Spectroscope sentence example

spectroscope
  • Closely related to the flame-colorations, we have to notice the great services rendered by the spectroscope to the detection of elements.

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  • The definition of a fine vertical line, and consequently the resolving power for contiguous vertical lines, is thus independent of the vertical aperture of the instrument, a law of great importance in the theory of the spectroscope.

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  • Again, by raising the temperature, a metal in the solid state can be melted and liquefied, and poured into a mould to assume any form desired, which is retained when the metal cools and solidifies again; the gaseous state of a metal is revealed by the spectroscope.

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  • Thus in 1864 the spectroscope yielded him evidence that planetary and irregular nebulae consist of luminous gas - a conclusion tending to support the nebular hypothesis of the origin of stars and planets by condensation from glowing masses of fluid material.

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  • In the spectroscope calcium exhibits two intense lines-an orange line (a), (X 6163), a green line (a), (X 4229), and a fainter indigo line.

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  • The image of this seen through the glass prism of the spectroscope will appear as in fig.

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  • The power of a spectroscope to perform its main function, which is to separate vibrations of different but closely adjacent frequencies, is called its " resolving power."

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  • Such a variation can be detected by the spectroscope.

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  • If the sodium is only gently heated, so as to produce a comparatively rarefied vapour, and a grating spectroscope employed, the spectrum obtained is like that shown in fig.

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  • The analysing appliance constitutes the main feature of a spectroscope.

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  • In interpreting the phenomena observed in a spectroscope, it is necessary to remember that the instrument, as pointed out by Lord Rayleigh, is itself a producer of homogeneity within the limits defined by its resolving power.

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  • The gradual elimination of the= nitrogen is tested at a moment's notice with a miniature spectroscope.

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  • In 1879 Maxwell Considered It One Of The Greatest Difficulties Which The Kinetic Theory Had Yet Encountered, That In Spite Of The Many Other Degrees Of Freedom Of Vibration Revealed By The Spectroscope, The Experimental Value Of The Ratio S/S Was 1.40 For So Many Gases, Instead Of Being Less Than 4/3.

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  • When examined with the spectroscope the light of the stars is found to resemble generally that of the sun.

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  • The spectroscope only yields information about the thin outer envelope of the star; and even here elements may be present which do not reveal themselves, for the spectrum shown depends very greatly on the temperature and pressure.

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  • By means of the spectroscope it is possible to determine the relative orbital velocity of the two components, and this when compared with the period fixes the absolute dimensions of the orbit; the apparent dimensions of the orbit being known from visual observations the distance can then be found.

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  • A better method is to derive the speed from the radial motions observed with the spectroscope.

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  • In connexion with the modern study of radioactivity, the electroscope has become an instrument of great usefulness, far outrivalling the spectroscope in sensibility.

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  • Of other papers in which he dealt with this and kindred branches of physics may be mentioned "Observations with a Rigid Spectroscope," "Heating of a Disc by Rapid Motion in Vacuo," "Thermal Equilibrium in an Enclosure Containing Matter in Visible Motion," and "Internal Radiation in Uniaxal Crystals."

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  • Pending more conclusive evidence from the spectroscope, the interpretation of the peculiar surface rotation of the sun appears to be that the central parts of the body are rotating faster than those outside them; for if such were the case the observed phenomenon would arise.

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  • The bolograph thus obtained must be cleared of the absorption of the earth's atmosphere, and that of the transmitting apparatus - a spectroscope and siderostat.

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  • When the slit of the spectroscope is set across a spot, it shows, as might be expected, a general reduction of brightness as we pass from the photosphere to the penumbra; and a still greater one as we pass to the umbra.

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  • In the higher chromosphere on occasions metallic gases are carried up to such a level that without an eclipse a bright line spectrum of many elements may be seen, but it is always possible to see those of hydrogen and helium, and by opening the slit of the spectroscope so as to weaken still further the continuous spectrum from the photosphere (now a mere reflection) the actual forms of the gaseous structures called prominences round the sun's rim may be seen.

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  • Light from an arc lamp was so directed that only that part reached the spectroscope which fell upon the flame of the burner at grazing incidence, and was thereby refracted.

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  • They are also revealed by the spectroscope in stars, comets and the sun.

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  • One characteristic of astronomy which tends to make its progress slow and continuous arises out of the general fact that, except in the case of motions to or from us, which can be determined by a single observation with the spectroscope, the motion of a heavenly body can be determined only by comparing its position at two different epochs.

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  • Discoveries with the spectroscope have ratified arid extended this conclusion.

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  • The likeness of the sun to the stars has been shown by the spectroscope to be profound and inherent.

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  • In the following year, Sir Norman Lockyer was enabled to prove, by its means, the extraordinary vehemence of chromospheric disturbances, the bright prominencerays in his spectroscope betraying, through their opposite shif tings, movements and counter-movements up to 120 m.

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  • This is imposed upon us by the fact that it is only when matter is in a gaseous form that the spectroscope can give us certain knowledge as to its physical condition.

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  • In this case the revelations of the spectroscope relate only to the constitution of the gaseous envelope, and not to the body below the envelope, from which the light emanates.

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  • When the spectroscope was first applied in astronomy, it was hoped that the light reflected from living matter might be found to possess some property different from that found in light reflected from non-living matter, and that we might thus detect the presence of life on the surface of a planet by a study of its spectrum; but no hope of this kind has so far been realized.

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  • The true character of the light in this case may be revealed by analysing it with a spectroscope, when a spectrum is obtained traversed by dark bands corresponding to the constituents that are weakened or annulled.

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  • Arago pointed out, by supposing that in passing through the plate the plane of polarization of each monochromatic constituent is rotated by an amount dependent upon the frequency - an explanation that may be at once verified either by using monochromatic light or by analysing the light with a spectroscope, the spectrum in the latter case being traversed by one or more dark bands, according to the thickness of the plate, that pass along the spectrum from end to end as the analyser is rotated.

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  • The polariscope and the spectroscope are the only instruments by the aid of which the nature of the matter can be inferred.

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  • The observations of Maxwell Hall also embraced some made with the spectroscope.

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  • The spectroscope has played an all-important part in the characterization of the elements, which, in combination with oxygen, constitute the group of substances collectively named the " rare earths."

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  • It can be seen with the eye at the beginning or ending of a total eclipse of the sun, and with a suitable spectroscope at any time under favourable conditions, (See SUN and ECLIPSE.)

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  • Turning to the study of radioactivity, he noticed its association with the minerals which yield helium, and in support of the hypothesis that that gas is a disintegration-product of radium he proved in 1903 that it is continuously formed by the latter substance in quantities sufficiently great to be directly recognizable in the spectroscope.

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  • Thus if a horizontal slit is illuminated by an arc lamp, and the light - rendered parallel by a collimating lens - is transmitted through the sodium tube and focused on the vertical slit of a spectroscope, the effect of the sodium vapour is to produce its refraction spec trum vertically on the slit.

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  • Lord Rayleigh, to whom we owe the first general discussion of the theory of the spectroscope, found by observation that if two spectroscopic lines of frequencies n1 and n, are observed in an instrument, they are just seen as two separate lines when the centre of the central diffraction band of one coincides with the first minimum intensity of the other.

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  • The collimator of a spectroscope should be detached, or moved so as to admit of the introduction of an auxiliary slit at a distance from the collimator lens equal to its focal length.

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  • A spectroscope may be compared to a mechanical harmonic analyser which when fed with an irregular function of one variable represented by a curve supplies us with the sine curves into which the original function may be resolved.

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  • One of the most interesting examples is that furnished by the green mercury line, which when examined by a powerful echelon spectroscope splits up into a number of constituents which have been examined by several investigators.

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  • By suitably replacing the ocular of the observing telescope in an angular vision spectroscope by a photographic camera, it is possible to photograph spectra; such instruments are termed spectrographs.

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  • In its simplest form it consists of a direct-vision spectroscope, having an adjustable slit (called "camera slit"), instead of an eyepiece, in the focal plane of the observing telescope.

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  • Suppose a fixed image of the sun to be formed on the collimator slit of this spectroscope, and a photographic plate, with its plane parallel to the plane of the solar image, to be mounted almost in contact with the camera slit.

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  • The spectroscope is then moved parallel to itself, admitting to the collimator slit light from all parts of the sun's disk.

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  • This permits the employment of a spectroscope furnished with a.

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  • The eye end presents an refractor appearance too complicated to be figured here; it has a micrometer and its illumination for the position circle, a micrometer head, and a bright or dark field, clamps in right ascension and declination and quick and slow motion in the same, a finder, microscopes for reading the hour and declination circles, an illuminated dial showing sidereal time and driven by an electric current from the sidereal clock, and counter weights which can be removed when a spectroscope or other heavy appliance is added.

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