This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience. Learn more

staffordshire

staffordshire

staffordshire Sentence Examples

  • north-west from London by the London & North-Western and the Midland railways, and is also served by the Great Northern and North Staffordshire railways.

    0
    0
  • See William Molyneux, History of Burton-on-Trent (1869); Victoria County History, Staffordshire.

    0
    0
  • Pipeclay and china clay, from Kingsteighton, are shipped for the Staffordshire potteries, while coal and general goods are imported.

    0
    0
  • The coasting trade consists chiefly of imports of coal and provisions, the exports being principally timber for shipbuilding and flint for the Staffordshire potteries.

    0
    0
  • ECCLESHALL, a market town in the north-western parliamentary division of Staffordshire, England; 7 m.

    0
    0
  • Pop. (1 9 01) 3799 The church of the Holy Trinity, one of the most noteworthy in Staffordshire, is principally Early English, and has fine stained glass.

    0
    0
  • WILLIAM WOLLASTON (1659-1724), English philosophical writer, was born at Coton-Clanford in Staffordshire, on the 26th of March 1659.

    0
    0
  • FRANCIS ASBURY (1745-1816), American clergyman, was born at Hamstead Bridge in the parish of Handsworth, near Birmingham, in Staffordshire, England, on the 10th of August 1 745.

    0
    0
  • by Staffordshire, and W.

    0
    0
  • The principal river is the Trent, which, rising in the Staffordshire moorlands, intersects the southern part of Derbyshire, and forms part of its boundary with Leicestershire.

    0
    0
  • The other principal rivers are the following: - The Dane rises at the junction of the three counties, Staffordshire, Cheshire and Derbyshire.

    0
    0
  • The Dove rises on the southern slope, and flows as the boundary stream between Derbyshire and Staffordshire for nearly its entire course.

    0
    0
  • The Carboniferous or "Mountain" Limestone is the oldest formation in the county; its thickness is not known, but it is certainly over 2000 ft.; it is well exposed in the numerous narrow gorges cut by the Derwent and its tributaries and by the Dove on the Staffordshire border.

    0
    0
  • In the north-east and north the Great Central system touches the county; in the west the North Staffordshire and a branch of the London & North-Western; while a branch of the Great Northern serves Derby and other places in the south.

    0
    0
  • The town and neighbourhood have been long noted for their lime and cement, and large quantities of potters', pipe, fire and other kinds of clay are sent to Staffordshire and to foreign countries.

    0
    0
  • The earliest list of British birds we possess is that given by Merrett in his Pinax rerun naturalium Britannicarum, printed in London in 1667.4 In 1677 Plot published his Natural History of Oxfordshire, which reached a second edition in 1705, and in 1686 that of Staffordshire.

    0
    0
  • Lorenzo Dow (1777-1834), an eccentric American Methodist revivalist, visited North Staffordshire and spoke of the campmeetings held in America, with the result that on the 31st of May 1807 the first real English gathering of the kind was held on Mow Cop, since regarded as the Mecca of Primitive Methodism.

    0
    0
  • Declining an appointment as a United States Senator from Virginia, he retired to his home, Gunston Hall (built by him about 1758 and named after the family home in Staffordshire, England).

    0
    0
  • THOMAS FITZHERBERT (1552-1640), English Jesuit, was the eldest son and heir of William Fitzherbert of Swynnerton in Staffordshire, and grandson of Sir Anthony Fitzherbert, judge of the common pleas.

    0
    0
  • The pleasant wooded district was formerly part of Brewood Forest, which extended into Staffordshire.

    0
    0
  • He laboured for some time as a missionary priest in Staffordshire, held several positions as tutor to young Roman Catholic noblemen, and was finally appointed president of the English seminary at St Omer, where he remained till his death on the 15th of May 1773.

    0
    0
  • of Crewe, on the London & North-Western and North Staffordshire railways.

    0
    0
  • TAMWORTH, a market town and municipal borough of England, in the Lichfield parliamentary division of Staffordshire and the Tamworth division of Warwickshire, on the river Tame, a southern tributary of the Trent.

    0
    0
  • In 1380 John Glasewryth, a Staffordshire glass-worker, came to work at Shuerewode, Kirdford, and there made brode-glas and vessels for Joan, widow of John Shertere.

    0
    0
  • They gradually made their way into Hampshire, Wiltshire, Gloucestershire, Staffordshire, Northumberland, Scotland and Ireland.

    0
    0
  • ROWLEY REGIS, an urban district in the Kingswinford parliamentary division of Staffordshire, England, on the Stourbridge branch of the Great Western railway, 7 m.

    0
    0
  • One of the most striking examples of this is afforded by the thick or ten-yard seam of South Staffordshire, which is from 30 to 45 ft.

    0
    0
  • A midland group of coalfields extends from south Lancashire to the West Riding of Yorkshire, the two greatest industrial districts Geo= in the country, southward to Warwickshire and graphical Staffordshire, and from Nottinghamshire on the east to distribu- Flintshire on the west.

    0
    0
  • In the South Staffordshire and other Midland coalfields, where only shallow pits are required, and the coals are thick, a pair of pits may be sunk for a very few acres, while in the North of England, on the other hand, where sinking is expensive, an area of some thousands of acres may be commanded from the same number of pits.

    0
    0
  • In Staffordshire the main levels are also known as Laying gate roads."

    0
    0
  • The most typical example of this kind of working in England is afforded by the thick coal of South Staffordshire, which consists of a series of closely associated coal seams, varying from 8 to 12 or 13, divided FIG.

    0
    0
  • - South Staffordshire method of working Thick Coal.

    0
    0
  • This apparatus has been used at Harecastle in North Staffordshire, and found to work well, but with the disadvantage of bringing down the coal in unmanageably large masses.

    0
    0
  • generally in South Staffordshire, the coals are suffi ciently free from gas, or rather the gases are not liable to become explosive when mixed with air, to allow the use of naked lights, candles being generally used.

    0
    0
  • In the thick coal workings in South Staffordshire the slack left behind in the sides of work is especially liable to fire from so-called spontaneous combustion, due to the rapid oxidization that is set up when finely divided coal is brought in contact with air.

    0
    0
  • This system has been used in Nottinghamshire, and at Sneyd, in North Staffordshire.

    0
    0
  • In connexion with the re-survey in greater detail of the coalfields by the Geological Survey a series of descriptive memoirs were undertaken, those on the North Staffordshire and Leicestershire fields, and nine parts dealing with that of South Wales, having appeared by the beginning of 1908.

    0
    0
  • STONE, a market town in the western parliamentary division of Staffordshire, England, on the river Trent, 7 m.

    0
    0
  • of Stafford by the North Staffordshire railway.

    0
    0
  • Staffordshire, the diorites of Warwickshire, the phonolite of the Wolf Rock (to which he first directed attention), the pitchstones of Arran and the altered igneous rocks near the Land's End were investigated and described by him during the years1869-1879in the Quarterly Journal of the Geological Society and in the Geological Magazine.

    0
    0
  • BURSLEM, a market town of Staffordshire, England, in the Potteries district, 150 m.

    0
    0
  • from London, on the North Staffordshire railway and the Grand Trunk Canal.

    0
    0
  • STOKE-ON-TRENT, a market town and municipal and parliamentary borough of Staffordshire, England, on the upper Trent, in the heart of the Potteries district.

    0
    0
  • Stoke is on the North Staffordshire railway, 146 m.

    0
    0
  • The principal public buildings in the old town of Stoke are the town hall, with assembly rooms, law library and art gallery, the market hall, the Minton memorial building, containing a school of art and science; the free library and museum, and the North Staffordshire infirmary, founded in 1815 at Etruria, and removed to its present site in 1868.

    0
    0
  • The head offices of the North Staffordshire Railway Company are here.

    0
    0
  • Stoke-upon-Trent became the railway centre and head of the parliamentary borough of Stoke-upon-Trent, comprising the whole of the Staffordshire Potteries, which was created by the Reform Bill of 1832.

    0
    0
  • EDWARD AUGUSTUS FREEMAN (1823-1892), English historian, was born at Harborne, Staffordshire, on the 2nd of August 1823.

    0
    0
  • Staffordshire, but extending into Worcestershire and Warwickshire, England.

    0
    0
  • The institution of this strange matrimonial prize - which had its parallel at Whichanoure (or Wichnor) in Staffordshire, at St Moleine in Brittany, and apparently also at Vienna - appears to date from the reign of John.

    0
    0
  • of Derby, on the London & North-Western and the North Staffordshire railways.

    0
    0
  • Its enormous railway facilities and its geographical situation as the junction of the great trunk lines running north and south, tapping also the Staffordshire potteries on the one side and the great mineral districts of Wales on the other, constitute Crewe station one of the most important links of railway and postal communication in the kingdom.

    0
    0
  • BROWNHILLS, an urban district in the Lichfield parliamentary division of Staffordshire, England, 6 m.

    0
    0
  • Silk spinning has chiefly developed in the Yorkshire, Lancashire, Cheshire and Staffordshire textiles centres.

    0
    0
  • WILLIAM HUSKISSON (1770-1830), English statesman and financier, was descended from an old Staffordshire family of moderate fortune, and was born at Birch Moreton, Worcestershire, on the 11th of March 1770.

    0
    0
  • He became domiciled in England in 1587-1588, leaving Holland on the discovery of his complicity in a political plot, and was appointed (1588) rector of Tattenhall, Staffordshire.

    0
    0
  • Cowles in 1885, which was worked both at Lockport, New York, U.S.A., and at Milton, Staffordshire.

    0
    0
  • In 1905 the Cleveland district in North Yorkshire supplied 41% of the total British product of iron ores; Lincolnshire, 14.8%; Northamptonshire, 13.9%; Leicestershire, 4.7%; Cumberland, 8.6%; North Lancashire, 2.7%; Staffordshire, 6.1%; and Scotland, 5.7%.

    0
    0
  • Most of the British iron works lie in and near the important coal-fields in Scotland between the mouth of the Clyde and the Forth, in Cleveland and Durham, in Cumberland and Lancashire, in south Yorkshire, Derbyshire, and Lincolnshire, in Staffordshire and Northamptonshire, and in south Wales in spite of its lack of ore.

    0
    0
  • of London, on the London & North-Western, North Staffordshire and Great Central railways.

    0
    0
  • of Worcester by the Great Western railway, on the river Stour and the Staffordshire and Worcestershire canal.

    0
    0
  • RICHARD HURD (1720-1808), English divine and writer, bishop of Worcester, was born at Congreve, in the parish of Penkridge, Staffordshire, where his father was a farmer, on the 1 3th of January 1720.

    0
    0
  • SEDGLEY, an urban district of Staffordshire, England, between Dudley and Wolverhampton, in the parliamentary borough of Wolverhampton.

    0
    0
  • JOHN JAMES BLUNT (1794-1855), English divine, was born at Newcastle-under-Lyme in Staffordshire, and educated at St John's College, Cambridge, where he took his degree as fifteenth wrangler and obtained a fellowship (1816).

    0
    0
  • He was so well acquainted with the contents of the volumes which he exposed for sale that the country rectors of Staffordshire and Worcestershire thought him an oracle on points of learning.

    0
    0
  • Before he was three he had insisted on being taken to hear Sacheverel preach at Lichfield Cathedral, and had listened to the sermon with as much respect and probably with as much intelligence, as any Staffordshire squire in the congregation.

    0
    0
  • But, in spite of her murmurs and reproaches, he gave an asylum to another lady who was as poor as herself, Mrs Desmoulins, whose family he had known many years before in Staffordshire.

    0
    0
  • The sayings and Johnsoniana have been reprinted in very many and various forms. Valuable work has been done in Johnsonian genealogy and topography by Aleyn Lyell Reade in his Johnsonian Gleanings, &c., and in the Memorials of Old Staffordshire (ed.

    0
    0
  • Originally a local breed in the districts around the Staffordshire town from which it takes its name, it is now extensively bred, and highly valued as a bacon pig.

    0
    0
  • The 1st battalion of the North Staffordshire regiment moved up from Cairo to join the Egyptian army.

    0
    0
  • Cholera and fever were busy both with the North Staffordshire regiment at Gemai, whither they had been moved on its approach, and with the Egyptian troops at the front, and carried off many officers and men.

    0
    0
  • The North Staffordshire moved up to the front, and in September the army moved on Kerma, which was found to be evacuated, the dervishes having crossed the river to Hafir.

    0
    0
  • The North Staffordshire returned to Cairo.

    0
    0
  • Much salt is obtained from north Lancashire, as also from the brine pits of Staffordshire, Worcestershire, Yorkshire, Durham and the Isle of Man (Point of Ayre).

    0
    0
  • The chief centres of manufacture in England are at Northwich, Middlewich, Winsford and Sandbach in Cheshire, Weston-on-Trent in Staffordshire, Stoke Prior and Droitwich in Worcestershire and Middlesbrough in Yorkshire.) The Cheshire and Worcestershire salt deposits are by far the most important.

    0
    0
  • CONGLETON, a market town and municipal borough in the Macclesfield parliamentary division of Cheshire, England, on the North Staffordshire railway, 1571 m.

    0
    0
  • S., in a narrow valley, across the border in Staffordshire, are several coal-mines and iron-foundries.

    0
    0
  • Within a year or two he became junior partner with Thomas Whieldon of Fenton, then the cleverest master-potter in Staffordshire.

    0
    0
  • In the schedules of boundaries appended to two Old English charters there occurs mention of pools called " Grendel's mere," one in Wiltshire and the other in Staffordshire.

    0
    0
  • Iron-mining - perhaps the first in the New World - was begun in Virginia in 1608, when the Virginia Company shipped a quantity of ore to England; and in 1619 the Company established on Falling Creek, a tributary of the James river, a colony of about 150 ironworkers from Warwickshire, Staffordshire and Sussex, who had established there several ore-reducing plants under the general management of John Berkeley of Gloucester, England, when on the 22nd of March 1622 the entire colony, excepting a girl and a boy, were massacred by the Indians.

    0
    0
  • Joseph Berington, himself a distinguished Catholic priest, considers that this number was above the mark; he reports that his co-religionists were most numerous in Lancashire and London; next came Yorkshire, Northumberland and Staffordshire.

    0
    0
  • REGINALD POLE (1500-1558), English cardinal and archbishop of Canterbury, born at Stourton Castle, Staffordshire, was the third son of Sir Richard Pole, Knight of the Garter, and Margaret, countess of Salisbury, a daughter of George, duke of Clarence, and therefore niece of Edward IV.

    0
    0
  • RUGELEY, a market town in the Lichfield parliamentary division of Staffordshire, England, in the Trent valley.

    0
    0
  • SMETHWICK, a municipal and county borough in the Handsworth parliamentary division of Staffordshire, England, 3 m.

    0
    0
  • The family seats (Alton Towers and Ingestre Hall) and the chief estates are in Staffordshire.

    0
    0
  • She was prioress (1872-1881) of the Stone convent in Staffordshire, where she died on the 29th of April 1894.

    0
    0
  • The Wellington-Crewe line of the Great Western railway is here joined by a branch into Staffordshire of the North Staffordshire railway.

    0
    0
  • east in Staffordshire, Audley Cross marks a great battle in the Wars of the Roses (1459), in which the Yorkists were successful and Lord Audley fell.

    0
    0
  • WALSALL, a market town and municipal, county and parliamentary borough of Staffordshire, England, on the northern edge of the Black Country, and on a tributary stream of the Tame.

    0
    0
  • 7.1 Railways 7.2 Furness 7.3 North Staffordshire 7.4 Cross-Country Connexions 7.5 Oversea Communications

    0
    0
  • It includes the whole of Northumberland and Durham, the West Riding of Yorkshire, most of Lancashire and Derbyshire, the north of Staffordshire and the west of Nottinghamshire.

    0
    0
  • In the south-west of the Pennine region the coal-field of North Staffordshire supports the group of small but active towns known collectively from the staple of their trade as " The Potteries."

    0
    0
  • The plain extends through Staffordshire and Worcester, forming the lower valley of the Severn.

    0
    0
  • The Triassic rocks, red sandstones, marls and conglomerates cover a broad area in the Midlands in Worcestershire, Warwickshire and Leicestershire, whence they may be followed south-westward through Somerset to the coast at Sidmouth, and northward, round either flank of the Pennine Hills, through Nottinghamshire and Yorkshire to Middlesbrough on the one hand, and upon the other through Staffordshire, Cheshire and Lancashire to Carlisle.

    0
    0
  • The great populous area which covers south Lancashire and the West Riding of Yorkshire, and extends beyond them into Cheshire, Derbyshire, Staffordshire and Nottinghamshire, is not in reality a unit.

    0
    0
  • This canal is owned by the North Staffordshire railway company.

    0
    0
  • Staffordshire.

    0
    0
  • The railways having the heaviest coal traffic are the North-Eastern, which monopolizes the traffic of Northumberland and Durham; the Midland, commanding the Derbyshire, Yorkshire and East Midland traffic, and some of the Welsh; the London & North Western, whose principal sources are the Lancashire, Staffordshire 1 The figure 17.76 is the percentage for the whole of Yorkshire.

    0
    0
  • There is also a considerable working of brown iron ore at various points in Lincolnshire, Northamptonshire and Leicestershire; with further workings of less importance in Staffordshire and several other districts.

    0
    0
  • Salt, obtained principally from brine but also as rock-salt, is an important object of industry in Cheshire, the output from that county and Staffordshire exceeding a million tons annually.

    0
    0
  • Among other textile industries attaching to definite localities may be mentioned the silk manufacture of eastern Staffordshire and Cheshire, as at Congleton and Macclesfield; and the hosiery and lace manufactures of Nottinghamshire, Derbyshire and Leicestershire.

    0
    0
  • But the district most intimately connected with every branch of this industry, from engineering and the manufacture of tools, &c., to working in the precious metals, is the " Black Country " and Birmingham district of Staffordshire, Warwickshire and Worcestershire.

    0
    0
  • Thus, the manufacture of china and pottery, although widespread, is primarily identified with Staffordshire, where an area comprising Stoke and a number of contiguous towns actually bears the name of the Potteries (q.v.).

    0
    0
  • It lies on the left bank of the Severn, at the junction of the Stour and the Staffordshire and Worcestershire canal.

    0
    0
  • Leigh died in Staffordshire in June 1671.

    0
    0
  • WEDNESBURY, a market town and municipal and parlia - mentary borough of Staffordshire, England, in the Black Country, 121 m.

    0
    0
  • Readman, experimenting with a Cowles furnace in Staffordshire in 1888, patented his process, and in the same year Parker and Robinson, working independently, patented a similar one.

    0
    0
  • There is a considerable general coasting trade, and clay is exported to the Staffordshire potteries.

    0
    0
  • En 1767 Hargreaves produced the spinning-jenny; Arkwrights;pinning machine was exhibited in 1768; Cromptons mule was ~inished in 1779; Cartwright hit upon the idea of the power,oom in 1784, though it was not brought into profitable use till The Staffordshire potteries had been flourishing under Wedgwood SinCe 1763, and the improved steam-engine was brought into shape by Watt in 1768.

    0
    0
  • WOLVERHAMPTON, a market town, and municipal, county and parliamentary borough of Staffordshire, England, 125 m.

    0
    0
  • A branch canal connects with the Worcestershire and Staffordshire system.

    0
    0
  • The white cattle formerly kept at Chartley Park, Staffordshire, exhibit signs of affinity with the long-horn breed.

    0
    0
  • PENKRIDGE, a town in the western parliamentary division of Staffordshire, England; 134 m.

    0
    0
  • GILBERT SHELDON (1598-1677), archbishop of Canterbury, was born at Stanton in the parish of Ellastone, Staffordshire, and educated at Oxford.

    0
    0
  • BILSTON, a market town of Staffordshire, England, 22 m.

    0
    0
  • He was the son of William Anson of Shugborough in Staffordshire, and his wife Isabella Carrier, who was the sister-in-law of Lord Chancellor Macclesfield, a relationship which proved very useful to the future admiral.

    0
    0
  • His first preferment was the small vicarage of Cannock in Staffordshire; but he leapt into notice when holding a preachership at St Saviour's, Southwark.

    0
    0
  • JOHN LIGHTFOOT (1602-1675), English divine and rabbinical scholar, was the son of Thomas Lightfoot, vicar of Uttoxeter, Staffordshire, and was born at Stoke-upon-Trent on the 29th of March 1602.

    0
    0
  • Shortly after the removal of Sir Rowland to London, Lightfoot, abandoning an intention to go abroad, accepted a charge at Stone in Staffordshire, where he continued for about two years.

    0
    0
  • Cotton to the rectory of Ashley in Staffordshire, where he remained until June, 1642, when he went to London, probably to superintend the publication of his next work, A Few and New Observations upon the Book of Genesis: the most of them certain; the rest, probable; all, harmless, strange and rarely heard of before, which appeared at London in that year.

    0
    0
  • UTTOXETER, a market town in the Burton parliamentary division of Staffordshire, England, 15 m.

    0
    0
  • It is also served by the North Staffordshire railway.

    0
    0
  • On the completion of his arts course, he nominally studied divinity at Edinburgh until 1787; in1788-1789he spent rather more than a year as private tutor in a Virginian family, and from 1790 till the close of 1792 he held a similar appointment at Etruria in Staffordshire, with the family of Josiah Wedgwood, employing his spare time in experimental research and in preparing a translation of Buffon's Natural History of Birds, which was published in nine 8vo vols.

    0
    0
  • But the recent find of a well preserved skull of a labyrinthodont (Capitosaurus stantonensis) from the Trias of Staffordshire has enabled A.

    0
    0
  • The original kingdom seems to have lain in the upper basin of the Trent, comprising the greater part of Derbyshire and Staffordshire, the northern parts of Warwickshire and Leicestershire, and the southern part of Nottinghamshire.

    0
    0
  • appropriation of land to Staffordshire County Council.

    0
    0
  • And I know at least two county archivists who worked under me in Staffordshire.

    0
    0
  • Levi is a dark brindle Staffordshire Bull Terrier; who went missing on 4th January from the Scarborough area.

    0
    0
  • My dog is a Staffordshire bull terrier x mastiff x chow.

    0
    0
  • Uxbridge, Middlesex, UK 3 beautiful female Staffordshire bull terrier puppies.

    0
    0
  • Put another way, 99 per cent of Staffordshire households were not burgled last year.

    0
    0
  • Attacks on paramedics soaring Attacks on paramedics in Staffordshire have risen fourfold in the past three years according to ambulance chiefs.

    0
    0
  • Slightly ahead of him, straining against a leather choker, was the biggest Staffordshire bull terrier I had ever seen.

    0
    0
  • constant companion was Captain, the Staffordshire bull terrier.

    0
    0
  • The proposed expressway will pass through South Staffordshire resulting in significant social, environmental and economic impacts.

    0
    0
  • faraday technology in Newcastle, Staffordshire, makes video filters used in the broadcasting industry.

    0
    0
  • After failing to rally the catholic gentry of the Midlands to join him in a rebellion he reached Holbeach House in Staffordshire.

    0
    0
  • In July 1784, according to the Staffordshire Advertiser, one such wagon was carrying gunpowder.

    0
    0
  • meander through before reaching rural Staffordshire.

    0
    0
  • oatcake shops exist in North Staffordshire and serve them with any mixture of bacon, cheese, sausage and eggs.

    0
    0
  • The following is the story of a 28-year-old Staffordshire woman who suffered a horrific ordeal after her drink was spiked.

    0
    0
  • His father, Clement Wedgwood, was the grandson of Josiah Wedgwood, the famous potter from Staffordshire.

    0
    0
  • Guests will include the Lord Lieutenant of Staffordshire, Mr James Hawley, who will present the first probationer Of The Year award.

    0
    0
  • The school decided to move and finally quit Park Hall for Cotton Hall, on the Staffordshire Moorlands, in August 1868.

    0
    0
  • There's a newly re-formed UK club at Trentham Lake, Staffordshire.

    0
    0
  • Staffordshire terrierdshire bull terrier x mastiff x chow.

    0
    0
  • She began to experience religious stirrings at the age of fifteen during a visit to a cousin in Staffordshire.

    0
    0
  • The last meeting of the North Staffordshire HIV Forum took place at The Herbert Minton Building in stoke on Thursday 9th December.

    0
    0
  • River Mease Derbyshire; Leicestershire; Staffordshire The River Mease is a good example of a riverine population of spined loach Cobitis taenia.

    0
    0
  • Rapid response team The council has joined forces with Staffordshire Police to form a rapid response team to combat rogue traders.

    0
    0
  • In Staffordshire, the slow running streams and rivers, especially near their source, were ideal for growing watercress.

    0
    0
  • wide-eyed excitement, nowhere else comes close to Staffordshire.

    0
    0
  • CANNOCK, a market town in the western parliamentary division of Staffordshire, England, in the district known as Cannock Chase, 130 m.

    0
    0
  • BURTON-UPON-TRENT, a market town and municipal and county borough in the Burton parliamentary division of Staffordshire and the Southern parliamentary division of Derbyshire, England; lying mainly upon the left bank of the Trent, in Staffordshire.

    0
    0
  • north-west from London by the London & North-Western and the Midland railways, and is also served by the Great Northern and North Staffordshire railways.

    0
    0
  • See William Molyneux, History of Burton-on-Trent (1869); Victoria County History, Staffordshire.

    0
    0
  • Pipeclay and china clay, from Kingsteighton, are shipped for the Staffordshire potteries, while coal and general goods are imported.

    0
    0
  • His father, John, a Staffordshire man, was one of a party of four mechanics who were sent by Boulton and Watt to Philadelphia about 1790 to set up a steam engine for the city water-works and who in 1793-1794 built at Belleville, N.J., the first steam engine constructed wholly in America; he made a fortune in the manufacture of furniture, but lost it by the burning of his factories.

    0
    0
  • The coasting trade consists chiefly of imports of coal and provisions, the exports being principally timber for shipbuilding and flint for the Staffordshire potteries.

    0
    0
  • ECCLESHALL, a market town in the north-western parliamentary division of Staffordshire, England; 7 m.

    0
    0
  • Pop. (1 9 01) 3799 The church of the Holy Trinity, one of the most noteworthy in Staffordshire, is principally Early English, and has fine stained glass.

    0
    0
  • WILLIAM WOLLASTON (1659-1724), English philosophical writer, was born at Coton-Clanford in Staffordshire, on the 26th of March 1659.

    0
    0
  • FRANCIS ASBURY (1745-1816), American clergyman, was born at Hamstead Bridge in the parish of Handsworth, near Birmingham, in Staffordshire, England, on the 10th of August 1 745.

    0
    0
  • by Staffordshire, and W.

    0
    0
  • The principal river is the Trent, which, rising in the Staffordshire moorlands, intersects the southern part of Derbyshire, and forms part of its boundary with Leicestershire.

    0
    0
  • The other principal rivers are the following: - The Dane rises at the junction of the three counties, Staffordshire, Cheshire and Derbyshire.

    0
    0
  • The Dove rises on the southern slope, and flows as the boundary stream between Derbyshire and Staffordshire for nearly its entire course.

    0
    0
  • The Carboniferous or "Mountain" Limestone is the oldest formation in the county; its thickness is not known, but it is certainly over 2000 ft.; it is well exposed in the numerous narrow gorges cut by the Derwent and its tributaries and by the Dove on the Staffordshire border.

    0
    0
  • In the north-east and north the Great Central system touches the county; in the west the North Staffordshire and a branch of the London & North-Western; while a branch of the Great Northern serves Derby and other places in the south.

    0
    0
  • The town and neighbourhood have been long noted for their lime and cement, and large quantities of potters', pipe, fire and other kinds of clay are sent to Staffordshire and to foreign countries.

    0
    0
  • The earliest list of British birds we possess is that given by Merrett in his Pinax rerun naturalium Britannicarum, printed in London in 1667.4 In 1677 Plot published his Natural History of Oxfordshire, which reached a second edition in 1705, and in 1686 that of Staffordshire.

    0
    0
  • It has long been extinct in the British Isles, where it once abounded, but traces have been found of its survival in Chartley Forest, Staffordshire, in an entry of 1683 in an account-book of the steward of the manor, and it possibly remained till much later in the more remote parts of Scotland and Ireland (J.

    0
    0
  • Yorkshire, Staffordshire, France, Portugal, Spain, Italy, Montenegro, Upper Austria, Tyrol, Bavaria, Wurttemberg, Baden, Elsass, Lothringen, Rhenish Bavaria, Rhenish Prussia, Hanover, Brunswick, Sweden, Spitzbergen, Punjab, China, Transvaal, Cape Colony, Connecticut, New Jersey, Virginia, North Carolina, Wyoming, Argentina, New South Wales, Queensland.

    0
    0
  • Lorenzo Dow (1777-1834), an eccentric American Methodist revivalist, visited North Staffordshire and spoke of the campmeetings held in America, with the result that on the 31st of May 1807 the first real English gathering of the kind was held on Mow Cop, since regarded as the Mecca of Primitive Methodism.

    0
    0
  • Declining an appointment as a United States Senator from Virginia, he retired to his home, Gunston Hall (built by him about 1758 and named after the family home in Staffordshire, England).

    0
    0
  • THOMAS FITZHERBERT (1552-1640), English Jesuit, was the eldest son and heir of William Fitzherbert of Swynnerton in Staffordshire, and grandson of Sir Anthony Fitzherbert, judge of the common pleas.

    0
    0
  • The pleasant wooded district was formerly part of Brewood Forest, which extended into Staffordshire.

    0
    0
  • He laboured for some time as a missionary priest in Staffordshire, held several positions as tutor to young Roman Catholic noblemen, and was finally appointed president of the English seminary at St Omer, where he remained till his death on the 15th of May 1773.

    0
    0
  • of Crewe, on the London & North-Western and North Staffordshire railways.

    0
    0
  • TAMWORTH, a market town and municipal borough of England, in the Lichfield parliamentary division of Staffordshire and the Tamworth division of Warwickshire, on the river Tame, a southern tributary of the Trent.

    0
    0
  • In 1380 John Glasewryth, a Staffordshire glass-worker, came to work at Shuerewode, Kirdford, and there made brode-glas and vessels for Joan, widow of John Shertere.

    0
    0
  • They gradually made their way into Hampshire, Wiltshire, Gloucestershire, Staffordshire, Northumberland, Scotland and Ireland.

    0
    0
  • ROWLEY REGIS, an urban district in the Kingswinford parliamentary division of Staffordshire, England, on the Stourbridge branch of the Great Western railway, 7 m.

    0
    0
  • One of the most striking examples of this is afforded by the thick or ten-yard seam of South Staffordshire, which is from 30 to 45 ft.

    0
    0
  • A midland group of coalfields extends from south Lancashire to the West Riding of Yorkshire, the two greatest industrial districts Geo= in the country, southward to Warwickshire and graphical Staffordshire, and from Nottinghamshire on the east to distribu- Flintshire on the west.

    0
    0
  • In the South Staffordshire and other Midland coalfields, where only shallow pits are required, and the coals are thick, a pair of pits may be sunk for a very few acres, while in the North of England, on the other hand, where sinking is expensive, an area of some thousands of acres may be commanded from the same number of pits.

    0
    0
  • In Staffordshire the main levels are also known as Laying gate roads."

    0
    0
  • The most typical example of this kind of working in England is afforded by the thick coal of South Staffordshire, which consists of a series of closely associated coal seams, varying from 8 to 12 or 13, divided FIG.

    0
    0
  • t%/ / Reference ' -u, E??%/%?'/,??/FA // %/////A %/// dangerous, owing to the great height of the excavations, and fatal accidents from falls of roof are in consequence more common in South Staffordshire than in any other coalfield in this country.

    0
    0
  • - South Staffordshire method of working Thick Coal.

    0
    0
  • This apparatus has been used at Harecastle in North Staffordshire, and found to work well, but with the disadvantage of bringing down the coal in unmanageably large masses.

    0
    0
  • generally in South Staffordshire, the coals are suffi ciently free from gas, or rather the gases are not liable to become explosive when mixed with air, to allow the use of naked lights, candles being generally used.

    0
    0
  • In the thick coal workings in South Staffordshire the slack left behind in the sides of work is especially liable to fire from so-called spontaneous combustion, due to the rapid oxidization that is set up when finely divided coal is brought in contact with air.

    0
    0
  • This system has been used in Nottinghamshire, and at Sneyd, in North Staffordshire.

    0
    0
  • In connexion with the re-survey in greater detail of the coalfields by the Geological Survey a series of descriptive memoirs were undertaken, those on the North Staffordshire and Leicestershire fields, and nine parts dealing with that of South Wales, having appeared by the beginning of 1908.

    0
    0
  • STONE, a market town in the western parliamentary division of Staffordshire, England, on the river Trent, 7 m.

    0
    0
  • of Stafford by the North Staffordshire railway.

    0
    0
  • Staffordshire, the diorites of Warwickshire, the phonolite of the Wolf Rock (to which he first directed attention), the pitchstones of Arran and the altered igneous rocks near the Land's End were investigated and described by him during the years1869-1879in the Quarterly Journal of the Geological Society and in the Geological Magazine.

    0
    0
  • BURSLEM, a market town of Staffordshire, England, in the Potteries district, 150 m.

    0
    0
  • from London, on the North Staffordshire railway and the Grand Trunk Canal.

    0
    0
  • STOKE-ON-TRENT, a market town and municipal and parliamentary borough of Staffordshire, England, on the upper Trent, in the heart of the Potteries district.

    0
    0
  • Stoke is on the North Staffordshire railway, 146 m.

    0
    0
  • The principal public buildings in the old town of Stoke are the town hall, with assembly rooms, law library and art gallery, the market hall, the Minton memorial building, containing a school of art and science; the free library and museum, and the North Staffordshire infirmary, founded in 1815 at Etruria, and removed to its present site in 1868.

    0
    0
  • The head offices of the North Staffordshire Railway Company are here.

    0
    0
  • Stoke-upon-Trent became the railway centre and head of the parliamentary borough of Stoke-upon-Trent, comprising the whole of the Staffordshire Potteries, which was created by the Reform Bill of 1832.

    0
    0
  • EDWARD AUGUSTUS FREEMAN (1823-1892), English historian, was born at Harborne, Staffordshire, on the 2nd of August 1823.

    0
    0
  • Staffordshire, but extending into Worcestershire and Warwickshire, England.

    0
    0
  • The institution of this strange matrimonial prize - which had its parallel at Whichanoure (or Wichnor) in Staffordshire, at St Moleine in Brittany, and apparently also at Vienna - appears to date from the reign of John.

    0
    0
  • of Derby, on the London & North-Western and the North Staffordshire railways.

    0
    0
  • Its enormous railway facilities and its geographical situation as the junction of the great trunk lines running north and south, tapping also the Staffordshire potteries on the one side and the great mineral districts of Wales on the other, constitute Crewe station one of the most important links of railway and postal communication in the kingdom.

    0
    0
  • BROWNHILLS, an urban district in the Lichfield parliamentary division of Staffordshire, England, 6 m.

    0
    0
  • Silk spinning has chiefly developed in the Yorkshire, Lancashire, Cheshire and Staffordshire textiles centres.

    0
    0
  • WILLIAM HUSKISSON (1770-1830), English statesman and financier, was descended from an old Staffordshire family of moderate fortune, and was born at Birch Moreton, Worcestershire, on the 11th of March 1770.

    0
    0
  • He became domiciled in England in 1587-1588, leaving Holland on the discovery of his complicity in a political plot, and was appointed (1588) rector of Tattenhall, Staffordshire.

    0
    0
  • Cowles in 1885, which was worked both at Lockport, New York, U.S.A., and at Milton, Staffordshire.

    0
    0
  • On the 26th of January 1569 she had been removed from Bolton Castle to Tutbury in Staffordshire, where proposals were conveyed to her, at the instigation of Leicester, for a marriage with the duke of Norfolk, to which she gave a graciously conditional assent; but the discovery of these proposals consigned Norfolk to the Tower, and on the outbreak of an insurrection in the north Mary, by Lord Hunsdon's advice, was again removed to Coventry, when a body of her intending deliverers was within a day's ride of Tutbury.

    0
    0
  • In 1905 the Cleveland district in North Yorkshire supplied 41% of the total British product of iron ores; Lincolnshire, 14.8%; Northamptonshire, 13.9%; Leicestershire, 4.7%; Cumberland, 8.6%; North Lancashire, 2.7%; Staffordshire, 6.1%; and Scotland, 5.7%.

    0
    0
  • Most of the British iron works lie in and near the important coal-fields in Scotland between the mouth of the Clyde and the Forth, in Cleveland and Durham, in Cumberland and Lancashire, in south Yorkshire, Derbyshire, and Lincolnshire, in Staffordshire and Northamptonshire, and in south Wales in spite of its lack of ore.

    0
    0
  • of London, on the London & North-Western, North Staffordshire and Great Central railways.

    0
    0
  • of Worcester by the Great Western railway, on the river Stour and the Staffordshire and Worcestershire canal.

    0
    0
  • RICHARD HURD (1720-1808), English divine and writer, bishop of Worcester, was born at Congreve, in the parish of Penkridge, Staffordshire, where his father was a farmer, on the 1 3th of January 1720.

    0
    0
  • SEDGLEY, an urban district of Staffordshire, England, between Dudley and Wolverhampton, in the parliamentary borough of Wolverhampton.

    0
    0
  • JOHN JAMES BLUNT (1794-1855), English divine, was born at Newcastle-under-Lyme in Staffordshire, and educated at St John's College, Cambridge, where he took his degree as fifteenth wrangler and obtained a fellowship (1816).

    0
    0
  • He was so well acquainted with the contents of the volumes which he exposed for sale that the country rectors of Staffordshire and Worcestershire thought him an oracle on points of learning.

    0
    0
  • Before he was three he had insisted on being taken to hear Sacheverel preach at Lichfield Cathedral, and had listened to the sermon with as much respect and probably with as much intelligence, as any Staffordshire squire in the congregation.

    0
    0
  • But, in spite of her murmurs and reproaches, he gave an asylum to another lady who was as poor as herself, Mrs Desmoulins, whose family he had known many years before in Staffordshire.

    0
    0
  • The sayings and Johnsoniana have been reprinted in very many and various forms. Valuable work has been done in Johnsonian genealogy and topography by Aleyn Lyell Reade in his Johnsonian Gleanings, &c., and in the Memorials of Old Staffordshire (ed.

    0
    0
  • Originally a local breed in the districts around the Staffordshire town from which it takes its name, it is now extensively bred, and highly valued as a bacon pig.

    0
    0
  • The 1st battalion of the North Staffordshire regiment moved up from Cairo to join the Egyptian army.

    0
    0
  • Cholera and fever were busy both with the North Staffordshire regiment at Gemai, whither they had been moved on its approach, and with the Egyptian troops at the front, and carried off many officers and men.

    0
    0
  • The North Staffordshire moved up to the front, and in September the army moved on Kerma, which was found to be evacuated, the dervishes having crossed the river to Hafir.

    0
    0
  • The North Staffordshire returned to Cairo.

    0
    0
  • Much salt is obtained from north Lancashire, as also from the brine pits of Staffordshire, Worcestershire, Yorkshire, Durham and the Isle of Man (Point of Ayre).

    0
    0
  • The chief centres of manufacture in England are at Northwich, Middlewich, Winsford and Sandbach in Cheshire, Weston-on-Trent in Staffordshire, Stoke Prior and Droitwich in Worcestershire and Middlesbrough in Yorkshire.) The Cheshire and Worcestershire salt deposits are by far the most important.

    0
    0
  • CONGLETON, a market town and municipal borough in the Macclesfield parliamentary division of Cheshire, England, on the North Staffordshire railway, 1571 m.

    0
    0
  • S., in a narrow valley, across the border in Staffordshire, are several coal-mines and iron-foundries.

    0
    0
  • Within a year or two he became junior partner with Thomas Whieldon of Fenton, then the cleverest master-potter in Staffordshire.

    0
    0
  • In the schedules of boundaries appended to two Old English charters there occurs mention of pools called " Grendel's mere," one in Wiltshire and the other in Staffordshire.

    0
    0
  • Iron-mining - perhaps the first in the New World - was begun in Virginia in 1608, when the Virginia Company shipped a quantity of ore to England; and in 1619 the Company established on Falling Creek, a tributary of the James river, a colony of about 150 ironworkers from Warwickshire, Staffordshire and Sussex, who had established there several ore-reducing plants under the general management of John Berkeley of Gloucester, England, when on the 22nd of March 1622 the entire colony, excepting a girl and a boy, were massacred by the Indians.

    0
    0
  • Joseph Berington, himself a distinguished Catholic priest, considers that this number was above the mark; he reports that his co-religionists were most numerous in Lancashire and London; next came Yorkshire, Northumberland and Staffordshire.

    0
    0
  • REGINALD POLE (1500-1558), English cardinal and archbishop of Canterbury, born at Stourton Castle, Staffordshire, was the third son of Sir Richard Pole, Knight of the Garter, and Margaret, countess of Salisbury, a daughter of George, duke of Clarence, and therefore niece of Edward IV.

    0
    0
  • RUGELEY, a market town in the Lichfield parliamentary division of Staffordshire, England, in the Trent valley.

    0
    0
  • SMETHWICK, a municipal and county borough in the Handsworth parliamentary division of Staffordshire, England, 3 m.

    0
    0
  • The family seats (Alton Towers and Ingestre Hall) and the chief estates are in Staffordshire.

    0
    0
  • She was prioress (1872-1881) of the Stone convent in Staffordshire, where she died on the 29th of April 1894.

    0
    0
  • from Stourbridge, in Staffordshire, the house of Stephen Littleton, who had been present at the hunting at Danchurch (see Digby, Everard), where they arrived at 10 o'clock at night, having on their way broken into Lord Windsor's house at Hewell Grange and taken all the armour they found there.

    0
    0
  • The Wellington-Crewe line of the Great Western railway is here joined by a branch into Staffordshire of the North Staffordshire railway.

    0
    0
  • east in Staffordshire, Audley Cross marks a great battle in the Wars of the Roses (1459), in which the Yorkists were successful and Lord Audley fell.

    0
    0
  • WALSALL, a market town and municipal, county and parliamentary borough of Staffordshire, England, on the northern edge of the Black Country, and on a tributary stream of the Tame.

    0
    0
  • 7.1 Railways 7.2 Furness 7.3 North Staffordshire 7.4 Cross-Country Connexions 7.5 Oversea Communications

    0
    0
  • It includes the whole of Northumberland and Durham, the West Riding of Yorkshire, most of Lancashire and Derbyshire, the north of Staffordshire and the west of Nottinghamshire.

    0
    0
  • In the south-west of the Pennine region the coal-field of North Staffordshire supports the group of small but active towns known collectively from the staple of their trade as " The Potteries."

    0
    0
  • The plain extends through Staffordshire and Worcester, forming the lower valley of the Severn.

    0
    0
  • The Triassic rocks, red sandstones, marls and conglomerates cover a broad area in the Midlands in Worcestershire, Warwickshire and Leicestershire, whence they may be followed south-westward through Somerset to the coast at Sidmouth, and northward, round either flank of the Pennine Hills, through Nottinghamshire and Yorkshire to Middlesbrough on the one hand, and upon the other through Staffordshire, Cheshire and Lancashire to Carlisle.

    0
    0
  • The great populous area which covers south Lancashire and the West Riding of Yorkshire, and extends beyond them into Cheshire, Derbyshire, Staffordshire and Nottinghamshire, is not in reality a unit.

    0
    0
  • This canal is owned by the North Staffordshire railway company.

    0
    0
  • The railways having the heaviest coal traffic are the North-Eastern, which monopolizes the traffic of Northumberland and Durham; the Midland, commanding the Derbyshire, Yorkshire and East Midland traffic, and some of the Welsh; the London & North Western, whose principal sources are the Lancashire, Staffordshire 1 The figure 17.76 is the percentage for the whole of Yorkshire.

    0
    0
  • There is also a considerable working of brown iron ore at various points in Lincolnshire, Northamptonshire and Leicestershire; with further workings of less importance in Staffordshire and several other districts.

    0
    0
  • Salt, obtained principally from brine but also as rock-salt, is an important object of industry in Cheshire, the output from that county and Staffordshire exceeding a million tons annually.

    0
    0
  • Among other textile industries attaching to definite localities may be mentioned the silk manufacture of eastern Staffordshire and Cheshire, as at Congleton and Macclesfield; and the hosiery and lace manufactures of Nottinghamshire, Derbyshire and Leicestershire.

    0
    0
  • But the district most intimately connected with every branch of this industry, from engineering and the manufacture of tools, &c., to working in the precious metals, is the " Black Country " and Birmingham district of Staffordshire, Warwickshire and Worcestershire.

    0
    0
  • Thus, the manufacture of china and pottery, although widespread, is primarily identified with Staffordshire, where an area comprising Stoke and a number of contiguous towns actually bears the name of the Potteries (q.v.).

    0
    0
  • It lies on the left bank of the Severn, at the junction of the Stour and the Staffordshire and Worcestershire canal.

    0
    0
  • Leigh died in Staffordshire in June 1671.

    0
    0
  • WEDNESBURY, a market town and municipal and parlia - mentary borough of Staffordshire, England, in the Black Country, 121 m.

    0
    0
  • Readman, experimenting with a Cowles furnace in Staffordshire in 1888, patented his process, and in the same year Parker and Robinson, working independently, patented a similar one.

    0
    0
  • There is a considerable general coasting trade, and clay is exported to the Staffordshire potteries.

    0
    0
  • En 1767 Hargreaves produced the spinning-jenny; Arkwrights;pinning machine was exhibited in 1768; Cromptons mule was ~inished in 1779; Cartwright hit upon the idea of the power,oom in 1784, though it was not brought into profitable use till The Staffordshire potteries had been flourishing under Wedgwood SinCe 1763, and the improved steam-engine was brought into shape by Watt in 1768.

    0
    0
  • WOLVERHAMPTON, a market town, and municipal, county and parliamentary borough of Staffordshire, England, 125 m.

    0
    0
  • A branch canal connects with the Worcestershire and Staffordshire system.

    0
    0
  • The white cattle formerly kept at Chartley Park, Staffordshire, exhibit signs of affinity with the long-horn breed.

    0
    0
  • PENKRIDGE, a town in the western parliamentary division of Staffordshire, England; 134 m.

    0
    0
  • GILBERT SHELDON (1598-1677), archbishop of Canterbury, was born at Stanton in the parish of Ellastone, Staffordshire, and educated at Oxford.

    0
    0
  • BILSTON, a market town of Staffordshire, England, 22 m.

    0
    0
  • He was the son of William Anson of Shugborough in Staffordshire, and his wife Isabella Carrier, who was the sister-in-law of Lord Chancellor Macclesfield, a relationship which proved very useful to the future admiral.

    0
    0
  • His first preferment was the small vicarage of Cannock in Staffordshire; but he leapt into notice when holding a preachership at St Saviour's, Southwark.

    0
    0
  • JOHN LIGHTFOOT (1602-1675), English divine and rabbinical scholar, was the son of Thomas Lightfoot, vicar of Uttoxeter, Staffordshire, and was born at Stoke-upon-Trent on the 29th of March 1602.

    0
    0
  • Shortly after the removal of Sir Rowland to London, Lightfoot, abandoning an intention to go abroad, accepted a charge at Stone in Staffordshire, where he continued for about two years.

    0
    0
  • Cotton to the rectory of Ashley in Staffordshire, where he remained until June, 1642, when he went to London, probably to superintend the publication of his next work, A Few and New Observations upon the Book of Genesis: the most of them certain; the rest, probable; all, harmless, strange and rarely heard of before, which appeared at London in that year.

    0
    0
  • UTTOXETER, a market town in the Burton parliamentary division of Staffordshire, England, 15 m.

    0
    0
  • It is also served by the North Staffordshire railway.

    0
    0
  • On the completion of his arts course, he nominally studied divinity at Edinburgh until 1787; in1788-1789he spent rather more than a year as private tutor in a Virginian family, and from 1790 till the close of 1792 he held a similar appointment at Etruria in Staffordshire, with the family of Josiah Wedgwood, employing his spare time in experimental research and in preparing a translation of Buffon's Natural History of Birds, which was published in nine 8vo vols.

    0
    0
  • But the recent find of a well preserved skull of a labyrinthodont (Capitosaurus stantonensis) from the Trias of Staffordshire has enabled A.

    0
    0
  • The original kingdom seems to have lain in the upper basin of the Trent, comprising the greater part of Derbyshire and Staffordshire, the northern parts of Warwickshire and Leicestershire, and the southern part of Nottinghamshire.

    0
    0
  • The school decided to move and finally quit Park Hall for Cotton Hall, on the Staffordshire Moorlands, in August 1868.

    0
    0
  • There 's a newly re-formed UK club at Trentham Lake, Staffordshire.

    0
    0
  • She began to experience religious stirrings at the age of fifteen during a visit to a cousin in Staffordshire.

    0
    0
  • The last meeting of the North Staffordshire HIV Forum took place at The Herbert Minton Building in stoke on Thursday 9th December.

    0
    0
  • Rapid response team The council has joined forces with Staffordshire Police to form a rapid response team to combat rogue traders.

    0
    0
  • In Staffordshire, the slow running streams and rivers, especially near their source, were ideal for growing watercress.

    0
    0
  • For sheer, wide-eyed excitement, nowhere else comes close to Staffordshire.

    0
    0
  • Both American Staffordshire Terriers and Staffordshire Bull Terrier bloodlines have been used to create what has come to be known as the "Pitbull type"; a muscular, stocky build, and strong ferocious jaws.

    0
    0
  • Pitbulls are a member of the Terrier family and are actually a mix of a number of breeds including the American Pit Bull Terrier, American Staffordshire Terrier and Staffordshire Bull Terrier.

    0
    0
  • Located in Alton, Staffordshire, on the grounds of a gothic country estate formerly owned by the Earl of Shrewsbury, the park is home to several world famous coasters.

    0
    0
  • Located in Staffordshire, the park is spread over the grounds of an abandoned gothic mansion formerly occupied by the Earl of Shrewsbury.

    0
    0
  • Companies like Staffordshire came out with unique teapots that were decorated in many ways.

    0
    0
  • Kiniki is based in Staffordshire, England, and has been in business since 1996.

    0
    0
  • All their products are designed and made in their Staffordshire, UK, factory, so you know you are getting a quality piece.

    0
    0
Browse other sentences examples →