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spire

spire

spire Sentence Examples

  • The cruciform church of St Mary, with a central tower and short spire, is in great part Early English, with Perpendicular additions; but considerable traces of a Norman building were revealed during a modern restoration.

  • Its central tower carries a remarkable twisted spire of wood covered with lead, 230 ft.

  • A.) Fleche (French for "arrow"), the term generally used in French architecture for a spire, but more especially employed to designate the timber spire covered with lead, which was erected over the intersection of the roofs over nave and transepts; sometimes these were small and unimportant, but in cathedrals they were occasionally of large dimensions, as in the fleche of Notre-Dame, Paris, where it is nearly ioo ft.

  • The church of St Peter is Perpendicular, with a lofty tower and spire.

  • A picturesque avenue leads to the church of St Mary, principally Early English and Perpendicular, with remains of Norman work, having a lofty tower surmounted by a spire, and containing several fine monuments, tombs and brasses.

  • There are portions probably of the 12th and 13th centuries, but the bulk of the building is of the 17th century, and considerable additions, including the tower and spire, were made in the 19th.

  • San Pietro de' Cassinensi (outside the Porta Romana) is a basilica with nave and aisles, founded in the beginning of the i 1th century by San Pietro Vincioli on the site of a building of the 6th century, and remarkable for its conspicuous spire, its ancient granite and marble columns, its walnut stall-work of 1535 by Stefano de' Zambelli da Bergamo, and its numerous pictures (by Perugino, &c.).

  • It is beautifully placed near the river, and is a fine cruciform structure, partly Early English and partly Perpendicular, with a central tower and lofty octagonal spire.

  • Thus, in spite of its having been approved by the king, this design was happily abandoned - much to Wren's disgust; and he prepared another scheme with a similar treatment of a dome crowned by a spire, which in 1675 was ordered to be carried out.

  • He was also very judicious in the way in which he expended the limited money at his command; he did not fritter it away in an attempt to make the whole of a building remarkable, but devoted it chiefly to one part or feature, such as a spire or a rich scheme of internal decoration.

  • Apart from the spire, which was rebuilt in 1884, it consists of two parts of different styles and date.

  • The church of St Helen stands near the river, and its fine Early English tower with Perpendicular spire is the principal object in the pleasant views of the town from the river.

  • The church of St Michael has a Norman square embattled tower surmounted by a spire, and an apsidal chancel.

  • The Early English style is on the whole less well exemplified in the county, but Ashbourne church, with its central tower and lofty spire, contains beautiful details of this period, notably the lancet windows in the Cockayne chapel.

  • The churches of Dethic, Wirksworth and Chesterfield are typical of the Perpendicular period; that of Wirksworth contains noteworthy memorial chapels, monuments and brasses, and that of Chesterfield is celebrated for its crooked spire.

  • rvg, Primarily right(subsequently the shell the spire comes to project on the right side, which was originally the left.

  • It is not certain that the projection of the spire to the originally left side of the shell has anything to do with the falling over of the shell to that side.

  • Shell conical without spire.

  • Spire of shell much reduced; two bipectinate ctenidia, the right being the smaller; no operculum.

  • Trochus, shell umbilicated, spire pointed and prominent, British.

  • Monodonta, no jaws, spire not prominent, no umbilicus, columella toothed.

  • Spire of shell much reduced; a single ctenidium.

  • Shell not nacreous, without umbilicus, with prominent spire and polished surface.

  • Shell semi-globular, with short spire; operculum calcareous, not spiral.

  • Cyclophorus, shell umbilicated, with a short spire and horny operculum.

  • Lanistes, shell sinistral, spire short or obsolete.

  • Shell with pointed spire; a short pallial siphon.

  • Shell with prominent spire; distant from right tentacle, generally appendiculated; brackish water or fluviatile.

  • Spire of shell somewhat elongated; mantle-border fringed; viviparous; fluviatile.

  • Shell with short spire; no siphon.

  • Shell with short spire, carinate and pointed.

  • Shell turriculated, with elongated spire; proboscis short; siphon rudimentary.

  • Summit of spire heterostrophic; a projection, the mentum, between head and foot; operculum present.

  • Shell with moderately long spire and canal, ornamented with ribs, often spiny; foot truncated anteriorly.

  • Shell ovoid, with short spire and folded columella; foot small, no operculum; siphon short.

  • Foot very large; without operculum; shell with short spire and longitudinal ribs; siphon long.

  • Shell fusiform, with elongated spire; margin of shell and mantle notched.

  • The visceral hump is low and not drawn out into a spire.

  • k, Opening of the albuphrodite duct, which very soon becomes miniparous gland into P Y the hermaphrodite entwined in the spire of a gland - the duct.

  • Cephalic disk enlarged anteriorly, forming an open tube posteriorly; shell external, thick, with p:ominent spire; no operculum.

  • Margins of foot not prominent; no radula; shell external, with inconspicuous spire.

  • Cephalic shield short, truncated posteriorly; eyes deeply embedded; three calcareous stomachal plates; shell external, with reduced spire.

  • Margins of foot well developed; eyes superficial; three chitinous stomachal plates; shell external, with reduced spire.

  • Foot very broad; cephalic shield with four tentacles; shell external, thin, without prominent spire.

  • spiral, with short spire.

  • The northern has a low spire.

  • Parker in the Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society, Journal asiatique, Revue numismatique, Asiatic Quarterly, &c. (C. EL.) EPI, the French architectural term for a light finial, generally of metal, but sometimes of terra-cotta, e forming the termination of a spire or the angle of a roof.

  • The Square chapel, erected by the Congregationalists in 18J7, is a striking cruciform building with a tower and elaborate crocketed spire.

  • In Helix the spire forms a more or less obtuse-angled cone; there are above 1200 species, of which 24 are British.

  • In Succinea the cone of the spire is acute-angled; three species are British.

  • In Vitrina the spire is very flat and the surface glassy.

  • In Bulimus the spire is elongated with a pointed apex.

  • Planorbis has the spire of the shell in one plane.

  • Physa is smaller than Limnaeus and has the upper part of the spire much shorter.

  • Neritina has a very small spire, the terminal portion of the shell containing nearly the whole animal.

  • Amongst the principal buildings are the fine Gothic parish church, with a spire 200 ft.

  • The 17th-century spire was removed in 1707, and replaced by a square tower, which was rebuilt in 1797; the chancel was rebuilt in 1869.

  • York also possesses a large number of churches of special architectural interest, including All Saints, North Street, Early English, Decorated and Perpendicular, with a spire 120 ft.

  • It lies on a gentle eminence in the flat fen country, and the fine Perpendicular tower and spire of the church of St Mary are a landmark from far.

  • The Nikolaikirche is especially remarkable for its spire, which is 473 ft.

  • It has a graceful tapering spire 402 ft.

  • Hamburg has comparatively few secular buildings of great architectural interest, but first among them is the new Rathaus, a huge German Renaissance building, constructed of sandstone in 1886-1897, richly adorned with sculptures and with a spire 33 o ft.

  • and a diameter of 16 ft., and is capped with a hexagonal spire of 18 ft., which was added in the 15th century.

  • The massive and richly decorated square tower in the centre of the west façade, which for centuries terminated in a temporary spire, was completed in 1890, according to the original plans, by the addition of an octagonal storey and a tall open spire (528 ft.), the loftiest ecclesiastical erection in the world, outstripping the twin spires of Cologne cathedral by 21 ft.

  • long, and is surmounted by a spire 275 ft.

  • It possesses the rare feature of two western towers, the one square and embattled, the other octagonal and bearing a short spire.

  • In 1561 St Paul's steeple and roof were destroyed by lightning, and the spire was never replaced.

  • This circumstance allows us to test the date of certain views; thus Wyngaerde's map has the spire, but Agas's map is without it.

  • Opposite the Hotel de Ville is the fine church of St Pierre, in the form of a cross with a low tower to which the spire has never been added.

  • to the top of the present spire - the transepts being the oldest portion.

  • Saving that the upper half of the original spire was struck by lightning in 1671, and not rebuilt, the cathedral is complete at all points, but it underwent extensive repairs in the 19th century.

  • The church of St Mary the Virgin stands high, and is surmounted by a lofty spire; it shows good Decorated and Perpendicular work.

  • The Prospect was acquired and laid out by Kyrle, who also planted the fine elm avenues near the church; his house stands opposite the market house, where he disbursed his charities; he erected the church spire, and is buried in the chancel, where his grave remained without a monument until Pope called attention to the omission.

  • The chief public edifices include the county buildings; town hall, surmounted by a spire zoo ft.

  • The church of St Mary is of good Perpendicular work, with Early English tower and Decorated spire.

  • Of the Protestant churches the oldest is the Nikolaikirche, which dates from the 13th century; the fine cast-iron spire erected in 1843 had to be taken down in 1901.

  • Its west portal, the decoration of the spire of the tower, and its stained glass are among the features which make it one of the finest churches of the Rouen diocese.

  • The west front is flanked by two towers and the crossing is surmounted by a slender timber spire.

  • The principal public buildings are the Nikolai Kirche (built 1390, restored 1894), with a spire 2 9 5 ft.

  • The parish church of St John the Baptist, with its fine tower and spire, was built about the close of the 14th century, and, though largely restored, has a beautiful chancel, Lady chapel and baptistery.

  • The handsome town buildings, surmounted by a fine spire 226 ft.

  • The church of St Bartholomew is remarkable for a fine Early English tower surmounted by a Decorated spire; there are also beautiful Decorated windows and details in the body of the church, and a richly carved octagonal font.

  • The hollow filled with water, and the spire of the old church is still to be seen in the middle of the lake.

  • Amongst these are St James, Antrim Road; St Peter's Roman Catholic chapel, with its Florentine spire; Presbyterian churches in Fitzroy Avenue, and Elmwood Avenue, and the Methodist chapel, Carlisle Circus.

  • The church of St Nicholas, with a graceful tower and spire, is mainly Early English, but has Norman and later portions.

  • The church of All Saints is cruciform, with central tower and spire.

  • Amongst the principal buildings are the town house (1815), with a tower and spire; the town hall (1873); the library (1887) founded by James Moffat, a merchant of the burgh, and the Carnegie Park Orphanage, also provided from the same bequest.

  • The two old churches, St Michael's, the central tower and lofty spire of which rise from Norman arches, and Holy Rood, partly Decorated, are greatly modernized.

  • The church of St Peter is a fine building with Early English, Decorated and Perpendicular porticos, with a western tower and lofty spire.

  • The latter is a beautiful Renaissance structure, with a magnificent facade and a delicate spire, and contains a grand hall, the Kaisersaal, in which every Whit Monday a play, Der Meistertrunk, which commemorates the capture of the town by Tilly in 1631, is performed.

  • The present church of St Mary is in various styles, with a lofty tower and spire and carved timber roof.

  • The cathedral, remarkable in having three towers over the transept, one of which is surmounted by a fine spire, dates from the 14th and 15th centuries.

  • According to Heron and Geminus they were discussed under the name spire by Perseus (c. 200-100 B.C.), their sections were termed spiral sections, and are probably the same as the hippopede of Eudoxus.

  • The central tower terminates in a Gothic spire surmounted by a gilded bronze statue of St Michael.

  • The baptismal fonts date from the 12th century, and the curious spire in the form of an elongated pumpkin and covered with slates gives a fantastic and original appearance to the whole edifice.

  • Few more brilliant pieces of historical writing exist than his description of the coronation procession of Anne Boleyn through the streets of London, few more full of picturesque power than that in which he relates how the spire of St Paul's was struck by lightning; and to have once read is to remember for ever the touching and stately words in which he compares the monks of the London Charterhouse preparing for death with the Spartans at Thermopylae.

  • St Peter's (Roman Catholic) cathedral (begun 1839, consecrated 1844), Grecian in style, is a fine structure, with a graceful stone spire 224 ft.

  • Several of the Protestant churches, such as the First Presbyterian (built 1835; steeple, including spire, 285 ft.

  • The Public Walks forms a pleasant promenade parallel to the wall, and in the centre of it stands a picturesque octagonal Chapel of the Red Mount, exhibiting ornate Perpendicular work, and once frequented by pilgrims. The church of St Margaret, formerly the priory church, is a fine building with two towers at the west end, one of which was formerly surmounted by a spire, blown down in 1741.

  • The church of St Oswald is cruciform, Early English and later; a fine building' with a central tower and lofty octagonal spire.

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