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spenser

spenser

spenser Sentence Examples

  • If Lisa was involved with both Spencer and Mertz, maybe she was an informant for Spenser.

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  • Of course, there was always the possibility that she had come up with the idea of distracting Spenser, but he found that hard to believe.

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  • Ars Poetica, 270-274), just as Addison declared Spenser to be no longer fitted to please "a cultivated age."

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  • He must have given general satisfaction, for even before Parker's death two persons so different as Burghley and Dean Nowell independently recommended Grindal's appointment as his successor, and Spenser speaks warmly of him in the Shepherd's Calendar as the "gentle shepherd Algrind."

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  • Oldham wrote other satires, notably one "addressed to a friend about to leave the university," which contains a well-known description of the state of slavery of the private chaplain, and another "dissuading from poetry," describing the ingratitude shown to Edmund Spenser, whose ghost is the speaker, to Samuel Butler and to Abraham Cowley.

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  • The name Isis has indeed the authority of Spenser as applied to the Thames in its course above Dorchester (Faerie Queen, Bk.

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  • He was the son of Thomas Ken of Furnival's Inn, who belonged to an ancient stock, - that of the Kens of Ken Place, in Somersetshire; his mother was a daughter of the now forgotten poet, John Chalkhill, who is called by Walton an "acquaintant and friend of Edmund Spenser."

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  • At first the plant was supposed to possess almost miraculous healing powers, and was designated " herba panacea," " herba santa," " sana sancta Indorum "; " divine tobacco " it is called by Spenser, and " our holy herb nicotian " by William Lilly.

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  • Spenser, in "Colin Clout's come home again," calls him with a spice of raillery "old Palaemon" who "sung so long until quite hoarse he grew."

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  • P. Collier, 1870), of the Worthines of Wales (Spenser Soc. 1876), and a notice of Churchyard by H.

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  • To the beginning of his four and a half years' residence in Italy belong the forty-seven sonnets of his Antiquites de Rome, which were rendered into English by Edmund Spenser (The Ruins of Rome, 1591).

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  • To this class belong the fairies of Boiardo, Ariosto and Spenser.

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  • The Heath is continued eastward in Parliament Hill (borough of St Pancras), acquired for the public in 1890; and westward outside the county boundary in Golders Hill, owned by Sir Spenser Wells, Bart., until 1898.

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  • Its name was originally Magh Allo, that is, Plain of the Allo (the old name used by Spenser for this part of the river), and the ford was defended by a castle, built by the Desmonds, the ruins of which remain.

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  • le Chatelier, whose work has since been supplemented by that of Spenser B.

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  • He was brought up in a neighbourhood bordering on the open country, and from his earliest years he found a companion in nature; he was also early initiated into the reading of poetry and romance, hearing Spenser and Scott in childhood, and introduced to old ballads by his mother.

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  • Both his collegiate and editorial duties stimulated his critical powers, and the publication in the two magazines, followed by republication in book form, of a series of studies of great authors, gave him an important place as a critic. Shakespeare, Dryden, Lessing, Rousseau, Dante, Spenser, Wordsworth, Milton, Keats, Carlyle, Thoreau, Swinburne, Chaucer, Emerson, Pope, Gray - these are the principal subjects of his prose, and the range of topics indicates the catholicity of his taste.

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  • It was under these conditions that Spenser gave his romantic epic to the world, a poem which derived its allegory from the middle ages, its decorative richness from the Italian Renaissance, its sweetness, purity, harmony and imaginative splendour from the most poetic nation of the modern world.

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  • To complete the sketch, we must set Bacon, the expositor of modern scientific method, beside Spenser and Shakespeare, as the third representative of the Renaissance in England.

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  • The gillyflower of Chaucer and Spenser and Shakespeare was, as in Italy, Dianthus Caryophyllus; that of later writers and of gardeners, Matthiola.

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  • The use made of the flowers to impart a spicy flavour to ale and wine is alluded to by Chaucer, who writes: "And many a clove gilofre To put in ale"; also by Spenser, who refers to them by the name of sops in wine, which was applied in consequence of their being steeped in the liquor.

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  • In English literature Milton seems to have been more familiar to him than Shakespeare, and Spenser was perhaps more of a favourite with him than either.

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  • Spenser and Raleigh were present.

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  • Spenser, an eye-witness, says famine slew far more than the sword.

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  • Edmund Spenser lost his all, escaping only to die of misery in a London garret.

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  • Spenser, View of the State of Ireland, edited by H.

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  • If Lisa was involved with both Spencer and Mertz, maybe she was an informant for Spenser.

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  • Of course, there was always the possibility that she had come up with the idea of distracting Spenser, but he found that hard to believe.

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  • The decision to use an archaic diction might be thought a central part of Spenser's particularly Protestant poetics.

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  • Spenser used an alexandrine to end his modified form of ottava rima.

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  • archaic diction might thus be thought a central part of Spenser's particularly Protestant poetics.

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  • elegyarently they all wrote elegies for Spenser which they threw into the grave along with their pens.

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  • An example of an iambic hexameter is the last line of each stanza of The Faerie Queene by Edmund Spenser.

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  • The decision to use an archaic diction might thus be thought a central part of Spenser's particularly Protestant poetics.

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  • This was in a sense only natural, since he was the real founder of the school of which Stephen Hawes was a distinguished ornament, and which "held the field" in English letters during the long and dreary interval between Chaucer and Spenser.

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  • Ars Poetica, 270-274), just as Addison declared Spenser to be no longer fitted to please "a cultivated age."

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  • He must have given general satisfaction, for even before Parker's death two persons so different as Burghley and Dean Nowell independently recommended Grindal's appointment as his successor, and Spenser speaks warmly of him in the Shepherd's Calendar as the "gentle shepherd Algrind."

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    0
  • Oldham wrote other satires, notably one "addressed to a friend about to leave the university," which contains a well-known description of the state of slavery of the private chaplain, and another "dissuading from poetry," describing the ingratitude shown to Edmund Spenser, whose ghost is the speaker, to Samuel Butler and to Abraham Cowley.

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    0
  • The name Isis has indeed the authority of Spenser as applied to the Thames in its course above Dorchester (Faerie Queen, Bk.

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    0
  • He was the son of Thomas Ken of Furnival's Inn, who belonged to an ancient stock, - that of the Kens of Ken Place, in Somersetshire; his mother was a daughter of the now forgotten poet, John Chalkhill, who is called by Walton an "acquaintant and friend of Edmund Spenser."

    0
    0
  • At first the plant was supposed to possess almost miraculous healing powers, and was designated " herba panacea," " herba santa," " sana sancta Indorum "; " divine tobacco " it is called by Spenser, and " our holy herb nicotian " by William Lilly.

    0
    0
  • Spenser, in "Colin Clout's come home again," calls him with a spice of raillery "old Palaemon" who "sung so long until quite hoarse he grew."

    0
    0
  • P. Collier, 1870), of the Worthines of Wales (Spenser Soc. 1876), and a notice of Churchyard by H.

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    0
  • To the beginning of his four and a half years' residence in Italy belong the forty-seven sonnets of his Antiquites de Rome, which were rendered into English by Edmund Spenser (The Ruins of Rome, 1591).

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    0
  • To this class belong the fairies of Boiardo, Ariosto and Spenser.

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    0
  • The Heath is continued eastward in Parliament Hill (borough of St Pancras), acquired for the public in 1890; and westward outside the county boundary in Golders Hill, owned by Sir Spenser Wells, Bart., until 1898.

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  • Its name was originally Magh Allo, that is, Plain of the Allo (the old name used by Spenser for this part of the river), and the ford was defended by a castle, built by the Desmonds, the ruins of which remain.

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  • le Chatelier, whose work has since been supplemented by that of Spenser B.

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  • He was brought up in a neighbourhood bordering on the open country, and from his earliest years he found a companion in nature; he was also early initiated into the reading of poetry and romance, hearing Spenser and Scott in childhood, and introduced to old ballads by his mother.

    0
    0
  • Both his collegiate and editorial duties stimulated his critical powers, and the publication in the two magazines, followed by republication in book form, of a series of studies of great authors, gave him an important place as a critic. Shakespeare, Dryden, Lessing, Rousseau, Dante, Spenser, Wordsworth, Milton, Keats, Carlyle, Thoreau, Swinburne, Chaucer, Emerson, Pope, Gray - these are the principal subjects of his prose, and the range of topics indicates the catholicity of his taste.

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    0
  • It was under these conditions that Spenser gave his romantic epic to the world, a poem which derived its allegory from the middle ages, its decorative richness from the Italian Renaissance, its sweetness, purity, harmony and imaginative splendour from the most poetic nation of the modern world.

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    0
  • To complete the sketch, we must set Bacon, the expositor of modern scientific method, beside Spenser and Shakespeare, as the third representative of the Renaissance in England.

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    0
  • The gillyflower of Chaucer and Spenser and Shakespeare was, as in Italy, Dianthus Caryophyllus; that of later writers and of gardeners, Matthiola.

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    0
  • The use made of the flowers to impart a spicy flavour to ale and wine is alluded to by Chaucer, who writes: "And many a clove gilofre To put in ale"; also by Spenser, who refers to them by the name of sops in wine, which was applied in consequence of their being steeped in the liquor.

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  • In English literature Milton seems to have been more familiar to him than Shakespeare, and Spenser was perhaps more of a favourite with him than either.

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  • Spenser and Raleigh were present.

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  • Spenser, an eye-witness, says famine slew far more than the sword.

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  • Edmund Spenser lost his all, escaping only to die of misery in a London garret.

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  • Spenser, View of the State of Ireland, edited by H.

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  • King, John N. Spenser 's Poetry and the Reformation Tradition.

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  • Although she is not so well rounded as Spenser 's titular heroes and heroines, she is more than a simple emblematic figure.

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  • In 1590, Edmund Spenser introduced the alternate spelling of fairy - faerie - as a way to distinguish between the fanciful pixie-like "fairy" and the beautiful, serious "faerie".

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  • Utilizing symbolism and the love of a queen, Spenser's The Faerie Queene became this author's most definitive work not for content as much as style.

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  • The Faerie Queene is an epic poem that was written by Englishman Edmund Spenser.

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  • Edmund Spenser's The Faerie Queene is more known for its unique style being the first to ever use what has become known as the "Spenserian Stanza".

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  • Spenser's The Faerie Queene is an epic poem that was written as an allegory to praise Queen Elizabeth I.

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  • Due to the link to Queen Elizabeth the poem found political favor with her and became a tremendous success and Spenser's defining work.

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  • Queen Elizabeth I enjoyed the poem so much that she awarded Edmund Spenser with a 50 pound a year pension for life.

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  • Spenser's The Faerie Queene, a favorite among critics, was also the subject of quite a few analysis.

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  • In 1589 Edmund Spenser wrote a letter to Sir Walter Raleigh that contained the beginnings of the Faerie Queene.

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  • Unfortunately the work was never completed as Spenser had died and so it is impossible to speculate how the full collection would have looked.

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  • Spenser hinted at the final product in his letter to Raleigh but between the time of that letter and the earliest publication of The Faerie Queene in 1590 it had already changed.

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  • These six virtues represent the initial idea by Spenser but in his Raleigh letter he mentioned that King Arthur is the representation of "magnificence".

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  • Spenser was very familiar with literary history and showed it in The Faerie Queene.

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  • The Book of Justice, the fifth book in the series, was Spenser's most direct of the books.

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