Sprung sentence example

sprung
  • He sprung up and grabbed the cookies.
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  • He whirled at the all too familiar voice and sprung to his feet.
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  • Grass had sprung up from boulders she touched, and she'd felt truly a part of her world for once in her life.
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  • A large sugar-beet industry has also sprung up here in modern times.
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  • The Bryophyta and Pteridophyta have sprung from the higher Thallophyta, and together form the larger group Archegoniatae, so-called from the form of the organ (archegonium) in which the egg-cell is developed.
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  • Thus it is used of the purchase used in raising the flukes of an anchor to the bill-board; of a piece of wood or metal used to strengthen a sprung mast or yard; and of a plate of metal used, as in railway construction, for the strengthening of the meeting-place of two rails.
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  • I was in haste to buy it, before the proprietor finished getting out some rocks, cutting down the hollow apple trees, and grubbing up some young birches which had sprung up in the pasture, or, in short, had made any more of his improvements.
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  • "One would have thought quill drivers enough had sprung up," remarked the old prince.
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  • The king's encouragement seemed at first to point to a successful revival of flagellation; but the practice disappeared along with the other forms of devotion that had sprung up at the time of the league, and Henry III.'s successor suppressed the Paris brotherhood.
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  • Far from being destroyed by the competition of the " modern " factories, domestic industries have well maintained their ground, new branches of petty trade having sprung up in some districts, among them the manufacture of agricultural machinery (thrashing machines in Ryazan, Vyatka and Perm; ploughs in Smolensk, &c.) deserves notice.
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  • The medieval and modern town of Syracuse (with the exception of a new quarter which has sprung up since the construction of the railway between the station and the island) is confined to the island.
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  • Since then many settlements of the same or similar nature have sprung up in Great Britain and America, some too on the continent of Europe and some in India and Japan.
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  • Under this system prosperous towns and villages have sprung up among the prairies.
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  • While this habit was doubtless aggravated by the amount of his journalistic work, it seems originally to have sprung from what may be called a professorial spirit, which occasionally appears in the tone of his remarks.
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  • Mythologically the white lily, Rosa Junonis, was fabled to have sprung from the milk of Hera.
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  • Through her agency an important bulwark for the Christian faith was created in the new nations which had sprung into existence since the beginning of the middle ages: the Bulgarians, the Servians, and the multifarious peoples grouped under the name of Russians.
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  • The florists' varieties of tulips, which have sprung from Tulipa Gesneriana, are arranged in separate classes named bizarres, bybloemens and roses, according to their colour and marking.
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  • Meaning in general the "king's court," it is difficult to define the curia regis with precision, but it is important and interesting because it is the germ from which the higher courts of law, the privy council and the cabinet, have sprung.
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  • Lind's anemometer, which consists simply of a U tube containing liquid with one end bent into a horizontal direction to face the wind, is perhaps the original form from which the tube class of instrument has sprung.
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  • Thus the siskin perhaps may be regarded as one of the less modified descendants of a stock whence such forms as those just mentioned have sprung.
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  • More dimly still visions of what the first bird may have been like could be reasonably entertained; and, passing even to a higher antiquity, the reptilian parent whence all birds have sprung was brought within reach of man's consciousness.
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  • Ausonius, for instance, apostrophizes the rhetorician Attius Patera as sprung from a race of Druids.
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  • The Crusades had sprung from the policy of a theocratic government counting on the motive of otherworldliness; they had helped in their course to overthrow that motive, and with it the government which it had made possible.
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  • The separation of the Ratitae from the other birds, and their seemingly fundamental differences, notably the absence of the keel and of the power of flight, induced certain authors to go so far as to derive the Ratitae from the Dinosaurian reptiles, whilst Archaeopteryx (q.v.) and the Carinatae were supposed to have sprung from some Pterosaurian or similar reptilian stock.
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  • At any rate we begin to see that some of the Ratitae, namely the Rheidae, may possibly be an early and then much modified offshoot of such of the Carinatae as are now represented by the Crypturi, whilst in another part of the world, and at a much later time, kiwis and moas have sprung from a somewhat more Gallilorm stock, which points to a descent from a still undivided GalliformTinamiform mass.
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  • This second writer singles out three of the Maccabean priest kings for attack, the first of whom he charges with every abomination; the people itself, he declares, is apostate, and chastisement will follow speedily - the temple will be laid waste, the nation carried afresh into captivity, whence, on their repentance, God will restore them again to their own land, where they shall enjoy the blessedness of God's presence and be ruled by a Messiah sprung from Judah.
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  • Even as its main historical importance had formerly sprung from pagan learning, so now it acquired fresh importance as a centre of Christian theology and church government.
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  • There has also sprung up of late years considerable direct trade between the European and American markets and Bagdad, and several foreign houses, especially English, have established themselves there.
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  • The Hussite movement may be said to have sprung from three sources, which are however closely connected.
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  • Athena also gave the Athenians the olive-tree, which was supposed to have sprung from the bare soil of the Acropolis, when smitten by her spear, close to the horse (or spring of water) produced by the trident of Poseidon, to which he appealed in support of his claim to the lordship of Athens.
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  • Several flour-mills and other factories have recently sprung up. Much grain is exported; timber is brought from the upper Volga, and manufactured wares from Nizhniy Novgorod.
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  • Leaving that question for consideration in connexion with the systematic statement of the characters of the various groups of Arachnida which follows on p. 475, it is well now to consider the following question, viz., seeing that Limulus and Scorpio are such highly developed and specialized forms, and that they seem to constitute as it were the first and second steps in the series of recognized Arachnida - what do we know, or what are we led to suppose with regard to the more primitive Arachnida from which the Eurypterines and Limulus and Scorpio have sprung ?
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  • A hardy and enterprising race of men had sprung from this mixture, and supplies being sent by sea from Holland.
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  • In 1883 the discovery of Moodie's Reef near the Kaap Valley led to a considerable influx of diggers and prospectors from the colonies and Europe, and by 1884 the Sheba Mine had been opened up, and Barberton, with a population of 5000 inhabitants, sprung into existence.
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  • The old town, containing many narrow and irregular streets, forms a semicircle with its diameter towards the river, while round its periphery has sprung up the greater part of modern Munich, including the handsome Maximilian and Ludwig districts.
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  • During the Seven Years' War a palisaded fort was erected on the south bank of the Mohawk at the ford where Utica later sprung up. It was named Fort Schuyler, in honour of Colonel Peter Schuyler, an uncle of General Philip Schuyler.
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  • Lan guage.Since the year 1820, when Klaproth concluded that the Japanese language had sprung from the Ural-Altaic stock, philologists have busied themselves in tracing its affinities.
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  • He was a descendant of Udaeus, one of the men who had sprung up from the serpent's teeth sown by Cadmus.
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  • As early as 1797 Fichte had begun to see that the ultimate basis of his system was the absolute ego, in which is no difference of subject and object; in 1800 the Bestimmung des Menschen defined this absolute ego as the infinite moral will of the universe, God, in whom are all the individual egos, from whom they have sprung.
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  • A large literature has sprung up round The Didache since 1884.
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  • In the different states, conferences, composed likewise of representatives of the several churches and their pastors, have sprung up. These meet at stated intervals for the consideration of practical subjects of moment, and for the promotion of a religious spirit.
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  • During the life of Arminius a bitter controversy had sprung up between his followers and the strict Calvinists, led by Francis Gomar, his fellow-professor at Leiden; and, in order to decide their disputes, a synodical conference was proposed, but Arminius died before it could be held.
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  • These last are of special importance, and the best kind, the Chinese banana, is said to have sprung from a plant given to the missionary John Williams, and cultivated in Samoa.
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  • As the marquess of Winchester said of himself, he was sprung from the willow rather than the oak, and he was not the man to suffer for convictions.
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  • Education, industrial occupation, commercial training and political responsibility are apparently working a transformation in a class that was once known chiefly for indolence and criminal instincts, and many of the leaders of modern Mexico have sprung from this race.
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  • The family is assumed to have sprung from Walsingham in Norfolk, but the earliest authentic traces of it are found in London in the first half of the 15th century; and it was one of the numerous families which, having accumulated wealth in the city, planted themselves out as landed gentry and provided the Tudor monarchy with its justices of the peace and main support.
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  • 4 he attests that he was sprung from.
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  • So the practice of securing places for persons who have served the party, in however humble a capacity, has sprung from the maxim that in the strife of politics the spoils belong to the victors, and has furnished a motive of incomparable and ever-present activity ever since the administration (1829-1837) of President Andrew Jackson.
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  • Since the visions of Bernadette Soubirous, their authentication by a commission of enquiry appointed by the bishop of Tarbes, and the authorization by the pope of the cult of Our Lady of Lourdes, the quarter on the left bank of the Gave has sprung up and it is estimated that 600,000 pilgrims annually visit the town.
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  • Some of the most modern streets on the plain have been laid out with Spanish-American regularity, but much the greater part seems to have sprung into existence without any plan.
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  • The early history of Hanover is merged in that of the duchy of Brunswick (q.v.), from which the duchy of Brunswick-Liineburg and its offshoots, the duchies of LUneburg-Celle and Luneburg-Calenberg have sprung.
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  • In recent years, however, a new and healthier interest has sprung up in things political; and one result of this improved civic spirit is seen in the various laws for purification of elections.
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  • Sandalwood (Santalum album or freycinetianum) was once abundant on rugged and rather inaccessible heights, but so great a demand arose for it in China,' where it was used for incense and for the manufacture of fancy articles, that the supply was nearly exhausted between 1802 and 1836; since then some young trees have sprung up, but the number is relatively small.
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  • But, at least in the south, market centres had sprung up, town life was beginning, houses of a better type were perhaps coming into use, and the southern tribes employed a gold coinage and also a currency of iron bars or ingots, attested by Caesar and by surviving examples, which weigh roughly, some two-thirds of a pound, some 21 lb, but mostly I g lb.
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  • But there can be no doubt that a considerable import and export trade with the continent had sprung up quite early.
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  • After Marozia and Alberic and the rest another branch of the same family, the Crescentii, exercised the temporal powers of the Holy See; and after them the same regime was continued by the counts of Tusculum, who were sprung from the same stock, which sometimes provided the Roman Church with the most unlikely and least honourable pontiffs.
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  • When in use, it is held at right angles to the periscope above the upper window by a bayonet catch; when not in use, it is lowered and sprung round the body of the periscope just below the upper prism box.
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  • In some of the older streets European shops have replaced the picturesque native cupboards; drinking dens have sprung up at many of the corners, while telephones and electric light have been introduced by private companies, and European machinery is used in many of the corn-mills, &c. The main thoroughfare leads from Bab el Marsa (Gate of the Port) to the Bab el Sok (Gate of the Market-place) known to the English as Port Catherine.
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  • This upper shoot is at the next winter pruning to be cut down to within about a foot of the point whence it sprung, and its buds rubbed off except the upper one for a leader, and one on each side just below it to furnish another pair of side shoots; these being trained in position, the tree would appear as in fig.
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  • The popular garden varieties have sprung from P. Hartwegii and P. Cobaea.
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  • But a decision to which he soon came deprived posterity of the results which might have sprung from the policy of his earlier years.
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  • As early as 1430 some of them - sprung of Alan, lord of Buckenhall - settled in the neighbourhood of Calne and Devizes, whence descended the immediate ancestors of "worthy Mr Tobie Alleine of Devizes," father of Joseph, who, the fourth of a large family, was born at Devizes early in 1634.1645 is marked in the title-page of a quaint old tractate, by an eye-witness, as the year of his setting forth in the Christian race.
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  • From the root idea of obligation to serve or give something in return, involved in the conception of duty, have sprung various derivative uses of the word; thus it is used of the services performed by a minister of a church, by a soldier, or by any employee or servant.
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  • There is no doubt that the phylum of Angiosperms has not sprung from that of Gymnosperms.
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  • Thus a customary law (`orf) has there sprung up side by side with the official sacred law (shari`a), much to the displeasure of the mollahs.
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  • In comparing algae with the great archegoniate series which has doubtless sprung from them, it is natural to inquire to what extent, if any, they present evidence of the existence Peridiniaceae Diatomaceae Cryptomonadaceae - Hydruraceae - EuPHAEOPHYnEAE Protozoa Flagellata protomastigina...
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  • Along with word-printing, or indeed in advance of it, there had sprung into use another kind of printing, picture-printing, or what is commonly called engraving.
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  • On occasion, a chain or ring was fastened about his body, that his condition might be obvious to all; and soon all manner of fables gained currency: how, here or there, the iron had sprung apart by a miracle, in token that the sinner was thereby absolved by God.
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  • With the aid of the vast body of Faust literature which has sprung up in recent years, and the many new documents bearing on its history above all, the so-called Urfaust, to which reference has already been made - we are able now to ascribe to their various periods the component parts of the work; it is possible to discriminate between the Sturm and Drang hero of the opening scenes and of the Gretchen tragedy - the contemporary of Gotz and Clavigo and the superimposed Faust of calmer moral and intellectual ideals - a Faust who corresponds to Hermann and Wilhelm Meister.
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  • He was sprung from a race the heads of which had been Celtic chiefs, had lost their lands in the wars of Ireland, and had felt the full weight of the harsh penal code which long held the Catholic Irish down.
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  • Bribery, fraud, even violence, have in turn been employed to serve the end in view: and churches, chapels and monasteries, most of them in the worst architectural taste, have sprung up like mushrooms over the surface of the country, and are perpetuating the memory of pseudo-sanctuaries which from every point of view were best relegated to oblivion.
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  • Even where different words are used, there is evidence of a common stem from which the various branches have sprung.
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  • Portions of the old walls survive, but the greater part of the former circumvallation has been converted into promenades and gardens, outside which a modern town has sprung up. The finest of its squares are the market-place and the so-called Sand.
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  • Nor were the least prosperous communities those which were sprung from earlier colonies.
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  • The special forms of the alphabet - the Cyrillic and the Glagolitic - which have been adopted by certain of the Slavonic peoples are both sprung directly frc m the Greek alphabet of the ninth century A.D., with the considerable additions rendered necessary by the much greater variety of sounds in Slavonic as compared with Greek.
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  • But despite the artificial character of the Trimurti, it has retained to this day at least its theoretical validity in orthodox Hinduism, whilst it has also undoubtedly exercised considerable influence in shaping sectarian belief, in promoting feelings of toleration towards the claims of rival deities; and in a tendency towards identifying divine figures newly sprung into popular favour with one or other of the principal deities, and thus helping to bring into vogue that notion of avatars, or periodical descents or incarnations of the deity, which has become so prominent a feature of the later sectarian belief.
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  • Indian myth represents them as a race of demons sprung from Kadru, the wife of the sage Kasyapa, with a jewel in their heads which gives them.
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  • The request was granted, and the right of electing parish ministers was conferred by the Patronage Act 1874 on the congregation; thus a grievance of old standing, from which all the ecclesiastical troubles of a century and a half had sprung, was removed and the church placed on a thoroughly democratic basis.
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  • Out of the vague and limitless body there sprung a central mass, - this earth of ours, cylindrical in shape, poised equidistant from surrounding orbs of fire, which had originally clung to it like the bark round a tree, until their continuity was severed, and they parted into several wheelshaped and fire-filled bubbles of air.
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  • His host belonged to the Collegiants or Rhijnsburgers, a religious society which had sprung up among the proscribed Arminians of Holland.
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  • It was sprung from a predatory nomad tribe (the Parnian Dahae, Scythians) which had established itself in Khorasan (Parthia), on the borders of civilization, and thence gradually annexed further districts as the political situation or the weakness of its neighbors allowed.
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  • 560, a new nation had sprung up in the East, the Turks.
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  • But we cannot conclude our brief survey of the national literature of Persia without calling attention to the rise of the drama, which has only sprung up in the beginning of The Drama the nineteenth century.
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  • This chieftain lived north of the Orange river in the district now known as Griqualand West, and ruled over some 4000 people, a bastard race sprung from the intercourse between Boers and native women.
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  • The Surtees family objected to the match, and attempted to prevent it; but a strong attachment had sprung up between them.
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  • On the death of this cousin the descent of the title was for a short time in dispute, and the lands were claimed for Lord Edmund Howard (now Talbot), an infant son of the duke of Norfolk, under the will of the last earl; but the courts decided that, under a private act obtained by the duke of Shrewsbury shortly before his death, the title and bulk of the estates must go together, and the true successor to the earldom was found in Earl Talbot, the head of another line of the descendants of Sir Gilbert Talbot of Grafton, sprung from a second marriage of Sir Gilbert's son, Sir John Talbot of Albrighton.
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  • Judaism Rutilius could assail without wounding either pagans or Christians, but he intimates, not obscurely, that he hates it chiefly as the evil root whence the rank plant of Christianity had sprung.
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  • More than 50% of its working population are engaged in industry, which embraces almost all branches, of which new ones have lately sprung into existence, whilst most of the older have taken a new lease of life.
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  • Nestorianism had sprung from an exaggeration of the theology of the school of Antioch, and the schism weakened that patriarchate and its dependencies.
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  • It has been observed with truth that so many populous nations can hardly have sprung from the Scandinavian peninsula; on the other hand, the existence of these traditions certainly requires some explanation.
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  • The fact that the two former were sprung from the north-east of Germany renders it probable that they had Gothic affinities, while the Alani, though non-Teutonic in origin, may have become gothicized in the course of the migration period.
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  • Sprung from such stock, Emerson inherited qualities of self-reliance, love of liberty, strenuous virtue, sincerity, sobriety and fearless loyalty to ideals.
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  • Thus, Hebrew and Arabic are closely related languages, neither of them the original of the other, but both sprung from some parent language more ancient than either.
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  • Thus, in the Hesiodic account of her birth, she is represented as sprung from the foam which gathered round the mutilated member of Uranus, and her name has been explained by reference to this.
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  • Numerous music halls have sprung up of late years, of which the principal is the Salone Margherita in the basement of the Galleria Umberto Primo.
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  • The Vomero, once merely a scattered village, is now an important suburb, and a large workmen's quarter has sprung up beyond the railway station to house the populace which was turned out from the centre of the town when the works of the risanamento were undertaken.
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  • The attention of antiquarians to the charms against the Evil Eye used by the inhabitants of the Neapolitan provinces was first drawn in 1888, when it was shown that they were all derived from the survival of ancient classical legends which had sprung from various sources in connexion with classical sites in the neighbourhood.
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  • He painted the picture on the wall in tempera, not, according to the legend which sprung up within twenty years of its completion, in oil.
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  • Trade has enormously expanded; new centres of commerce have sprung up in spots which formerly were silent jungles; new staples of trade, such as tea and jute, have rapidly attained importance; and the coalfields and iron ores have opened up prospects of a new and splendid era in the internal development of the country.
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  • Their great importance in history lies in the fact that they opened the eyes of the world, and specially of the nations from whom these buccaneers had sprung, to the whole system of Spanish-American government and commerce - the former in its rottenness, and the latter in its possibilities in other hands.
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  • Large steam mills have rapidly sprung up in Bombay City, Ahmedabad and Khandesh.
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  • There is evidence, however, that so early as loon B.C. an export trade existed to the Red Sea by way of East Africa, and before 750 B.C. a similar trade had sprung up with Babylon by way of the Persian Gulf.
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  • It is observable that most of the abuses which are remedied by it are regarded as having sprung up since the accession of Henry II.; but the most offensive afforestations have been made under Richard and John.
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  • Fife-Keith has sprung up since 1816.
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  • The old Anglo-Norman houses had forgotten the tradition of their origin, and now formed but a small section of the aristocracy; the newer families, sprung from the officials of the first two Henries, had always been English in spirit.
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  • Further, a system of granting monopolies and other privileges had again sprung up. Many of these grants embodied some scheme which was intended to serve the interests of the public, and many actions which appear startling to us were covered by the extreme protectionist theories then in vogue.
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  • Behind these legal contrivances stood the fact that the army was organized in the same way as the nation was organized, being officered by gentlemen who had no desire to overthrow a constitution through which the class from which they sprung controlled the government.
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  • The mercantile system, which had sprung up in Spain in the 16th century, held that The colonies were to be entirely prohibited from trading, except with the mother country.
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  • A new Tory party had sprung up, not distinguished, like the Tories of Queen Annes reign, by a special ecclesiastical policy, but by their acceptance of the kings claim to nominate ministers, and so to predominate in the ministryhimself.
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  • Berkeley had already given a surname to an earlier family sprung from Roger, its Domesday tenant, whose descendants, seem to have been ousted by the partisan of the Angevin.
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  • " For some think that they ought to fast only one day, some two, some more days; some compute their day as consisting of forty hours night and day; and this diversity existing among those that observe it is not a matter that has just sprung up in our times, but long ago among those before us."
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  • There are numerous breweries, saw and flour mills, and manufactures of preserves, soap, candles, glass and paper, especially in the busy suburb that has sprung up on the right bank of the Urumea.
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  • It has been suggested that the Sphenophyllales may have sprung from a-very old stock which existed prior to the divergence of the latter groups.
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  • The climate is in winter inclement in the higher elevations, and, as the snow lies deep until the spring, the range is largely frequented by devotees of winter sport, ski, toboganning, &c. In summer the air is bracing, and many climatic health resorts have sprung into existence, among which may be mentioned Kipsdorf, Barenfels and Oberwiesenthal.
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  • By the pagan philosophers it was always conceived under the form of Knowledge or Wisdom, it being inconceivable to all the schools sprung from Socrates that a man could truly know his own good and yet deliberately choose anything else.
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  • So again, in his view, the history of mankind is a history of the necessary development of the free spirit through the different forms of political organization: the first being that of the Oriental monarchy, in which freedom belongs to the monarch only; the second, that of the Graeco-Roman republics, in which a select body of free citizens is sustained on a basis of slavery; while finally in the modern societies, sprung from the Teutonic invasion of the decaying Roman empire, freedom is recognized as the natural right of all members of the community.
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  • But even so, the Balkan League would never have sprung into being but for Venizelos' higher vision, and his supreme courage in consenting to an alliance with Bulgaria, without a preliminary agreement as to the division of the Turkish spoils in case of victory.
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  • The other as the Upper (Eighter) M`William took Galway, and from him the earls of Clanricarde afterwards sprung.
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  • Out of the rival " defenders " Ribbonism in part sprung, and the United Irishmen drew from both sources (1791).
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  • The Etruscans were said to have learned it from a being named Tages, grandson of Jupiter, who had suddenly sprung from the ground near Tarquinii.
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  • Louis Napoleon could feel vaguely the state of public opinion in France, the longing for glory from which it suffered, and the deep-rooted discord between the nation and the king, Louis Philippe, who though sprung from the national revolution against the treaties of 1815, was yet a partisan of peace at any price.
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  • But all over the savage world, especially in Africa, spirit worship has sprung up and choked the All-Father, who, however, in most savage regions, abides as a name, receiving no sacrifice, and, save among the Masai, seldom being addressed in prayer.
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  • She did, indeed, join with Athens and Achaea in 353 to prevent Philip of Macedon passing Thermopylae and entering Phocis, but beyond this she took no part in the struggle of Greece with the new power which had sprung up on her northern borders.
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  • While founding her colonial empire England had come into collision with France; and the rivalry of the Hundred Years War had immediately sprung up again between the two countries.
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  • Secular philosophy found its first entrance amongst the Saracens in the days of the early caliphs of the Abbasid dynasty, whose ways and thoughts had been moulded by their residence in Persia amid the influences of an older C creed, and of ideas which had in the last resort sprung from the Greeks.
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  • Philosophy, which had only sprung up when the purely Arabian influences ceased to predominate, came to an end when the sceptre of the Moslem world passed away from the dynasty of Persia.
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  • The chief of the exiles, Don Manuel Ruiz Zorilla, who had retired to Paris since the Restoration, organized a military conspiracy, which was sprung upon the Madrid gcvernment at Badajoz, at Seo de Urgel, and at Santo Domingo in the Ebro valley.
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  • The name Erichthonius is connected with xecbv ("earth") and the representation of him as half-snake, like Cecrops, indicates that he was regarded as one of the autochthones, the ancestors of the Athenians who sprung from the soil.
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  • Several controversialists, including Gotti, Krohn and Stockmann, have mentioned among the innumerable sects that have sprung from Anabaptism a group of individuals whose open-air preaching and rigorous practice of poverty gained them the name of Apostolici.
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  • The family as a whole is of great interest, as presenting points of contact with various recent orders, especially Hymenophyllaceae, Osmundaceae and Ophioglossaceae; the group appears to have been a synthetic one, belonging to a primitive stock (the Primofilices of Arber) from which the later Fern families may have sprung.
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  • Although "' G r 'e t, the young elector spent the two first years of his reign mainly in Prussia, he was by no means forgetful of Brandenburg, and began resolutely to root out the many evils which had sprung up during the feeble rule of his father.
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  • She touched her palm to the activation key, and the ground battle hologram sprung up before her.
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  • The tree deposited Deidre and Toby in a heap, and Toby sprung up, pleased with himself.  Katie looked at the tree in uneasy mistrust.  The trees of her world were alive, but this was something else.
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  • Indeed, a new area of laboratory scale astrophysics has sprung up around table-top terawatt femtosecond lasers.
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  • Both have Victorian brass and cast iron bedsteads, with interior sprung mattresses, made up with crisp white cotton bedding.
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  • Is the only sprung on the the carnival conquest.
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  • The first dwarf daffodil, in the patch that we planted in the autumn, has suddenly sprung into flower.
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  • A sincere friendship founded on mutual esteem, had sprung up between these two.
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  • Basketball players often grow into their length, tend to look slightly etiolated in their youth, green and lately sprung.
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  • Athena, reputed to be Zeus's favorite child, sprung full-grown from his forehead.
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  • These soon formed a small hamlet sprung up around a railroad halt.
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  • The Red Vic is the only place where I've heard the phrase " Quick, The Aquarium restroom's sprung a leak!
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  • The third part of the door bumper assembly (the sprung loaded plunger) will be simply turned from solid.
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  • Numerous restaurants, specializing in fish, which have sprung up along the seaside promenade.
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  • Price £ 52.00 We also sell the front sprung seat separately for £ 65.00 Royal Enfield rear rack.
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  • The base is a box metal frame with sprung beech slats giving a partial sprung base.
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  • Having three main branches and roots the tree was believed to have sprung from the beginning of time out of primordial slime and ashes.
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  • The very cozy Delta red and gold 'Poppy ' color scheme of the sprung upholstery remains for 2006.
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  • It is probable that the island was not dorized before the 9th century B.C. One of the earliest facts known to us in its history is its membership in the League of Calauria, which included, besides Aegina, Athens, the Minyan (Boeotian) Orchomenos, Troezen, Hermione, Nauplia and Prasiae, and was probably an organization of states which were still Mycenaean, for the suppression of the piracy which had sprung up in the Aegean as a result of the decay of the naval supremacy of the Mycenaean princes.
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  • The algal fungi, Phycomycetes, are obviously derived from the Green Algae, while the remaining Fungi, the Eumycetes, appear to have sprung from the same stock as the Rhodophyceae (see FUNGI).
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  • But in Bosnia and most of the other provinces the deputies had no popular mandate whatever, beyond being members of the self-constituted local committees which had sprung up amid the ferment of the revolution.
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  • Teg Bahadur was succeeded by the tenth and most powerful guru, his son Govind Singh; and it was under him that what had sprung into existence as a quietist sect of a purely parshad is then distributed equally to all the faithful present, no matter to what caste they belong.
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  • The city is growing in all directions, and a number of new quarters have sprung up where the houses are more sanitary than in the older parts, but unfortunately few of them evince much aesthetic feeling.
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  • (See Oreodon.) The Eocene American genus Homacodon is regarded as representing a third family group, the Homacodontidae (= Pantolestidae), in which the molars were of a bunodont type, and approximate to those of the Condylarthra from which this family appears to have sprung, and to have given origin on the one hand to the Oreodontidae, and on the other to the Camelidae.
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  • The Protestants have shown a tendency to subdivision, and many curious and ephemeral sects have sprung up; of late years, however, the various sections of Presbyterians, Methodists and Baptists have united, and a working alliance has been formed between Presbyterians, Methodists and Congregationalists.
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  • He cites native poems which declared that the Inguaeones, Hermiones and Istaeuones - the three main branches of the Germani (see below) - were sprung from three sons of a certain Mannus (perhaps " Man "), who was himself the son of the god Tuisto the son of Earth; and in a Frankish document at least four centuries later we hear again of three brothers named Erminus, Inguo and Istio, from whom many nations were descended.
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  • Herodotus, who states that they, with the Egyptians and the Ethiopians, were the first to practise circumcision, believed them to have sprung from the relics of the army of Sesostris, and thus regarded them as Egyptians.
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  • (See Feudalism.) Side by side with these purely official dukedoms, however, there had continued to exist, or had sprung up, either independently or in more or less of subjection to the Frank rulers, national dukedoms, such as those of the Alemanni, the Aquitanians, and, later, of the Bavarians and Thuringians.
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  • Many of the American officers, too, had taken offence at the close personal friendship which had sprung up between the marquis de La Fayette and Washington, and at the diplomatic deference which the commander-in-chief felt compelled to show to other foreign officers.
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  • Mankind was supposed by Anaximander to have sprung from some other species of animals, probably aquatic. But as the measureless and endless had been the prime cause of the motion into separate existences and individual forms, so also, according to the just award of destiny, these forms would at an appointed season suffer the vengeance due to their earlier act of separation, and return into the vague immensity whence they had issued.
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  • Many of them were punished, some sent to Siberia, many died of cold and hunger on the road, many returned of their own accord, and the movement died down of itself just as it had sprung up, without apparent reason.
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  • Before her words were out, Pierre had sprung up and with a frightened expression seized Princess Mary's hand.
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  • It was as tho a bag full of water had sprung a leak.
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  • The long travel suspension arms are connected to independent oil-filled sprung dampers to soak up the bumps without affecting directional control.
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  • Secure in place with sprung pin on left of tooling block.
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  • Scott Maciver sprung the offside trap with a well-timed run in behind.
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  • Temples had sprung up all over the westernized world and the Order attracted a lot of heavyweight talent.
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  • With so many Americans in debt, countless ways of managing that debt have sprung up.
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  • With the advent of digital scrapbooking, printable paper sites have sprung up all over the web.
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  • I did not know one person, and as soon as I was sprung they would be toast as far as I was concerned.
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  • She sprung back up and continued to sing without much incident.
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  • T.I. got sprung from jail three months before his one year and one day sentence was complete, but he isn't quite on the loose yet.
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  • Wahler's most recent arrest comes right after U.S. authorities sprung him from a Mexican jail.
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  • As a result, more and more health food stores have sprung up causing major competition for the average supermarket.
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  • A multitude of varieties have sprung from W. floribunda, W. grandiflora (known also as W. amabilis), W. rosea, and W. hortensis.
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  • The common Sun Rose (H. vulgare) is variable in color, and from it have sprung the many varieties.
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  • Of late years there has sprung up a new race with double Hose-in-hose flowers, collectively called the Narcissi-flora group, the chief sorts of which number about a score-Graf von Meran, one of the first, being still among the best yellows.
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  • Of all the guitar tablature sites that have sprung up over the years, Guitar Tabs Universe was certainly one of the most popular.
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  • In response to MySpace criticisms, several people have sprung into action.
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  • To focus the action somewhat, a few popular franchises have sprung up, most notably NFL Blitz and NFL Street.
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  • Videos, websites, blogs, and many other forms of social media have sprung up from teachers, performers, and fans alike.
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  • Liberty™ Sprung Floors - Consisting of shock-absorbing panels pre-manufactured on blocks, these can be used as either a temporary or permanent dance floor for a studio or theater.
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  • Sprung floors ensure a safe learning experience.
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  • As New York City is a landing zone for creative fashion, it is not surprising that so many New York laser hair removal spas and specialty shops have sprung up to meet that need.
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  • As I read the books, thousands of possible lessons sprung to mind.
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  • The American Conservatory Theater's main stage is a thrilling spot to take in productions that originated in the Bay Area, as well as ones that sprung from the Great White Way.
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  • In Asia, Christmas is only celebrated by a small percentage of the population, but some unique customs have sprung up around the holiday.
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  • An entire crop of women's apparel and accessories has sprung up from this brand name.
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  • In addition to the main festival competition, numerous related events (called "sidebars") have sprung up to run concurrently.
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  • Online galleries have sprung up everywhere, and while some may be better than others, all of them are places where people interested in tattoos can find some great pictures.
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  • With the enormous popularity and speed of air travel, many airlines in Europe has sprung up that offer great deals on flights.
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  • In fact, companies have sprung up that match students and charity projects needing volunteer labor.
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  • Banda was initially popularized by military bands, but imitators soon sprung up.
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  • A large part of the show was about the planning of the wedding, the pregnancy announcement, and the rift that her pregnancy temporarily caused with her family because Kendra sprung the news on them at a surprise baby shower.
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  • To aid in her mission, she has sprung from prison disgraced former Starfleet officer Tom Paris (Robert Duncan McNeill).
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  • His name is Frank Parker (Jonathan LaPaglia) and they've sprung him from a CIA loony bin.
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  • With SEO getting more and more complicated all the time, it's no wonder that businesses have sprung up, especially in large target markets like NYC.
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  • The death dealer touched a gloved finger to a blank spot on the construction paper, and an orchid sprung up, ethereal and hovering over the paper.
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  • The land and space battle sprung up before him and began to spin.
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  • Five bonfires had sprung up, each one with a massive spit turning a large deer in its center.
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  • Tents had sprung up two nights before, and the two people who could keep his powers from spinning out of control remained at the center of the beach.
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  • The death-dealer motioned for them to start walking along the stream.  Rhyn sprung forward, anxious to be moving again.
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  • Kris looked up in time to see Kiki crash through the canopy and plummet towards the ground.  Kris gasped and sprung forward.  A streak of black crossed his vision as a flying demon snatched Kiki out of the air.
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  • A considerable overland trade has sprung up since the opening of Mengtsze.
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  • Kant had substituted one great necessity, sprung from an ideal source.
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  • The algal fungi, Phycomycetes, are obviously derived from the Green Algae, while the remaining Fungi, the Eumycetes, appear to have sprung from the same stock as the Rhodophyceae.
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  • Besides the Academy of Science, the Moscow Society of Naturalists, the Mineralogical Society, the Geographical Society, with its Caucasian and Siberian branches, the archaeological societies and the scientific societies of the Baltic provinces, all of which are of old and recognized standing, there have lately sprung up a series of new societies in connexion with each university, and their serials are yearly growing in importance, as, too, are those of the Moscow Society of Friends of Natural Science, the Chemico-Physical Society, and various medical, educational and other associations.
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  • The serfdom which had sprung up in Russia in the 16th century, and became consecrated by law in 1609, taking, however, nearly one hundred and fifty years to attain its full growth, was abolished in 1861.
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  • In the society of the members he assumed the name of "Isaac Bickerstaff," and later of "Gawin Douglas," the latter partly in memory of his maternal grandfather Douglas of Muthill (Perthshire), and partly to give point to his boast that he was a "poet sprung from a Douglas loin."
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  • This kingdom was to be ruled over by a Messiah sprung not from Judah but from Levi, that is, from the reigning Maccabean family.
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  • He is also sometimes represented as sprung from the earth.
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  • All are sprung from the seed of Brahm.
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  • Early in the 18th century the spirit of revolt against despotism led to an attempt at the restoration of the drama by authors sprung from the people, who wrote for spectators .
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  • Had Speranski sprung from the same class as himself and possessed the same breeding and traditions, Bolkonski would soon have discovered his weak, human, unheroic sides; but as it was, Speranski's strange and logical turn of mind inspired him with respect all the more because he did not quite understand him.
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  • "And where has he sprung from?" he asked, turning to Shinshin.
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  • Now that his diet had begun, wouldn't you know, Paul Dawkins had sprung for a case.
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