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spirant

spirant

spirant Sentence Examples

  • When the lips are not tightly closed the sound produced is not a stop, but a spirant like the English w.

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  • In Late Latin there was a tendency to this spirant pronunciation which appears as early as the beginning of the 2nd century A.D.; by the 3rd century b and consonantal u are inextricably confused.

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  • V is therefore a voiced labio-dental spirant, the breath escaping through a very narrow slit between the lower lip and the upper teeth.

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  • In the middle of words between vowels f was originally regularly voiced: life, lives; wife, wives, &c. The Latin V, however, was not a labio-dental spirant like the English v, but a bi-labial semivowel like the English w, as is clear from the testimony of Quintilian and of later grammarians.

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  • In modern Greek the ancient b (d) has become the voiced spirant (8), though it is still written b.

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  • He thinks that the guttural element in E was a spirant, and therefore different from X, which is an aspirate.

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  • The sign x was kept in the western group for the guttural spirant in E, which was written X*; but, as this spirant occurred nowhere else, the combination was often abbreviated, and X was used for X precisely as in the Italic alphabets we shall find that F =f develops out of a combination FH.

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  • Thus F came to be the representative of the unvoiced labiodental spirant instead of that for the bilabial voiced spirant.

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  • The differentiation of the Roman alphabet from the Greek is brought about (a) by utilizing the digamma for the unvoiced labio dental spirant F; (b) by dropping out the aspirates 0, (I), in the Chalcidian alphabet, whence the Roman is derived) from the alphabet proper and employing them on l as numerals, 0 'y' ?

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  • took over from Etruscan perhaps the sign but gave it the new value of a spirant which developed out of an earlier d-sound, but which is written in the Latin alphabet with rs.

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  • Latin D; while the symbol for the voiced spirant o is doubled, it is difficult to believe that the symbol for the spirant g, viz.

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  • {% f and p a, 0 u and 8 b, because this time b was a bilabial spirant and not a stop), ultimately obtains an order - a b d e f z kgw h i j pr st u l m n o o.

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  • th in this); the guttural voiced spirant (7) disappeared early in Welsh.

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  • - (1) Between two vowels, or a vowel and a liquid, the seven consonants p, t, c, b, d, g, in, became respectively b, d, g, f, dd, -, f, where "-" represents the lost voiced spirant y.

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  • This change is called the " spirant mutation."

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  • The spirant mutation occurs after a, " and," " with," ei, " her "; thus a phen, " and a head," ei phen, " her head."

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  • Changes of the original s into the spirant ii, Thus Sanskrit.

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  • A series of consonants often disappear in the spirant; thus Old Persian or Zend.

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  • th in thing), had down till about the middle of the 16th century the voiceless sound Is and the voiced sounddz respectively, and that in like manner tbe palatal spirants g, j, x, before assuming the uniform pronunciation of the guttural spirant (-=Germ.

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  • The Hebrew and probably the Phoenician name for 0 was Ain (Ayin), and in the Semitic alphabet, which does not indicate vowels, the symbol stood for a "voiced glottal stop" and also for a "voiced velar spirant" (Zimmern).

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  • When the lips are not tightly closed the sound produced is not a stop, but a spirant like the English w.

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    0
  • In Late Latin there was a tendency to this spirant pronunciation which appears as early as the beginning of the 2nd century A.D.; by the 3rd century b and consonantal u are inextricably confused.

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    0
  • V is therefore a voiced labio-dental spirant, the breath escaping through a very narrow slit between the lower lip and the upper teeth.

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    0
  • In the middle of words between vowels f was originally regularly voiced: life, lives; wife, wives, &c. The Latin V, however, was not a labio-dental spirant like the English v, but a bi-labial semivowel like the English w, as is clear from the testimony of Quintilian and of later grammarians.

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  • In modern Greek the ancient b (d) has become the voiced spirant (8), though it is still written b.

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  • He thinks that the guttural element in E was a spirant, and therefore different from X, which is an aspirate.

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  • The sign x was kept in the western group for the guttural spirant in E, which was written X*; but, as this spirant occurred nowhere else, the combination was often abbreviated, and X was used for X precisely as in the Italic alphabets we shall find that F =f develops out of a combination FH.

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  • Thus F came to be the representative of the unvoiced labiodental spirant instead of that for the bilabial voiced spirant.

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  • The differentiation of the Roman alphabet from the Greek is brought about (a) by utilizing the digamma for the unvoiced labio dental spirant F; (b) by dropping out the aspirates 0, (I), in the Chalcidian alphabet, whence the Roman is derived) from the alphabet proper and employing them on l as numerals, 0 'y' ?

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  • took over from Etruscan perhaps the sign but gave it the new value of a spirant which developed out of an earlier d-sound, but which is written in the Latin alphabet with rs.

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  • Latin D; while the symbol for the voiced spirant o is doubled, it is difficult to believe that the symbol for the spirant g, viz.

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  • {% f and p a, 0 u and 8 b, because this time b was a bilabial spirant and not a stop), ultimately obtains an order - a b d e f z kgw h i j pr st u l m n o o.

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  • th in this); the guttural voiced spirant (7) disappeared early in Welsh.

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  • - (1) Between two vowels, or a vowel and a liquid, the seven consonants p, t, c, b, d, g, in, became respectively b, d, g, f, dd, -, f, where "-" represents the lost voiced spirant y.

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  • This change is called the " spirant mutation."

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  • The tenuis becomes a spirant also after r or 1, as in corff from corpus, and Elfin from Alpinus; but It gives llt or ll.

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  • The spirant mutation occurs after a, " and," " with," ei, " her "; thus a phen, " and a head," ei phen, " her head."

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  • Changes of the original s into the spirant ii, Thus Sanskrit.

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  • A series of consonants often disappear in the spirant; thus Old Persian or Zend.

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  • th in thing), had down till about the middle of the 16th century the voiceless sound Is and the voiced sounddz respectively, and that in like manner tbe palatal spirants g, j, x, before assuming the uniform pronunciation of the guttural spirant (-=Germ.

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  • There is no guttural spirant,j, but, according to circumstances, y or x (C); thus Lat.

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  • Navarrese-Aragonese does not possess the guttural spirant (j) of Castilian, which is here rendered according to circumstances either by g (Fr.

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  • One of the most notable differences between normal Portugiiese and Gahician is the substitution of the surd spirant in place of the sonant spirant for the Lat.

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  • The Hebrew and probably the Phoenician name for 0 was Ain (Ayin), and in the Semitic alphabet, which does not indicate vowels, the symbol stood for a "voiced glottal stop" and also for a "voiced velar spirant" (Zimmern).

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