Speeches sentence example

speeches
  • I had a splendid time; the toasts and speeches were great fun.
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  • He published Speeches on the Legislative Independence of Ireland (1852).
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  • His speeches in the chamber were always eloquent and powerful.
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  • Though not a great orator, his speeches were weighty and impressive.
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  • There is a valuable treatise on the life and speeches of Dinarchus by Dionysius of Halicarnassus.
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  • Sometimes defendants' speeches passed into literature, e.g.
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  • Whatever may be thought of the manner of this refusal, or of its immediate motives, it was in itself wise, for the German empire would have lost immeasurably had it been the cause rather than the result of the inevitable struggle with Austria, and Bismarck was probably right when he said that, to weld the heterogeneous elements'of Germany into a united whole, what was needed was, not speeches and resolutions, but a policy of "blood and iron."
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  • Dinarchus wrote, for one or more of these prosecutors, the three speeches which are still extant - Against Demosthenes, Against Aristogeiton, Against Philocles.
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  • The antagonism between free labour and slave labour became the theme of many of his speeches.
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  • The wish to meet people of the different sections of the country and to explain his position upon the questions of the day led the President to begin (14th September 1909), a tour which included the Pacific coast, the South-west, the Mississippi Valley and the South Atlantic states, and during which he travelled 13,000 miles and made 266 speeches.
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  • After the outbreak of the revolution of 1848 he was elected to the Constituent Assembly, and in 1849 to the Legislative Assembly, but his speeches on behalf of the extreme socialist wing were of so abstract and mystical a character that they had no effect.
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  • 2 In 1842 he published the Speeches of Lord Campbell at the Bar and in the House of Commons, with an Address to the Irish Bar as Lord Chancellor of Ireland (Edin., Black).
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  • The only positive piece of evidence produced is the passage from Thomas Nash's "Epistle to the Gentlemen of the Two Universities," prefixed to Greene's Arcadia, 1859, in which he upbraids somebody (not known to be Shakespeare) with having left the "trade of Noverint" and busied himself with "whole Hamlets" and "handfuls of tragical speeches."
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  • In his rare speeches in the House of Representatives he clearly defined his position in regard to states rights, which he consistently held ever afterwards.
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  • By a series of powerful speeches in and out of parliament, and by the publication of his masterly pamphlet, 1 793 and 1853, Cobden sought to calm the passions of his countrymen.
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  • And when relations with America were becoming critical and menacing in consequence of the depredations committed on American commerce by vessels issuing from British ports, he brought the question before the House of Commons in a series of speeches of rare clearness and force.
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  • Cobden's speeches were collected and published in 1870.
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  • This gave rise to sympathetic demonstrations in many Dalmatian and Bosnian towns, and to a series of interpellations and speeches by the Yugoslav and Czech deputies in the Parliament of Vienna.
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  • 4 Austria-Hungary, in a note to America, accepted President Wilson's speeches as a basis of discussion, and on the 8th Baron Hussarek admitted that the Monarchy's internal structure must be modified, and " full-grown nations " determine their own future.
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  • (b) The Ada concilii Remensis ad Sanctum Basolum, a detailed account of the proceedings and discourses at the great council of St Basle; a shorter account of his apologetic speeches at the councils of Mouzon and Causey; and drafts of the decrees of two or three other councils or imperial constitutions promulgated when he was archbishop of Ravenna or pope.
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  • So keenly were the Midlothian speeches appreciated by the Boers that the Boer committee wrote a letter of thanks to Gladstone, and expressed the hope that should a change in the government of Great Britain occur, " the injustice done to the Transvaal might find redress."
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  • Elected deputy in 1860 he became celebrated by the biting wit of his speeches, while, as journalist, the acrimony of his polemical writings made him a redoubtable adversary.
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  • There was a fierce 1 The laws of Hiero are often mentioned with approval in Cicero's speeches against Verres.
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  • But no one can permanently carry on the government of a great country by speeches from the balcony of a house in the capital, and Lamartine found himself in a dilemma.
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  • Giddings published a series of political essays signed "Pacificus" (1843); Speeches in Congress (1853); The Exiles of Florida (1858); and a History of the Rebellion: Its Authors and Causes (1864).
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  • His collected speeches and lectures were published under the title of Altertum and Gegenwart (5th ed., 1903 foll.), to which a third volume was added under the title of Unter drei Kaisern (2nd ed., 1895).
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  • That he was a man of great versatility appears in the Acts from the speeches introduced on various occasions, if (as is probable) they were in part, at least, his own composition.
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  • He was one of those who induced the states-general to proclaim itself a National Assembly on the 17th of June 1789; approved, in several speeches, of the capture of the Bastille and of the taking of the royal family to Paris (October 1789); demanded that strict measures be taken against the royalists who were intriguing in the south of France, and published some pamphlets on finance.
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  • In the chamber he still sought to obtain liberty for the press - a theme upon which he published a volume of his speeches (Paris, 1817).
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  • In June a warning proclamation by the governor was answered by a series of violent speeches by Papineau, who in August was deprived of his commission in the militia.
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  • In 1863 he made violent speeches in Ohio against the administration, and for these he was arrested by the military authorities, tried by military commission, and sentenced to imprisonment.
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  • A volume of Selected Speeches was published in 1879.
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  • It had little chance of doing more than make speeches; the country was in the hands of an armed mob of civilians and mutinous soldiers; and, meanwhile, the grand-duke of Baden had joined with Bavaria in requesting the armed intervention of Prussia, which was granted on the condition that Baden should join the League of the Three Kings.
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  • His Speeches were collected and published in 1815.
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  • The matter remained in abeyance till 330, when the two rivals delivered their speeches Against Ctesiphon and On the Crown.
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  • His three speeches, called by the ancients "the Three Graces," rank next to those of Demosthenes.
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  • Cicero, who speaks of 150 of these speeches as extant in his day, praises them for their acuteness, their wit, their conciseness.
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  • The story told in the Pro Cluentio may be true or false, but the picture of provincial crime which it presents is vividly dramatic. Had we only known Cicero in his speeches we should have ranked him with Demosthenes as one who had realized the highest literary ideal.
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  • He was one of the earliest of English parliamentary orators; his speeches greatly impressed his contemporaries, and in a later generation, as Macaulay observes, they were "a favourite theme of old men who lived to see the conflicts of Walpole and Pulteney."
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  • Many of Sacheverell's speeches are reported in Anchitell Grey's Debates of the House of Commons, 1667-1694 (io vols., London, 1769).
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  • For other accounts see Carlyle, Cromwell's Letters and Speeches, letter cxl.; Hoenig, Cromwell; Baldock, Cromwell as a Soldier; and Gardiner, Hist.
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  • 36 and 40);'expatiates on his verses and his speeches, his holiday-tasks in Umbria (vii.
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  • This honour he owed to the purity of style and remarkable eloquence of his speeches, which, with a few pamphlets, form the bulk of his published work.
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  • Although he lacked oratorical fluency, his short speeches, like his writings, were forceful; his plain dress and unassuming ways helped to make him extremely popular with the common people, in whom he had much greater faith than his cousin John had; and, above all, he was an eminently successful manager of men.
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  • 603, who gives a list of his printed speeches and letters; Foss, Lives of the Judges, vi.
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  • He wrote also forensic speeches; Phrynichus, in Photius, ranks him amongst the best orators, and mentions his orations as the standard of the pure Attic style.
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  • He was jailed in 1937 for his speeches, and Hitler eventually had Martin confined to a concentration camp throughout World War II.
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  • Gensonne was accounted one of the most brilliant of the little band of brilliant orators from the Gironde, though his eloquence was somewhat cold and he always read his speeches.
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  • In 1910 he had published a volume of speeches, which was translated into English, and in 1919 he brought out a work on political conflicts and constitutional reform.
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  • Each was allowed two speeches, and the trial lasted three days.
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  • His extant works are - (i) a speech before Arcadius, De regno; (2) Dio, sive de suo ipsius instituto, in which he signifies his purpose to devote himself to true philosophy; (3) Encomium calvitii (he was himself bald), a literary jeu d'esprit, suggested by Dio Chrysostom's Praise of Hair; (4) De providentia, in two books; (5) De insomniis; (6) 157 Epistolae; (7) 12 Hymni, of a contemplative, Neoplatonic character; and several homilies and occasional speeches.
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  • On this occasion he delivered two speeches on successive days, one in favour of justice, the other against it.
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  • The Choate Story Book (New York, 1903) contains a few of his addresses and after-dinner speeches, and is prefaced by a brief biographical sketch.
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  • The speeches dwell upon Jesus' person and work, as we shall find, with a didactic directness, philosophical terminology and denunciatory exclusiveness unmatched in the Synoptist sayings.
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  • And whilst the Synoptist speeches and actions stand in loose and natural relation to each other, the Johannine deeds so closely illustrate the sayings that each set everywhere supplements the other: the history itself here tends to become one long allegory.
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  • In August, on representations of the alarming state of the contest, he took the field in person, and made a series of campaign speeches, beginning in New England and extending throughout Pennsylvania, Ohio and Indiana, which aroused great enthusiasm, and were regarded at the time by both friends and opponents as the most brilliant continuous exhibition of varied intellectual power ever made by a candidate in a presidential canvass.
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  • The spring and early summer of 1910 were spent by Mr Roosevelt in travelling through Egypt, the continent of Europe, and England, in acceptance of invitations which he had received to make various public speeches in these countries.
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  • By his speeches and messages, and by his frank use of one of the greatest of modern social engines - the newspaper press - he created a public opinion which heartily supported him.
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  • His official acts and the influence of his speeches and messages led to the adoption by both citizens and government of a new theory regarding natural resources.
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  • In numerous speeches and addresses he expressed his belief in a strong colonial government, but a government administered for the benefit of the people under its control and not for the profit of the people at home.
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  • The volume of his letters and his writings in books, articles for the press and speeches and official messages, is enormous, and yet this work was done in the midst of the executive labours of a long political career.
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  • His long experience, his wide reading and his thorough knowledge of all sorts and conditions of men, enabled him to act quickly at a time of crisis, but his important speeches, or a course of political action that might be far-reaching in its effect, were not cast into their final form without careful consultation with the best advisers he could obtain.
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  • The first form of his written speeches was always painstakingly edited and revised, and not infrequently entirely rewritten.
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  • The typical speeches in Chronicles are of little value for the periods to which they relate, and where they are inconsistent with the evidence from earlier writings or contain inherent improbabilities are scarcely of historical worth.
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  • The next few years were chiefly distinguished by remarkable speeches which displayed the prince in the unexpected character of a great orator.
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  • He took a prominent part in the agitation which followed "the Bulgarian atrocities"; his speeches were intemperate, and he was accused of uttering the words "Perish India!"
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  • He described their speeches and proceedings, caricatured their motives, denounced the exercise of the right of private judgment, and set forth the divine right of bishops in such strong language that one of the queen's councillors held it to amount to a threat against the supremacy of the crown.
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  • There in 1789 he and Dumont allied themselves with Mirabeau, secretly collaborating for him on the Courrier de Provence and also in preparing the speeches which Mirabeau delivered as his own.
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  • A few fragments printed in Polish had appeared before this, as the Lord's Prayer in the statutes of the bishops of Breslau in 1475, the story of Pope Urban in Latin, German and Polish in 1505, &c.; but the first complete work in the Polish language appeared from the press of this printer at Cracow in 1521, under the title, Speeches of the Wise King Solomon.
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  • In some speeches delivered at Munich in 1861 he outspokenly declared his view that the maintenance of the Roman Catholic Church did not depend on the temporal sovereignty of the pope.
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  • His contemporary Asconius is best known as the author of an extant historical commentary on five of the speeches of Cicero.
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  • He frequently quotes from the speeches of Cicero, and it has been surmised that the survival of those speeches may have been due to the influence of Gerbert.
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  • Thirteen of Cicero's speeches were found by him at Cluny and Langres, and elsewhere in France or Germany; the commentary of Asconius, a complete Quintilian, and a large part of Valerius Flaccus were discovered at St Gallen.
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  • Milton, in his Tractate on Education (1644), advances further on Bacon's lines, protesting against the length of time spent on instruction in language, denouncing merely verbal knowledge, and recommending the study of a large number of classical authors for the sake of their subject appointed to consider the studies and examinations of the university, their report of November 1904 on the Previous Examination was fully discussed, and the speeches published in the Reporter for December 17, 1904.
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  • We possess two declamations under his name: Peri Sofiston, directed against Isocrates and setting forth the superiority of extempore over written speeches (a recently discovered fragment of another speech against Isocrates is probably of later date); ''Odusseus, in which Odysseus accuses Palamedes of treachery during the siege of Troy (this is generally considered spurious).
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  • The discussions on the budget entirely monopolized public attention for the year, and while the measure was defended by Mr Lloyd George in parliament with much suavity, and by Mr Asquith, Sir Edward Grey and Mr Haldane outside the House of Commons with tact and moderation, the feelings of its opponents were exasperated by a series of inflammatory public speeches at Limehouse and elsewhere from the chancellor of the exchequer, who took these opportunities to rouse the passions of the working-classes against the landed classes and the peers.
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  • /n==Authorities== - The principal ancient authorities for the life of Caesar are his own Commentaries, the biographies of Plutarch and Suetonius, letters and speeches of Cicero, the Catiline of Sallust, the Pharsalia of Lucan, and the histories of Appian, Dio Cassius and Velleius Paterculus (that of Livy exists only in the Epitome).
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  • These characteristics reappear (accompanied, however, by frequent touches of the epigrammatic power above mentioned, which seems to have come to Thiers more readily as an orator or a journalist than as an historian) in his speeches, which after his death were collected in many volumes by his widow.
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  • His histories, in many different editions, and his speeches, as above, are easily accessible; his minor works and newspaper articles have not, we believe, been collected in any form.
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  • Besides his numerous political and socialist pamphlets he published in 1901 two volumes of his speeches in the Chamber of Deputies entitled Quatre ans de lutte de classe 1893-1898.
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  • Pratt's Leading Points in South African History (London, 1900); and Cecil Rhodes, His Political Life and Speeches, by Vindex (London, 1900).
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  • A parallel case to Automatic Writing is the action of the speech centres, resulting in the production of all kinds of utterances from trance speeches in the ordinary language of the speaker to mere unintelligible babblings.
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  • Zittwitz assumes that this epistle was in its original form of much larger extent, and that the author of the Acts took out of it the matter for the speeches which he makes Mani deliver during his disputation with Bishop Archelaus.
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  • Speeches are limited to one hour, and may be confined in committee of the whole house to five minutes.
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  • On his arrival in England the marquess delivered a number of vigorous speeches in defence of his adminstration.
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  • Papineau, The Most Insistent Demagogue Of 1837, Must Certainly Be Named Among The Founders, For The Sake Of Speeches Which Came Before Written Works Both In Point Of Time And Popular Esteem.
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  • The Liberals of Quebec under the leadership of Sir Antoine Dorion were hostile to confederation, or at least to the terms of union agreed upon at the Quebec conference, and Laurier in editorials and speeches maintained the position of Dorion and his allies.
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  • During his first two years in the federal parliament his chief speeches were made in defence of Rid and the French half breeds who were concerned in the Red River rebellion, and on fiscal questions.
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  • Some of his speeches in Great Britain, coming as they did from a French-Canadian, and revealing delicate appreciation of British sentiment and thorough comprehension of the genius of British institutions, excited great interest and enthusiasm, while one or two impassioned speeches in the Canadian parliament during the Boer war profoundly influenced opinion in Canada and had a pronounced effect throughout the empire.
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  • David, Laurier et son temps (Montreal, 1905); see also Henri Moreau, Sir Wilfrid Laurier, Premier Ministre du Canada (Paris, 1902); and the collection of Laurier's speeches from 1871 to 1890, compiled by Ulric Barthe (Quebec, 1890).
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  • It is far more probable that he was previously composing them at his leisure and in the vigour of manhood, precisely as his contemporary Demosthenes composed all his great speeches except the De Corona before he was fifty.
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  • After a dedicatory epistle to Alexander (chap. I) the opening of the treatise itself (chap. 2) is as follows: - " There are three genera of political speeches; one deliberative, one declamatory, one forensic: their species are seven; hortative, dissuasive, laudatory, vituperative, accusatory, defensive, critical."
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  • In Athens such speeches were delivered at national festivals or games, with the object of rousing the citizens to emulate the glorious deeds of their ancestors.
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  • Although he was defeated at the elections of 1898 and was for four years outside the chamber, his eloquent speeches made him a force in politics as an intellectual champion of socialism.
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  • 1 The charges centred in the president's removal of Secretary Stanton, his ad interim appointment of Lorenzo Thomas, his campaign speeches in 1866, and the relation of these three things to the Tenure of Office Act.
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  • Unfortunately his extemporaneous speeches were commonplace, in very bad taste, fervently intemperate and denunciatory; and though this was probably due largely to temperament and habits of stump-speaking formed in early life, it was attributed by his enemies to drink.
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  • His reputation in the parliament of 1880-1886 was that of a dilettante, who allied himself with the three politicians already named from a feeling of irresponsibility rather than of earnest purpose; he was regarded as one who, on the rare occasions when he spoke, was more desirous to impart an academic quality to his speeches than to make any solid contribution to public questions.
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  • Impressive in matter rather than in manner of delivery, and seldom rising to the level of eloquence in the sense in which that quality was understood in a House which had listened to Bright and Gladstone, his speeches were logical and convincing, and their attractive literary form delighted a wider audience than that which listens to the mere politician.
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  • His speeches and work throughout this period took a wider range than before his accession to the leadership of the Commons.
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  • In the councils strange speeches were heard from the mouths of laymen, who were beginning to carry to extreme lengths the spirit of independence with regard to Rome.
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  • His defects as a debater were not compensated entirely by the excellence of his set speeches; but his wide culture and powerful intellect were bound to leave their mark on affairs.
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  • His idea of history was more severe and less rhetorical than that of Sallust and Livy, whom he blamed for putting elaborate speeches into the mouths of the characters of whom they wrote.
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  • He quickly made his mark in the House of Commons, one of his earliest speeches being in favour of his father's reform of the marriage law.
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  • This position, which he filled with much ability, did not prevent his occasionally descending from the presidential chair to make speeches, one of which, advocating an amnesty to the communards, was especially memorable.
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  • The best of his previously unpublished speeches appeared in Addresses of John Hay (1906).
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  • Grattan warned the government in a series of masterly speeches of the lawless condition to which Ireland had been driven.
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  • In one of his speeches opposing the sending by the United States of representatives to the Panama Congress, he said, "The moment the federal government shall make the unhallowed attempt to interfere with the domestic concerns of the states, those states will consider themselves driven from the Union."
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  • This use is only found in narrative before the story of the mission of the apostles: it is also found in speeches; Matthew once, Mark once and Luke twice.
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  • During the presidential campaign he made speeches in Illinois, and in Massachusetts he spoke before the Whig State Convention at Worcester on the 12th of September, and in the next ten days at Lowell, Dedham, Roxbury, Chelsea, Cambridge and Boston.
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  • The National Convention of the Republican Party in 1856 cast i ra votes for Lincoln as its vice-presidential candidate on the ticket with Fremont, and he was on the Republican electoral ticket of this year, and made effective campaign speeches in the interest of the new party.
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  • Lincoln's speeches in this campaign won him a national fame.
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  • On the 27th of February 1860 in Cooper Union, New York City, he made a speech (much the same as that delivered in Elwood, Kansas, on the 1st of December) which made him known favourably to the leaders of the Republican party in the East and which was a careful historical study criticising the statement of Douglas in one of his speeches in Ohio that "our fathers when they framed the government under which we live understood this question [slavery] just as well and even better than we do now," and Douglas's contention that "the fathers" made the country (and intended that it should remain) part slave.
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  • During the campaign Lincoln remained in Springfield, making few speeches and writing practically no letters for publication.
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  • Learned professors and talkative journalists insisted on delivering interminable speeches and on examining in the light of ultimate philosophical principles every proposal laid before the assembly.
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  • They carried on the agitation as best they could, chiefly by distributing reports of speeches made in the Reichstag.
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  • Under the effect of one of Bismarcks speeches, the Military Bill was unanimously passed almost without debate.
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  • In his public speeches the emperor repeatedly expressed his reverence for am the memory of his grandfather, and his determination to continue his policy; but he also repudiated the attempt of the extreme Conservatives to identify him with their party.
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  • He aspired by his own will to direct the policy of the state; he put aside the reserve which in modern times is generally observed even by absolute rulers, and by his public speeches and personal influence took a part in political controversy.
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  • The rule adopted was that discussion was permitted on those speeches of the emperor which were officially published in the Reichsanzeiger.
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  • He also found time to preach and lecture elsewhere, and to deliver remarkable speeches at social functions; he worked hard with Archbishop Benson on the Parish Councils Bill (1894); he became the first president of the Church Historical Society (1894), and continued in that office till his death; he took part in the Laud Commemoration (189J); he represented the English Church at the coronation of the tsar (1896).
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  • He was also the author of rhetorical exercises on hackneyed sophistical themes; of a Quadrivium (Arithmetic, Music, Geometry, Astronomy), valuable for the history of music and astronomy in the middle ages; a general sketch of Aristotelian philosophy; a paraphrase of the speeches and letters of Dionysius Areopagita; poems, including an autobiography; and a description of the Augusteum, the column erected by Justinian in the church of St Sophia to commemorate his victories over the Persians.
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  • In the last years of his short life he engaged actively in politics, and made speeches in Paris and in Moscow in the beginning of 1882 in favour of a militant Panslavism, predicting a desperate strife between Teuton and Sla y.
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  • During his later years Lysias - now probably a comparatively poor man owing to the rapacity of the tyrants and his own generosity to the Athenian exiles - appears as a hard-working member of a new profession - that of writing speeches to be delivered in the law-courts.
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  • The literary tact which is so remarkable in the extant speeches is that of a singularly flexible intelligence, always obedient to an instinct of gracefulness.
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  • Thirty-four speeches (three fragmentary) have come down under the name of Lysias; one hundred and twenty-seven more, now lost, are known from smaller fragments or from titles.
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  • Two hundred and fifty-two of them represent one hundred and twenty-seven speeches of known title; and of six the fragments are comparatively large.
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  • Of these, the fragmentary speech For Pherenicus belongs to 381 or 380 B.C., and is thus the latest known work of Lysias.2 In literary and historical interest, the first place among the extant speeches of Lysias belongs to that Against Eratosthenes (403 B.C.), one of the Thirty Tyrants, whom Lysias arraigns as the murderer of his brother Polemarchus.
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  • Bekker occasionally consulted eleven other MSS., most of which contain only the above nine speeches: viz., Marciani F, G, I, K (Venice); Laurentiani D, E (Florence); Vaticani M, N; Parisini U, V; Urbinas 0.
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  • Mr Aldis counselled him not to learn his speeches, but to write out and commit to memory certain passages and the peroration.
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  • Cobden's argumentative speeches were regarded more sympathetically than Bright's more rhetorical appeals, and in a debate on Villiers's annual motion against the Corn Laws Bright was heard with so much impatience that he was obliged to sit down.
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  • But war was in the air, and the most impassioned speeches he ever delivered were addressed to this parliament in fruitless opposition to the Crimean War.
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  • There was a tremor in Bright's voice in the touching parts of his great speeches which stirred the feelings even of hostile listeners.
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  • He spoke at great gatherings at Edinburgh, Glasgow, Bradford and Manchester, and his speeches filled the papers.
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  • See The Life and Speeches of the Right Hon.
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  • In 1843 a small volume of his Sonnets and other Poems was published, and in 1852 appeared a volume of Selections from his Writings and Speeches.
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  • The former he imitates in the maxims (-yv14at) he throws in and the speeches which he puts into the mouth of the chief actors; the latter in his frequent geographical digressions, in the personal anecdotes, in the tendency to collect and attach some credence to marvellous tales.
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  • The speeches are obviously composed by Procopius himself, rarely showing any dramatic variety in their language, but they seem sometimes to convey the substance of what was said; and even when this is not the case they frequently serve to bring out the points of a critical situation.
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  • His published works include numerous speeches and pamphlets, including those connected with his well-known Roman Catholic controversy with Charles Butler (1750-1832).
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  • During the critical years of Mr Chamberlain's crusade (1903-1906) he made himself the chief spokesman of the Liberal party, delivering a series of speeches in answer to those of the tariff-reform leader; and his persistent following and answering of Mr Chamberlain had undoubted effect.
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  • John Bassett Moore has edited The Works of James Buchanan, comprising his Speeches, State Papers, and Private Correspondence (Philadelphia, 1908 et seq.).
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  • In 1869-1875 he was United States senator from Missouri, and made a great reputation (especially in 1873-1874) by his speeches on financial subjects.
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  • A sense of humour added much to his campaign speeches.
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  • Later in the year he was appointed "agent and corresponding secretary" of the extreme wing of the Reform party, and more and more openly, in his speeches throughout the province, advocated armed revolt.
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  • Nevertheless, in a letter to Captain Lambton, an unsuccessful Liberal candidate for Newcastle, in September 1900, he condemned the general conduct of affairs by Lord Salisbury's government, while in several speeches in the House of Lords he strongly urged the necessity of army reform.
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  • At Glasgow on the 5th of December he again outlined a Liberal programme, this and other speeches all leading to the assumption that his return to active co-operation with the Liberal party in the general election - which could not be long delayed - was fairly certain.
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  • Lord Rosebery had just gone down to Cornwall to make a series of speeches in support of the Liberal programme, now fairly well mapped out as regards those items which represented the strong public opposition to what had been done by the Unionist government..
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  • Pelletan's indiscreet speeches did him no good; and he became a common subject for ill-natured caricatures.
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  • It is quite possible that the memory of the early disciples, highly trained as it was, enabled them to preserve a substantially true record of some of these speeches, and of the circumstances in which they were uttered.
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  • In 1789 he was elected by the third estate of Paris to the states general, and attracted attention by his speeches against social inequalities.
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  • A popular edition of his works appeared in 1896-8, and his parliamentary speeches were published in four volumes (190810).
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  • His speeches, sermons and lectures, delivered during his tour, were printed in a volume of 400 pages, and show an extraordinary power of rising to the occasion and of speaking with sympathy and tact.
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  • These enigmatic speeches were all that the multitudes got, but the disciples in private were taught their lesson of hope.
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  • In 1915 he was sworn of the Privy Council and in 1919 he became K.C. He published The Case for Labour and other pamphlets, and a collection of his speeches in Great Britain appeared in 1918.
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  • Tilden, and became his literary executor, editing his speeches and other political writings (1885), publishing a biography in 1895, and editing a two-volume collection of Tilden's letters and literary memorials (1908).
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  • His Letters and Speeches were published in 1858 in Boston, Mass., in 2 vols., edited nominally by William Annand, really by himself.
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  • Thorbecke's speeches in the Dutch legislature were published at Deventer in six volumes (1867-1870), to which should be added a collection of his unpublished speeches, printed at Groningen in 'goo.
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  • Of Van Hogendorp's Essays and Speeches, indeed, he published a standard edition, which is still highly valued.
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  • Thorbecke's speeches form a remarkable continuation of Van Hogendorp's orations, not only in their style, but also in their train of thought.
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  • This is the centre of the swadeshi movement for the boycott of English goods, of the most seditious speeches and writings and of conspiracies for the assassination of officials.
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  • In 65 B.C. he even thought of defending Catiline on a charge of extortion, and delivered two brilliant speeches on behalf of Gaius Cornelius, tribune in 67 B.C., a leader of the democratic party.
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  • Besides the three speeches against Publius Rullus and the four against Catiline, he delivered a number of others, among which that on behalf of Gaius Rabirius is especially notable.
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  • He quotes a passage from one of his own speeches in which any change in the order would destroy the rhythm.
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  • Other investigators had shown that Cicero's clausulae are generally variations of some three or four forms in which the rhythm is trochaic. Dr Thaddaeus Zielinski of St Petersburg, after examining all the clausulae in Cicero's speeches, finds that they are governed by a law.
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  • Other minor works written in later life, such as the Partitiones Oratoriae, a catechism of rhetoric, in which instruction is given by Cicero to his son Marcus; the Topica, and an introduction to a translation of the speeches delivered by Demosthenes and Aeschines for and against Ctesiphon, styled de optimo genere oratorum, also need only be mentioned.
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  • None of the other speeches are in the exact form in which they were delivered.
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  • Cicero in his speeches must be given all the privileges of an advocate.
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  • These are throughout rhythmical in character, like his speeches and philosophical works.
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  • The speeches abound in details which may be accepted as authentic, either because there is no reason for misrepresentation or on account of their circumstantiality.
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  • It was for a long time usual to doubt the authenticity of the speeches post reditum and pro Marcello.I Recent scholars consider them genuine.
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  • As their rhythmical structure corresponds more or less exactly with the canon of authenticity formed by Zielinski from the other speeches, the question may now be considered closed.
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  • 2 Absurd suspicion has been cast upon the later speeches in Catilinam and that pro Archia.
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  • John of Salisbury (111o-1180) continually quotes from rhetorical and philosophical writings, but only once from the speeches.
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  • The most popular speeches were those against Catiline, the Verrines, Caesarianae and Philippics, to which may be added the spurious Controversia.
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  • We have a very interesting colophon to the speeches against Rullus, in which Statilius Maximus states that he had corrected the text by the help of a MS. giving the recension of Tiro, which he had collated with five other ancient copies .° It is interesting to notice that Servatus Lupus did similar work in the 9th century.
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  • He brought back no less than ten speeches of Cicero previously unknown to the Italians, viz.
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  • Fragments of the lost speeches pro Tullio and pro Scauro were discovered in two Milan and Turin palimpsests.
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  • It contains the speeches in Pisonem, pro Fonteio, pro Flacco and the Philippics.
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  • The only other 9th-century MS. of the speeches is now in Lord Leicester's library at Holkham, No.
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  • The speeches pro Roscio Comoedo, pro Rabirio perduellionis reo and pro Rabirio Postumo are only known from Italian copies of the transcript (now lost) made by Poggio from lost MSS.
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  • While in opposition he devoted special attention to naval affairs, and in speeches that attracted much notice declared that the function of the French navy was to secure and develop colonial enterprise, deprecated all attempts to rival the British fleet, and advocated the construction of commerce destroyers as France's best reply to England.
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  • He was enthusiastically received, but as he knew little of the language translations of his speeches had to be read for him.
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  • Crassus is one of the chief speakers in the De oratore of Cicero, who has also preserved a few fragments of his speeches.
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  • It is impossible to read the speeches of Vergniaud without being convinced of the solidity of his education, and in particular of the wide range of his knowledge of the classics, and of his acquaintance - familiar and sympathetic - with ancient philosophy and history.
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  • His speeches breathe the very spirit of the storm, and they were perhaps the greatest single factor in the development of the events of the time.
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  • While his opponent travelled throughout the country making speeches, McKinley remained in Canton, where he was visited by and addressed many Republican delegations.
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  • His Speeches and Addresses were printed in two volumes (New York, 1893 and 1901).
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  • The Christology, for instance, of the early Petrine speeches is such as a Gentile Christian writing c. 80 A.D.
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  • He is particularly careful in his speeches to show how deep is his respect for the law of Moses.
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  • The speeches in Acts deserve special notice.
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  • Did its author follow the plan adopted by all historians of his age, or is he an Speeches.
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  • Ancient historians (like many of modern t i mes) used the liberty of working up in their own language the speeches recorded by them.
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  • Besides this, some did not hesitate to give to the characters of their history speeches which were never uttered.
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  • Some of his speeches are evidently but summaries of thoughts which occurred to individuals or multitudes.
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  • Others claim to be reports of speeches really delivered.
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  • But all these speeches have to a large extent the same style, the style also of the narrative.
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  • What was said above of the Christology of the Petrine speeches applies to the whole conception of Messianic salvation, the eschatology, the idea of Jesus as equipped by the Holy Spirit for His Messianic work, found in these speeches, as also to titles like " Jesus the Nazarene " and " the Righteous One " both in and beyond the Petrine speeches.
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  • In 1410 Jerome, who had incurred the hostility of the archbishop of Prague by his speeches in favour of Wycliffe's teaching, went to Ofen, where King Sigismund of Hungary resided, and, though a layman, preached before the king denouncing strongly the rapacity and immorality of the clergy.
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  • Even if the ninth book is rejected (as Grote proposed), there remain the speeches of the first, sixteenth and nineteenth books.
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  • These speeches form the cardinal points in the action of the Iliad - the framework into which everything else is set; and they have also the best title to the name of Homer.
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  • The joy of Menelaus on seeing Paris, Priam's ignorance of the Greek leaders, the speeches of Agamemnon in his review of the ranks (in book iv.), the building of the wall - all these are in place after the Greek landing, but hardly in the ninth year of the siege.
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  • Among his publications are A Winter in Madeira and a Summer in Spain and Florence (1850), and Speeches and Occasional Addresses (1864).
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  • Many of his American speeches have been published.
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  • The petitions addressed to the senate by the town of Bononia and by the communities of Rhodes and Ilium were gracefully supported by him in Latin and Greek speeches, and during Claudius's absence in 52 at the Latin festival it was Nero who, as praefect of the city, administered justice in the forum.
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  • They were found in the chanceries of the republics, in the papal curia, in the council chambers of princes, at the headquarters of condottieri, wherever business had to be transacted, speeches to be made and the work of secretaries to be performed.
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  • Mr Webb was one of the early members of the Fabian Society, contributing to Fabian Essays (1889); and he became well-known as a socialist, both by his speeches and his writings.
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  • He himself delivered in the House of Commons many speeches unrivalled in parliamentary history for wit and recklessness; and one of them still lives in history as the "champagne speech."
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  • Like others of the dominant planter class in Virginia, he was repeatedly elected to the House of Burgesses, but the business which came before the colonial assembly was for some years of only local importance, and he is not known to have made any set speeches in the House, or to have said anything beyond a statement of his opinion and the reasons for it.
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  • The most important speeches and papers are: - The South Carolina Exposition (1828); Speech on the Force Bill (1833); Reply to Webster (1833); Speech on the Reception of Abolitionist Petitions (1836), and on the Veto Power (1842); a Disquisition on Government, and a Discourse on the Constitution and Government of the United States (1849-1850) - the last two, written a short time before his death, defend with great ability the rights of a minority under a government such as that of the United States.
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  • A lofty and magnetic orator, his speeches were published at Budapest in 1896; and he is the author of an interesting dissertation, Esthetics and Politics, the Artist and the Statesman (Hung.) (Budapest, 1895).
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  • In spite of great physical weakness he made several earnest speeches in behalf of these measures to save the Union.
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  • Bacon's use of this illustration and of the former one of Peisistratus, has been much commented on, and in general it seems to have been thought that had it not been for his speeches Essex might have escaped, or, at all events, have been afterwards pardoned.
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  • There are on the summit of the hill the remains of an old castle, and a monument erected in 1875 to Prince Bismarck, with an inscription taken from one of his speeches against the Ultramontane claims of Rome - "Nach Canossa gehen wir nicht."
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  • He also brought out the editio princeps of the speeches of Hypereides Against Demosthenes (1850), On Behalf of Lycophron and Euxenippus (1853), and his Funeral Oration (1858).
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  • It was by his edition of these speeches from the papyri discovered at Thebes (Egypt) in 1847 and 1856 that Babington's fame as a Greek scholar was made.
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  • After a heated canvass, in which he made a series of brilliant speeches, he was beaten by a narrow margin in New York.
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  • Gustavus Adolphus (1594-1632) was the most polished writer of its earlier half, and his speeches take an important place in the development of the language.
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  • He was elected deputy for Le Mans in 1841 with hardly a dissentient voice; but for the violence of his electoral speeches he was tried at Angers and sentenced to four months' imprisonment and a fine, against which he appealed successfully on a technical point.
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  • It was the speeches of Ledru-Rollin and Louis Blanc at working-men's banquets in Lille, Dijon and Chalons that really heralded the revolution.
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  • His speeches were lacking in judgment and tact, and created an unfavourable impression, The conference was not held, and Froude returned to England in the autumn.2 Lord Carnarvon was far from abandoning his plan.
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  • After the receipt in December 1879 of the reports of Mr Gladstone's speeches during his Midlothian campaign - in which he denounced annexation as obtained by means dishonourable to Great Britain - the Boers expected nothing less than the retrocession of the country.
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  • See The Life of William Pinkney (New York, 1853) by his nephew, William Pinkney (1810-1883), who was Protestant Episcopal bishop of Virginia in 1879-1883; and Henry Wheaton, Some Account of the Life, Writings, and Speeches of William Pinkney (New York, 1828).
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  • His most important extant works are: in prose, Gratiarum Actio, an address of thanks to Gratian for his elevation to the consulship; Periochae, summaries of the books of the Iliad and Odyssey; and one or two epistolae; in verse, Epigrammata, including several free translations from the Greek Anthology; Ephemeris, the occupations of a day; Parentalia and Commemoratio Professorum Burdigalensium, on deceased relatives and literary friends; Epitaphia, chiefly on the Trojan heroes; Caesares, memorial verses on the Roman emperors from Julius Caesar to Elagabalus; Ordo Nobilium Urbium, short poems on famous cities; Ludus Septem Sapientum, speeches delivered by the Seven Sages of Greece; Idyllia, of which the best-known are the Mosella, a descriptive poem on the Moselle, and the infamous Cento Nuptialis.
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  • Castelar soon became famous by his rhetorical speeches in the Constituent Cortes of 1869, where he led the republican minority in advocating a federal republic as the logical outcome of the recent revolution.
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  • His first parliamentary speeches were directed against Fox's India Bill.
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  • In 1788 he was appointed solicitor-general, and was knighted, and at the close of this year he attracted attention by his speeches in support of Pitt's resolutions on the state of the king (George III., who then laboured under a mental malady) and the delegation of his authority.
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  • His style is lucid and vivid, but he lacks the critical sense, and the speeches he puts into the mouths of his characters are imaginary.
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  • The philologists have added to the confusion by classing as " Celtic " the speeches of the darkcomplexioned races of the west of Scotland and the west of Ireland.
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  • Specially effective, according to contemporary testimony, were his speeches against the Hanoverian subsidies, against the Spanish convention in 1739, and in favour of the motion in 17 4 2 for an investigation into the last ten years of Walpole's administration.
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  • It must be borne in mind that the reports of these speeches which have come down to us were made from hearsay, or at best from recollection, and are necessarily therefore most imperfect.
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  • Nicolas de Bauffremont, his son Claude, and his grandson Henri, all played important parts in the states-general of 1576, 1588 and 1614, and their speeches have been published.
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  • He also delivered forcible speeches upon the death of Kosciusko and upon General Andrew Jackson's course in the Floridas, favouring a partial censure of the latter.
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  • Harrison's canvass was conspicuous for the immense Whig processions and mass meetings, the numerous " stump " speeches (Harrison himself addressing meetings at Dayton, Chillicothe, Columbus and other places), and the use of campaign songs, of party insignia, and of campaign cries (such as " Tippecanoe and Tyler too "); and in the election he won by an overwhelming majority of 234 electoral votes to 60 cast for Van Buren.
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  • He inserted speeches, enlivened his pages with chance tales, and aimed, as Cicero tells us, at not merely narrating facts but also at beautifying them.
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  • Fresh incidents were inserted, new motives suggested and speeches composed in order to infuse the required life and freshness into these dry bones of history.
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  • The classical purity of his style, the eloquence of his speeches, the skill with which he depicted the play of emotion, and his masterly portraiture of great men, are all in turn warmly commended, and in our own day we question if any ancient historian is either more readable or more widely read.
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  • Perhaps an even stronger proof of the skill which enabled Livy to avoid dangers which were fatal to weaker men is to be found in his speeches.
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  • With a very few exceptions the speeches are dignified in tone, full of life and have at least a dramatic propriety, while of such incongruous and laboured absurdities as the speech which Dionysius puts into the mouth of Romulus, after the rape of the Sabine women, there are no instances in Livy.
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  • But, if our estimate of the merits of his speeches is moderated by doubts as to his right to introduce them at all, no such scruples interfere with our admiration for the skill with which he has drawn the portraits of the great men who figure in his pages.
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  • These merits, not less than the high tone and easy grace of his narrative and the eloquence of his speeches, gave Livy a hold on Roman readers such as only Cicero and Virgil besides him ever obtained.
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  • See Speeches (Hung.) ed.
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  • After Giovanni's death he remained in the court of Bernabe and Galeazzo Visconti, closing his eyes to their cruelties and exactions, serving them as a diplomatist, making speeches for them on ceremonial occasions, and partaking of the splendid hospitality they offered to emperors and princes.
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  • That he possessed considerable literary abilities, and that these were carefully trained, we gather, both from the speeches which Tacitus puts into his mouth, and from the reputation he left as an orator, as attested by Suetonius and Ovid, and from the extant fragments of his works.
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  • He possessed considerable literary abilities; his speeches and Greek comedies were highly spoken of by his contemporaries.
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  • Speeches, letters and documents are reworded to be in tone with the rest of the story.
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  • The Augustan age produced in Livy a great popular historian and natural artist and a trained rhetorician (in the speeches), - but as uncritical and inaccurate as he was brilliant.
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  • 1 The word is also used of the writers of speeches for the use of the contending parties in the law courts, who were forbidden to employ advocates.
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  • Speeches were then badly reported.
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  • In 1810 he was a member of the Bullion Committee, and his speeches on the report showed his mastery of the subject.
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  • In one of his most powerful speeches he maintained the inviolability of the king's person.
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  • The division, nevertheless, cannot be passed over without mention, as it is not only a common one in economic writing, but it figures largely in budget statements, financial accounts, and finance ministers' speeches - especially in the United Kingdom and France.
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  • The principal books by Beecher, besides his published sermons, are: Seven Lectures to Young Men (1844); Plymouth Collection of Hymns and Tunes (1855); Star Papers, Experiences of Art and Nature (1855); Life Thoughts (1858); New Star Papers; or Views and Experiences of Religious Subjects (1859); Plain and Pleasant Talks about Fruits, Flowers and Farming (1859); American Rebellion, Report of Speeches delivered in England at Public Meetings in Manchester, Glasgow, Edinburgh, Liverpool, and London (1864); Prayers from Plymouth Pulpit (1867); Norwood: A Tale of Village Life in New England (1867); The Life of Jesus the Christ (1871), completed in 2 vols., by his sons (1891); and Yale Lectures on Preaching (3 vols., 1872-1874).
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  • Not a few speeches of Surena and of Othon are of a very high order.
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  • His speeches were full of knowledge of the real condition of the people, and contained something like an original programme of Radical legislation.
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  • In 1876, when the Eastern question was looming large, he visited Servia and Turkey, and his subsequent speeches on the subject were marked by studious moderation, distasteful to extremists on both sides.
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  • It was not till the next session that he delivered his fiercest attack on Parnell in the debate on the address, denouncing him for his connexion with the Land League, and quoting against him the violent speeches of his supporters and the articles of his newspaper organs.
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  • Many of his speeches were monuments of erudition, but the wealth of detail, of allusion, and of quotation, often from the Greek and Latin, sometimes detracted from their effect.
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  • He made several speeches in the country in this year and the next, of which the gist was that British trade policy must be relative to circumstances, which had wholly changed from what they were in Cobden's time.
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  • The withdrawal of Mr. Chamberlain from active work in Parliament, owing to ill-health, left the stalwart Tariff Reform Ministry without a leader; his son, Mr. Austen Chamberlain, was his natural representative; but Mr. Law, by a series of fighting speeches both in the House and in the country, made himself particularly congenial to the more prominent members of that section.
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  • Not only did he render a steady support to Ministers in Parliament; but he aided the national cause and promoted recruiting by speeches at Guild hall, in Belfast and elsewhere; and even when criticism of the mismanagement of the war began legitimately to raise its head in the early months of 1915, he used his influence, in the national interest, to repress or moderate its expression in Parliament.
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  • The tenor of his speeches was always to encourage Ministers in vigorous action - on such questions, for instance, as the mobilization of industry, the treatment of aliens and the provision of munitions.
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  • His speeches on this occasion were published in a tractate Defense de l'universite et de la philosophie (1844 and 1845).
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  • Though he possessed a fine and flexible voice, his manner as a speaker was ineffective, and his speeches were generally ill-arranged and destitute of oratorical point.
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  • In 1872 an administrative ordinance made German the medium of instruction in the schools "wherever possible," and the police commissaries who attended public meetings were instructed to close any meeting at which speeches were delivered in Polish.
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  • The votes of its members were not published, and still less were their speeches made known.
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  • The bill did not create much enthusiasm among Liberals, and it was naturally opposed by the Conservatives, who were reinforced by a large section of moderate Liberals, nicknamed, in consequence of a phrase in one Of Brights speeches, Adullamites.
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  • In a series of speeches in Midlothian, where he offered himself for election, he denounced the whole policy which Lord Beaconsfield had pursued.
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  • His speeches decided the contest throughout the kingdom.
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  • In his election speeches Gladstone had insisted on the necessity of the country returning a Liberal majority which could act independently of the Irish vote; and the result of the general election had left the Irish the virtual arbiters of the political situation.
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  • He practised law in Boston, and won a wide reputation by his speeches for the Free Soil party in 1848.
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  • Burlingame's speeches did much to awaken interest in, and a more intelligent appreciation of, China's attitude toward the outside world.
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  • His speeches are lmost the one monument of the struggle on which a lover of english greatness can look back with pride and a sense of wort ness, such as a churchman feels when he reads Bossuet, or an A glican when he turns over the pages of Taylor or of Hooker.: urke's attitude in these high transactions is really more imp essive than Chatham's, because he was far less theatrical than Ch tham; and while he was no less nobly passionate for freedom and j stice, in his passion was fused the most strenuous political argu entation and sterling reason of state.
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  • There is no difference in social spirit and doctrine between his protests against the maxims of the English common people as to the colonists, and his protests against the maxims of the French common people as to the court and the nobles; and it is impossible to find a single principle either asserted or implied in the speeches on the American revolution which was afterwards repudiated in the writings on the revolution in France.
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  • In February 1785 he delivered one of the most famous of all his speeches, that on the nabob of Arcot's debts.
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  • Bourke, with appendix, detached papers and notes for speeches, was published in 4 vols., 1844.
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  • The Speeches of Edmund Burke, in the House of Commons and Westminster Hall, were published in 4 vols., 1816.
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  • As an orator Senator Evarts stood in the foremost rank, and some of his best speeches were published.
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  • In his last candidature at Wycombe he stood on more independent ground, commending himself by a series of speeches which fully displayed his quality, though the prescience which gemmed them with more than one prophetic passage was veiled from his contemporaries.
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  • Among Disraeli's great acquaintances were many - Lyndhurst at their head - whose expectations of his future were confirmed by the Wycombe speeches.
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  • The command which his idiosyncrasies had upon him is shown, for example, by reproachful speeches on the treatment of Ireland, and by a startling harangue on behalf of the Chartists, at a time when such irregularities could but damage him, a new man, where he hoped for influence and office.
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  • These two books, the Vindication, published in 1835, and his speeches up to this time and a little beyond, are quite enough to show what Disraeli's Tory democracy meant, how truly national was its aim, and how exclusive of partisanship for the "landed interest"; though he did believe the stability and prosperity of the agricultural class a national interest of the first order, not on economic grounds alone or even chiefly.
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  • Disraeli's opportunity was soon to come now; and in 1845, seeing it on the way, he launched the brilliantly destructive series of speeches which, though they could not prevent the abolition of the corn-laws, abolished the minister who ended them.
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  • These speeches appeal more to admiration than to sympathy, even where the limitations of Disraeli's protectionist beliefs are understood and where his perception of the later consequences of free trade is most cordially acknowledged.
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  • So it is that to read some of his books and many of his speeches is to draw more respect and admiration from their pages than could have been found there originally.
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  • His speeches carry us but a little way beyond the mental range; his novels rather baffle than instruct.
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  • The fine Thucydidean speeches, the dramatic power of grasping character, and the pathos and poetry that run through the stories, along with a humour such as is shown in the Edda, and a varied grace of style that never flags or palls, make Snorri one of the greatest of historians.
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  • In the Senate he made a series of brilliant speeches on the tariff, the Oregon boundary, in favour of the Fiscal Bank Act, and in opposition to the annexation of Texas.
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  • Of the many speeches perhaps the most striking was that of Senator Henry C. Lodge, who, curiously enough in the circumstances, prefaced his eloquent appreciation of the services rendered to the American cause by France by a brilliant sketch of the way in which the French had been driven out of North America by England and her colonists combined.
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  • Sulpicius left no written speeches, those that bore his name being written by a certain P. Canutius (or Cannutius).
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  • He now became a professional writer of speeches or pleas (Xoyoypb40s) for the law courts, sometimes speaking himself.
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  • His formally political speeches must never be considered apart from his forensic speeches in public causes.
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  • But the forensic speeches of Demosthenes for public causes are not only political in this general sense.
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  • Only by taking them along with the formally political speeches, and regarding the whole as one unbroken series, can we see clearly the full scope of the task which he set before him, - a task in which his long resistance to Philip was only the most dramatic incident, and in which his real achievement is not to be measured by the event of Chaeronea.
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  • The First Philippic of Demosthenes was spoken in 35 1 B.C. The Third Philippic - the latest of the extant political speeches - was spoken in 341 B.C. Between these he delivered eight political orations, of which seven are directly concerned with Philip. The whole series falls into two great divisions.
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  • The first division comprises those speeches which were spoken against Philip while he was still a foreign power threatening Greece from without.
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  • The second division comprises the speeches spoken against Philip when, by admission to the Amphictyonic Council, he had now won his way within the circle of the Greek states, and when the issue was no longer between Greece and Macedonia, but between the Greek and Macedonian parties in Greece.
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  • More than half of the sixty-one speeches extant under the name of Demosthenes are certainly or probably spurious.
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  • Blass in Die attische Beredsamkeit (1887-1898), who regards thirty-three (or possibly thirty-five) of the speeches as genuine.
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  • Arguments to his speeches were drawn up by rhetoricians so distinguished as Numenius and Libanius.
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  • (N 85), derived from the last, and containing scholia to the speeches on the Crown and the Embassy, by Ulpian, with some by a younger writer, who was I.
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  • The 56 irpooi.µca, exordia or sketches for political speeches, are by various hands and of various dates.'
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  • On this occasion Herault, as president of the Convention, had to make several speeches.
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  • In October Mr Chamberlain visited Ulster, where he was received with enthusiasm, and delivered several stirring Unionist speeches.
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  • It was evident from the speeches made on the occasion that there was not much cordiality between the various leaders, but the outward solidarity of the party was calculated to bring in renewed subscriptions both at home and from America.
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  • Starcevic, was condemned to imprisonment for the violence of his speeches against the ban, Count KhuenHedervary.
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  • As a member of the Duma he attained a certain notoriety by impassioned speeches and appeals for root-and-branch reform, but he was never conspicuous for steady work or constructive statesmanship. When the first Revolutionary Government was formed people were astonished to hear that Kerensky had been nominated Minister of Justice.
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  • An orator of a business-like, straightforward type, cool and hard-hitting, his spare figure, incisive features and single eye-glass soon made him a favourite subject for the caricaturist; and in later life his aggressive personality, and the peculiarly irritating effect it had on his opponents, made his actions and speeches the object of more controversy than was the lot of any other politician of his time.
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  • His accession to office was marked by speeches breathing a new spirit of imperial consolidation, embodied either in suggestions for commercial union or in more immediately practicable proposals for improving the "imperial estate"; and at the Diamond Jubilee of 1897 the visits of the colonial premiers to London emphasized and confirmed the new policy, the fruits of which were afterwards seen in the cordial support given by the colonies in the Boer War.
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  • In 1895 the time for the realization of these views had come; and Mr Chamberlain's speeches, previously remarkable chiefly for debating power and directness of argument, were now dominated by a newnote of constructive statesmanship, basing itself on the economic necessities of a world-wide empire.
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  • No English statesman probably has ever been, at different times in his career, so able an advocate of absolutely contradictory policies, and his opponents were not slow to taunt him with quotations from his earlier speeches.
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  • In all these speeches he managed to point his argument by application to local industries.
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  • On January 18th, 1904, Mr Chamberlain ended his series of speeches by a great meeting at the Guildhall, in the city of London, the key-note being his exhortation to his audience to "think imperially."
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  • Free-trade unionists like Lord Goschen and Lord Hugh Cecil, and the Liberal leaders - for whom Mr Asquith became the principal spokesman, though Lord Rosebery's criticisms also had considerable weight - found new matter in Mr Chamberlain's speeches for their contention that any radical change in the traditional English fiscal policy, established now for sixty years, would only result in evil.
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  • From the end of Mr Chamberlain's series of expository speeches on his scheme of tariff reform, onwards during the various fiscal debates and discussions of 1904, it is unnecessary to follow events in detail.
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  • He made three important speeches at Welbeck (August 4), at Luton (October 5), and at Limehouse (December 15), but he had nothing substantial to add to his case, and the party situation continued in all its embarrassments.
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  • His speeches of this period show great debating skill, combined with strong originality and imagination.
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  • It was probably his speeches on German policy which induced the king to appoint him Prussian representative at the restored diet of Frankfort in 1851.
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  • The indignation which his appointment caused was intense; he was known only by the reputation which in his early years he had won as a violent ultra-Conservative, and the apprehensions were increased by his first speech, in which he said that the German question could not be settled by speeches and parliamentary decrees, but only by blood and iron.
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  • This was the great work of Bismarck's life; he had completed the programme foreshadowed in his early speeches, and finished the work of Frederick the Great.
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  • The speeches are of the greatest importance both for his character and for political history; of the numerous editions that by Horst Kohl, in 12 vols.
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  • A useful general collection is that by Ludwig Hahn, Bismarck, sein politisches Leben, &c. (5 vols., Berlin, 1878-1891), which includes a selection from letters, speeches and newspaper articles.
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  • By far the fullest guide to Bismarck's life is Horst Kohl's Fiirst Bismarck, Regesten zu einer wissenschaftlichen Biographic (Leipzig, 1891-1892), which contains a record of Bismarck's actions on each day, with references to and extracts from his letters and speeches.
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  • The former follows upon Joshua's two concluding speeches, one given by a Deuteronomic writer in xxiii., and the other incorporated by another though similar hand in xxiv.
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  • After a short period of freedom she was again arrested for making inflammatory speeches.
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  • His published works include some volumes of speeches and well-known studies of Ignatius Loyola (1876) and of Michelet (1876).
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  • Service includes, pre-day music requests, disco, background music, confetti cannons, mics provided for speeches.
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  • He said: âToo many of the speeches are doing a quick canter.
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  • Showing unusual courage, he made speeches advocating civil disobedience in opposition to the United States ' war effort in Vietnam.
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  • During this stage, someone numbered several of the speeches in blue crayon, in an attempt to order them.
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  • There were a few speeches from the liberal left present, but it was the usual leftist drivel.
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  • Through his many articles, books and keynote speeches, John has become a highly respected business futurist and a renowned global thought leader.
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  • These wedding gavels can be used for the speeches on the day and then presented as a gift afterward.
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  • I can see his odd grimaces, and hear him swear so funnily in his speeches, as if it were but yesterday!
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  • Speeches ensued in which the palindrome was explained to those not imbibed with the spirit of Python Monty.
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  • Capable of fierce invective, his oratory is impersonal; passionate and emotional himself, his speeches are temperate.
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  • The twelve jurors just couldn't agree whether or not Nick Griffin's speeches incited racial hatred to the extent they broke the law.
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  • How many speeches have you listened to and books have you read that have included those seemingly magical words?
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  • You could also use the DJ's radio mic for speeches.
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  • To celebrate, Colin Gibbs made it a champagne picnic, complete with speeches - and soup thoughtfully provided by Iris Piggott.
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  • Listen to his speeches on a cd player or find much more using a computer.
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  • Formal speeches are but an empty prattle, which God regards not: Ps. xlvii.
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  • Their speeches are not premeditated - they're all in the moment.
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  • The march passed off peacefully, despite usual police provocation, & finished with speeches & delicious vegan food by Veggies!
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  • Speeches ' inciting people to hatred or contempt ' of the king or the government became punishable by death.
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  • Write the wedding speeches (groom, best man, father of the bride ). TOP 7 Days before Have the wedding rehearsal.
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  • The final synoptic unit asks you to analyze the language of genres such as travel writing, autobiography, news reportage and speeches.
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  • An undercover reporter recorded the speeches which were later broadcast on the BBC.
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  • They could not be expected necessarily to understand common scriptural symbolism let alone the arcane speeches of the Nazarene.
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  • Speeches of dying men are wont to be received with much veneration and reverence, especially the charge of dying friends.
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  • Then followed an hour's wrangle, with countless speeches as to the candidate for the Vise Presidency.
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  • Capacity for work brought him places on important committees - he was chairman successively of the committee on military affairs, the committee on banking and currency, and the committee on appropriations, - and his ability as a speaker enabled him to achieve distinction on the floor of the House and to rise to leadership. Between 1863 and 1873 Garfield delivered speeches of importance on "The Constitutional Amendment to abolish Slavery," "The Freedman's Bureau," "The Reconstruction of Rebel States," "The Public Debt and Specie Payments," "Reconstruction,'" The Currency," Taxation of United States Bonds," Enforcing the 14th Amendment," National Aid to Education,' and "the Right to Originate Revenue Bills."
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