictions in a passage or its immediate neighbourhood, proved and inexplicable deviations from the standards for forms, constructions and usages (mere rarity or singularity is not enough), weak and purposeless repetitions of a word (if there is no reason for attributing these to the writer), violations of the laws of metre and rhythm as observed by the author, obvious breaks in the thought (incoherence) or disorderly sequence in the same (double or multiple incoherence).

  • On Prospect Hill on the, 8th of July 1775 Israel Putnam raised the "Appeal to Heaven" flag, and here also is said to have been raised on the 1st of January 1776 one of the earliest of the Continental standards, the Union Jack and Stripes.

  • unnatural, seeing his defiance of the ordinary habits and standards of the world.

  • Spectroscopic Measurements and Standards of Wave-Length.- All spectroscopic measurement should be reduced to wavelengths or wave-frequencies, by a process of interpolation between lines the wave-lengths of which are known with sufficient accuracy.

  • A number of secondary standards separated by about 50 A, and tertiary standards at intervals of from 5 to 10 A have also been determined.

  • In the case of a prism some caution is necessary unless the standards used are very close together.

  • The last event recorded by the epitomator Justin (q.v.) is the recovery of the Roman standards captured by the Parthians (20 B.C.).

  • They retain their Armenian liturgies and rites, pruned to suit the Vatican standards of orthodoxy, and they recognize the pope as head of the church.

  • and obligations had no place, and it was seen that the volunteers who flocked to the standards of the various commanders were not less but even more efficient in the field than the vassals they had hitherto been accustomed to lead.

  • The main divisions of the army were distributed under the royal and other principal standards, smaller divisions under the banners of some of the greater nobility or of knights banneret, and smaller divisions still under the pennons of knights or, as in distinction from knights banneret they came to be called, knights bachelors.

  • They kept the keys of the treasury and had charge of its contents, including not only coin and bullion but also the military standards and a large number of public documents, which in later times comprised all the laws as well as the decrees of the senate.

  • Standards from which galvanized wire is tightly strained from one end to the other are preferable and very convenient.

  • They may be supported by iron standards or brick piers, back and front, bearing up a flat bar of iron on which the slates may rest; the use of the bar will give wider intervals between the supports, which will be found convenient for filling and emptying the beds.

  • Very durable trellises for greenhouse climbers are made of slender round iron rods for standards, having a series of hooks on the inner edge, into which rings of similar metal are dropped; the rings may be graduated so as to form a broad open top, or may be all of the same size, when the trellis will assume the cylindrical form.

  • Shallow planting, whether of wall trees or standards, is generally to be preferred, a covering of a few inches of soil being sufficient for the roots, but a surface of at least equal size to, the surface of the hole should be covered with dung or litter so as to restrain evaporation and preserve moisture.

  • Plums are propagated chiefly by budding on stocks of the Mussel, Brussels, St Julien and Pear plums. The damson, wine-sour and other varieties, planted as standards, are generally increased by suckers.

  • From 1855 to 1859 he acted as director of the Dudley observatory at Albany, New York; and published in 1859 a discussion of the places and proper motions of circumpolar stars to be used as standards by the United States coast survey.

  • Five thousand Spaniards were killed; seven hundred taken, and one hundred and five standards.

  • On the upper plate are placed two small levelling bubbles, and two standards tt ate attached to the upper side of the plate for supporting the trunnions of the telescope T.

  • Gathering around them many of the Covenanters who clung tenaciously to their standards of faith, these ministers began to preach in the fields, and a period of persecution marked by savage hatred and great brutality began.

  • They renounced their allegiance to King James and were greatly disappointed when their standards found no place in the religious settlement of 1689, continuing to hold the belief that the covenants should be made obligatory upon the entire nation.

  • They had lost some 2 500 killed, amongst them Gournay and Berbier du Metz, the chief of artillery, the Allies twice as many, as well as 48 guns, and Luxemburg was able to send 150 colours and standards to decorate NotreDame.

  • His use of this material was not always according to accepted standards.

  • Here again success attended the rebel standards.

  • On the 1st of January 1861 the standards of the new regiments were solemnly blessed; on the next day Frederick William IV.

  • Under the New Empire, when Egypt was almost a military stte, the army was a more specialized institution, the art of war in siege and strategy had developed, divisions were formed with special standards, there were regiments armed with battle-axes and scimitars, and chariots formed an essential part of the host.

  • Rings of metal, gold, silver and bronze played some part in exchange, and from the Hyksos period onwards formed the usual standards by which articles of all kinds might be valued.

  • We find such divine standards ~ often depicted on the earliest monuments, and among the symbols placed upon them may be detected the images of many deities destined to play an important part in the later national pantheon, such as the falcon Horus, the wolf Wepwawet (Ophois) ~ the goddess Neith, symbolized -~r~.by a shield transfixed with arrows, and the god Mm ~r, the nature of whose fetish is obscure.

  • Hence it came about that the provincial districts or nomes, as they were called, often derived their pames from the gods of tribes that settled in them, these names being hieroglyphically written with the sign for district surmounted by standards of the type above described, e.g.

  • The paintings on the vases show boats driven by oars and sails rudely figured, and the boats bear emblematic standards or ensigns.

  • Nur-el-Kanzi was killed and ten standards taken.

  • Wad en Nejumi, most of his amirs, and more than I 200 Arabs were killed; 4000 prisoners and 147 standards were taken, and the dervish army practically destroyed.

  • Since that date the most important changes effected in the elementary education system were the abolition, in 1886, of individual inspection of the lower standards - afterwards extended to the whole of the standards, the inspectors applying a collective test, the " block-grant " system, to the efficiency of a school - and the abolition of school fees (1889) for the compulsory standards, the loss being made up principally by a parliamentary grant, and partly by a proportion, earmarked for the purpose, of the proceeds of the Local Taxation (Customs and Excise) Act 1890, and the Education and Local Taxation Account (Scotland) Act 1892.

  • Proposals to admit women to university degrees were rejected by Oxford and Cambridge in 1896 and 1897 respectively.) The standard of difficulty set by the university of London was a high one, very much higher for its pass degrees than the corresponding standards at Oxford and Cambridge, while the standard for honours was equally high.

  • The committee were of opinion that a central board, consisting of representatives of the Board of Education and the different examining bodies, should be established, to co-ordinate and control the standards of the examinations, and to secure interchangeability of certificates, &c., as soon as a sufficient number of such bodies signified their willingness to be represented on the board.

  • The Absolute Value Of The Specific Heat Deduced Necessarily Depends On The Absolute Values Of The Electrical Standards Employed In The Investigation.

  • But For The Determination Of Relative Values Of Specific Heats In Terms Of A Standard Liquid, Or Of The Variations Of Specific Heat Of A Liquid, The Method Depends Only On The Constancy Of The Standards, Which Can Be Readily And Accurately Tested.

  • All this hand-work was reckoned according to customary standards as day-work and week-work.

  • It was during his stay in Asia (20 B.C.) that the Parthian king Phraates voluntarily restored the Roman prisoners and standards taken at Carrhae (53 B.C.), a welcome tribute to the respect inspired by Augustus, and a happy augury for the future.

  • The mother-idea of his poems, he says, is democracy, and democracy "carried far beyond politics into the region of taste, the standards of manners and beauty, and even into philosophy and theology" His Leaves certainly radiates democracy as no other modern literary work does, and brings the reader into intimate and enlarged relations with fundamental human qualities - with sex, manly love, charity, faith, self-esteem, candour, purity of body, sanity of mind.

  • Tried by current standards his poems lack form and structure, but they undoubtedly have in full measure the qualities and merits that the poet sought to give them.

  • The heroes of the Reformation, judged by modern standards, were reactionaries.

  • It need not be infinitely small, or even small compared with ordinary standards; thus in astronomy such vast bodies as the sun, the earth, and the other planets can for many purposes be treated merely as points endowed with mass.

  • It is only when we come to consider such delicate questions as the influence of tidal friction that other standards become necessary.

  • Nor was he much more respectful towards the official standards of the Church.

  • The wines of these vineyards are sold every year by auction early in November, and the prices they make serve as standards for the valuation of the other growths.

  • In the Westminster Standards also, which were the fruit of the Scottish desire for a religious uniformity, Scotland did not obtain by any means all it desired in its church documents.

  • The Scottish Church Society was founded in 18 2 with of y 9 Dr John Macleod of Govan as president, " to defend and advance catholic doctrine as set forth in the ancient creeds and embodied in the standards of the Church of Scotland."

  • - For the earlier history of the kirk the outstanding authorities are the histories of Knox, Calderwood, Baillie's Letters, and Wodrow's History: Knox's liturgy has been edited by Dr Sprott, and on the Westminster Standards the reader may consult Dr Mitchell's Minutes of the Westminster Assembly, and Baird lectures on the same subject.

  • It must be confessed that, judged by Western standards, the poems of Ephraim are prolix and wearisome in the extreme, and are distinguished by few striking poetic beauties.

  • The Talmud discusses and formulates rules upon points which other religions leave to the individual; it inculcates both ceremonial and spiritual ideas, and often sets up most lofty ethical standards.

  • This brings with it new standards independent of clan-customs or tribeusage.

  • The metric system of weights and measures is the legal standard in Chile, but the old Spanish standards are still widely used, especially in handling mining and farm produce.

  • Consequently in 20 B.C., h restored the standards captured in the victories over Crassus and Antony, and recognized the Roman suzerainty over Osroeni and Armenia.

  • Soc. vii.); corrected for the length of the seconds-pendulum by introducing a neglected element of reduction; and was entrusted, in 1843, with the reconstruction of the standards of length.

  • If the view of the satirist is owing to this circumstance more limited in some directions, and his taste and temper less conformable to the best ancient standards of propriety, he is also saved by it from prejudices to which the traditions of his class exposed the historian.

  • Spain again imposed its literary standards and models in the 17th century, France in the 18th, while the Romantic movement reached Portugal by way of England and France; and those countries, and in less degree Germany, have done much to shape the literature of the 10th century.

  • The league prescribed uniform laws, standards and coinage; it summoned contingents, imposed taxes and fined or coerced refractory members.

  • Ciliary movements, which undoubtedly contribute in bringing the surface into contact with larger supplies of oxygen and other fluids in unity of time, are not so rapid or so extensive when compared with other standards than the apparent dimensions of the microscopic field.

  • 18 the omission of all reference to the restoration, in 20 B.C., of the standards taken at Carrhae seems to justify the inference that the passage was written before that date.

  • In this office he was in constant intercourse with Pepys, whose diary frequently mentions him; but the insinuations of Pepys against him must not be taken too seriously, as there is no evidence to show that Batten in making a profit from his office fell below the standards of the time.

  • The Pharisees, who pruned and fed the tree of Judaism so that it might bear fruit for the healing of the Nation - and the nations in the latter days - gave them the opportunity of posing as the champions of the primitive standards.

  • Criticism no longer judges by absolute standards; it applies the standards of the author's own environment.

  • In ethics, again, the revolt against absolute standards limits us to the relative, and morals are investigated on the basis of history, as largely conditioned by economic environment and the growth of intellectual freedom.

  • Like these our author holds himself so far aloof from current debate of ceremonial or doctrine as to escape our principal standards of measurement regarding place and time.

  • Still, some adherents of the old Israelitish moral and religious standards must have survived, only they were not to be found in the chief places of concourse, but as a rule in coteries which handed on the traditions of Amos and Isaiah in sorrowful retirement.

  • There are a few well-marked types of wood which serve as convenient standards of comparison, but these cannot be used except in a few cases to distinguish individual genera.

  • The French decimal system is in use for weights and measures, together with Turkish standards.

  • Unfortunately his writings, with a few exceptions, are still in MS. He is the author of the first history of the Rumanians in Dacia written according to the standards of Western science.

  • Trans., 1821, 1831) on British standards of length and mass; and in 1832 he published an account of his labours in verifying the Russian standards of length.

  • In making such comparisons, it is always desirable, if possible, to select as standards longperiod gauges which are so situated that the short-period district lies.

  • From the Notice issued by the Standards Department of the Board of Trade, by permission of the Controller of H.M.

  • A large number of movements From the Notice issued by the Standards Department of the Board of Trade, by permission of the Controller of H.

  • The dim - inished stream of sugar con - tinues to flow till the 4-lb weight in the weights-pan is lifted (the end of the upper beam being for the time brought up against the frame and unable to descend further), and in lifting it dis --------------------- From the Notice issued by the Standards Department of the Board of Trade, by permission of the Controller of H.

  • But at the same instant that the cut - off takes place the rider weight is lifted off the end of the balance by a From the Notice issued by the Standards Department of the Board of Trade, by permission of the Controller of H.M.

  • The knife-edges on which the hopper rests are on two hori - zontal levers, one on each side of the hop From the Notice issued by the Standards Department per.

  • When a charge of coal is dropped into the hopper, the bell-crank lever receives a violent jerk from the shackle of the flitch-plate, and this jerk by means of suitable mechanical arrangements throws a pinion on the cam shaft into gear with a wheel on a counter shaft From the Notice issued by the Standards Department of the Board of Trade, by permission of the Controller of H.M.

  • By the second part of the drop the motion of the poise is reversed and the poise is run back to the zero From the Notice issued by the Standards Department of the Board of Trade, by permission of the Controller of H.M.

  • By its constitution of that year the English Church in South Africa adopts the laws and usages of the Church of England, as far as they are applicable to an unestablished church, accepts the three creeds, the ThirtyNine Articles, the Book of Common Prayer, the decisions of the undisputed general councils, the Authorized English Version of the Scriptures, disclaims the right of altering any of these standards of faith and doctrine, except in agreement with such alterations as may be adopted by a general synod of the Anglican Communion.

  • But in interpreting these standards of faith and doctrine, the Church of the Province of South Africa is not bound by decisions other than those of its own Church courts, or such court as the Provincial Synod may recognize as a tribunal of appeal.

  • Smith, " On Methods of High Precision for the Comparison of Resistances," Appendix to the Report of the British Association Committee on Electrical Standards, British Association Report (York, 1906), or the Electrician, 57, p. 97 6 (1906); C. V.

  • But there was a danger behind this revival; for the reformers of the 11th century, in their zeal for establishing the Kingdom of God on earth, were not content with raising the moral and intellectual standards prevailing in Christendom, but sought to bring the whole scheme of life under the church, by asserting the absolute supremacy of the spiritual over the temporal power, wherever the two came in contact or overlapped.

  • Its standards have also been upheld with varying success in great co-operative undertakings, such as the Dictionary of National Biography, the Cambridge Modern History, and Messrs Longmans Political History of England.

  • All these various changes in the opening of the valves and dampers are automatically performed in the proper order by means of a hand-wheel H, the shaft m resting on the standards t and shaft v.

  • In 1705 the Belfast Society was founded for theological discussion by Presbyterian ministers in the north, with the result of creating a body of opinion adverse to subscription to the Westminster standards.

  • But when such criticism passes into the attempt to find a universal criterion of morality - such an attempt being in effect an effort to make morality scientific - and especially when the attempt is seen, as it must in the end be seen, to fail (the moral consciousness being superior to all standards of morality and realizing itself wholly in particular judgments), then ethics as a process of reflection upon the nature of the moral consciousness may be said to begin.

  • The ultimate superiority of the moral consciousness over all other standards is recognized, even by those who impugn its authority, whenever they claim that all men ought to recognize the superior value of the standards which they themselves wish to substitute.

  • In fact, no acceptable scientific criterion emerges, and the outcome of Spencer's attempt to ascertain the laws of life and the conditions of existence is either a restatement of the dictates of the moral consciousness in vague and cumbrous quasi-scientific phraseology, or the substitution of the meaningless test of " survivability " as a standard of perfection for the usual and intelligible standards of " good " and " right."

  • The need is urgent of fixing a scale, and defining standards of actinic brightness; but it has not yet been successfully met.

  • He mapped 324, chose out nine, which he designated by the letters of the alphabet, to be standards of measurement for the rest, and ascertained the coincidence in position between the double yellow ray derived from the flame of burning sodium and the pair of dark lines named by him " D " in the solar spectrum.

  • In 1634 he took part in the convocation which drafted the code of canons that formed the basis of Irish ecclesiastical law till the disestablishment of the Irish Church in 1869, and defeated the attempt of John Bramhall, then bishop of Derry and later his own successor in Armagh, to conform the Irish Church exactly to the doctrinal standards of the English.

  • Several mints had been established since Richard of York's time; the standards varied and imitation was easy.

  • In the United States of America Langstroth's frame and hive are the acknowledged " standards " among the great body of bee-keepers, although about a dozen different frames, Size of varying more or less in size, have their adherents.

  • But even in this case allowance must be made for the difference between modern and medieval standards of decorum.

  • After the brilliant victory of Roccasecca (May 19, 1411) he had the satisfaction of dragging the standards of Pope Gregory and King Ladislaus through the streets of Rome.

  • He delivered the Roman hostages who were held in captivity in the town, recovered the standards lost at Caudium, and made 7000 of the enemy pass under the yoke.

  • In 1861 it was Thomson who induced the British Association to appoint its first famous committee for the determination of electrical standards, and it was he who suggested much of the work carried out by J.

  • Alex was a wealthy man - rich by her standards.

  • The way I heard it, Grandma & Grandpa Barret were rolling in money and Dad wasn't up to their standards... financially.

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