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spoken

spoken

spoken Sentence Examples

  • Carmen had already spoken to Mums about it.

  • It was nice to hear English spoken without a Spanish accent.

  • They must have been close, and yet, to the best of her memory, Alex had not spoken of Gerald.

  • I've spoken to the school and you can take the bus from there.

  • He had spoken earlier of last night.

  • "It wasn't exactly a fun party, anyway," he continued as if none of them had spoken.

  • Her face felt hot when she thought of how she had spoken of him.

  • The words were spoken softly, but the gun in Davis' hand was convincing.

  • The single word spoken by Davis held a tone that silenced Royce like a slap to the mouth.

  • Those were the last words spoken as I turned out the light.

  • We hadn't spoken in several weeks.

  • I've spoken with Cooms, a few times.

  • While Merrill Cooms knew there were five of us and had spoken to each, we'd never identified which one of us held the gift.

  • Have you spoken to Howie about this?

  • I regretted the words as soon as I'd spoken; suggesting a lie to cover a larger one.

  • He's never spoken on the phone; it's only Julie's word and I'm sure she'd retract anything she said earlier.

  • It had been several days since I'd spoken to them.

  • she continued as if I hadn't spoken.

  • Struck by something else, she removed her sunglasses and eyed Jake, saying, You know, you haven't spoken to me more than to say hello in two years.

  • They'd had a falling out a few hundred years before and hadn't spoken since.

  • While his form was large enough to be a man the size of Damian's Guardians, his voice was terrified and gravelly, as if he hadn't ever spoken to anyone.

  • The words were familiar, the same words he'd spoken to Dusty thousands of years ago, when he'd discovered the youth who was not yet a man on a slave trader's block, bloodied and weeping for the family he'd just lost.

  • She saw the thaw from the cactus daring anyone to touch him to the man she'd spoken to on the phone.

  • "Smart," he repeated, even though she hadn't spoken it.

  • They trudged home without a word being spoken.

  • She'd not spoken a word since they'd left the road.

  • Yes, Pumpkin had been there and Westlake had spoken to him briefly.

  • He definitely never would've spoken to her like this, as if … …as if he was Death and she was not.

  • She touched his lips, not knowing whether he was awake enough to know he had spoken aloud.

  • She turned around, amazed by the fact that he had spoken while he was awake.

  • "Spoken like someone on the other end of the equation," she said, offended by his casual dismissal.

  • He hadn't spoken or drawn weapons on her.

  • "A deal is as much about the spoken terms as the unspoken ones," he replied with a predatory smile.

  • His gaze settled on her, and she'd wished she'd never spoken.

  • She heard several different languages spoken before those she passed fell silent.

  • His words were spoken with an unusual amount of venom.

  • Kisolm has already spoken to your father.

  • He'd spoken to his sisters in depth and learned quickly just how different she was, their tales ranging from those that ought to anger him to those that amused him.

  • She knew what the answer was, but hadn't spoken it.

  • It was very traumatic for Donnie and he hasn't spoken since.

  • Edith still hadn't spoken, but clung to Donnie's hand.

  • "I'm sorry to see you leave," Dean answered, "but I wish you'd spoken to us before making arrangements with someone else."

  • He's never even spoken to Claire that I know of.

  • He has spoken to me in whispers, in the dark of the night, how waves of guilt over our relationship are with him every waking moment, and yet he loves me so as to risk all for my embrace.

  • I haven't spoken to her.

  • It was the first words spoken to him by the sharp-tongued woman since the prior Tuesday evening when she'd first purchased the letters.

  • He hadn't spoken to Edith Shipton since her husband's accident and felt, as the host of Bird Song, he owed the woman some sort of condolence.

  • "She already said yes," Janet answered, gesturing toward Cynthia as if to say, the boss has spoken, mind your own business.

  • Dean hadn't spoken to Jake Weller in nearly two weeks when he gave the law man a call.

  • They hadn't spoken of the possibility of Cynthia's pregnancy since the topic was first mentioned.

  • Gabriel had spoken of immortality, but Jackson had not given much thought to it, until hearing these words.

  • His words were spoken with sarcasm, but not for the reason Alex probably thought.

  • She'd never spoken of them to anyone, not since being granted access to a file only a handful of people in the country had access to.

  • "What?" she asked, startled by another repeat of the words her Guardian had spoken to her.

  • Her last words to him had been spoken in anger.

  • On many occasions, she'd seen the duplicity and cold manipulation he'd spoken of.

  • None of them had spoken again about what to do if Lana wasn't alive.

  • He wasn't sure what to say.  Andre had never spoken well of Death, but the woman in his tent seemed harmless.

  • Fear made Rhyn's chest seize.  No sooner had Gabe spoken the words than the demons fell away.  Coldness snapped over Rhyn, and his surroundings blurred.  He blinked, uncertain what happened until he found himself standing in a dimly lit chamber.  Kris and Gabe were still beside him, and instead of demons, there was only Death.

  • The detective's knock was answered by a woman who introduced herself as Janice Riley, the neighbor he had spoken to on the phone.

  • She was too upset to remember much of what was said and she'd not spoken directly with Norfolk since that first call.

  • She called and said she'd spoken with you.

  • Weeks had passed since the two had spoken and the conversation was more social than business.

  • But it was nice to hear it—the nicest words she'd ever spoken.

  • "We'll leave our clothes on," he continued as if she had not spoken.

  • What about all the times he had spoken to her lately?

  • He understood the value of a gentle caress and a soft spoken word.

  • Her thoughts went to the Watcher that had spoken to her and healed her.

  • The praise was spoken grudgingly with a note bordering despair.

  • "Spoken like a fool!" she managed, startled.

  • And yet, he had not spoken a word of disapproval.

  • The words were spoken with effort through his clenched teeth, as if the admittance was a personal insult.

  • He was also the most fascinating person she'd ever spoken to, in a terrifying, otherworldly way.

  • He then seized, but soon released, Stephen Colonna and some other barons who had spoken disparagingly of him.

  • Virgil is spoken of in the highest terms in ii.

  • The Panayano dialect of the Visayan language is spoken by most of the inhabitants.

  • It is also spoken of as a pastoral country (Diod.

  • They may make certain concessions or privileges once given without any corresponding obligation; they constitute for a given country a special ecclesiastical law; and it is thus that writers have sometimes spoken of concordats as privileges.

  • He vehemently opposed the persecuting acts now passed - the Corporation Act, the Uniformity Bill, against which he is said to have spoken three hundred times, and the Militia Act.

  • It appears to have fallen under the Roman sway after the capture of this town, and is spoken of by classical authors as a place almost deserted in their time.

  • The merchant families of Iannina are well educated; the dialect spoken in that town is the purest specimen of colloquial Greek.

  • They were spoken of as" the way."4 They took with them, into the new communities which they formed, the Jewish polity or rule and oversight by elders.

  • The Bretons, who most nearly represent the Celts, and the Basques, who inhabit parts of the western versant of the Pyrenees, have preserved their distinctive languages and customs, and are ethnically the most interesting sections of the nation; the Flemings of French Flanders where Flemish is still spoken are also racially distinct.

  • the two are spoken of as "brothers" with a communal assembly.

  • The same year he was named one of the justices of the peace for his borough; and on the grant of a new charter showed great zeal in defending the rights of the commoners, and succeeded in procuring an alteration in the charter in their favour, exhibiting much warmth of temper during the dispute and being committed to custody by the privy council for angry words spoken against the mayor, for which he afterwards apologized.

  • He is a barbarian to others and they to him, since they cannot understand what is spoken by him.

  • In the Lombard period it is spoken of as one of the principal cities of Tuscia.

  • Rajasthani is the chief language of the country, one or other of its dialects being spoken by 7, 0 3 5,093 persons or more than 72% of the total population.

  • Hence we frequently meet with forms which had passed out of the language that was spoken at the time they were engraved, side by side with their equivalents in that language.

  • When the sounding board was spoken to or subjected to sound-waves, the mechanical resistance of the loose electrode, due to its weight, or the spring, or both, served to vary the pressure at the contact, and this gave to the current a form corresponding to the sound-waves, and it was therefore capable of being used as a speaking-telephone transmitter.'

  • Such multiple-electrode transmitters give a loud although somewhat harsh sound, and will bear being spoken to very strongly without breaking the circuit.

  • When spoken to the diaphragm vibrated, and thus set the carbon granules into vigorous vibration.

  • Words spoken to the telephone at one end could be heard by holding the telephone to the ear at the other.

  • variation in resistance of the transmitter spoken into causes a variation of the pressure at the line terminals of the impedance coils, and since those terminals are common to the two circuits the variable E.M.F.

  • (I) It is probable, though not very clearly demonstrated, that Venetic, East Italic and Messapian are connected together and with the ancient dialects spoken in Illyria, so that these might be provisionally entitled the Adriatic group, to which the language spoken.

  • Latin will be counted the language of the earlier plebeian stratum of the population of Rome and Latium, probably once spread over a large area of the peninsula, and akin in sijme degree to the language or languages spoken in north Italy before either the Etruscan or the Gallic invasions began.

  • On the 12th of July 1871, Articles 268, 269 and 270 of the Italian Penal Code were so modified as to make ecclesiastics liable to imprisonment for periods varying from six months to five years, and to fines from 1000 to 3000 lire, for spoken or written attacks against the laws of the state, or for the fomentation of disorder.

  • At the end of May the pope, in an allocution to the cardinals, had spoken of Italy in terms of unusual cordiality, and had expressed a wish for peace.

  • We have already spoken of Kant's peculiar philosophical positions.

  • Certain enactments of later Saxon times in England have been sometimes spoken of as though they united together the temporal and spiritual jurisdictions into one mixed tribunal deriving its authority from the State.

  • The name here used by the chronicler for Pali is "the Magadhi tongue," by which expression is meant, not exactly the language spoken in Magadha, but the language in use at the court of Asoka, king of Kosala and Magadha.

  • Many forms, even when multicellular, have all their cells identical in structure and function, and are often spoken of as physiologically unicellular.

  • Such a structure may be spoken of as a dissected dictyostele.

  • This type of stern is therefore often spoken of as protoslelic. In the Ferns there is clear evidence that the amphiphloic haplostele or protostele succeeded the simple (ectophloic) protostele in evolution, and that this in its turn gave rise to the solenostele, which was again succeeded by the dictyostele.

  • When the young sporophyte first begins its independent lifewhen, that is, it exists in the form of the embryo in the seedits living substance has no power of utilizing the simple inorganic compounds spoken of.

  • The building up and nutrition of the living substance by the foods manufactured or absorbed is properly spoken of as the assimilation of such food.

  • The other group attacks these peptones and breaks them down into the amino-acids of which we have spoken before.

  • The need of the protoplasm for oxygen has already been spoken of: in its absence death soon supervenes, respiration being stopped.

  • Such decompositions are nov~ generally spoken of as anatrobic respiration.

  • Growth, as usually spoken of, includes two essentially different processes.

  • The time during which these regular changes in the rate can be observed is generally spoken of as the grand period of growth.

  • These movements are spoken of as heliotropic and apheliotropic curvatures.

  • These movements are spoken of as different kinds of geotropic curvatures.

  • We have spoken of the absence of structural differentiation in the sense organs.

  • Oxylophytes.These plants, sometimes spoken of as bog 1(

  • It is even probable that Celtic was spoken in forest districts into the 4th century A.D.

  • He wore on his breast a badge with his title of "Pere," was spoken of by his preachers as "the living law," declared, and probably believed, himself to be the chosen of God, and sent out emissaries in a quest of a woman predestined to be the "female Messiah," and the mother of a new Saviour.

  • Neither island has for ages been in any sense a Norman land, and the tongue which the Norman brought with him into both has not for ages been spoken in either.

  • His disappearance in both cases is an illustration of one of the features which we have spoken of in the Norman character, the tendency which in fact made Normans out of Northmen, the tendency to adopt the language and manners of the people among whom they found themselves.

  • In the 12th century three languages were certainly spoken in London; yet London could not call itself the "city of threefold speech," as Palermo did.

  • In their country was a wooden city inhabited by a distinct race, the Geloni, who seem to have spoken an Indo-European tongue.

  • The series of revolutions already spoken of first made descent from former councillors a necessary qualification for election to the council; then election was abolished, and the council consisted of all descendants of its existing members who had reached the age of twenty-five.

  • Both Eutyches and Nestorius are spoken of as living.

  • Catalonian is still spoken here.

  • It is most nearly akin to the Sasak language spoken in Lombok and on the east coast of Bali.

  • We have spoken of his services to the state, to the poor, to religion.

  • About education a great deal was spoken and written, and a certain amount of progress was effected.

  • The sovereigns of Sardinia, Naples, Portugal and Spain were dethroned, the pope was driven from Rome, the Rhine Confederation was extended till France obtained a footing on the Baltic, the grand-duchy of Warsaw was reorganized and strengthened, the promised evacuation of Prussia was indefinitely postponed, an armistice between Russia and Turkey was negotiated by French diplomacy in such a way that the Russian troops should evacuate the Danubian principalities, which Alexander intended to annex to his empire, and the scheme for breaking up the Ottoman empire and ruining England by the conquest of India, which had been one of the most attractive baits in the Tilsit negotiations, but which had not been formulated in the treaty, was no longer spoken of.

  • For many years this was practically the only one used in America for all traffic, and it is often spoken of as the " American " type.

  • The earliest of these phenomena were the raps already spoken of and other sounds occurring without apparent physical cause, and the similarly mysterious movements of furniture and other objects; and these were shortly followed by the ringing of bells and playing of musical instruments.

  • The trunk line constructed by the Franco-Belgian syndicate connects Lu-Kou-ch'iao, the original terminus, with Hankow - hence the name Lu-Han by which this trunk line is generally spoken of, Lu being short for Lu-Kou-ch'iao and Han for Hankow.

  • The villages thus obtained are still spoken of as "cannon ball villages."

  • 339 it is spoken of as having previously been the chief town of Picenum, but having recently been assigned to Aemilia.

  • By the latter part of the 16th century the terms Sodor and Man had become interchangeable, the bishopric being spoken of as that of Sodor or Man.

  • At this time they were speaking Oscan as well as Greek, and two of three Oscan inscriptions in Greek alphabet still testify to the language spoken in the town in the 3rd century B.C. We know, however, that the Bruttians, though at this date speaking the same language (Oscan) as the Samnite tribe of the Lucani, were not actually akin to them.

  • These latter unfairly attempted to fix the stigma of the Quartodeciman observance on the British and Celtic churches, and they are even now sometimes ignorantly spoken of as having followed the Asiatic practice as to Easter.

  • Even in imperial times Greek was largely spoken there, for about as many Greek as Latin inscriptions have been found.

  • Here the Tibetan mountains unite with the line of elevation which stretches across the continent from the Pacific, and which separates Siberia from the region commonly spoken of under the name of central Asia.

  • Those of the Indian region abruptly disappear at, and many Australian forms reach but do not pass, the line above spoken of.

  • The Turks are Mahommedans; their tribes extend up the Oxus to the borders of Afghanistan and Persia, and to the Caspian, and under the name of Kirghiz into Russia, and their language is spoken over a large part of western Asia.

  • The spoken languages of northern India are very various, differing one from another in the sort of degree that English differs from German, though all are thoroughly Sanskritic in their vocables, but with an absence of Sanskrit grammar that has given rise to considerable discussion.

  • The " cave " is also spoken of as a " hold " or fortress, and this is everywhere the true reading.

  • Associated with these glands are frequently to be found bundles or pairs of long and variously modified setae which are termed penial setae,to distinguish them from other setae sometimes but not always associated with rather similarglandswhich are found anteriorly to these, and often in the immediate neighbourhood of the spermathecae; the latter are spoken of as genital setae.

  • According to the languages spoken the populations of Caucasia admit of being classified as follows,' according to Senator N.

  • He may, in fact, be regarded as the final exponent of that empirical school of philosophy which owed its impulse to John Locke, and is generally spoken of as being typically English.

  • The larvae of these are usually spoken of as " false caterpillars," on account of their resemblance to the larvae of a moth.

  • The condition usually spoken of as a " proboscis " appears to be derived from the condition of a simple rostrum (having the mouth at its extremity) by the process of incomplete introversion of that simple rostrum.

  • The kidney has similar relations in both species, and is identical with the organ spoken of by many authors as the triangular gland.

  • It only remains to be added that there is some ground for supposing that the language spoken in Crete before the later Doric was non-Hellenic, but Indo-European.

  • This was the work of Salerne, published after his death, and is often spoken of as being a mere translation of Ray's Synopsis, but a vast amount of fresh matter, and mostly of good quality, is added.

  • Technically speaking they are in quarto, but their size is so small that they may be well spoken of here.

  • are known to exist in British and French libraries, and probably ' Brewer thinks this unknown professor is Richard of Cornwall, but the little we know of Richard is not in harmony with the terms in which he is elsewhere spoken of by Bacon.

  • Certain writers have even spoken of the "honour" of ostracism.

  • The language spoken at Palmyra was a dialect of western Aramaic, and belongs to the same group as Nabataean and the Aramaic spoken in Egypt.

  • We are further told that at the court of Conchobar no one had the right to speak before the Druids had spoken.

  • It is significant of the final result of these things that already in 1147 Roger of Sicily, engaged in war with Manuel, had proposed the sea-route for the Second Crusade, perhaps with some intention of diverting it against Constantinople; and in the winter of 1189-1190 Barbarossa, as we have seen, had actually thought and spoken of an attack on Constantinople.

  • 21, do not listen to all that you may overhear, lest you hear yourself ill spoken of; ix.

  • Of its municipal constitution little is known, indeed in an inscription of the end of the Republic it is spoken of both as a colonic and a municipium.

  • The area over which it is spoken comprises the peninsula of Malacca with the adjacent islands (the Rhio-Lingga Archipelago), the greater part of the coast districts of Sumatra and Borneo, the seaports of Java, the Sunda and Banda Islands.

  • This has its origin in the names Great Java and Lesser Java, by which the medieval Java and Sumatra were called, and it accordingly means the language spoken along the coasts of the two great islands.

  • He is erroneously spoken of as a king in Mark vi.

  • In Josephus and the New Testament the name Peraea or ripav Tou 'Iopbavou is most frequently used; and the country is sometimes spoken of by Josephus as divided into small provinces called after the capitals in which Greek colonists had established themselves during the reign of the Seleucidae.

  • The Compromise Measures are sometimes spoken of collectively as the Omnibus Bill, owing to their having been grouped originally - when first reported (May 8) to the Senate - into one bill.

  • This is spoken of as " Neumann's law."

  • A male Pales was sometimes spoken of, corresponding in some respects to Pan; the female Pales was associated with Vesta and Anna Perenna.

  • So too the people is spoken of as xvIl.

  • Though the usage is not accurate, friars, and also canons regular, are often spoken of as monks and included among the monastic orders.

  • In the Old and New Testaments the dog is spoken of almost with abhorrence; it ranked amongst the unclean beasts: traffic in it was considered as an abomination, and it was forbidden to he offered in the sanctuary in the discharge of any vow.

  • The points on which special stress is laid are: - (i) the share of responsibility resting on each individual, whether called to vocal service or not, for the right spiritual atmosphere of the Meeting, and for the welfare of the congregation; (2) the privilege which may be enjoyed by each worshipper of waiting upon the Lord without relying on spoken words, however helpful, or on other outward matters; (3) freedom for each individual (whether a Friend or not) to speak, for the help of others, such message as he or she may feel called to utter; (4) a fresh sense of a divine call to deliver the message on that particular occasion, whether previous thought has been given to it or not.

  • It is also known as the " Eastern Horn of Africa," because it projects somewhat sharply eastwards into the Indian Ocean, and is the only section of the continent which can be spoken of as a peninsula.

  • It is the soul of the righteous that is here spoken of, and a rightly says that the angel of peace " leads him into eternal life."

  • Emerson, the poets Bryant, Longfellow, pre-eminently Whittier and Whitman, have spoken on this theme with no uncertain sound.

  • The predominant languages spoken, besides the Arabic of the natives, are Greek, French, English and Italian.

  • His sons and daughters are repeatedly spoken of.

  • We have already spoken of the eucharistic celebrations of which the cubicula were the scene; and still existing baptisteries prove that the other sacrament was also administered there.

  • What in popular usage are spoken of as the instincts of animals, for example, the hunting of prey by foxes and wolves, or the procedure of ants in their nests, are generally joint products of hereditary and acquired factors.

  • The main islands and groups, beginning from the north-west, are as follows: Little and Great Abaco, with Great Bahama to the west; Eleuthera (a name probably corrupted from the Spanish Isla de Tierra), Cat, Watling, or Guanahani, and Rum Cay on the outer line towards the open ocean, with New Providence, the Exuma chain and Long Island forming an inner line to the west, and still farther west Andros (named from Sir Edmund Andros, governor of Massachusetts, &c., at the close of the 17th century; often spoken of as one island, but actually divided into several by narrow straits); and finally the Crooked Islands, Mayaguana and Inagua.

  • The chief poets of the transition are Fazil Bey, Wasif, notable for his not altogether unhappy attempt to write verses in the spoken language of the capital, `Izzet Molla, Pertev Pasha, `Akif Pasha, and the poetesses Fitnet and Leyla.

  • The climate of Thrace was regarded by the Greeks as very severe, and that country was spoken of as the home of the north wind, Boreas.

  • Both the Ammonites and Moabites are sometimes spoken of under the common name of the children of Lot (Deut.

  • In 63 B.C. Pompey placed it (together with the Tectosagan territory) under one chief, and it continued under native rule till it became the capital of the Roman province of Galatia in 25 B.C. By this time the population included Greeks, Jews, Romans and Romanized Gauls, but the town was not yet Hellenized, though Greek was spoken.

  • The Berber tribes, whose racial unity is attested by their common spoken language and by the comparatively numerous Berber inscriptions that have come down to us, bore in ancient times the generic names of Numidians, Gaetulians and Moors or Maurusiani.

  • He is often spoken of in German works as the author of the "territorial system," or Erastian theory of ecclesiastical government.

  • The first mention of "that place called Weymouth" occurs in a charter of King Ethelred (866-871), while it is again spoken of in a charter of King ZEthelstan (895-940).

  • In this narrower sense the word has played a great part in ethical systems, which have spoken of the social or parental "affections" as in some sense a part of moral obligation.

  • Lines of induction are frequently but inaccurately spoken of as lines of force.

  • On the other hand, its susceptibility is about fifty times less than that of Hadfield's 12% manganese steel, which is commonly spoken of as non-magnetizable.

  • - The Gigantostraca are frequently spoken of as " the Eurypterines."

  • This book (IIErpov K17pv)pa) gave the substance of a series of discourses spoken by one person in the name of the apostles.

  • It is spoken unfavourably of by Origen (De Prin.

  • 25 the locusts are spoken of in the plain language of chap. i.

  • r noted above, the court allowed English or French to be spoken according to the nationality of the counsel engaged.

  • is spoken of as its founder, it really originated in the liberality of the citizens of Edinburgh.

  • The freedom here spoken of is a freedom from the immediacy of impulse - a freedom based upon our possession of reason as a power of comparison, memory and forethought.

  • If the latter be spoken of as quidditas, the former may be called haecceitas.

  • Cobden had spoken with great fervour of the deplorable suffering and distress which at that time prevailed in the country, for which, he added, he held Sir Robert Peel, as the head of the government, responsible.

  • This remark, when it was spoken, passed unnoticed, being indeed nothing more than one of the commonplaces of party warfare.

  • fatum, that which is spoken, decreed), strictly the doctrine that all things happen according to a prearranged fate, necessity or inexorable decree.

  • These are sometimes erroneously spoken of as the "roots" of cancer, and in the case of cancer of the stomach they may fix it to the pancreas, the liver, the bowels or the spine.

  • It was the cardinal Louis de Rohan, formerly ambassador at Vienna, whence he had been recalled in 1774, having incurred the queen's displeasure by revealing to the empress Maria Theresa the frivolous actions of her daughter, a disclosure which brought a maternal reprimand, and for having spoken lightly of Maria Theresa in a letter of which Marie Antoinette learned the contents.

  • His homologous structures are now spoken of as " homogenetic " structures, the idea of community of representation in an archetype giving place to community of derivation from a single representative structure present in a common ancestor.

  • If now we suppose the aperture AB to be covered by a great number of opaque strips or bars of width d, separated by transparent intervals of width a, the condition of things in the directions just spoken of is not materially changed.

  • are not spoken by a king but addressed to a king by his people; Ps.

  • So far we have spoken only of the Christian use of Syriac. Of the pagan Syriac literature which issued mainly from Harran, a city about one day's journey south of Edessa, not a single example appears to have survived.

  • They are sometimes spoken of as "lower" or "soluble" cottons or nitrates.

  • A king Pollis is spoken of; but nothing is known of his actions.

  • The island thus became the inner city, the stronghold of the ruler, so that, despite its low level, it is often spoken of as the "acropolis."

  • He is spoken of as the Rhymer of Scotland in the accounts of the English privy council dealing with the visit of the mission for the hand of Margaret Tudor, rather because he wrote a poem in praise of London,than because, as has been stated, he held the post of laureate at the Scottish court.

  • The pulse is not spoken of in any of the works now attributed to Hippocrates himself, though it is mentioned in other works of the collection.

  • The reputation of Herophilus is attested by the fact that four considerable physicians wrote works about him and his writings, and he is further spoken of with the highest respect by Galen and Celsus.

  • It was not meant for the physicians, and was certainly little read by them, as Celsus is quoted by no medical writer, and when referred to by Pliny, is spoken of as an author not a physician.

  • In the 9th century Salernitan physicians were already spoken of, and the city was known as Civitas hippocratica.

  • He thus had some share, though a share not generally recognized, in the foundation of the iatro-chemical school, now to be spoken of.

  • One of the most elaborate developments of the system was that of Archibald Pitcairne (1652-1713), a Scottish physician who became professor at Leiden, to be spoken of hereafter.

  • He had spoken in the House of Commons on the 13th of February, but since then had been prostrated and unable to transact business, his illness dating really from a serious heart attack in the night of the 13th of November at Bristol, after a speech at the Colston banquet.

  • 3), where the OvjAa,ua is spoken of as one of the requisites of the eucharistic service.

  • 25 he was brought to trial for having eulogized Brutus and spoken of Cassius as the last of the Romans.

  • Burmese, which was spoken by 7,006,495 people in the province in 1901, is a monosyllabic language, with, according to some authorities, three different tones; so that any given syllable may have three entirely different meanings only distinguishable by the intonation when spoken, or by accents or diacritical marks when written.

  • Though often spoken of as the American lion, chiefly on account of its colour, it rather resembles the leopard of the Old World in size and habits: usually measuring from nose to root of tail about 40 in., the tail being rather more than half that length.

  • It was at this time that he wrote, primarily for the same body as his prayers, his morning, evening and midnight hymns, the first two of which, beginning "Awake, my soul, and with the sun" and "Glory to Thee, my God, this night," are now household words wherever the English tongue is spoken.

  • We have already touched on this characteristic of apocalyptic. The prophet stood in direct relations with his people; his prophecy was first spoken and afterwards written.

  • 14) indicate that the prediction referred to appeared first not in a spoken address but in a written form, as was characteristic of apocalypses.

  • It is a late production; for Ishmaelites are spoken of, the Crusades, and the taking of Jerusalem.

  • In 1859 after the annexation of Tuscany to the Italian kingdom it was revived and reorganized; since then it has become to some extent a national centre of learning and culture, attracting students from other parts of Italy, partly on account of the fact that it is in Florence that the purest Italian is spoken.

  • 1-3) he is spoken of as the author of certain legal ordinances affecting the welfare of the community (the expression in the original is "tiqqun ha-`olam," i.e.

  • 14), Junius Blaesus is spoken of by Tacitus (Annals, i.

  • SuIdas (s.v.), who mentions the second work, confounds the older Scylax with a much later author, who wrote a refutation of the history of Polybius, and is presumably identical with Scylax of Halicarnassus, a statesman and astrologer, the friend of Panaetius spoken of by Cicero (De div.

  • The process resulting in the formation of nitrates in the soil is spoken of as nitrification.

  • During this period the bacteria multiply and most of them assume a peculiar thickened or branched form, in which state they are spoken of as bacteroids.

  • Hence he is spoken of with respect in the Clementines; while Paul, as a radical in relation to the Law, is discountenanced.

  • The smartest epigrams, the fairest similes, the keenest satires, spoken or sung on such occasions, were treasured in the memory of the hearers and carried by them to their homes.

  • Moreover, the word of God in the Koran left many practical points undecided, and therefore it was of the highest importance to know exactly how the Prophet had spoken and acted in various circumstances.

  • The school of Kufa claimed to pay more attention to the living language (spoken among the Bedouins) than to written laws of grammar.

  • And there has lately come to light a MS. of the 9th or 10th century in Sogdianese, an Indo-Iranian language spoken in the north-east of Asia,which shows that theNestorians had translated the New Testament into that tongue and had taught the natives the alphabet and the doctrine.

  • The town's inhabitants are farmers, and rice is the principal crop. Pangasinan and Ilocano are the languages spoken.

  • 4, 6, where it is prescribed among the materials to be used for the cleansing of leprosy; but the wood there spoken of was probably that of the juniper.

  • Berber dialects are still spoken in Tunisia in the island of Jerba, in the Matmata country, and in the Tunisian Sahara.

  • Short vocabularies of the Berber spoken in the Tunisian Sahara have been published by Sir H.

  • The Guayaquil author, Olmedo, who wrote the famous ode on the victory of Junin, and the Limenians Felipe Pardo and Manuel Segura are names well known wherever the Spanish language is spoken.

  • Victoria, the capital, often spoken of as Hong-Kong (population over 166,000, of whom about 6000 are European or American), stretches for about 4 m.

  • The Cebu dialect of the Visayan language is spoken.

  • He is first spoken of in Nennius's History of the Britons (9th century), and at greater length in Geoffrey of Monmouth's History of the Kings of Britain (12th century), at the end of which the French Breton cycle attained its fullest development in the poems of Chretien de Troyes and others.

  • Such a thought can hardly be Micah's, even if we resort to the violent harmonistic process of imagining that two quite distinct sieges, separated by a renewal of the theocracy, are spoken of in consecutive verses.

  • The cavalry commander spoken of by the historian is probably identical with the poet.

  • The principal language is Pangasinan; Ilocano is also spoken.

  • The life of Martineau was so essentially the life of the thinker, and was so typical of the century in which he lived and the society within which he moved, that he can be better understood through his spoken mind than through his outward history.

  • Farther south, in the province of Kai (KOshiu), and separating two great rivers, the Fuji-kawa and the Tenriu-gawa, there lies a range of hills with peaks second only to those of the Japanese Alps spoken of above.

  • These peoplethe Ainuare usually spoken of as the aborigines of Japan.

  • To this day the spoken language of Japanese women is appreciably simpler and softer than that of the men, and to this day while the educated woman uses the hiragana syllabary in writing, eschews Chinese sords and rarel pens an ideograph, the educated man employs the ideograp entirely, and translates his thoughts as far as possible into thi mispronounced Chinese words without recourse -to which it would be impossible for him to discuss any scientific subject, or even tc refer to the details of his daily business.

  • H~ retained a knowledge of spoken Japanese, but the ideographic script was a sealed book to him, and his editorial part was limited to ora translations from American journals which the editor committee to writing.

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