Speaks sentence example

speaks
  • He speaks the truth.
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  • He won't make plane reservations until he speaks to her.
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  • "She speaks the truth," he replied as he strode into the house.
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  • Anna Pavlovna's circle on the contrary was enraptured by this enthusiasm and spoke of it as Plutarch speaks of the deeds of the ancients.
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  • Presumably, he speaks Spanish.
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  • When the law speaks universally, and something happens which is not according to the common course of events, it is right that the law should be modified in its application to that particular case, as the lawgiver himself would have done, if the case had been present to his mind.
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  • She speaks French and German.
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  • The jactus lapidum of which he speaks was probably more akin to the modern "putting the weight," once even called "putting the stone."
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  • Curtius places the original Prytaneum south of the Acropolis in the Old Agora, speaks of a second identical with the Tholos in the Cerameicus, and regards that of Pausanius as a building of Roman times (Stadtgeschichte, p. 302).
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  • He speaks as a legislator, citing no authority; but he formulates, doubtless, the ideas and perhaps the practices of the Jerusalem priesthood.
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  • He speaks of the canon of logarithms as "a me longo tempore elaboratum."
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  • Charles in the Answer to the Petition (June 13, 1642) speaks of cavaliers as a "word by what mistake soever it seemes much in disfavour."
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  • The Septuagint translators did not read the clause which speaks of "priests and Levites," and 2 Chron.
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  • Ritchie, " that, in the various dialogues in which Plato speaks of immortality, the arguments seem to be of different kinds, and most of them quite unconnected with one another.
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  • James Thomson (" B.V.") speaks " of the restful rapture of the inviolate grave," and sings the praises of death and of oblivion.
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  • For instance, he asserts the number of the Sabine virgins to have been exactly 527; again, in a certain year when no Greek or Latin writers mention any important campaign, Antias speaks of a big battle with enormous casualties.
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  • 'Shaftesbury, doubtless no friendly witness, speaks of him as .an inveterate liar, "proud, ambitious, revengeful, false, prodigal and covetous to the highest degree," 4 and Burnet supports his unfavourable judgment to a great extent.
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  • So, too, in his psychology he speaks of the several degrees of mind as arising according to a progressive necessity.
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  • His name does not occur in Homer or Hesiod, but he was known in the time of Ibycus (c. 530 B.C.), and Pindar (522-442 B.C.) speaks of him as " the father of songs."
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  • Priscian the grammarian speaks of him as having attained the summit of honesty and of all sciences.
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  • 1 It should be noted as against this, the general account, that Thucydides, speaking apparently with accuracy, describes the tax as (5%); the Constitution of Athens speaks of (the familiar) SEKar7 (10%).
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  • He speaks Finnish with Finns, Mongolian with Buriats, Ostiak with Ostiaks; he shows remarkable facility in adapting his agricultural practices to new conditions, without, however, abandoning the village community; he becomes hunter, cattle-breeder or fisherman, and carries on these occupations according to local usage; he modifies his dress and adapts his religious beliefs to the locality he inhabits.
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  • He must have given general satisfaction, for even before Parker's death two persons so different as Burghley and Dean Nowell independently recommended Grindal's appointment as his successor, and Spenser speaks warmly of him in the Shepherd's Calendar as the "gentle shepherd Algrind."
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  • Laws were engraved on cypress by the ancients, and objects of value were preserved in receptacles made of it; thus Horace speaks of poems levi servanda cupresso.
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  • Of Kirkby, from whom he learned the rudiments of English and Latin grammar, he speaks gratefully, and doubtless truly, so far as he could trust the impressions of childhood.
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  • In his Memoirs he speaks of the results of his " childish revolt against the religion of his country " with undisguised self gratulation.
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  • In this wider sense Demeter is akin to Ge, with whom she has several epithets in common, and is sometimes identified with Rhea-Cybele; thus Pindar speaks of Demeter xaXKoKparos (" brass-rattling "), an epithet obviously more suitable to the Asiatic than to the Greek earth-goddess.
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  • Pepys, a far more trustworthy judge, speaks of him invariably in terms of respect and approval as a " grave, serious man," and commends his appointment as treasurer of the navy as that of " a very notable man and understanding and will do things regular and understand them himself."
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  • Though his method is throughout scholastic, he covers the same ground, and Grotius speaks of him in terms of high respect.
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  • Others shared this conviction: Strabo speaks of embassies from Egypt and Judaea bearing presents - one deposited in the temple of Jupiter Capitolinus bore the inscription of Alexander, the king of the Jews.
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  • That he displayed considerable classical knowledge, was a good linguist, a ready and versatile writer of verse, and above all that he possessed an astounding memory, seems certain, not only from the evidence of men of his own time, but from the fact that even Joseph Scaliger (Prima Scaligerana, p. 58, 1669) speaks of his attainments with the highest praise.
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  • This doctrine or hypothesis he usually speaks of as "the ideal system" or "the theory of ideas"; and to it he opposes his own analysis of the act of perception.
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  • On the other hand he speaks of the great anti-Teuton emperor Justinian, and of his reversal of the German conquests of the 5th century, in language which would certainly have grated on the ears of Totila and his heroes.
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  • His widow, however, bore a posthumous child, also named Germanus, of whom Jordanes speaks (cap. 60) as "blending the blood of the Anicii and the Amals, and furnishing a hope under the divine blessing of one day uniting their glories."
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  • As to the style and literary character of Jordanes, every author who has used him speaks in terms of severe censure.
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  • Blith speaks of an instrument which ploughed, sowed and harrowed at the same time; and the setting of corn was then a subject of much discussion.
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  • Sometimes he speaks of political economy as a department "carved out of the general body of the science of society;" whilst on the other hand the title of his systematic work implies a doubt whether political economy is a part of "social philosophy" at all, and not rather a study preparatory and auxiliary to it.
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  • All this speaks of intense hatred alike of Jews and Christians; the fasts, celibacy and monastic and anchoret life of the latter are peculiarly objectionable to the Mandaeans.
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  • The word drill is always used to render the Latin magus, and in one passage St Columba speaks of Christ as his Druid.
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  • If there was thus only a customary and unwritten law (and William of Tyre definitely speaks of a jus consuetudinarium under Baldwin III., quo regnum regebatur), then the "Letters of the Sepulchre" are a myth - or rather, if they ever existed, they existed not as a code of written law, but, perhaps, as a register of fiefs, like the Sicilian Defetarii.
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  • Homer knows only "Apt ot, but Herodotus speaks of " Syrians " as identical with Assyrians, the latter being, he thinks, a " barbarian " form, and he applies the name very widely to include, e.g.
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  • The Liber de compositione alchemiae, which professes to be by Morienus - perhaps the same as the Marianus who was the teacher of Khalid - was translated by Robertus Castrensis, who states that he finished the work in 1182, and speaks as if he were making a revelation - " Quid sit alchemia nondum cognovit vestra Latinitas."
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  • This arouses his spirit of contradiction; and he tells them that they might have won it from him by coaxing, but never by threats, and that he values his life no more than the stone he tosses away as he speaks to them.
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  • Plutarch speaks of his intercourse with the deity, and compares him with Lycurgus and Numa (Numa, 4).
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  • Plutarch, drawing partly on Theopompus, speaks of his religion in his Isis and Osiris (cc. 46-47).
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  • Like Mahommed after him he often speaks of his conversations with God and the archangels.
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  • He speaks for the most part only in general references of the divine commands and of good and evil works.
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  • He speaks more in the character of prophet than in that of lawgiver.
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  • He speaks of his poor circumstances, but from the superscription clarissimus and spectabilis in one MS., he seems to have held a high official position.
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  • Nepet had become Roman before 386 B.C., when Livy speaks of it and Sutrium as the keys of Etruria.
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  • Cicero speaks of it as a prcsperous country town, which had not as yet fallen into the hands of large proprietors; and inscriptions show that under the empire it was still flourishing.
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  • Homer was acquainted with it and speaks of the "Argo" as well known to all men; the wanderings of Odysseus may have been partly founded on its voyage.
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  • In addition to these Clement often speaks of his intention to write on certain subjects, but it may well be doubted whether in most cases, if not all, he intended to devote separate treatises to 1 Zahn thinks we have part of them in the Adumbrationes Clem.
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  • He believed in a personal Son of God who was the Reason and Wisdom of God; and he believed that this Son of God really became incarnate though he speaks of him almost invariably as the Word, and attaches little value to his human nature.
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  • Johann Anton Scopoli, writing in the 18th century, speaks of them as so abundant in one place in Carniola that in June twenty cartloads were carried away for manure!
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  • The ordinary use of "hustings" at the present day for the platform from which a candidate speaks at a parliamentary or other election, or more widely for a political candidate's election campaign, is derived from the application of the word, first to the platform in the Guildhall on which the London court was held, and next to that from which the public nomination of candidates for a parliamentary election was formerly made, and from which the candidate addressed the electors.
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  • As Wellhausen says (p. 171): "The poet appears to believe that in the very act of describing enthusiastically the ancient deed of deliverance, he brings home to us the new; we are left sometimes in doubt whether he speaks of the past to suggest the new by analogy, or whether he is concerned directly with the future, and simply paints it with the colours of the past."
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  • For it is to the individual conscience that God speaks; through the struggles of the individual conscience He builds up a strong and stable Christian character.
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  • In the first the prophet speaks in his own name, addressing himself to the people in a lively description of a present calamity caused by a terrible plague of locusts which threatens the entire destruction of the country, and appears to be the vehicle of a final consuming judgment (the day of Yahweh).
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  • He enjoyed a triple wergeld, but had no definite salary, being remunerated by the receipt of certain revenues, a system which contained the germs of discord, on account of the confusion of his public and private 1 The changing language of this epoch speaks of civitates, subsequently of pagi, and later of comitatus (counties).
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  • Sennacherib speaks of one at Tarbisu to the north of Nineveh, but it is significant that although Nebuchadrezzar II.
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  • John Major in his Latin History speaks of "one Henry, blind from his birth, who, in the time of my childhood, fashioned a whole book about William Wallace, and therein wrote down in our popular verse - and this was a kind of composition in which he had much skill - all that passed current among the people in his day.
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  • Some of these, it may be said, are simply the old Scholastic problem in a different garb; but the extended horizon of which Haureau speaks is amply proved by mere reference to the treatises of Albert and St Thomas.
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  • It would correspond in time with the movement of the Scyths of which Herodotus speaks, and it may be inferred that immigrants coming from those regions were rather allied to the Tatar family of nations than to the Iranian.
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  • His description of the Temple ritual is not strictly accurate, but he speaks of the worshippers as passing the night in gazing at the stars and calling on God in prayer; his words, if they do not exactly fit anything in the later ritual, are well fitted to illustrate the original liturgical use of Ps.
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  • A younger contemporary speaks of his having made a wonderful clock or sun-dial at Magdeburg; and we know from his letters that Gerbert was accustomed to exchange his globes for MSS.
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  • A native of the city, Thabit ibn Kurra, in a passage from a Syriac work of his (now lost) quoted by Barhebraeus, 2 speaks of the paganism of IHarran as distinguished by its steadfast resistance to Christian propaganda.
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  • Gregory Magistros, as we have seen, attests their predilection for the apostle Paul, and speaks of their perpetually "quoting the Gospel and the Apostolon."
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  • In one of the extant fragments he speaks of himself as having begun his wanderings sixty-seven years before, when he was twenty-five years of age, so that he was not less than ninety-two when he died.
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  • Aristotle, in a passage already cited, Metaphysics, A5, speaks of Xenophanes as the first of the Eleatic unitarians, adding that his monotheism was reached through the contemplation of the oupavos.
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  • Another account speaks of him as having left behind him gardens, to the extent of about twelve acres, close to the Appian Way.
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  • He constantly speaks of the malevolence and detraction of an older poet, whose name is said to have been Luscius Lavinius or Lanuvinus.
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  • He speaks of "his fine expression, elegancy and quaintness," and adds, "he does so possess the soul with his graces that we forget those of his fable."
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  • In the description of surgical operations the vagueness of the language seems sometimes to show that the author had not performed such himself; but in other parts, and especially in his historical introduction, he speaks with more confidence; and everywhere he compares and criticizes with learning and judgment.
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  • The Armenian liturgy, in its benediction of the incense, speaks of "this perfume prepared from myrrh and cinnamon."
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  • He speaks of its wealth, commerce, grandeur and magnificence - of the mildness of the climate, the beauty of the gardens, the sweet, clear and salubrious springs, the flowing streams, and the pleasant clack of the watermills.
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  • Baber always calls the range Hindu Kush, and the way in which he speaks of it shows clearly that it was a range that was meant, not a solitary pass or peak (according to modern local use, as alleged by Elphinstone and Burnes).
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  • It lay off the main roads, and is hardly mentioned by ancient writers, though Pliny speaks of the Silis as flowing "ex montibus Tarvisanis."
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  • Simeon of Durham speaks of a submission of Scotland as a result; if it ever took place it was a mere form, for three years later we find a great confederacy formed in Scotland against Ethelstan.
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  • Temples and palaces were repaired or erected at Lagash and elsewhere, the town of Nina - which probably gave ' They are also called high-priests of Gunammide and a contracttablet speaks of " Te in Babylon," but this was probably not the Te of the seal.
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  • He was still reigning in Babylonia in his seventh year, as a contract dated in that year has been discovered at Erech, and an inscription of his, in which he speaks of restoring the ruined temples and their priests, couples Merodach of Babylon with Assur of Nineveh.
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  • In the former passage of Jubilees the subject-matter leads to this identification, as well as the fact that Noah is represented as speaking in the first person, although throughout Jubilees it is the angel that speaks.
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  • The present book is possibly the long-lost AcaO'iuo Mwv04cos mentioned in some ancient lists, for it never speaks of the assumption of Moses, but always of his natural death.
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  • Irenaeus, Clement of Alexandria and Origen quote it as Scripture, though in Africa it was not held in such high consideration, as Tertullian speaks slightingly of it.
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  • The date is late, for the writer speaks of the "venerable and holy images," as well as "the glorious and precious crosses and the sacred things of the churches" (xiv.), which points to the 5th century, when such things were first introduced into churches.
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  • He speaks more favourably of the introduction of food into the stomach by a silver tube; and he strongly recommends the use of nutritive enemata.
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  • The last-named studied under him (78-77 B.C.), and speaks as his admirer and friend.
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  • Some writers, indeed, considered the Pisidians as the same people with the Milyans, while others regarded them as descendants of the Solymi, but Strabo speaks of the language of the Pisidians as distinct from that of the Solymi, as well as from that of the Lydians.
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  • Pliny explicitly speaks of a mineral Katiµ€ia or cadmic as serving for the conversion of copper into aurichalcum, and says further that the deposit (of zinc oxide) formed in the brass furnaces could be used instead of the mineral.
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  • As the Praefatio speaks of the emperor Ludwig in the present tense, the former part of it at least was probably written in his reign, i.e.
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  • Palgrave says little of the desert part of the journey or of its Bedouin inhabitants, but much of the fertility of the oases and of the civility of the townsmen; and like other travellers in Nejd he speaks with enthusiasm of its bright, exhilarating climate.
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  • 1 000, speaks of them as comprising the bulk of the population of Syria, Irak and Khorasan, and as superior to the orthodox in intellectual ability.
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  • Leo Africanus, writing early in the 16th century, gives a favourable picture of the "great city" of Tunis, which had a flourishing manufacture of fine cloth, a prosperous colony of Christian traders, and, including the suburbs, nine or ten thousand hearths; but he speaks also of the decay of once flourishing provincial towns, and especially of agriculture, the once powerful Church.
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  • The Alexandrians prepared oil of turpentine by distilling pine-resin; Zosimus of Panopolis, a voluminous writer of the 5th century A.D., speaks of the distillation of a "divine water" or "panacea" (probably from the complex mixture of calcium polysulphides, thiosulphate, &c., and free sulphur, which is obtained by boiling sulphur with lime and water) and advises "the efficient luting of the apparatus, for otherwise the valuable properties would be lost."
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  • When he wrote the latter work he must have left Royaumont, as he speaks of returning from the funeral of Prince Louis (15th January 1260) "ad nostram domum," a phrase which can hardly be explained otherwise than as referring to his own Dominican house, whether at Beauvais or elsewhere.
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  • Jerome speaks of Lactantius as a poet, and several poems have been attributed to him: - De Ave Phoenice (which Harnack thinks makes use of Clement), De Passione Domini and De Resurrectione (Domini) or De Pascha ad Felicem Episcopum.
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  • He was called "Xenophon the younger" from his imitation of that writer, and he even speaks of himself as Xenophon.
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  • When Eusebius placed MwpavIel near Eleutheropolis it is not likely that he is thinking of Mareshah (Maresa), for he speaks of the former as a village and of the latter as a ruin 2 m.
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  • Tacitus wrongly speaks of it as a colony; but it appears to have received a new colony under Gallienus.
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  • Asconius Pedianus and Thrasea Paetus were natives of the town; and Quintilian speaks of the directness and simplicity of their diction as Patavinitas, comparing it with the artificial obscurity of the writers of Rome itself.
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  • 720 speaks of historiographers having been appointed to collect local records for the first time in 403, from which it is to be inferred that such officials had already existed at the court.
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  • He elsewhere speaks of his office as principally an opening of the spiritual sense of the word.
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  • He there speaks very briefly and slightingly of life insurance, probably because it was then regarded as impious by religionists of his complexion.
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  • Cicero, who speaks of 150 of these speeches as extant in his day, praises them for their acuteness, their wit, their conciseness.
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  • He speaks with emphasis of the impressiveness of Cato's eulogy and the satiric bitterness of his invective.
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  • Varro speaks of its apple trees which gave fruit twice in the year and Pliny praises its wine also.
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  • Shelley also very truly speaks of the ” legioned rooks " to which he stood listening " mid the mountains Euganean."
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  • Morris, in The Defence of Guinevere, speaks of "gloomy Gawain"; perhaps the most absurdly misleading epithet which could possibly have been applied to the "gay, gratious, and gude" knight of early English tradition.
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  • The first printed edition of the book, by a certain Blaise de Vigenbre, dates from 1585, is dedicated to the seigniory of Venice (Villehardouin, it should be said, has been accused of a rather unfair predilection for the Venetians), and speaks of either a part or the whole of the memoirs as having been printed twelve years earlier.
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  • 3 Plato regarding the world as an embodiment of eternal, archetypal ideas, which he groups under the central idea of Good, identified with the divine reason, at the same time uses the ordinary language of the day, and speaks of God and the gods, feeling his way towards the conception of a personal God, which, to quote Dr Illingworth again, neither he nor Aristotle could reach because they had not " a clear conception of human personality."
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  • In his revised New Testament Marcion speaks of " the covenant which is the mother of us all, which begets us in the holy Church, to which we have vowed allegiance."
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  • Nevertheless, the Assyriologist speaks with a good deal of confidence of dates as remote as 3800 B.C.,the time ascribed to King Sargon, who was once regarded as a mythical person, but is now known to have been an actual monarch.
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  • Finlay speaks of him as a capable partisan leader who had great influence over his men, and describes him as of "middle size, thin, dark-complexioned, with a bright expressive animal eye which indicated gipsy blood."
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  • He afterwards became a royal privy councillor, and remained so till his death, which took place suddenly at Paris in February 1603, but in what manner we do not know; Anderson, the editor of his scientific writings, speaks only of a "praeceps et immaturum autoris fatum."
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  • 70, since it speaks of the fall of only a tenth of the city, xi.
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  • 2, where he speaks of the church as a bride and the marriage supper of the Lamb.
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  • The author speaks not at all of the law 1 - the word does not occur in his work; he looks for salvation from the power and grace of God and Christ alone.
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  • It is true that the Florentine Simone Sigoli, who visited Cairo in 1384, in his Viaggio al Monte Sinai still speaks of "Presto Giovanni" as a monarch dwelling in India; but it is the India which is conterminous with the dominions of the soldan of Egypt, and whose lord is master of the Nile, to close or open its discharge upon Egypt.
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  • In them too he speaks of the Numantine War as recently finished, and of Scipio as still living.
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  • This thought begins to appear in literature in the end of the 5th century B.C., when Aristophanes (Frogs, 186) speaks of the plain of Lethe.
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  • Lentulus played a prominent part in the recall of Cicero from exile, and although a temporary coolness seems to have arisen between them, Cicero speaks of him in most grateful terms. From 56-53 Lentulus was governor of the province of Cilicia (with Cyprus) and during that time was commissioned by the senate to restore Ptolemy XI.
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  • SuIdas speaks of him as "Laconian or Milesian"; possibly he visited Miletus in his youth, where he became familiar with the Ionic elegy.
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  • 16, he speaks of " the sacraments of our religion," intending, it would appear, the love-feast and Eucharist.
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  • 34, he speaks of the sacrament of baptism and Eucharist.
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  • In the same work, chap. x., he speaks of " the Sacrament of the Passion foreshadowed in prophecies."
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  • Elsewhere he speaks of " the sacraments of water, oil, bread."
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  • Augustine speaks of the salt administered to catechumens before baptism and of their exorcism as sacraments; and as late as 1129 Godefrid so calls the salt and water, oil and chrism, the ring and pastoral staff used in ordinations.
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  • God in another dream permits him to go, on condition that he speaks what God tells him.
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  • 23 f., speaks of the coming of ships from the West, to attack Assur and "Eber" it may refer to the conquest of Persia by Alexander the Great.
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  • Josephus 7 paraphrases the story more suo, and speaks of Balaam as the best prophet of his time, but with a disposition ill adapted to resist temptation.
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  • Philo describes him in the Life of Moses as a great magician; elsewhere 8 he speaks of "the sophist Balaam, being," i.e.
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  • In all this, Harnack speaks from a point of view of his own.
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  • A forged grant of Ceadwalla speaks of the fall of Kent before Sigehere as a well-known event; and in a Kentish charter dated 676 a king of Kent called Swebhard grants land with the consent of his father King Sebbe.
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  • He speaks in places as if his object was to record the wars between the Greeks and the barbarians; but as he omits the Trojan war, in which he fully believes, the expedition of the Teucrians and Dlysians against Thrace and Thessaly, the wars connected with the Ionian colonization of Asia Minor and others, it is evident that he does not really aim at embracing in his narrative all the wars between Greeks and barbarians with which he was acquainted.
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  • His Autonomies ecclesiastiques; eglises separees (1897), in which he speaks of the origin of the Anglican Church, but treats especially of the origin of the Greek Churches of the East, was received with scant favour in certain narrow circles of the pontifical court.
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  • 6 The New Testament often speaks of " spirits," 7rv€UµaTa.
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  • In the New Testament angels appear frequently as the ministers of God and the agents of revelation"; and Our Lord speaks of angels as fulfilling such functions', implying in one saying that they neither marry nor are given in marriage.
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  • He speaks of a Christian collection of writings, and knew and used the gospels, but was influenced less by the fourth than by the Synoptics.
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  • Ministerial gradations exist in this church; Jesus begins the feet-washing with Peter, who alone speaks and is spoken to; the beloved disciple outruns Peter to Jesus' monument, yet waits to go in till Peter has done so first; and in the appendix the treble pastoral commission is to Peter alone: a Petrine pre-eminence which but echoes the Synoptists.
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  • In character it is profoundly " pneumatic "; Paul's super-earthly Spirit-Christ here breathes and speaks, and invites a corresponding spiritual comprehension.
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  • When the prologue to Job speaks of plundering Sabaeans (and Chaldaeans) on the northern skirts of Arabia, these may be either colonists or caravans, which, like the old Phoenician and Greek traders, combined on occasion robbery with trade.
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  • This short but important and well-informed notice is followed a little later by that of Agatharchides (120 B.C.), who speaks in glowing terms of the wealth and greatness of the Sabaeans, but seems to have less exact information than Eratosthenes.
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  • 69, where he speaks of Minaean myrrh " in qua et Atramitica est et Gebbanitica et Ausaritis Gebbanitarum regno," &c., implying that Minaean myrrh was really a Hadramite and Gebanite product.
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  • A map of 1830 shows a small settlement on "Milwalky Bay"; and the treaty of the 8th of February 1831 speaks of the "Milwauky or Manawauky River."
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  • Pliny speaks of the whiteness of its linen, and the productiveness of its vines is mentioned.
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  • Ptolemy, who himself chiefly used the " Claws " (XnXai), speaks of it as a distinctively Chaldaean sign; 2 and it occurs as an extrazodiacal asterism in the Chinese sphere.
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  • He devoted himself to the study of books, birds and trees, and speaks of his natural delight in solitude being largely increased.
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  • Pliny, who flourished under Vespasian, speaks particularly of a male and female palm, but his statements were not founded on any real knowledge of the organs.
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  • Caesalpinus had his attention directed to the subject, and he speaks of a halitus or emanation from the male plants causing fertility in the female.
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  • The earliest account of these birds is that of Polack (New Zealand, London, 1838), who speaks of the former existence of some struthious birds in the north island as proved by fossil bones which were shown to him.
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  • Even Hume, in various passages of his Treatise, speaks of himself as recovering cheerfulness and mental tone only by forgetfulness of his own arguments.
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  • This happened in 76 B.C. Kashgar does not appear to have been known in the West at this time but Ptolemy speaks of Scythia beyond the Imaus, which is in a Kasia Regio, possibly exhibiting the name whence Kashgar and Kashgaria (often applied to the district) are formed.
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  • As Anna Comnena, in describing the capture of the town (Tic 'Ioavvcva) by Bohemond in 1082, speaks of the walls as being dilapidated, it may be supposed that the place existed before the Ilth century.
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  • 25, 26 had no original connexion with J.'s story of the creation, which speaks of Yahweh freely from the outset.
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  • The Proverbs of Jesus, the son of Sirach (c. 200 B.C.), which form now the apocryphal book Ecclesiasticus, were translated into Greek by the grandson of the author at about 130 B.C.; and in the preface prefixed by him to his translation he speaks of " the law, and the prophets, and the other books of our fathers," and again of " the law, and the prophets, and the rest of the books," expressions which point naturally to the same threefold division which was afterwards universally recognized by the Jews.
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  • That the interval which elapsed before the Prophets and the Hagiographa were also translated was no great one is shown by the prologue to Sirach which speaks of " the Law, the Prophets and the rest of the books," as already current in a translation by 132 B.C. The date at which the various books were combined into a single work is not known, but the existence of the Septuagint as a whole may be assumed for the 1st century A.D., at which period the Greek version was universally accepted by the Jews of the Dispersion as Scripture, and from them passed on to the Christian Church.
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  • Pusey indeed studied under Eichhorn, and in his Historical Enquiry into the probable causes of the Rationalist Character lately predominant in German Theology (1828-1830) speaks sympathetically of the attitude of the Reformers on the question of Scripture and in condemnation of the later Protestant scholastic doctrine; but even in this book he shows no receptivity for any of the actual critical conclusions of Eichhorn and his successors, and subsequently threw the weight of his learning against critical conclusions - notably in his Commentary on Daniel (1864).
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  • It should be noted that when Tischendorf speaks of Syr utr he means the Peshito and the Harklean.
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  • Again, Moses differs from all other prophets in that Yahweh speaks to him face to face, and he sees the similitude of Yahweh.
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  • To this period also belongs a set of " philosophers," with regard to whom it is impossible to say whether they are dupes or impostors - the " decepti deceptores " of whom Augustine speaks.
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  • To complete the early history of logarithms it is necessary to return 1 In the Rabdologia (1617) he speaks of the canon of logarithms as " a me longo tempore elaboratum."
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  • Livy tells us it was taken from the Sabines, while Virgil speaks of it as a Latin colony.
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  • 7 he asserts the Eucharist to be Christ's " flesh which suffered for our sins," elsewhere speaks of the blood as being " joy eternal and lasting," as " hope," as " love incorruptible," and of the flesh as " faith " or as " the gospel."
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  • He speaks of the dominical host (hostia), and takes the verb to do in Paul's letter in the sense of to sacrifice.
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  • Here Paul, being dead, yet speaks through Timothy to the local Christians who are exposed to such mischievous tendencies in their environment.
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  • At least Augustine speaks of such a personage, and the Fihrist also has knowledge of a chief of all Manichaeans.
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  • The most interesting episode of his life was his intimacy with Locke, who in his letters speaks of him with affection and admiration.
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  • This is the less improbable because it lies in the neighbourhood of a line of earthquake movement, and both from Thucydides and from Strabo we hear of the northern part of the island being shaken at different periods, and the latter writer speaks of a fountain at Chalcis being dried up by a similar cause, and a mud volcano formed in the neighbouring plain.
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  • Strabo speaks of it as varying seven times in the day, but it is more accurate to say, with Livy, that it is irregular.
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  • The Athenians fully recognized its importance to them, as supplying them with corn and cattle, as securing their commerce, and as guaranteeing them against piracy, for its proximity to the coast of Attica rendered it extremely dangerous to them when in other hands, so that Demosthenes, in the De corona, speaks of a time when the pirates that made it their headquarters so infested the neighbouring sea as to prevent all navigation.
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  • Now, as in all eight passages Aristotle speaks, somewhat disparagingly, of " even (Kai) extraneous discourses," and as these include his own early dialogues, they must be taken to mean that though he might quote them, he no longer wished to be judged by his early views, and therefore drew a strong line of demarcation between his early dialogues and the mature treatises of his later philosophical system.
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  • 59 (17), 11 (6), where he speaks of " a great worm which has horns and so differs from others.
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  • In his own memoirs he speaks much more of these than of any Ruskins, Tweddales, Adairs or Agnews.
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  • Writing as an old man, long after her death, Ruskin speaks of his early love without any sort of rapture.
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  • Poland is another case of the difficulty of managing a population which speaks a language not that of the governing majority, and Russia, in trying to solve one problem by absorbing Finland into the national system, is burdening herself with another which may work out in centuries of unrest, if not in domestic violence.
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  • Hooker, who speaks of Jewel as "the worthiest divine that Christendom bath bred for some hundreds of years," was one of the boys whom Jewel prepared in his house for the university; and his Ecclesiastical Polity owes much to Jewel's training.
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  • Even before his marriage with Margaret Fell he seems to have been fairly well off; he does not appear to have worked for a living after he was nineteen, and yet he had a horse, and speaks of having money to give to those who were in need.
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  • Wundt, however, afterwards wrote an Einleitung in die Philosophic (1901; 4th ed., 1906), in which he speaks of realism in the form of ideal realism as the philosophy of the future.
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  • At first in his psychology he speaks of the " attuition " and the rational perception of an outside object.
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  • Such is the modern " Acatalepsia," which arises from denying the evidence of the senses, and from citing the transfigured realism of Spencer instead of the original realism of Aristotle, about whom Balfour speaks as follows: " It would be difficult, perhaps impossible, to sum up our debts to Aristotle.
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  • While in his treatise Quod omnis, &c., Philo speaks of their avoiding towns and preferring to live in villages, in his "Apology for the Jews" we find them living in many cities, villages, and in great and prosperous towns.
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  • Tacitus speaks of tribes which had kings and tribes which had not, the latter apparently being under a number of principes.
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  • Besides the anthropomorphic " giants, " mentioned above, Northern mythology speaks also of theriomorphic demons, the chief of which were Midgar6sormr, the " worldserpent," and Fenrisulfr, a monster wolf, the enemies of Thor and Odin respectively.
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  • Prantl speaks of them with great, but hardly merited, contempt.
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  • He speaks there of a needle carried on board ship which, being placed on a pivot, and allowed to take its own position of repose, shows mariners their course when the polar star is hidden.
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  • 1 Here of course the author speaks of the papal supremacy and not of papal infallibility in matters of faith and morals - a doctrine which was formally declared a dogma of the Church only at the Vatican council in 1870.
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  • (2) The rolling plains north of the `Abd al `Aziz Sinjar mountain wall are intersected by the many streams of the Khabur system (the Arab geographer Mustaufi speaks of 300 feeders), which under favourable political and administrative conditions would produce a marked fertility.
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  • Of the moderation of the latter, and their abstinence from all outrage or plunder, he speaks highly.
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  • Louise, who concealed great cleverness and a strong will under an appearance of languor and a rather childish beauty (Evelyn the diarist speaks of her "baby face"), yielded only when she had already established a strong hold on the king's affections and character.
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  • Roger Bacon, his pupil, speaks highly of his attainments in theology and mathematics.
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  • Homer speaks as if there were one town in the island called Lemnos, but in historical times there was no such place.
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  • Ilept KaTaeAiaews 7rpo'yvwo ruca, he speaks of the advantage of a knowledge of physiognomy to the physician.'
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  • 8 Plato also tells us that Socrates predicted the promotion of Alcibiades from his appearance; and Apuleius 9 speaks of Socrates recognizing the abilities of Plato at first view.
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  • Apion speaks of the metoposcopists, who judge by the appearance of the face, and Cleanthes the Stoic says it is 5 Op. cit., xix.
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  • The chief point of interest in his account is that he speaks of the species having been already taken from New Spain (Mexico) to the islands and to Castilla del Oro (Darien), where it bred in a domestic state among the Christians.
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  • 4 I 1672 Josselin (New England's Rarities, p. 9) speaks of the settlers bringing up " great store of the wild kind " of turkeys, " which remain about their houses as tame as ours in England."
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  • The excellence of the converts, upon the whole, is testified to by travellers who really know the case; particularly by Mrs Bishop, who speaks of the " raw material " out of which they are made as " the best stuff in Asia."
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  • Writings which bore his name were extant in antiquity; but as Aristotle, when he speaks of Thales's doctrine, always depends upon tradition, there can be little doubt that they were forgeries.
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  • In the apocryphal Acts of Barnabas, which profess to be written by him, he speaks of himself as having been formerly a servant of Cyrillus, the high priest of Zeus, and as having been baptized at Iconium.
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  • Gibbon speaks of his learning as "immense," and says that his "skill in employing facts is equal to his learning," although he severely criticizes his method and style.
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  • Roughly speaking, in each of these five lands the Alpine population speaks the tongue of the country, though in Italy there are a few French-speaking districts (the Waldensian valleys as well as the Aosta and Oulx valleys) as well as some German-speaking and Ladin-speaking settlements.
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  • 639 it had already been deserted for a century, but he speaks in glowing terms of its magnificence and beauty.
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  • Thus, in Sumerian we find such forms as numunnib-bi, " he speaks not to him," where the negative prefix nu and the verbal prefix mun are in harmony, but in dissimilation to the infix nib, " to him," and to the root bi, " speak," which are also in harmony.
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  • The entry speaks of seven hedged enclosures, and there is evidence of fortification in the 13th century, to which the names Jordangate, Chestergate and Wallgate still bear witness.
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  • (c) Even Clement of Rome does not say that the apostles had appointed presbyters in the congregation, he speaks only of bishops and deacons.
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  • Suidas only tells us that he lived "in the times of Marcus"; but the contempt with which he speaks of Commodus (died 192) shows that he survived that emperor.
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  • She speaks of his "vast knowledge upon all and every subject," and "his great activity of mind."
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  • As Malachi speaks in Deuteronomic phrase of the "whole tithe," the payment to the Levites (now subordinate ministers of the Temple) was perhaps still only triennial; and if even this was difficult to collect, we may be sure that the minor sacrificial tithe had very nearly disappeared.
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  • Aristotle, who speaks highly of the sincerity of Eudoxus's convictions, while giving a qualified approval to his arguments, considers him wrong in not distinguishing the different kinds of pleasure and in making pleasure the summum bonum.
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  • The History of Armenia speaks of its author as an old, infirm man, constantly engaged in the work of translating.
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  • In the east a Gaulish people named Cotini are mentioned, apparently in the upper basin of the Oder, and Tacitus speaks of a tribe in the same neighborhood, the Osi, who he says spoke the Pannonian language.
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  • The Welsh triads know no fewer than three Gwenhwyfars; Giraldus Cambrensis, relating the discovery of the royal tombs at Glastonbury, speaks of the body found as that of Arthur's second wife; the prose Merlin gives Guenevere a bastard half-sister of the same name, who strongly resembles her; and the Lancelot relates how this lady, trading on the likeness, persuaded Arthur that she was the true daughter of Leodegrance, and the queen the bastard interloper.
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  • Next we note that an extract in the Philocalia is introduced as follows: "Yea, and Clement the Roman, a disciple of Peter the Apostle, after using words in harmony with these on the present problem, in conversation with his father at Laodicea in the Circuits, speaks a very necessary word for the end of arguments touching this matter, viz.
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  • In 1652 he amused himself with ploughing and bell-ringing, In the Life he speaks of himself and his family as Wood or a Wood, the last form being a pedantic return to old usage adopted by himself.
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  • Here and there Mahomet speaks of visions, and appears even to see angels before him in bodily form.
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  • Each tribe has a different ju-ju, and each speaks a separate language or dialect, the most widely diffused tongues being the Ibo and Efik, which have been reduced to writing.
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  • - Our earliest knowledge of Denmark is derived from Pliny, who speaks of three islands named " Skandiai," a name which is also applied to Sweden.
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  • Asser speaks grandiosely of Alfred's relations with foreign powers, but little definite information is available.
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  • The difficulty of arriving at a fair conclusion is increased by the fact that Procopius, who is our chief authority for the events of his reign, speaks with a very different voice in his secret memoirs (the Anecdota) from that which he has used in his published history, and that some of the accusations contained in the former work are so rancorous and improbable that a certain measure of discredit attaches to everything which it contains.
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  • Captain John Smith, in his History of Virginia (1626), at p. 27 speaks of "Martins, Powlecats, Weesels and Minkes," showing that the animal must at that time have been distinguished by a vernacular appellation from its congeners.
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  • Now, though the Hebrew certainly speaks of ten "words," not of ten "precepts," it is most unlikely that the first word can be different in character from those that follow.
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  • Wager speaks with greater reserve, acknowledging, however, the central body to be a nucleus of a rudimentary type, but devoid of nuclear membrane and nucleolus.
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  • We can distinguish portions of an historical narrative which speaks of Elisha in connexion with events of public interest, without making him the central figure, and a series of anecdotes of properly biographical character..
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  • He is said to have made an epitome of the Tactica of Aeneas, probably referred to by Cicero, who speaks of a Cineas as the author of a treatise De Re Militari.
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  • Gardiner speaks of the final shape of Charles's measure as " a wise and beneficent reform "; and he did aim at recovering the "teinds" or tithes, and securing something like a satisfactory sustenance for ministers.
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  • In particular, while in his first draft he speaks of the bailiff as Gryssler - the usual name up to his time, except in the White Book and in Stumpff's Chronicle of 1548 - in his final recension he calls him Gessler, knowing that this was a real name.
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  • Blome in 1673 speaks of Warrington market as an important one "for linen cloth, corn, cattle, provisions and fish, being much resorted to by the Welshmen," and in 1730 Defoe says the market was especially famous for "a sort of table linen called Huk-a-back or Huk-abuk."
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  • But the mines continued to be worked, though Strabo records that in his time the tailings were being worked over, and Pausanias speaks of the mines as a thing of the past.
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  • If the fatherhood of God stands out clearly, we may remember a passage of St Mark also which speaks of " the Heavenly Father " as forgiving those who forgive.
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  • If in one mysterious passage Jesus speaks of " the Father " and " the Son "- terms with which the Gospel of St John has made us familiar St Mark also in one passage uses the same impressive terms " the Son " and " the Father."
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  • Niethammer (1766-1848) on the day before the battle, he speaks with admiration of the " world-soul," the emperor, and with satisfaction of the probable overthrow of the Prussians.
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  • He speaks, e.g., as if species and genera were fixed and unchangeable; and fixing his eye on the ideal forms in their purity and self-sameness, he scorns the phenomenal world, whence this identity and persistence are absent.
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  • Zarib, whose name is associated with Tadmor and with a town on the right bank of the Euphrates, which is no doubt the Zenobia of which Procopius speaks as founded by the famous queen.
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  • The Periplus of the Erythraean Sea speaks of the island as peopled only in one part by a mixed race of Arab, Indian and Greek traders.
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  • Nearly three centuries latar, it was still studied at Padua, the last home of Averroism, and Lucilio Vanini speaks of him with great veneration.
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  • That, whereas before the time of Protagoras there was little higher education in the colonies and less in central Greece, after his time attendance in the lecture-rooms of the sophists was the customary sequel to attendance in the elementary schools, is a fact which speaks for itself.
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  • But the first Greek historian who speaks clearly of India was Hecataeus of Miletus (549-486 B.C.); the knowledge of Herodotus (450 B.C.) ended at the Indus; and Ctesias, the physician (401 B.C.), brought back from his residence in Persia only a few facts about the products of India, its dyes and fabrics, its monkeys and parrots.
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  • A more moderate and usual view is given by Diego de Couto, who in 1616 speaks of " a dominion over all Kaffraria from the Cabo das Correntes to the great river Zambezi."
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  • Thus Cicero frequently speaks as if his client were to be put to death, though a criminal could always evade capital consequences by going into exile.
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  • Soddy has used them in phthisis, and Louisa Chesney speaks favourably of the emanations in chronic and acute laryngitis and in tuberculous laryngeal ulcerations.
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  • Amin, in anger, caused the will of his father, which, as we have seen, was preserved in the Ka`ba, to be destroyed, declared on his own authority that Mamun's rights of succession were forfeited, and caused the army to swear allegiance to his own son Musa, a child of five, on whom he bestowed the title of an-N atiq bil-Haqq (" he who speaks according to truth"), A.H.
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  • The royal courts refused to entertain suits of villeins against their lords, although there was a good deal of vacillation before this position was definitely taken up. Bracton still speaks in his treatise of the possibility for the courts to interfere against intolerable cruelty on the part of the lord involving the destruction of the villein's waynage, that is, of his ploughteam, and in the Notebook of Bracton there are a couple of cases which prove that r3th-century judges occasionally allowed themselves to entertain actions by persons holding in villenage against their lords.
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  • Bracton speaks of the contrast between the irregular services of a serf, " who could not know in the evening what he would have to do in the morning," and services agreed upon and definite in their amount.
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  • They overlooked the fact that man thinks long before he speaks, makes judgments which he does not express at all, or expresses them by interjections, names and phrases, before he uses regular propositions, and that he does not begin by conceiving and naming, and then proceed to believing and proposing.
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  • Beneath Hamilton's postulate there is a deeper principle of logic - _A rational being thinks only to the point, and speaks only to understand and be understood.
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  • It is in virtue of this view of derived or mediate knowledge that Descartes speaks of the (subsumptive) syllogism as " of avail rather in the communication of what we already know."
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  • Even in his " logic " Kant speaks of abstraction from all particular objects of thought rather than of a resolution of concrete thinking into thought and its " other " as separable co-operating factors in a joint product.
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  • They are mentioned by Herodotus among the races conquered by Croesus, and they sent an important contingent to the army of Xerxes in 480 B.C. Xenophon speaks of them as being governed by a prince of their own, without any reference to the neighbouring satraps, a freedom due, perhaps, to the nature of the country, with its lofty mountain ranges and difficult passes.
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  • Domesday Book was originally preserved in the royal treasury at Winchester (the Norman kings' capital), whence it speaks of itself (in' one later addition) as Liber de Wintonia.
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  • The notices of the early prelates are of little value, but the portion of the book in which he speaks of Bishop Elphinstone is of enduring merit.
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  • (2) In the matter of infallibility: "We decree that when the Roman Pontiff speaks ex cathedra, that is to say, when, in his capacity as Pastor and Doctor of all Christians he defines, in virtue of his supreme apostolic authority, a certain doctrine concerning faith or morals to be held by the whole Church, he enjoys, by the divine assistance promised to him in the Blessed Peter, that infallibility with which the divine Redeemer has thought good to endow His Church in order to define its doctrine in matters of faith and morals; consequently, these definitions of the Roman Pontiff are irreformable in themselves and not in consequence of the consent of the Church."
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  • The prophets use the formula, " Thus saith the Lord," but he goes beyond them and speaks in his own name, " Amen, I say unto you."
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  • The clergyman is primarily the preacher, renewed by God's power and enlightened by the Spirit, so that he speaks with divine authority.
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  • (2) Rufus speaks of the buboes called pestilential as being specially fatal, and as being found chiefly in Libya, Egypt and Syria, He refers to the testimony of a physician Dionysius, who lived probably in the 3rd century B.C. or earlier, as and to Dioscorides and Posidonius, who fully described these buboes in a work on the plague which prevailed in Libya in their time.
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  • Harnack finds that our sense of the trustworthiness of the book " is enhanced by a thorough study of the chronological procedure of its author, both where he speaks and where he keeps silence."
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  • The charter that mentions the Wiltshire " Grendel's mere " speaks also of a place called Beowan ham (" Beowa's home "), and another Wiltshire charter has a " Scyld's tree " among the landmarks enumerated.
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  • He speaks as an eye-witness of the king's doings at Messina, in Cyprus, at the siege of Acre, and in the abortive campaign which followed the capture of that city.
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  • The First Book of Discipline set forth the whole of the proposed religious and educational constitution, and this book speaks of " the order of Geneva which is now in use in some of our churches."
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  • That the practice was common is indeed implied by the terms in which Bacon speaks of it, and it is not improbable that the fact of these gifts being taken by officials was a thing fairly well known, although all were aware of their illegal character, and it was plain that any public exposure of such dealings would be fatal to the individual against whom the charge was made out.
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  • We do not think, indeed, that the notiones of which he speaks in any way correspond to what Whewell and Ellis would call " conceptions or ideas furnished by the mind of the thinker "; nor do we imagine that Bacon would have admitted these as necessary elements in the inductive process.
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  • So the Encyclopedie, besides giving a eulogistic article " Baconisme," speaks of him (in d'Alembert's preliminary discourse) as " le plus grand, le plus universel, et le plus eloquent des philosophes."
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  • Leibnitz speaks of Bacon as " divini ingenii vir," and, like several other German authors, classes him with Campanella; Huygens refers to his " bonnes methodes."
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  • Joseph Glanvill, in his Scepsis Scientifica (dedication) says, " Solomon's house in the New Atlantis was a prophetic scheme of the Royal Society "; and Henry Oldenburg (c. 1615-1677), one of the first secretaries of the society, speaks of the new eagerness to obtain scientific data as " a work begun by the single care and conduct of the excellent Lord Verulam."
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  • In many cases the metrical structure 2 is true that in the Confession attributed to him and printed among his Greek works in the first volume of the Roman edition he speaks (p. 129) of his parents as having become martyrs for the Christian faith.
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  • On the 19th of July 1669 Louvois, Louis XIV.'s minister, writes to Saint-Mars at Pignerol that he is sending him "le nomme Eustache Dauger" (Dauger, D'Angers - the spelling is doubtful),' whom it is of the last importance to keep with special closeness; Saint-Mars is to threaten him with death if he speaks about anything except his actual needs.
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  • Latimer, in 1552, speaks of them as segregating themselves from the company of other men.
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  • BjdrkS ("the isle of birches"), by foreign authors called Birka, was a kind of capital where the king lived occasionally at least; history speaks of its relations with Dorestad in the Netherlands, and the extensive refuse heaps of the old city, as well as the numerous sepulchral monuments, show that the population must have been large.
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  • The book was revised by Dr Meyer for publication and furnished by him, at Spinoza's request, with a preface in which it is expressly stated that the author speaks throughout not in his own person but simply as the exponent of Descartes.
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  • Instead of his atheism Hegel speaks of his acosmism, and Novalis dubs him a God-intoxicated man.
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  • From this time onwards we hear little or nothing of Veii up to the end of the Republic. Propertius speaks indeed of the shepherds within its walls.
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  • In this brief work Acosta declares his opposition both to Christianity and Judaism, though he speaks with the more bitterness of the latter religion.
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  • He praises the horses of the Svear and speaks of their great trade in furs of arctic animals which were transferred from merchant to merchant until they reached Rome.
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  • Only once he speaks of the gods of the clans, and once of the other gods which there are.
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  • Of this temple Herodotus speaks as existing in his day; and unless weight be given to an isolated statement of Eusebius, that it was burned about 395 B.C., we must assume that it survived until the night when one Herostratus, desirous of acquiring ° eternal fame if only by a great crime, set it alight.
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  • Early in life, too, he met with the doctrines of Jacob Behmen, of whom, in the Biographia Literaria, he speaks with affection and gratitude as having given him vital philosophic guidance.
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  • The "common potatoes" of which Gerard speaks are the tubers of Ipomoea Batatas, the sweet potato, which nowadays would not in Great Britain be spoken of as common.
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  • William of Tyre speaks of him as a fine soldier, an able politician, and a good son of the church, and only blames him for partiality to his friends, and a forgetfulness of names and faces, which placed him at a disadvantage and made him too dependent on his immediate intimates.
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  • An epigram of Martial, written at the time when Juvenal was most vigorously employed in their composition, speaks of him as settled in Rome.
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  • 15); he speaks of his farm in the territory of Tibur (xi.
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  • 16 Juvenal speaks of his friend Calvinus as now past sixty years of age, having been born in the consulship of Fonteius.
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  • Following Epictetus, he speaks of man as a corpse bearing about a soul; at another time he has a threefold division - (z) body, (2) soul, the seat of impulse (7rveu,uariov),.
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  • It is noteworthy that Rutilius speaks of the crime of Stilicho in terms far different from those used by Orosius and the historians of the lower empire.
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  • Of this work, which contains no direct intimation of a fourth figure, and which in general exhibits an astonishing mixture of the Aristotelian and Stoic logic, Prantl speaks with the bitterest contempt.
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  • The literal text of the Septuagint seems to be the only decisive authority, and that is so sacred and almighty, that, whenever it comes into collision with the human conscience, the latter is silenced when the voice of revelation speaks."
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  • The only contribution which need be made here to the controversy is to point out that if Rabelais was born in 1483 he must have been an old man when he died, and that scarcely even tradition speaks of him as such.
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  • There is also in existence a letter of Calvin, dated 1 533, in which he speaks of Pantagruel, but not of Gargantua, as having been condemned as an obscene book.
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  • There is no positive evidence of any measures taken or threatened against him; but it is certain that he passed nearly the whole of 1546 and part of 1547 at Metz in Lorraine as physician to the town at the salary of 120 livres, and Sturm speaks of him as having been "cast out of France by the times" (with the exclamation c56 TLilv xpovwv) in a contemporary letter, and says that he himself in another letter gives a doleful account of his pecuniary affairs and asks for assistance.
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  • Of monarchy he speaks with a genuine Ronan hatred, and we know that in the last days of the republic his sympathies were wholly with those who strove in vain to save it.
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  • He there speaks of himself as being the only son and heir of his father and as fearing to be deprived of his inheritance if he adopted the reformed religion.
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  • Hooper speaks of himself at this period as being "a courtier and living too much of a court life in the palace of our king."
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  • "Hecataeus of Miletus thus speaks: I write as I deem true, for the traditions of the Greeks seem to me manifold and laughable."
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  • The "laborious task" of which he speaks is that of consulting all possible evidence, and weighing conflicting accounts.
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  • The editor of Newton's Journal of Arts and Sciences speaks of it thus: - " The apparatus consists of a car containing the goods, passengers, engines, fuel, &c., to which a rectangular frame, made of wood or bamboo cane, and covered with canvas or oiled silk, is attached.
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  • Gildas, writing in the 6th century, speaks of the twentyeight cities of the Britons.
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  • In the next chapter Irenaeus speaks of Menander, who was also a Samaritan, as the successor of Simon, and as having, like him, attained to the highest pitch of magic. His doctrine is represented as being the same as that of Simon, only that it was he this time who was the saviour of the world.
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  • 3 Hippolytus speaks in language similar to that of Irenaeus about the variety of magic arts practised by the Simonians, and also of their having images of Simon and Helen under the forms of Zeus and Athena.
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  • But they were still extant in his time, and there is no sect of whom he speaks in such unmeasured terms of vituperation.'
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  • It seems that there were some Simonians Epl _ still in existence in his day, but he speaks of them as.
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  • Yet Schmiedel speaks of this as " a well ascertained case in which an utterance of Paul regarding himself is spitefully twisted to his discredit."
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  • 9 9) speaks somewhat disparagingly of him, and Cicero, although he admits with some hesitation that Caecilius may have been the chief of the comic poets (De Optimo Genere Oratorum, I), considers him inferior to Terence in style and Latinity (Ad Att.
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  • Each tribe speaks a different language or dialect of Bantu,, the chief groups being described in the article Bantu Languages.
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  • The poet speaks in the first person and is styled Simichidas 2 by his friends.
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  • Theocritus speaks of himself as having already gained fame, and says that his lays have been brought by report even unto the throne of Zeus.
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  • Now Hiero first came to the front in 275 B.C. when he was made " General " (QTpaT27y6s) : Theocritus speaks of his achievements as still to come, and the silence of the poet would show that Hiero's marriage to Philistis, his victory over the Mamertines at the Longanus and his election as " King " (#ao-Aein), events which are ascribed to 270 B.C., had not yet taken place.
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  • Swift, who was intimate with him, speaks of him as "an arrant knave"; but the dean may have been disappointed at being unmentioned in Rivers's will, for he made a fierce comment on the earl's bequests to his mistresses and his neglect of his friends.
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  • His uncomfortable little house he speaks of as his "hospital" and his "prison;" his wife's health was broken and he was bowed down by the number of his children, who often lacked even clothes and food.
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  • After asserting these in detail under nine different heads, he speaks under a tenth of his proficiency as a civil engineer and architect, and adds lastly a brief paragraph with reference to what he can do in painting and sculpture, undertaking in particular to carry out in a fitting manner the monument to Francesco Sforza.
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  • A letter from Leonardo to Charles d'Amboise in 1511, announcing the end of his law troubles, speaks of two Madonnas of different sizes that he means to bring with him to Milan.
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  • There is some doubt on the point; but a contemporary and intimate friend, Luca Pacioli, speaks of his "ineffable left hand"; all the best of his drawings are shaded downward from left to right, which would be the readiest way for a left-handed man; and his habitual eccentric practice of writing from right to left is much more likely to have been due to natural left-handedness than to any desire of mystery or concealment.
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  • It is to his honour that he never speaks of the queen with resentment or bitterness.
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  • Idrisi, in the 12th century, speaks of its possessing a variety of educational establishments, and carrying on an active trade.
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  • However this may be, the Commonwealth made an end of them, and they seem never to have been revived; Sparrow, in his Rationale upon the Book of Common Prayer (London, 1668), speaks of "the service formerly appointed in the Rogation days of Procession."
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  • He speaks of Wisdom in a way reminding us of the book of Proverbs.
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  • He speaks of the Logos (1) as the agency by which God reveals Himself, in some measure to all men, in greater degree to chosen souls.
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  • Carra, a Swiss who had been tutor to Prince Ghica's children, and who published in 1781 an account of the actual state of the principalities, speaks of some of the boiars as possessing a taste for French literature and even for the works of Voltaire, a tendency actively combated by the patriarch of Constantinople.
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  • Lord Brougham, in delivering the judgment, speaks of the " common law prevailing for 1400 years over Christian Europe," and (p. 137) says that " nothing but express enactment can abrogate the common law of all Christendom before the Reformation of the Anglican Church."
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  • Cassian speaks of an abbot of the Thebaid who had Soo monks under him, a number exceeded in other cases.
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  • Cassian speaks of an abbot in Egypt doing this; and in later times we have another example in the case of St Bruno.
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  • The Teaching of the Apostles, indeed, prescribes baptism in the name of Father, Son and Holy Ghost, but on the next page speaks of those who have been baptized into the name of the Lord - the normal formula of the New Testament.
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  • Matthew Paris speaks of its foundation by the mythical king Rudhudibras, while Asser ascribes it to Alfred, who made his daughter Ethelgeofu the first abbess.
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  • Leland speaks of Shaftesbury as a great market town, and it possessed a market in the time of Edward I.
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  • In the second preface to the Fragmens philosophiques, in which he candidly states the varied philosophical influences of his life, Cousin speaks of the grateful emotion excited by the memory of the day in 1811, when he heard Laromiguiere for the first time.
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  • To me an ethnologist who speaks of Aryan race, Aryan blood, Aryan eyes and hair, is as great a sinner as a linguist who speaks of a dolichocephalic dictionary or a brachycephalic grammar."
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  • In a looser sense the word is employed to denote abstinence from certain kinds of food merely; and this meaning, which in ordinary usage is probably the more prevalent, seems also to be at least tolerated by the Church of England when it speaks of " fast or abstinence days," as if fasting and abstinence were synonymous.
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  • It is not, it is true, mentioned by any ancient authorities before the time of Cicero, who in 45 B.C. speaks of the existence of three roads from Rome to Mutina, the Flaminia, the Aurelia and the Cassia.
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  • (Abelard speaks himself of " theologia nostra.") 2 It is of interest to note that even in these books the Trinity and Christology are the topics of outstanding importance.
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  • He speaks, most cleverly, to his brief, but he will not go outside it.
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  • Here, says Ritschl, the involuntary logic of predestinarianism speaks its last word.
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  • Ritschl 3 even speaks of the Reformed as teaching Kenosis in the modern sense; but it is to be feared they rather taught alternately the manhood and the Godhead than made a serious effort to show the compatibility of divine and human predicates in one person.
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  • Clemens Alexander speaks of a Hercules d roµucos as worshipped at Rome.
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  • 25, Christ speaks of men calling the master of the house, i.e.
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  • On the one hand, he speaks of moral approbation as derived from " humanity and benevolence," while expressly recognizing, after Butler, that there is a strictly disinterested element in our benevolent impulses (as also in hunger, thirst, love of fame and other passions).
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  • Indeed, he seems himself quite undecided on this question; since, though he generally represents ethical method as deductive, he also speaks of the " original judgment that this action is right and that wrong."
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  • Whewell, indeed, explains that this latter formula must be practically interpreted by positive law, though he inconsistently speaks as if it supplied a standard for judging laws to be right or wrong.
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  • Pomponius Mela speaks of the climate as unfit for ripening grain, but he, too, notices the luxuriance of the grass.
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  • It is impossible to give accurate statistics of the alien population; for, in the compilation of the official figures, language is taken as a test of nationality, an utterly untrustworthy method in a country where every educated person speaks two or three languages.
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  • The first line proves that this poem is not by D, who speaks invariably of Horeb, never of Sinai.
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  • Howitt speaks too of the Dieri Kutchi, who inspires medicine-men with ideas, but about him our information is scanty.
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  • His conception of the Logos is not that of the philosophers and apologists; he looks upon the Logos not as the "reason" of God, but as the "voice" with which the Father speaks in the revelation to mankind, as did the writer of the Fourth Gospel.
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  • An example of these is found in the work called Anecdotes sur l'etat de religion dans la Chine (Paris, 1733-35), the author of which (Abbe Villers) speaks of the T'ien-chu shih-i in this fashion: "The Jesuit was also so ill versed in the particulars of the faith that, as the holy bishop of Conon, Monsgr.
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  • To the south of the line the condition of affairs is entirely different; here the entire population speaks one or another dialect of the Bantu Languages.
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  • Under Constantine it was united into one province with Umbria, an arrangement which subsisted until at least 400, as the Notitia speaks of a "consularis Tusciae et Umbriae."
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  • As regards their geographical position Ptolemy states that they inhabited the coast above the Bructeri as far as the Ems, while Tacitus speaks of them as adjacent to the Rhine.
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  • Petrarch refuses to believe that any good thing can come out of Arabia, and speaks of Averroes as a mad dog barking against the church.
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  • In its careful chronology, based upon the Seleucid era, in the minuteness of its geographical knowledge, in the frankness with which it records defeat as well as victory, on the restraint with which it speaks of the enemies of the Jews, in its command of details, it bears on its face the stamp of genuineness.
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  • The name Dagon seems to come from ddg " fish," and that his idol was half-man half-fish is possible from the ichthyomorphic representations found upon coins of Ascalon and Arvad, and from the fact that Berossus speaks of an Assyrian merman-god.
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  • The wool trade gave these great importance; in 1341 there were ten wool merchants in Cirencester, and Leland speaks of the abbots' cloth-mill, while Camden calls it the greatest market for wool in England.
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  • The Calician who spoke, and still speaks, a language of his own, was profoundly P 11.
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  • If a given province now speaks Catalan rather than Castilian, the explanation is to be sought simply and solely in the fact that it was conquered by a king of Aragon and peopled by his Catalan subjects.
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  • He left his cloister on several occasions, and speaks of having visited Croyland, Worcester, Cambrai (I105) and Cluny (1132).
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  • 3 The very rare edition of the first 200 nights published at Calcutta in 1814 speaks of cannon, which are first mentioned in Egypt in 1383; and all editions sometimes speak of coffee, which was discovered towards the end of the 14th century, but not generally used till 200 years later.
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