This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience. Learn more

st. martin

st. martin

st. martin Sentence Examples

  • St Jerome's mind was first seriously directed to religion while studying at Trier about 370, and St Martin of Tours came in 385 to plead with the tryant Maximus for the lives of the heretic Priscillian and his followers.

  • Sugar is grown also in St Landry and the eastern part of Attakapas - a name formerly loosely applied to what are now St Mary, Iberia, Vermilion, St Martin and Lafayette parishes.

  • The parishes of St Mary, Iberia, Vermilion, St Martin and Lafayette are known as the Attakapas country from an Indian name.

  • The church of St Martin is ancient, and contains stained glass from Cartmel priory in Furness.

  • The church of St Martin was built in 1879, and there are Nonconformist chapels.

  • Latin.) to the appointment of persons to watch over the sacred cloak (cappa or capella) of St Martin of Tours, which was preserved as a relic by the French monarchs.

  • A Roman road, which crossed from the Sussex coast to the Thames, passed near the present churchyard of St Martin.

  • The church of St Martin is a brick building of the 17th century in the Gothic style with a modern facade.

  • Bishop Stapledon obtained a Saturday market, and two annual fairs lasting three days at the feasts of St Laurence (August io) and St Martin in winter (November II).

  • He was educated by a certain Tigernach, and having become a monk he crossed over to the continent of Europe in 1056, and his subsequent life was passed in the abbeys of St Martin at Cologne and of Fulda, and at Mainz.

  • The Feast of St Martin (Martinmas) took the place of an old pagan festival, and inherited some of its usages (such as the Martinsmdnnchen, Martinsfeuer, Martinshorn and the like, in various parts of Germany); by this circumstance is probably to be explained the fact that Martin is regarded as the patron of drinking and jovial meetings, as well as of reformed drunkards.

  • The church of St Martin (1420) contains several fine tombs of the 15th-17th centuries.

  • The church of St Martin dates from the 15th century, but was practically destroyed in 1862 by a fire caused by lightning.

  • Other Saxon foundations were the nunneries at Folkestone (630), Lyminge (633; nunnery and monastery), Reculver (669), Minster-in-Thanet (670), Minster-in-Sheppey (675), and the priory of St Martin at Dover (696), all belonging to the Benedictine order.

  • The cathedral of St Martin dates from the 13th century, with a tower of the 15th century.

  • The present Gothic building of St Martin (in Wyk) was erected in 1859; the original church is said by tradition to have occupied the site of an old heathen temple.

  • The parish church of St Martin contains several monuments and an ancient stone altar bearing a Latin inscription.

  • Three fairs on the feasts of St Martin and St Peter and on 25th of February were granted in 1708.

  • The church of St Martin is Early English and later.

  • The churches of Holy Trinity, St Martin and St Leonard at Hythe are of antiquarian interest; the first has an apparently pre-Norman tower and the last preserves some curious frescoes.

  • and a population of 4926; together with St Eustatius, Saba and part of St Martin.

  • The market day was altered to Tuesday in 1662, and Sir William Fenwick, then lord of the manor, received a grant of a cattle market on the Tuesday after the feast of St Cuthbert in March and every Tuesday fortnight until the feast of St Martin.

  • In 1311 a Tuesday market is mentioned, and a fair at the feast of St Martin.

  • The church of St Martin in the village of Herne, 1 Z m.

  • Ep. 78, 3); while in Gaul the grave of St Martin at Tours drew pilgrims from all quarters (Paul.

  • In France St Martin remained the chief goal of the pilgrim; while Notre Dame de Sous-Terre in Chartres (with a portrait of the "black Virgin"), Le Puy-en-Velay (dep. Haute Loire), and others, also enjoyed considerable celebrity.

  • No region was more often ravaged than that of the lower Loire, so rich in abbeys - St Martin of Tours, Marmoutiers, St Benedict, &c. But the country ceded to the vikings under Hasting at the Loire mouth was insignificant and not in permanent occupation.

  • The college of St Martin for twenty-two secular canons, which had been established in the castle in 696, was removed into the town in the beginning of the 8th century, and in 1139 became a Benedictine priory under the jurisdiction of that at Canterbury, to which see the lands are still attached.

  • The sympathies here betrayed by Severus are wholly those of St Martin.

  • Severus also fully sympathized with the action of St Martin touching Priscillianism.

  • It belongs to the Roman Catholic community, who possess also the church of St Martin and the church of Our Lady (Liebfrauenkirche), a handsome Gothic edifice outside the town, finished in 1467.

  • Stephen hastened against the rebels, bearing before him the banner of St Martin of Tours, whom he now chose to be his patron saint, and routed the rebels at Veszprem (998), a victory from which the foundation of the Hungarian monarchy must be dated, for Stephen assumed the royal title immediately afterwards.

  • EDME MARIOTTE (c. 1620-1684), French physicist, spent most of his life at Dijon, where he was prior of St Martin sous Beaune.

  • Falling seriously ill, he went to Tours to seek a cure at the tomb of St Martin.

  • The shrine of St Martin attracted the sick from all quarters, and the basilica of the saint was a favourite sanctuary for political refugees.

  • We are told by Bede that St Ninian dedicated his church to St Martin of Tours, who died between 397 and 400, but Ailred of Rievaulx is our only authority for the statement that St Martin supplied him with masons.

  • Its church of St Martin belongs to the end of the 12th century.

  • The cathedral of St Martin was begun in 1063 by Bishop Anselm (later Pope Alexander II.); but the great apse with its tall columnar arcades and the fine campanile are probably the only remnants of the early edifice, the nave and transepts having been rebuilt in the Gothic style in the 14th century, while the west front was begun in 1204 by Guidetto (lately identified with Guido Bigarelli of Como), and "consists of a vast portico of three magnificent arches, and above them three ranges of open galleries covered with all the devices of an exuberant fancy."

  • St Basile (12th and 16th centuries), which preserves a Romanesque doorway, and St Martin (12th and 13th centuries), with a leaning tower of the 16th century, are of less importance.

  • The latter, which form the local section, are further divided into several classes: firstly, the synods held under the Roman empire, the chief being that of Elvira 4 (c. 300); next the texts belonging to the kingdom of the Suevi, after the conversion of these barbarians by St Martin of Braga: these are, the two councils of Braga (563 and 572), and a sort of free translation or adaptation of the canons of the Greek councils, made by Martin of Braga; this is the document frequently quoted in later days under the name of Capitula Martini papae; thirdly, the decisions of the councils of the Visigothic Church, after its conversion to Catholicism.

  • Five bridges cross the river, on the right bank of which lies the old and somewhat decayed suburb of Nungate, interesting as having contained the Giffordgate, where John Knox was born, and where also are the ruins of the pre-Reformation chapel of St Martin.

  • As lay abbot of the abbeys of St Martin at Tours and of St Denis he was interested in clerical reform, was fond of participating in religious ceremonies, and had many friends among the clergy.

  • Charlemagne had just given him the great abbey of St Martin at Tours, and there, far from the disturbed life of the court, he passed his last years.

  • Pleased with his success, the canons at Noyon gave him the curacy of St Martin de Marteville in September 1527.

  • The place is interesting chiefly on account of its fine church of Notre Dame, formerly dedicated to St Martin.

  • (Alberto de Mora), pope from the 21st of October to the 17th of December 1187, a native of Benevento and Praemonstratensian monk, successively abbot of St Martin at Laon, cardinal-deacon of San' Adriano al foro, cardinal-priest of San Lorenzo in Lucina, and chancellor of the Roman Church, was elected to succeed Urban III.

  • The Tour St Martin is an old church-tower of the 15th and 18th centuries transformed into a belfry.

  • Since 1 494 he had been prebendary of York, and canon of St Martin le Grand, London.

  • TOP South Helford River Bishops Key - St Martin - Sleeps 6. A 300 year old cottage situated in a quiet riverside hamlet.

  • They also established a small priory under the supervision of the great abbey of St Martin les Champs in Paris.

  • Her mother was a leading freelance violinist, playing with the Academy of St Martin in the Fields.

  • St Jerome's mind was first seriously directed to religion while studying at Trier about 370, and St Martin of Tours came in 385 to plead with the tryant Maximus for the lives of the heretic Priscillian and his followers.

  • Sugar is grown also in St Landry and the eastern part of Attakapas - a name formerly loosely applied to what are now St Mary, Iberia, Vermilion, St Martin and Lafayette parishes.

  • The parishes of St Mary, Iberia, Vermilion, St Martin and Lafayette are known as the Attakapas country from an Indian name.

  • The church of St Martin is ancient, and contains stained glass from Cartmel priory in Furness.

  • Besides the celebrated school of the Palace, where Alcuin had among his hearers the members of the imperial family and the dignitaries of the empire as well as talented youths of humbler origin, we hear of the episcopal schools of Lyons, Orleans and St Denis, the cloister schools of St Martin of Tours, of Fulda, Corbie, Fontenelle and many others, besides the older monasteries of St Gall and Reichenau.

  • The church of St Martin was built in 1879, and there are Nonconformist chapels.

  • Latin.) to the appointment of persons to watch over the sacred cloak (cappa or capella) of St Martin of Tours, which was preserved as a relic by the French monarchs.

  • A Roman road, which crossed from the Sussex coast to the Thames, passed near the present churchyard of St Martin.

  • The church of St Martin is a brick building of the 17th century in the Gothic style with a modern facade.

  • Bishop Stapledon obtained a Saturday market, and two annual fairs lasting three days at the feasts of St Laurence (August io) and St Martin in winter (November II).

  • He was educated by a certain Tigernach, and having become a monk he crossed over to the continent of Europe in 1056, and his subsequent life was passed in the abbeys of St Martin at Cologne and of Fulda, and at Mainz.

  • The Feast of St Martin (Martinmas) took the place of an old pagan festival, and inherited some of its usages (such as the Martinsmdnnchen, Martinsfeuer, Martinshorn and the like, in various parts of Germany); by this circumstance is probably to be explained the fact that Martin is regarded as the patron of drinking and jovial meetings, as well as of reformed drunkards.

  • The church of St Martin (1420) contains several fine tombs of the 15th-17th centuries.

  • The church of St Martin dates from the 15th century, but was practically destroyed in 1862 by a fire caused by lightning.

  • Other Saxon foundations were the nunneries at Folkestone (630), Lyminge (633; nunnery and monastery), Reculver (669), Minster-in-Thanet (670), Minster-in-Sheppey (675), and the priory of St Martin at Dover (696), all belonging to the Benedictine order.

  • The cathedral of St Martin dates from the 13th century, with a tower of the 15th century.

  • The present Gothic building of St Martin (in Wyk) was erected in 1859; the original church is said by tradition to have occupied the site of an old heathen temple.

  • The parish church of St Martin contains several monuments and an ancient stone altar bearing a Latin inscription.

  • Three fairs on the feasts of St Martin and St Peter and on 25th of February were granted in 1708.

  • The church of St Martin is Early English and later.

  • The churches of Holy Trinity, St Martin and St Leonard at Hythe are of antiquarian interest; the first has an apparently pre-Norman tower and the last preserves some curious frescoes.

  • and a population of 4926; together with St Eustatius, Saba and part of St Martin.

  • The market day was altered to Tuesday in 1662, and Sir William Fenwick, then lord of the manor, received a grant of a cattle market on the Tuesday after the feast of St Cuthbert in March and every Tuesday fortnight until the feast of St Martin.

  • In 1311 a Tuesday market is mentioned, and a fair at the feast of St Martin.

  • The church of St Martin in the village of Herne, 1 Z m.

  • Ep. 78, 3); while in Gaul the grave of St Martin at Tours drew pilgrims from all quarters (Paul.

  • In France St Martin remained the chief goal of the pilgrim; while Notre Dame de Sous-Terre in Chartres (with a portrait of the "black Virgin"), Le Puy-en-Velay (dep. Haute Loire), and others, also enjoyed considerable celebrity.

  • No region was more often ravaged than that of the lower Loire, so rich in abbeys - St Martin of Tours, Marmoutiers, St Benedict, &c. But the country ceded to the vikings under Hasting at the Loire mouth was insignificant and not in permanent occupation.

  • The college of St Martin for twenty-two secular canons, which had been established in the castle in 696, was removed into the town in the beginning of the 8th century, and in 1139 became a Benedictine priory under the jurisdiction of that at Canterbury, to which see the lands are still attached.

  • The sympathies here betrayed by Severus are wholly those of St Martin.

  • Severus also fully sympathized with the action of St Martin touching Priscillianism.

  • It belongs to the Roman Catholic community, who possess also the church of St Martin and the church of Our Lady (Liebfrauenkirche), a handsome Gothic edifice outside the town, finished in 1467.

  • Stephen hastened against the rebels, bearing before him the banner of St Martin of Tours, whom he now chose to be his patron saint, and routed the rebels at Veszprem (998), a victory from which the foundation of the Hungarian monarchy must be dated, for Stephen assumed the royal title immediately afterwards.

  • EDME MARIOTTE (c. 1620-1684), French physicist, spent most of his life at Dijon, where he was prior of St Martin sous Beaune.

  • Falling seriously ill, he went to Tours to seek a cure at the tomb of St Martin.

  • The shrine of St Martin attracted the sick from all quarters, and the basilica of the saint was a favourite sanctuary for political refugees.

  • We are told by Bede that St Ninian dedicated his church to St Martin of Tours, who died between 397 and 400, but Ailred of Rievaulx is our only authority for the statement that St Martin supplied him with masons.

  • Its church of St Martin belongs to the end of the 12th century.

  • The church of St Martin was built (c. 1730) on the site of an older church at the instance of Dr Browne Willis, an eminent antiquary (d.

  • The cathedral of St Martin was begun in 1063 by Bishop Anselm (later Pope Alexander II.); but the great apse with its tall columnar arcades and the fine campanile are probably the only remnants of the early edifice, the nave and transepts having been rebuilt in the Gothic style in the 14th century, while the west front was begun in 1204 by Guidetto (lately identified with Guido Bigarelli of Como), and "consists of a vast portico of three magnificent arches, and above them three ranges of open galleries covered with all the devices of an exuberant fancy."

  • St Basile (12th and 16th centuries), which preserves a Romanesque doorway, and St Martin (12th and 13th centuries), with a leaning tower of the 16th century, are of less importance.

  • The latter, which form the local section, are further divided into several classes: firstly, the synods held under the Roman empire, the chief being that of Elvira 4 (c. 300); next the texts belonging to the kingdom of the Suevi, after the conversion of these barbarians by St Martin of Braga: these are, the two councils of Braga (563 and 572), and a sort of free translation or adaptation of the canons of the Greek councils, made by Martin of Braga; this is the document frequently quoted in later days under the name of Capitula Martini papae; thirdly, the decisions of the councils of the Visigothic Church, after its conversion to Catholicism.

  • Five bridges cross the river, on the right bank of which lies the old and somewhat decayed suburb of Nungate, interesting as having contained the Giffordgate, where John Knox was born, and where also are the ruins of the pre-Reformation chapel of St Martin.

  • As lay abbot of the abbeys of St Martin at Tours and of St Denis he was interested in clerical reform, was fond of participating in religious ceremonies, and had many friends among the clergy.

  • Charlemagne had just given him the great abbey of St Martin at Tours, and there, far from the disturbed life of the court, he passed his last years.

  • Pleased with his success, the canons at Noyon gave him the curacy of St Martin de Marteville in September 1527.

  • The place is interesting chiefly on account of its fine church of Notre Dame, formerly dedicated to St Martin.

  • (Alberto de Mora), pope from the 21st of October to the 17th of December 1187, a native of Benevento and Praemonstratensian monk, successively abbot of St Martin at Laon, cardinal-deacon of San' Adriano al foro, cardinal-priest of San Lorenzo in Lucina, and chancellor of the Roman Church, was elected to succeed Urban III.

  • The Tour St Martin is an old church-tower of the 15th and 18th centuries transformed into a belfry.

Browse other sentences examples →