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sprang

sprang

sprang Sentence Examples

  • All the birds sprang up joyfully.

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  • Two images sprang from the pages.

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  • Two images sprang from the pages.

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  • It sprang to life at her touch with a ping that made her heart leap.

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  • He sprang out before the sleigh stopped, and ran into the hall.

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  • Traci sprang up and snatched her purse.

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  • Lana sprang up from her corner of the couch and flung her arms around Elise.

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  • On the other side of the rocks, water sprang from the ground and spilled off a ledge into a large blue pool.

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  • Trees of all kinds sprang from the earth in the strangest positions.

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  • The cry awoke the farmers; they sprang from their beds and looked out.

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  • He released her, and she sprang up, backing away from him.

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  • But out of the copies of Norfolk deeds and records collected for Thomas, earl of Arundel, in the early part of the 17th century, it seems clear enough that he sprang from a Norfolk family, several of whose members held lands at Wiggenhall near Lynn.

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  • Kiki sprang up from his seat in the corner.

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  • "Okay, Mama!" he sang and sprang away.

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  • Then he sprang up quickly and seized it by the tail.

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  • Rhyn focused the little bit of magic he had remaining on the wood.  Fire sprang up.  With it, Rhyn felt a stitch of the seam binding his power snap.

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  • The name is generally applied not only to the order of Ku Klux Klan, but to other similar societies that existed at the same time, such as the Knights of the White Camelia, a larger order than the Klan; the White Brotherhood; the White League; Pale Faces; Constitutional Union Guards; Black Cavalry; White Rose; The '76 Association; and hundreds of smaller societies that sprang up in the South after the Civil War.

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  • She sprang forward, anxious to see her brother.

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  • The children and the Wizard rushed across the moving rock and sprang into the passage beyond, landing safely though a little out of breath.

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  • The footman sprang onto the box of the moving coach which jolted as it passed out of the yard onto the uneven roadway; the other vehicles jolted in their turn, and the procession of carriages moved up the street.

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  • Pseudo-Joachimite treatises sprang up on every hand, and, finally, in 1254, there appeared in Paris the Liber introductorius ad Evangelium aeternum, the work of a Spiritual Franciscan, Gherardo da Borgo San Donnino.

    15
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  • In the early 1800s, fertilizer companies sprang up using bone meal as the principle agent.

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  • This large import trade in fresh meat, which sprang up entirely within the last quarter of the 19th century, has placed an abundance of cheap and wholesome food well within the reach of the great industrial TABLE XVIII.

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  • The girls sprang aside.

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  • Such was the seedground in which what is specifically known as German mysticism sprang up.

    9
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  • The discords which followed on the break-up of the Carolingian power, and the weakness of the so-called Italian emperors, who were unable to control the feudatories (marquises of Ivrea and Tuscany, dukes of Friuli and Spoleto), from whose ranks they sprang, exposed Italy to ever-increasing misrule.

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  • She tried to pass Anna Mikhaylovna, but the latter sprang so as to bar her path.

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  • "Isn't it fine?" cried Dorothy, in a joyous voice, as she sprang out of the buggy and let Eureka run frolicking over the velvety grass.

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  • Irio is London rocket, so-called because it sprang up after the fire of 1666), Brassica (cabbage and mustard), Diplotaxis (rocket), Cochlearia (scurvy-grass), Capsella (shepherd's purse), Lepidium (cress), Thlaspi (penny-cress), Cakile (sea rocket), Raphanus (radish), and others.

    6
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  • Hotels and villas were built in the new part of the town that sprang up outside the picturesque walled fortress, and there is quite a contrast between the part inside the heavy, half-ruined ramparts, with its narrow, steep streets and curious gable-roofed houses, its fine old church and castle and its massive town hall, and the new suburbs and fishermen's quarter facing the estuary of the Bidassoa.

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  • Irio is London rocket, so-called because it sprang up after the fire of 1666), Brassica (cabbage and mustard), Diplotaxis (rocket), Cochlearia (scurvy-grass), Capsella (shepherd's purse), Lepidium (cress), Thlaspi (penny-cress), Cakile (sea rocket), Raphanus (radish), and others.

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  • Hephaestus (or Prometheus) subsequently split open his head with a hatchet, and Athena sprang forth fully armed, uttering a loud shout of victory (Hesiod, Theogony, 886; Pindar, Olympia, vii.

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  • While the characteristic features of apocalyptic literature were derived from Judaism, those of Gnosticism sprang partly from Greek philosophy, partly from oriental religions.

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  • The lad sprang up alarmed.

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  • From this root, which lay horizontally, smaller roots pushed down into the mud, and the stem of the plant sprang up to the height of 4 cubits, being triangular and tapering in form.

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  • Factories sprang up in the South in a few months, supplying the army with arms and munitions of war, and the energy of the president was everywhere apparent.

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  • Samanids, the first great native dynasty which sprang up in the 9th century in E.

    4
    1
  • But Dorothy sprang up and ran to seize her friend's hand drawing him impulsively toward the lovely Princess, who smiled most graciously upon her guest.

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  • Junot, believing the allied August21, left to be weakly held, attacked it without reconnoitring, but Wellesley's regiments, marched thither behind the heights, sprang up in line; and under their volleys and bayonet charge, supported by artillery fire, Junot's deep columns were driven off the direct road to Lisbon.

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  • His application of the pendulum to regulate the movement of clocks sprang from his experience of the need for an exact measure of time in observing the heavens.

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  • The moment they laid hands on him he sprang aside in terror and clutched at Pierre.

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  • From the dying animal sprang the life of the earth, although Ahriman sent his emissaries to prevent it.

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  • Being pursued by Minos, king of Crete, who was enamoured of her, she sprang from a rock into the sea, but was saved from drowning by falling into some fishermen's nets.

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  • Dunkirk is said to have originated in a chapel founded by St Eloi in the 7th century, round which a small village speedily sprang up. In the 10th century it was fortified by Baldwin III., count of Flanders; together with that province it passed successively to Burgundy, Austria and Spain.

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  • A huge, broad-shouldered gunner, Number One, holding a mop, his legs far apart, sprang to the wheel; while Number Two with a trembling hand placed a charge in the cannon's mouth.

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  • There are also certain liabilities or debts which, for the convenience of the remedy, have been made to appear as though they sprang from contract, and are sometimes termed quasi-contracts.

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  • Towns, most of them also the sees of bishops, now sprang up everywhere, including Szekesfehervar (Stuhlweissenburg), Veszprem, Pecs (Fiinfkirchen) and Gydr (Raab).

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  • Towns, most of them also the sees of bishops, now sprang up everywhere, including Szekesfehervar (Stuhlweissenburg), Veszprem, Pecs (Fiinfkirchen) and Gydr (Raab).

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  • Doubts, however, soon sprang up as to its effect upon the minds of Austrian statesmen, since on the 8th of November the language employed by Kllay and Count Andrssy to the Hungarian delegations on the subject of Irredentism was scarcely calculated to soothe Italian susceptibilities.

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  • In the middle of the wood a brown hare with white feet sprang out and, scared by the tramp of the many horses, grew so confused that it leaped along the road in front of them for some time, arousing general attention and laughter, and only when several voices shouted at it did it dart to one side and disappear in the thicket.

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  • The village of Tonopah sprang into existence as soon as the rush of newcomers to this region began, and in 1903 it contained 4000 inhabitants.

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  • From Heaven and Earth sprang the remaining members of a circle analogous to the Olympic gods.

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  • Dorothy sprang forward and caught the fluffy fowl in her arms, uttering at the same time a glad cry.

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  • From these two marriages sprang the houses of Lancaster and Stafford.

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  • The international interests thus created, and others that sprang from them, heavily burdened the diplomacy, and even threatened the safety of the United States after they were placed in possession of the eastern bank of the Mississippi down to 31° in 1783.

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  • Her mouth felt suddenly dry and goose bumps sprang up all over her bare arms.

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  • In the evening a wind from the northeast sprang up, and the flakes rushed hither and thither in furious melee.

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  • He sprang forward and upset an old woman who was catching at a biscuit; the old woman did not consider herself defeated though she was lying on the ground--she grabbed at some biscuits but her hand did not reach them.

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  • Believing their danger past, they sprang from their ambush and, chirruping something in their shrill little voices and holding up their skirts, their bare little sunburned feet scampered merrily and quickly across the meadow grass.

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  • Similar brother-houses soon sprang up in different places throughout the Low Countries and Westphalia, and even Saxony.

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  • In 1796 he met Julie Carron, and an attachment sprang up between them, the progress of which he na�ly recorded in a journal (Amorum).

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  • THE TEUTONIC ORDER, or Teutonic Knights of St Mary's Hospital at Jerusalem (Der deutsche Orden, Deutsche Ritter) was one of the three great military and religious orders which sprang from the Crusades.

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  • These associations were soon aided in their important labours by numerous local societies which sprang up in all parts of the kingdom.

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  • The Templars were founded about the year 1118 by a Burgundian knight, Hugh de Paganis; the Hospitallers sprang from a foundation in Jerusalem erected by merchants of Amalfi before the First Crusade, and were reorganized under Gerard le Puy, master until 1120.

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  • The military development which sprang from the Crusades is thus largely a matter of borrowing; the financial development is independent and indigenous in the West.

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  • While a new spirit which compares and tolerates thus sprang from the Crusades, the large sphere of new knowledge and experience which they gave brought new material at once for scientific thought and poetic imagination.

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  • It is not improbable that all dogs sprang from one common source, but climate, food and cross-breeding caused variations of form which suggested particular uses, and these being either designedly or accidentally perpetuated, the various breeds of dogs arose, and became numerous in proportion to the progress of civilization.

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  • unfriendly to strangers, but as Greek colonies sprang up on the shores this was changed to euxinus, friendly to strangers.

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  • Similar brother-houses soon sprang up in different places throughout the Low Countries and Westphalia, and even Saxony.

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  • The Templars were founded about the year 1118 by a Burgundian knight, Hugh de Paganis; the Hospitallers sprang from a foundation in Jerusalem erected by merchants of Amalfi before the First Crusade, and were reorganized under Gerard le Puy, master until 1120.

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  • He dropped the pen and sprang to his feet.

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  • Natasha, after she had pulled him down toward her and covered his face with kisses, holding him tight by the skirt of his coat, sprang away and pranced up and down in one place like a goat and shrieked piercingly.

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  • Helene's face became terrible, she shrieked and sprang aside.

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  • After their engagement, quite different, intimate, and natural relations sprang up between them.

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  • As always happens in such cases rivalry sprang up as to which should get paid first, and those who like Mitenka held promissory notes given them as presents now became the most exacting of the creditors.

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  • The name Manitoba sprang from the union of two Indian words, Manito (the Great Spirit), and Waba (the " narrows " of the lake, which may readily be seen on the map).

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  • (a) Fines sprang from the older custom of directing alms by way of penance in the internal forum (Van Espen, ubi sup. c. 1, 5-10).

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  • To no town has the memory of one famous son brought wider notoriety than that which the memory of William Shakespeare has brought to Stratford; yet this notoriety sprang into strong growth only towards the end of the 18th century.

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  • Her father's line and the royal Stewards of Scotland sprang from one forefather, Alan, son of Flaald the Breton.

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  • From the communion sacrifice sprang the piaculum, which here becomes a subsidiary form and finds its full explanation in the ideas connected with the mystic union of god and worshippers.

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  • The great route was that which led from Venice over the Brenner and up the Rhine to Bruges; and this route became the long red line of municipal development, along which - in Lombardy, Germany and Flanders - the great towns of the middle ages sprang to life.

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  • In the beginning of the 13th century the foundation of the Dominican and Franciscan_ orders furnished a more ecclesiastical and regular means of supplying the same wants, and numerous convents sprang up at once throughout Germany.

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  • Characteristic of the omitted portions are the friendship which sprang up between Jonathan and David and the latter's appointment to a command in the army.

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  • As a result some 60,000,000 mulberry trees were planted in Turkey during 1890-1910, involving the plantation of about 130,000 acres, and new magnaneries and spinning factories sprang up in every direction; while the revenue (silk tithe) increased in the regions administered by the council from £T17,000 in1881-1882to LT125,000 in 1906-1907, the value of the silk crop in those regions having thus advanced by over £Tr,000,000.

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  • Characteristic of the omitted portions are the friendship which sprang up between Jonathan and David and the latter's appointment to a command in the army.

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  • The suburb of Rusafa, on the eastern bank, sprang up almost immediately, and after the siege and capture of the round city by Mamun, in 814, this became the most important part of the capital.

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  • In a simpler and more immediate sense, the capture of Constantinople was detrimental to the movement from which it sprang.

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  • Agriculturists, tanners, merchants and mollahs (priests) were called from Turkestan, and small principalities sprang up on the Irtysh and the Ob.

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  • Of the cadet branches of the house, the oldest was that of Powyke and Alcester, which obtained a barony in 1447 and became extinct in 1496; from it sprang the Beauchamps, Lords St Amand from 1448, of whom was Richard, bishop of Salisbury, first chancellor of the order of the Garter, and who became extinct in 1508, being the last known male heirs of the race.

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  • Chronos begat fire, air and water, and from these three sprang numerous other gods; Smoke and darkness appear in a later tradition.

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  • The present port sprang into being as the result of a clause in the Anglo-Portuguese agreement of 1891 providing for the construction of a railway between Rhodesia and the navigable waters of the Pungwe.

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  • He died from the bite of a serpent which sprang from the blood of the Gorgon Medusa.

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  • Of Metternich, Stadion's successor, he had at the outset no high opinion, and it was not till 1812 that there sprang up between the two men the close relations that were to ripen into life-long friendship. But when Gentz returned to Vienna as Metternich's adviser and henchman, he was no longer the fiery patriot who had sympathized and corresponded with Stein in the darkest days of German depression and in fiery periods called upon all Europe to free itself from foreign rule.

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  • The people accepted all this, and so a romantic tradition sprang up side by side with the historical, and had a literature of its own, the beginnings of which must be placed as early as the 2nd century of the Flight.

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  • - In Turkey these consist of the Dominican mission, established at Mosul during the 18th century, and in Persia of the French Lazarist mission, which sprang out of some schools established by a French layman and scientific traveller, Eugene Bore, in 1838.

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  • At the corner of the Graben, one of the busiest thoroughfares, containing the most fashionable shops in Vienna, is the Stock im Eisen, the stump of a tree, said to be the last survivor of a holy grove round which the original settlement of Vindomina sprang up. It is full of nails driven into it by travelling journeymen.

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  • Their king Joseph, in answer to the inquiry of Hasdai Ibn Shaprut of Cordova (c. 958), stated that his people sprang from Thogarmah, grandson of Japhet, and the supposed ancestor of the other peoples of the Caucasus.

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  • Simultaneously with the approach of Persia to the Caucasus the terrible empire of the Huns sprang up among the Ugrians of the northern steppes.

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  • Thus with respect to early religious beliefs he rejected Hume's notion that religion sprang out of the fears of primitive men, in favour of the theory that it represents the first attempts of our species to explain phenomena.

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  • In 1839 he sprang to the defence of Unitarian doctrine, which had been assailed by certain Liverpool clergymen, of whom Fielding Ould was the most active and Hugh McNeill the most famous.

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  • Gradually the Kabuki developed the features of a genuine theatre; the actor and the playwright were discriminated, and, the performances taking the form of domestic drama (Wagoto and Sewamono) or historical drama (Aragoto or Jidaimono), actors of perpetual fame sprang up, as Sakata TOjOrO and Ichikawa DanjinrO (1660-1704).

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  • Many families of sword artists sprang up at a later period, furnishing treasures for the collector even down to the present day, and their labors reached a level of technical mastery and refined artistic judgment almost without parallel in the art industries of Europe.

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  • The engravers of pipes, pouch clasps, and the metallic discs (kagami-buta) attached to certain netsuke, sprang from the same class and were not less original.

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  • The Blotter fur literarische Unterhaltung sprang out of the Literarisches Wochenblatt (1818), founded by Kotzebue; after 1865 it was edited by R.

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  • The incidents of his life are shrouded by uncertain traditions, which naturally sprang up in the absence of any authentic record; the earliest biography was by one of the Sorani, probably Soranus the younger of Ephesus, in the 2nd century; Suidas, the lexicographer, wrote of him in the 11th, and Tzetzes in the 12th century.

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  • Various pretenders sprang up and the kingdom fell into confusion.

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  • Historians have found it hard to dispel the idea that civilization in Greece was a very late development, and that the culture of the age of Solon sprang, in fact, suddenly into existence, as it seems to do in the records of the historian.

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  • Out of it sprang the rebellion of Megabyzus, who was greatly exasperated because, though he had persuaded Inarus to surrender by promising that his life would be spared, Artaxerxes, yielding to the entreaties of his wife Amytis, who wanted to take revenge on Inarus for the death of her brother Achaemenes, the satrap of Egypt, had surrendered him to her for execution.

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  • The seigneurs of Bethune, avoues (advocati) of the great abbey of Saint-Vaast at Arras from the I 1 th century, were the ancestors of a great French house whence sprang the dukes of Sully, Charost, Orval, and Ancenis; the marquises of Rosny, Courville and Chabris; the counts of Selles and the princes of Boisbelle and Henrichemont.

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  • They essentially resembled the obligations undertaken towards a Teutonic chief by the members of his "comitatus" or "gefolge," one of the institutions from which feudalism directly sprang.

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  • The crown of St Edward, with which the sovereigns were crowned, had a narrow circlet from which rose alternately four crosses and four fleurs-de-lys, and from the crosses sprang two arches, which at their crossing supported an orb and cross.

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  • To perform their task adequately required from the critics a wide circle of knowledge; and from this requirement sprang the sciences of grammar, prosody, lexicography, mythology and archaeology.

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  • " The Socinian creed sprang from intellectual rather than religious motives.

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  • The " transcendental movement," which sprang out of German affiliations and produced as one of its results the well-known community of Brook Farm (1841-1847), under the leadership of Dr George Ripley, was a Massachusetts growth, and in passing away it left, instead of traces of an organization, a sentiment and an aspiration for higher thinking which gave Emerson his following.

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  • But Anabaptism was not to remain an abiding force on the continent; and though colonies of its exiles settled in England, they did not produce the Congregationalism which sprang up there under Elizabeth.

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  • In 1610 a vessel was despatched with merchandise suitable for traffic with the Indians, the voyage resulted in profit, and a lucrative trade in peltry sprang up. Early in 1614 Adriaen Block explored Long Island Sound and discovered Block Island.

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  • HEINRICH VON SYBEL (1817-1895), German historian, sprang from a Protestant family which had long been established at Soest, in Westphalia.

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  • He possessed the characteristic vigour and astuteness of the old Arab stock from which he sprang; and in his wife, the renowned Zenobia, he found an able supporter of his policy.

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  • When, on the 2nd of May 1840, some time after the nomination by the Whig party of William Henry Harrison for the Presidency, Greeley began the publication of a new weekly campaign paper, The Log Cabin, it sprang at once into a great circulation; 40,000 copies of the first number were sold, and it finally rose to 80,000.

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  • It sprang into importance through the utilization of the falls in the river Glommen for driving saw-mills and generating electric power.

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  • Is he a pale form of the Babylonian chaos-dragon, or of the serpent of Iranian mythology who sprang from heaven to earth to blight the" good creation "?

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  • 452, and its inhabitants took refuge in the islands of the lagoons, forming settlements from which Venice eventually sprang.

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  • But in so doing they did not only repeat the old formulae; the ideas of the men of old sprang into new life.

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  • The fundamental type of the Arabic sanctuary can be traced through all the Semitic lands, and so appears to be older than the Semitic dispersion; even the technical terms are mainly the same, so that we may justly assume that the more developed ritual and priesthoods of the settled Semites sprang from a state of things not very remote from what we find among the heathen Arabs.

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  • Among these the provision of public libraries in the United States and United Kingdom (and similarly in other English-speaking countries) was especially prominent, and "Carnegie libraries" gradually sprang up on all sides, his method being to build and equip, but only on condition that the local authority provided site and maintenance, and thus to secure local interest and responsibility.

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  • We shall begin by giving a general account of the historical and literary conditions under which the unique literature of the Old Testament sprang up, of the stages by which it gradually reached its present form, and (so far as this is possible) of the way in which the Biblical books were brought together in a.

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  • It has been urged that these brown peoples sprang from one stock with the Malays and the Malagasy of Madagascar; and that they represent this parent stock better than the Malays who have been much modified by crossings.

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  • L'AUBESPINE, a French family which sprang from Claude de l'Aubespine, a lawyer of Orleans and bailiff of the abbey of St Euverte in the beginning of the 16th century, and rapidly acquired distinction in offices connected with the law.

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  • According to the story, during the ploughing of a field near Tarquinii a being of boyish appearance sprang out of the furrow.

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  • A friendship, of mutual advantage, soon sprang up between the two men, and it has been said that Scheele was Bergman's greatest discovery.

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  • Other European Societies.-The impluse which founded the British and Foreign Bible Society in 1804 soon spread over Europe, and, notwithstanding the turmoils of the Napoleonic wars, kindred organizations on similar lines quickly sprang up, promoted and subsidized by the British and Foreign Bible Society.

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  • Between John Craig and John Napier a friendship sprang up which may have been due to their common taste for mathematics.

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  • Thus there came into the fluctuating mass a strong movement and formative impulse, and the individual systems and sects sprang up like mushrooms from this soil.

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  • Directly the French troops had passed, Republican bands sprang up, and the non-combatant Mexicans, to save themselves, could only profess neutrality.

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  • Philip, his eldest son, ascended the French throne in 1328, and from him sprang the royal house of Valois.

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  • In the west city communities rapidly sprang up under direct Roman influence.

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  • The race of Somerled continued to rule the islands, and from a younger son of the same potentate sprang the lords of Lorne, who took the patronymic of Macdougall.

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  • Its historical ancestors were the counts of Kafernburg, from whom the counts of Schwarzburg sprang about the beginning of the 13th century.

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  • Its rigid rule was adopted by a vast number of the old Benedictine abbeys, who placed themselves in affiliation to the mother society, while new foundations sprang up in large numbers, all owing allegiance to the "archabbot," established at Cluny.

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  • Tertullian in fact created Christian Latin literature; one might almost say that that literature sprang from him full-grown, alike in form and substance, as Athena from the head of Zeus.

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  • A formidable agitation sprang up in France, which only served to make the king more obstinate.

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  • Arnulf's real authority did not extend far beyond the confines of Bavaria, and he contented himself with a nominal recognition of his supremacy by the kings who sprang up in various parts of the Empire.

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  • To meet these new responsibilities a branch Missionary Society had been formed in Leeds in October 1813, and others soon sprang up in various parts of the country.

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  • Out of the Annual Home Missionary gathering sprang a system of committees of review which, in 1852, James H.

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  • From them sprang a code of ecclesiastical laws and a whole judicial organization.

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  • These sprang from his participation in the War of the Barons; but to this vtu., 1484= the pope was absolutely compelled.

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  • One scandal followed hard on the other, and opposition naturally sprang up. Unfortunately, Savonarola, the head of that opposition, transgressed all bounds in his wellmeant zeal.

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  • All three were of humble extraction, and sprang from the people in the full sense of the phrase.

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  • Mesopotamia fell to one of his sons, Saif ad-Din, and branches sprang up at Sinjar and Jezira.

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  • He kept to the far north of Mesopotamia to avoid his brother Ferhan; but finally half-sedentary tribes on the Khabur and the Belikh became tributary to him, and a more or less active warfare sprang up between the brothers, which ended in a partition of Mesopotamia.

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  • Not only did pupils flock to Tosa from many quarters, attracted alike by the novelty of Itagaki's doctrines, by his eloquence and by his transparent sincerity, but also similar schools sprang up among the former vassals of other fiefs, who saw themselves excluded from the government.

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  • Collateral Aid.-Side by side with the founding of the great missionary societies, Bible and Tract societies sprang up. The dates are significant: Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge (1698), Religious Tract and Book Society of Scotland (1793), Religious Tract Society in London (1799), British and Foreign Bible Society (1804), American Bible Society (1816), American Tract Society (1823).

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  • Out of his endeavours sprang a new organization, the China Inland ' For complete directory see Statistical Atlas of Foreign Missions (1910).

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  • The two men were mutually attracted, and a warm affection sprang up betweem them.

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  • During the Reformation period there sprang up, to meet the needs of the time, a new kind of religious order, called Regular Clerks.

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  • A custom also sprang up, and was common at the time of the Commutation Acts, for a tithe-owner to accept a fixed sum of money or fixed quantity of the goods tithable in place of the actual tithes, known as a modus decimandi, whether in respect of a whole parish or only of particular lands within it; and this could be sued for in the ecclesiastical courts.

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  • In the discussions from which sprang the federation of 1867, Ontario was the one province strongly in favour of the union, which was only rendered possible by the coalition of her rival leaders, J.

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  • 1328), sprang two sons.

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  • They sprang from a double cause.

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  • Under his rule the city at once sprang to the first place in Sicily, and he was the first Siceliot ruler who held dominion over two Greek cities, Acragas and Himera.

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  • On the death of Agathocles tyrants sprang up in various cities.

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  • Other newspapers were afterwards established upon the same principles; anti-slavery societies, founded upon the doctrine of immediate emancipation, sprang up on every hand; the agitation was carried into political parties, into the press, and into legislative and ecclesiastical assemblies; until in 1861 the Southern states, taking alarm from the election of a president known to be at heart opposed to slavery though pledged to enforce all the constitutional safeguards of the system, seceded from the Union and set up a separate government.

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  • The Abolitionists of the United States were a united body until 1839-1840, when divisions sprang up among them.

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  • The XIth dynasty sprang from a family in the Hermonthite nome or perhaps at Thebes itself, and adorned the temple of Karnak with statues.

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  • As towns and villages gradually sprang up, they too adopted as their patron some one or other of the original tribal gods, so that these came to have different seats of worship all over Egypt.

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  • They again gave birth to Keb and Nut, from whom ieir turn sprang Osiris and Seth, Isis and Nephthys.

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  • In the XXVlth Dynasty, when a line of Pharaohs sprang from Sais, she regained a prominent position, and was given many cosmogonic attributes, including the title of mother of Re.

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  • Whether they all sprang from one common I stock of picture-writing we shall perhaps never know, nor can we as yet trace the influence which one great system may have had on another, owing to the poverty of documents from most of the countries concerned.

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  • A war then sprang up between Karamalla and Sultan Yusef, who had succeeded Zogal as amir of Darfur.

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  • Indirectly he powerfully promoted it by deepening the national life from which it sprang.

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  • Technically one of these arts, that of line-engraving on copper, sprang from the craft of the goldsmith and metal-chaser; while that of woodengraving sprang from the craft of the printers of pattern-blocks and playing cards.

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  • 12) he recommends the love of peace and the love of mankind beyond all else, and his own love of peace sprang from the tenderness and deep humility which were essential features in his character, as has been illustrated by many anecdotes.

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  • It first sprang into notice from a visit of Queen Caroline in 1804, and as it is the nearest seaside resort to London it is much frequented.

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  • The burgesses, of course, had long been a relatively rich and powerful body: it is a fond delusion to suppose that they sprang into being under John Knox, though their attachment to his principles made them prominent among his disciples, while Flodden probably began to deter them from the ancient attachment to France.

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  • He appeared seated in his chariot surrounded by thunder and lightning; Semele was consumed by the flames and gave birth prematurely to a child, which was saved from the fire by a miraculous growth of ivy which sprang up round the palace of Cadmus.

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  • It would appear from the way in which Anabaptism sprang up everywhere independently, as if more than one ancient sect took in and through it a new lease of life.

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  • The name originally belonged to one of the tribes of the Persians, which included the clan of the Achaemenidae, from which sprang the royal family of Cyrus and Darius (Herod.

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  • The castle, at first called Lydbury Castle, was built by one of the bishops of Hereford between 1085 and 1154, to protect his manor from the Welsh, and the town which sprang up round the castle walls acquired the name of Bishop's Castle in the 13th century.

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  • The chief immediate result was the friendship between Morris and Dante Gabriel Rossetti, which sprang up from a successful attempt to secure Rossetti as a contributor.

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  • At this time a fresh outlet for his energy was furnished by his foundation in 1877 of the Society for the Protection of Ancient Buildings, which sprang into being as a practical protest against a scheme for restoring and reviving Tewkesbury Abbey.

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  • The notion sprang from an ancient bas-relief of George and the Dragon on the Lydda church.

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  • i.), Jewish academies under the charge of great teachers existed early in the 2nd century B.e., and the beginnings of such institutions may go back a century; they would probably be suggested by the Greek schools of philosophy, which early sprang up in Western Asia and Egypt under Alexander's successors.

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  • He interested himself in agriculture, horticulture and mining, which were of paramount importance to the welfare of the duchy, and out of these interests sprang his own love for the natural sciences, which took up so much of his time in later years.

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  • Only a small fraction of Goethe's work was written in an impersonal and objective spirit, and sprang from what might be called a conscious artistic impulse; by far the larger - and the better - part is the immediate reflex of his feelings and experiences.

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  • It is at this age, when the external evidence becomes extremely fragmentary, that new political movements were inaugurated and new confederations of states sprang into existence.

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  • Rivals sprang up from time to time.

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  • Telesio was the head of the great South Italian movement which protested against the accepted authority of abstract reason, and sowed the seeds from which sprang the scientific methods of Campanella and Bruno, of Bacon and Descartes, with their widely divergent results.

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  • For a century and more after the Mongol invasion the whole of the Afghan countries were under Mongol rule; but in the middle of the 14th century a native dynasty sprang up in western Afghanistan, that of the Kurts, which extended its rule over Ghor, Herat and Kandahar.

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  • " The sophists," says Grote, " are spoken of as a new class of men, or sometimes in language which implies a new doctrinal sect or school, as if they then sprang up in Greece for the first time - ostentatious impostors, flattering and duping the rich youth for their own personal gain, undermining the morality of Athens, public and private, and encouraging their pupils to the unscrupulous prosecution of ambition and cupidity.

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  • But there is a marked tendency both on the part of the sects and of the distinct religions to lapse into the parent religion from which they sprang.

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  • The Mahommedans of India may be divided into two classes, pure Mahommedans from the Mogul and Pathan conquering races, and Mahommedan converts, who differ very little from the surrounding Hindu population from which they originally sprang.

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  • They are often brilliant, and sometimes very penetrating in their judgment of men and books; but the most constant element is a pervasive humour, and this humour, by turns playful and sentimental, is largely characteristic of his poetry, which sprang from a genial temper, quick in its sympathy with nature and humanity.

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  • In Glasgow Stewart boarded in the same house with Archibald Alison, author of the Essay on Taste, and a lasting friendship sprang up between them.

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  • An attachment quickly sprang up, and on the prince's second visit in November they were formally engaged.

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  • In especial it is an outstanding characteristic of the younger rivals to Aristotelianism that as they sprang up suddenly into being to contest the claims of the Aristotelian system in the moment of its triumph, so they reached maturity very suddenly, and thereafter persisted for the most part in a stereotyped tradition, modified only when convicted of indefensible weakness.

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  • From all these causes sprang much unrest and considerable agitation.

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  • And in several cities of the Languedoc, each of the two classes composing the population retained its separate laws and customs. It is matter of dispute whether vestiges of Roman institutions had survived in these parts down to the time when the new constitutions sprang into being; but all investigators are pretty well agreed that in no case did such remnants prove of any practical importance.

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  • They sprang up at the foot of the count's castles and rose in close conjunction with his power.

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  • About the time of Heraclitus, however, there sprang up a totally new philosophical spirit.

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  • But the bristle-tails and springtails, which form the modern order Aptera, are all without any trace of wings, and, on account of several remarkable archaic characters which they exhibit, there is reason for believing that they are primitively wingless - that they represent an early offshoot which sprang from the ancestral stock of the Hexapoda before organs of flight had been acquired by the class.

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  • Under the fostering care of the judges, a belief sprang up that to call oneself a " Jansenist, " and oppose the Unigenitus, was to show oneself a lover of civil and religious liberty.

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  • Under his influence a Christian Socialist movement sprang up in France and Belgium, and soon spread to Italy, Germany and Austria.

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  • The Renaissance closed the middle ages and opened the modern era, - not merely because the mental and moral ideas which then sprang into activity and owed their force in large measure to the revival of classical learning were opposed to medieval modes of thinking and feeling, but also because the political and international relations specific to it as an age were at variance with fundamental theories of the past.

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  • The new activity which sprang up everywhere after the French Revolution produced in Scotland a revival of Evangelicalism which has not yet spent its force.

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  • The agitation for disestablishment sprang up afresh after the passing of the Church Patronage Act (Scotland); each assembly of the Free Church passed a resolution in favour of it, and the United Free Church continued this testimony.

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  • there appeared the weekly Times of Wales (Amserau Cymry), founded and edited by the able William Rees, who may be styled the father of the Welsh political press; and the success of Rees's venture was so marked that other journals, arranged to suit the special tenets of each sect, speedily sprang into existence.

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  • The legal, religious and other decisions formulated in the pontifical communications of one generation usually became the venerated teaching of the next, and a new class of literature thus sprang into existence.

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  • 185) they were the daughters of Earth, and sprang from the blood of the mutilated Uranus; in Aeschylus (Eum.

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  • From this six other churches sprang, five of which were Baptist.

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  • On the union of the two companies under the name of the latter, Fort Edmonton sprang into new importance.

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  • They were slain by a dragon, which was in turn destroyed by Cadmus; and by the instructions of Athena he sowed its teeth in the ground, from which there sprang a race of fierce armed men, called Sparti (sown).

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  • All the great railway systems of England sprang into existence within less than ten years after the opening of the London-Birmingham line.

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  • The community which sprang up around it was diversely called Esseveldoburg, Eselsfleth and Ezeho.

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  • From this sprang the Lyrical Ballads, to which Coleridge contributed The Ancient Mariner, the Nightingale and two scenes from Osorio, and after much cogitation the book was published in 1798 at Bristol by Cottle, to whose reminiscences, often indulging too much in detail, we owe the account of this remarkable time.

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  • A close friendship sprang up between the two young men, which remained unbroken till the death of Louis in 1595.

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  • In the various towns where he stayed and produced his plays, writers for the stage sprang up, and these formed the Eschola.

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  • Theobald, count of Blois and Clermont, died in 1218 without issue, and King Philip Augustus, having received the countship of Clermont from the collateral heirs of this lord, gave it to his son Philip Hurepel,whose daughter Jeanne, and his widow, Mahaut, countess of Dammartin, next held the countship. It was united by Saint Louis to the crown, and afterwards given by him (1269) to his son Robert, from whom sprang the house of Bourbon.

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  • A theory sprang up which was supposed to explain the marvellous powers of the Buddhas by representing them as only the outward appearance, the reflection, as it were, or emanation, of ethereal Buddhas dwelling in the skies.

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  • According to others he sprang into the sea for love of the sea-god Melicertes, with whom he was often identified (Athenaeus vii.

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  • The story of the pagan past slipped out of mind, and in its place was set, by the genius of Eusebius, the story of the world force which had superseded it, Christianity, and of that small fraction of antiquity from which it sprang, - the Jews.

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  • A famous period in the history of the cycloid is marked by a bitter controversy which sprang up between Descartes and Roberval.

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  • A blaze of controversy sprang up at once.

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  • From his lectures and researches at Bonn sprang his first great work, Analytisch-geometrische Entwickelungen (vol.

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  • The first considerable settlement around the fort sprang up in 1760; it was composed of two groups of houses and cabins, the " lower town," near the fort's ramparts; and the " upper town," built chiefly along the banks of the Monongahela, and extending as far as the present Market Street.

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  • Between this and the next crescent of the Heeren Gracht sprang up, on the east, the labyrinthine quarter where for more than three centuries the large Jewish population has been located, and in the middle of which the painter Rembrandt lived (1640-1656) and the philosopher Spinoza was born (1632).

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  • Between the brilliant young sovereign and the grand old sage an immediate and strong sympathy sprang up; Leonardo accompanied Francis on his homeward march as far as Milan, and there determined to accept the royal invitation to France, where a new home was offered him with every assurance of honour and regard.

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  • Around this castle sprang up the town of Thuredrecht or Dordrecht.

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  • Swift was twenty-two and Esther eight years old at the time, and a curious friendship sprang up between them.

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  • From the same source sprang the report of Swift's marriage to Stella by Bishop Ashe in the deanery garden at Clogher in the summer of 1716.

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  • Not unreasonably; for if half his patriotism sprang from an instinctive hatred of oppression, the other half was disappointed egotism.

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  • Lesser mendicant orders sprang up in all directions - Gasquet mentions half a dozen such that found their way into England (English Monastic Life, p. 241) - in such numbers that the Council of Lyons in 1274 found it necessary to suppress all except the orders already named.

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  • At Megidia, a flourishing town of about 1 0,000 inhabitants, which sprang up after 1860 between Cernavoda and Constantza, the Tatars predominate.

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  • It is probable that at an early period buildings sprang up in those parts of the present Stare mesto and Mala strana that are situated nearest to the banks of the river.

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  • During the latter part of the 19th century a popular cult of the Maid of Orleans sprang up in France, being greatly stimulated by the clerical party, which desired to advertise, in the person of this national heroine, the intimate union between patriotism and the Catholic faith, and for this purpose ardently desired her enrolment among the Saints.

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  • From the labours of his pupil Miotto sprang that branch of the glass trade which is concerned with the imitation of gems. In the 15th century the first crystals were made, and in the 17th the various gradations of coloured and iridescent glass were invented, together with the composition called " aventurine "; the manufacture of beads is now a main branch of the trade.

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  • Ten generations of settlers from northern Europe have been born, lived and died there, and the race is as strong and vigorous as that from which it sprang.

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  • A jealous feeling soon sprang up between him and Huascar, who insisted that Quito should be held as a dependent province of his empire.

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  • The Pentactaea, at all events as it sprang from the brain of Semon, must pass to the limbo of mythological ancestors.

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  • Between himself and a son of his instructor there sprang up a close and affectionate friendship, and, unlike so many of the exquisite attachments of youth, this was not choked by the dust of life, nor parted by divergence of pursuit.

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  • As we have seen, Burke's very first piece, the satire on Bolingbroke, sprang from his conviction that merely rationalistic or destructive criticism, applied to the vast complexities of man in the social union, is either mischievous or futile, and mischievous exactly in proportion as it is not futile.

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  • One temple or chapel after another sprang up upon it dedicated to various gods, including the Nubian Mandulis.

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  • True, Jesus Christ sprang theology.

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  • Fact and theory sprang asunder; for theory had done its utmost, and was baffled.

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  • Byzantium, out of which Constantinople sprang, was a small, well-fortified town, occupying most of the territory comprised in the two hills nearest the head of the promontory, and in the level ground at their base.

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  • The town of Bamburgh (Bebbanburgh) sprang up round the ancient castle.

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  • The "purposed affectation" sprang from an unaffected delight in gauds of attire, gauds of fancy and expression.

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  • The branches alternated in position with the leaves, and sprang from just above the insertion of the latter.

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  • When Myrtilus claimed his promised reward, Pelops flung him into the sea near Geraestus in Euboea, and from his dying curse sprang those crimes and sorrows of the house of Pelops which supplied the Greek tragedians with such fruitful themes (Sophocles, Electra, 505, with Jebb's note).

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  • The political clubs which sprang up all over the country often presumed to act as though they were public authorities (see Jacobins).

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  • But for an English trade, which sprang up out of the halfsmuggling, half-buccaneering enterprise of the Bristol merchants, the island would have fared badly, for during the whole of the 15th century their trade with England, exporting sulphur, eiderdown (of which the English taught them the value), wool, and salt stock-fish, and importing as before wood, iron, honey, wine, grain and flax goods, was their only link with the outer world.

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