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sown

sown Sentence Examples

  • These are taken off and sown in drills, like seed.

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  • Potatoes and turnips are recommended to be sown in the yard (kitchen-garden).

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  • Thus in the end of the 17th century the seed was sown which has at intervals brought forth recurrent crops of evolutional hypotheses, based, more or less completely, on general reasonings.

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  • They are propagated by cuttings, or from the leaves, which are cut off and pricked in welldrained pots of sandy soil, or by the scales from the underground tubes, which are rubbed off and sown like seeds, or by the seeds, which are very small.

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  • Out of the total acreage under cereals 34% is generally sown with rye, 26% with wheat, 20% with oats and 102% with barley.

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  • As rice has to be transplanted as well as sown and irrigated, it needs a considerable amount of labour expended on it; and the Burman has the reputation of being a somewhat indolent cultivator.

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  • He now reaped to the full the harvest of treason and rebellion which he himself had sown so abundantly during the first forty years of his life.

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  • He was as careful of the sowing and reaping of the peasants' hay and corn as of his own, and few landowners had their crops sown and harvested so early and so well, or got so good a return, as did Nicholas.

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  • The yield of corn varies from six to ten times the amount sown.

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  • The comparatively rapid growth of the tree is its great recommendation to the planter; it is best raised from acorns sown on the spot, as they are very bitter and little liable to the attacks of vermin; the tree sends down a long tap-root, which should be curtailed by cutting or early transplanting, if the young trees are to be removed.

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  • All classes high and low are fond of the religious festivals, the principal of which, the Dasahra, occurs in October, when the first harvest of the year has been secured and the second crops sown.

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  • The seedtime, begun in October, extends, for wheat and some other white crops, through November and December; and barley continues to be sown until about the middle of February.

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  • According to early methods of cropping, which were destined to prevail for centuries, wheat, the chief article of food, was sown in one autumn, reaped the next August; the following spring, oats or barley were sown, and the year following the harvest was a period of fallow.

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  • " Know that an acre sown with wheat takes three ploughings, except lands that are sown each year, and that each ploughing costs 6d.

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  • Hops, which had been introduced in the early part of the 16th century, and on the culture of which a treatise was published in 1574 by Reginald Scott, are mentioned as a well-known crop. Buckwheat was sown after barley.

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  • " Clouer grasse, or the grasse honey suckle " (white clover), is directed to be sown with other hay seeds.

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  • It is next to be well ploughed and harrowed; and about 10 lb of clover seed must be sown on an acre in April or the end of March.

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  • Being once sown, it will last five years; the land, when ploughed, will yield, three or four years together, rich crops of wheat, and after that a crop of oats, with which clover seed is to be sown again.

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  • Ten acres (he adds) sown with clover, turnips, &c., will feed as many sheep as one hundred acres thereof would before have done."

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  • Rye-grass was now sown along with it.

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  • " The infield (where wheat is sown) is generally divided by the tenant into four divisions or breaks, as they call them, viz.

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  • Mangels are sown earlier and have a longer period of growth than turnips; if they become well established in the summer they are less susceptible to autumn drought.

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  • In the British Isles wheat is, as a rule, sown in the autumn on a heavier soil, and has four or five months in which to distribute its roots, and so it gets possession of a wide range of soil and subsoil before barley is sown in the spring.

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  • Barley, on the other hand, is sown in a lighter surface soil, and, with its short period for root-development, relies in a much greater degree on the stores of plant-food within the surface soil.

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  • Accordingly it is more susceptible to exhaustion of surface soil as to its nitrogenous, and especially as to its mineral supplies; and in the common practice of agriculture it is found to be more benefited by direct mineral manures, especially phosphatic manures, than is wheat when sown under equal soil conditions.

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  • rye, vetches, winter-oats or some other rapidly-growing crop may be sown in autumn and fed off or otherwise disposed of prior to the root-sowing.

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  • Clover is sown at the same time or shortly after the cereal and thus occupies the land for two years.

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  • The crops can then be sown in due time, which in wet years, and with the usual teams of horses kept on a farm, is not always practicable.

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  • The general rule with regard to " waygoing crops " on arable farms is that the tenant is entitled to reap the crop sown before the term of removal (whether or not that be the natural termination of the lease), the right of exclusive possession being his during seed time.

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  • During April (when the seed is usually sown) and May frequent light showers, which keep the ground sufficiently moist to assist germination and the growth of the young plants, are desired.

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  • Channels formed at right angles to the cultivation ridges provide for the access of water to the crop. The seeds, previously soaked, are sown, usually in March, on the sides of the ridges, and the land watered.

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  • Bell, The Desert and the Sown (1907); H.

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  • Parkinson tells us that in his time (early in the 17th century) the naked oat was sown in sundry places, but "nothing so frequent" as the common sort.

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  • In this region the sandstone rocks are generally overlaid with heavy black soil formed from the decaying trap, which is principally devoted to the cultivation of the spring crops, wheat and grain, while rice and hill millets are sown in the lighter and more sandy soils.

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  • During the last three years of his life John Wesley reaped the harvest he had sown.

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  • More than four-fifths of the total area sown to cane in the island is in the three provinces of Santa Clara, Matanzas and Oriente (formerly Santiago), the former two representing two-thirds of the area and three-fourths of the crop. The majority of the sugar estates are of an area less than 3000 acres, and the most common area is between 1500 and 2000 acres; but the extremes range from a very small size to 60,000 acres.

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  • That done, the field was to be sown with the dragons' teeth brought by Phrixus, from which armed men were to spring.

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  • grow very well; the radishes are sown and gathered twice during the summer (June to August).

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  • Corn sown about Yakutsk in the end of May is ripe in the end of August.

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  • In this way was sown the seed of future trouble between the two races.

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  • The wheat-seed for these straws is sown very thickly on comparatively elevated and arid land, and it sends up long attenuated stalks.

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  • Sir Sackville Carden, the British commander-in-chief in those waters, proposed that a fleet should try to destroy the Ottoman forts in the Straits and to clear away the mine-fields sown in the channel, by adopting a process of methodical advance.

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  • The land is then usually sown with some rapidly growing green crop, such as rape, or with turnips.

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  • The new warp is allowed to lie fallow during the winter after being laid out in four-yard " lands " and becomes dry enough to be sown with oats and grass and clover seeds in the following spring.

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  • The seed is sown in nursery beds, and the plants set out in the field later.

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  • about 120 days in all from the date the seed was sown.

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  • He was a descendant of Udaeus, one of the men who had sprung up from the serpent's teeth sown by Cadmus.

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  • The grain crops are maize, wheat and barley; the two latter are frequently sown together.

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  • And yet in the European Stone age which followed, the age in which the great menhirs and cromlechs were erected, in which the domestication of animals began and the first corn was sown, we find in the strata no image of man or beast, big or little.

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  • In spite of his own wonderful genius the seeds of weakness were sown in his lifetime.

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  • sylvatica, 1 ft., blue, pink or white, used for spring bedding, should be sown annually in August.

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  • The seed, which should be plump, light in colour, with a thin skin covered by fine wrinkles, is sown in March and early April at the rate of from 8 to 2 pecks to the acre and lightly harrowed in.

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  • 1 Barley is occasionally sown in autumn to provide keep for sheep in the following spring.

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  • „How much more extensive is grazing - of the more scientific order - than agriculture, is seen at once from the figures of the amount of land broken up, for crops or other purposes, and the amount under sown grasses.

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  • The character of the soil and the moist cool climate enable English grasses to be sown almost everywhere, and 13,000,000 acres are now laid down with these.

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  • (The colour variation in the flowers of seedlings is discussed above.) Seeds are sown in.

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  • They are then lifted and treated like offsets, being sown thinly in beds out of doors.

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  • The leaves are glaucous and smooth like those of a swede turnip. For a seed-crop rape is sown in July or early August in order that the plants may be strong enough to pass the winter uninjured.

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  • There is a "summer" variety of colza which is sown in April and ripens its seed in the same year.

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  • Neither of these is much grown in Great Britain for the production of oil, but the "winter" variety is very extensively grown as green food for sheep. For this purpose it is generally sown at short intervals throughout the summer to provide a succession of fodder.

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  • In these provinces spring wheat is almost universally sown, except in Alberta where fall or winter wheat is also sown to a considerable extent.

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  • Land ploughed and otherwise tilled, but left unseeded during the summer, is sown with wheat in the succeeding autumn or spring.

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  • Wheat on summer fallow land yielded, according to the NorthWest census of 1906, from 2 to 8 bushels per acre more than that sown on other land.

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  • Seeds should be sown in spring in a cold frame, and the young plants should be put out into beds when large enough, and should flower the following May.

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  • The seeds are sown in April, on rich ground, which should not be too highly manured; the young larches are planted out when two years old, or sometimes transferred to a nursery bed to attain a larger size; but, like all conifers, they succeed best when planted young; on the mountains, the seedlings are usually put into a mere slit made in the ground by a spade with a triangular blade, the place being first cleared of any heath, bracken, or tall herbage that might smother the young tree; the plants should be from 3 to 4 ft.

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  • According to Stanislas Julien a ceremonial ordinance was established in China by the emperor Chin-nung 2800 years B.C., in accordance with which the emperor sows the rice himself while the seeds of four other kinds may be sown by the princes of his family.

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  • Rice is sown broadcast, and in some districts is transplanted after a fortnight or three weeks.

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  • Thus Ivan Poroshkov, Peter's contemporary, the father of Russian political economy, writes as follows: "If any land be over-much encumbered with weeds, corn cannot be sown thereon unless the weeds first be burned with fire.

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  • In England the principal crop may be sown at any time from the middle of February to the middle of March, if the weather is fine and the ground sufficiently dry.

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  • The seed should be sown in shallow drills, 10 in.

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  • About the end of August a crop is sown to afford a supply of young onions in the spring months.

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  • To obtain a crop of bulbs for pickling, seed should be sown thickly in March, in rather poor soil, the seeds being very thinly covered, and the surface well rolled; these are not to be thinned, but should be pulled and harvested when ripe.

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  • Onions may be forced like mustard and cress if required for winter salads, the seeds being sown thickly in boxes which are to be placed in a warm house or frame.

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  • It forms no bulbs, but, on account of its extreme hardiness, is sown in July or early in August, to furnish a reliable supply of young onions for use in salads during the early spring.

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  • He had, however, sown seeds in the minds of two distinguished pupils, T.

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  • Both the " two-course system " and the " three-course system " may have been in use; but on the other hand it is quite possible that in many cases the same ground was not sown more than once in three years.

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  • Precisely as to-day inventions are guarded by patents, and literary and artistic creations by the law of copyright, so, at that period, the papal bull and the protection of the Roman Church were an effective means for ensuring that a country should reap where she had sown and should maintain the territory she had discovered and conquered by arduous efforts; while other claimants, with predatory designs, were warned back by the ecclesiastical censorship. In the Vatican the memory of Alexander VI.

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  • the establishment of new religious orders - Theatines, Somascians, Barnabites and Capuchins - had sown the seeds of a new life in the ancient Church.

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  • As a rule, seeds require to be sown more deeply in proportion to their size and the lightness of the soil.

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  • Thus the seeds of Primula japonica, though sown under precisely similar conditions, yet come up at very irregular intervals of time.

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  • It is used as a top-dressing sown by the hand.

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  • Many seeds will grow freely if sown in a partially ripened state; but as a general rule seeds have to be kept for some weeks or months in store, and hence they should be thoroughly ripened before being gathered.

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  • They should be sown in fine rich soil, and such as will not readily get consolidated.

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  • Somewhat larger seeds sown indoors may be covered to the depth of one-eighth or;,one-fourth of an inch, according to their size.

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  • Outdoor crops require to be sown, the smaller seeds from z to i in., and the larger ones from 2 to 4 in.

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  • Whatever the seeds, the ground should be made tolerably firm both beneath and above them; this may be done by treading in the case of most kitchen garden crops, which are also better sown in drills, this admitting the more readily of the ground being kept clear from weeds by hoeing.

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  • It is very important that seeds should be sown when the ground is in a good working condition, and not clammy with moisture.

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  • Strips of turf are sometimes used for the rearing of early peas, which are sown in a warmish house or frame, and gradually hardened so as to bear exposure before removal to the open air.

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  • 6 lb The seeds should be thoroughly mixed, and very evenly sown, after which the surface should be raked over to bury them, and then rolled down while dry so as to finish it off smooth and level.

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  • When thus sown, lawns require to be promptly weeded.

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  • Annuals may be divided into three classes: the hardy, which are sown at once in the ground they are to occupy; the half-hardy, which succeed best when aided at first by a slight hot bed, and then transplanted into the open air; and the tender, which are kept in pots, and treated as greenhouse or stove plants, to which departments they properly belong.

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  • The hardy annuals may be sown in the open ground during the latter part of March or beginning of April, as the season may determine, for the weather should be dry and open, and the soil in a free-working condition before sowing is attempted.

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  • In favourable situations and seasons some of the very hardiest, as Silene pendula, Saponaria, Nemophila, Gilia, &c., may be sown in September or October, and transplanted to the beds or borders for very early spring flowering.

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  • Those sown in spring begin to flower about June.

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  • The plants, if left to flower where they are sown, should be thinned out while young, to give them space for proper development.

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  • The half-hardy series are best sown in pots or pans under glass in mild,heat, in order to accelerate germination.

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  • The class of tender annuals, being chiefly grown for greenhouse decoration, should be treated much the same as soft-wooded plants, being sown in spring, and grown on rapidly in brisk heat, near the glass, and finally hardened off to stand in the greenhouse when in flower.

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  • They require to be sown in the summer months, about June or July, in order to get established before winter; they should be pricked out as soon as large enough, and should have ample space so as to become hardy and stocky.

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  • sylvatica, i ft., blue, pink or white, used for spring bedding, should be sown annually in August.

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  • The spores should be sown in well-drained pots or seed pans on the surface of a mixture of fibrous sifted peat and small broken crocks or sandstone; this soil should be firmly pressed and well-watered, and the spores scattered over it, and at once covered with propagating glasses or pieces of sheet glass, to prevent water or dry air getting to the surface.

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  • The spores may be sown as soon as ripe, and when the young plants can be handled, or rather can be lifted with the end of a pointed flat stick, they should be pricked out into well-drained pots or pans filled with similar soil and should be kept moist and shady.

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  • Spores may be sown as above described, but in a much lower temperature.

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  • In the early stages seeds of carrots and radishes are sown simultaneously on the same beds, and over them young lettuces that have been raised in advance are planted.

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  • Transplant to the bottom of a south wall a portion of the peas sown in pots in frames in November and January for the first crop. Sow Brussels sprouts in gentle heat for an early crop.

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  • Small salads should be sown every ten days.

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  • Sow seeds of greenhouse and hothouse plants; also the different sorts of tender annuals; pot off those sown last month; sow cineraria for the earliest bloom; also Chinese primulas.

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  • Transplant from the nursery to their final sites annuals sown in autumn, with biennials and herbaceous plants.

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  • Biennials and perennials should be sown before the middle of the month.

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  • Sow tender annuals for succession, potting and shifting those sown at an earlier period; sow cinerarias for succession; and a few hardy annuals and tenweek stock, &c., for late crops.

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  • Flower Garden, &c. - Sow in the beginning of this month all halfhardy annuals required for early flowering; also mignonette in pots, thinning the plants at an early stage; the different species of primula; and the seeds of such plants as, if sown in spring, seldom come up the same season, but if sown in September and October, vegetate readily the succeeding spring.

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  • If the winter prove mild they will be somewhat earlier than those sown next month or in January.

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  • Sow a few peas and beans, in case of accident to those sown in November, drawing up the soil towards the stems of those which are above ground as a protection; earth up celery; blanch endive with flower-pots; sow radishes in a very sheltered place.

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  • But little can be done in the northern states except to prepare manure, and get sashes, tools, &c., in working order; but in sections of the country where there is little or no frost the hardier kinds of seeds and plants may be sown and planted, such as asparagus, cabbage, cauliflower, carrot, leek, lettuce, onion, parsnip, peas, spinach, turnip, &c. In any section where these seeds can be sown in open ground, it is an indication that hotbeds may be started for the sowing of such tender vegetables as tomatoes, egg and pepper plants, &c.; though, unless in the extreme southern states, hotbeds should not be started before the beginning or middle of February.

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  • - The directions for January will in the main apply to this month, except that now some of the hardier annuals may be sown in hotbed or greenhouse, and also the propagation of plants by cuttings may be done rather better now than in January, as the greater amount of light gives more vitality to the cutting.

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  • Cabbage, lettuce and cauliflower seeds, if sown early this month in hotbed or greenhouse, will make fine plants if transplanted into hotbed in March.

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  • Hardier kinds of annuals may be sown; it is best done in shallow boxes, say 2 in.

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  • If the lawn is thin in spots, these places may be raked over heavily and new grass seed sown.

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  • In localities where the frost is out of the ground, if it is not wet, seeds of the hardier vegetables can be sown.

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  • In March flower seeds and vegetable seeds may be sown in boxes or flats in the greenhouse, or in residence windows, or near the kitchen stove.

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  • Hardier sorts of vegetable seeds and plants, such as beets, cabbage, cauliflower, celery, lettuce, onions, parsley, parsnips, peas, potatoes, radishes, spinach, turnip, &c., should all be sown or planted by the middle of the month if the soil is dry and warm, and in all cases, where practicable, before the end of the month.

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  • Annuals that have been sown in the greenhouse or hotbed may be planted out, and seeds of such sorts as mignonette, sweet alyssum, Phlox Drummondii, portulaca, &c., may be sown in the beds or borders.

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  • The seed may be sown in the north as late as the middle of May, or even the first of June, with good results for fall blooming.

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  • Crops sown last month will have to be thinned out if large enough.

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  • Sow spinach for fall use, but not yet for the winter crop. Red top, white globe, and yellow Aberdeen turnips should now be sown; ruta-baga turnips sown last month will need thinning, and in extreme southern states they may yet be sown.

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  • If cabbage, cauliflower and lettuce are wanted to plant in cold frames, the seed should be sown from about the 10th to the 20th of this month; but judgment should be exercised, for, if sown too early, cabbage and cauliflower are apt to run to seed.

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  • The main crop of spinach or sprouts that is wanted for winter or spring use should be sown about the same date.

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  • Turnips of the early or flat sorts may yet be sown the first week of this month in the northern states, and in the south from two to four weeks later.

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  • All vegetable roots not designed to be left in the ground during the winter should be dug up, such as beets, carrots, parsnips, sweet potatoes, &c. The cabbage, cauliflower and lettuce plants grown from seed sown last month should be pricked out in cold frames.

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  • Plants are readily grown from seed, which should be sown singly in small pots and placed in heat early in March.

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  • Disputes had been constantly recurring between Dutch and English traders in the East Indies and elsewhere, and the seeds were already sown of that stern rivalry which was to issue in a series of fiercely contested wars.

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  • The yeast-conidia, which bud off from the conidia or their resulting mycelium when sown in nutrient solutions, are developed in successive crops by budding exactly as in the yeast plant, but they cannot ferment sugar solutions.

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  • Miyoshi then demonstrated that if Botrytis is sown in a lamella of gelatine, and this lamella is superposed on another similar one to which a chemotropic substance is added, the tips of the hyphae at once turn from the former and enter the latter.

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  • racemosus are sown on B.

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  • From the peculiar use which is made of the produce of an irrigated meadow, and from the conditions to which it is subjected, it is necessary to include in our mixture of seeds some that produce an early crop, some that give an abundant growth, and some that impart sweetness and good flavour, while all the kinds sown must be capable of flourishing on irrigated soil.

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  • But though this plan is ultimately better, it is attended with the one great disadvantage that the soft ground cannot be irrigated for two or three years after it is sown with grass-seeds.

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  • In November the waters have passed off; and whenever a man can walk over the mud with a pair of bullocks, it is roughly turned over with a wooden plough, or merely the branch of a tree, and the wheat or barley crop is immediately sown.

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  • As the river daily fell, of course the water in the canals fell too, and since they were never dug deep enough to draw water from the very bottom of the river, they occasionally ran dry altogether in the month of June, when the river was at its lowest, and when, being the month of greatest heat, water was more than ever necessary for the cotton crop. Thus large tracts which had been sown, irrigated, weeded and nurtured for perhaps three months perished in the fourth, while all the time the precious Nile water was flowing useless to the sea.

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  • In south Germany the so-called Fruchtwechsel is practised, the fields being sown with grain crops every second year, and with pease or beans, grasses, potatoes, turnips, &c., in the intermediate years.

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  • The seed is sown at the end of February or beginning of March and the crop is picked in September and October.

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  • Wheat and barley are important crops, and some 2,000,000 acres are sown with them yearly.

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  • Beans and lentils are extensively sown, and form an important article of export.

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  • The Carmathians were gradually forced to retreat from Egypt and then from Syria by some successful engagements, and by the judicious use of bribes, whereby dissension was sown among their leaders.

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  • In 1707 the Sheik al-Bamad, Qgsim Iywa.z, is found at the head of one of two Mameluke factions, the Qasimites and the Fiqarites, between whom the seeds of enmity were sown by the pasha of the time, with the result that a fight took place between the factions outside Cairo, lasting eighty days.

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  • Amongst her publications are: Poems from the Divan of Ilafaz (translations, 1897), The Desert and the Sown (1907); The Thousand and One Churches (with Sir W.

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  • The seed thus sown rapidly germinated and multiplied.

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  • When maize is sown broadcast or closely planted in drills the ears may not develop at all, but the stalk is richer in sugar and sweeter; and this is the basis of growing " corn-fodder."

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  • One of these, called by the Afghans bandrak, or the spring crop, is sown in the end of autumn and reaped in summer.

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  • The other, called pdizah or Ifrmdi, the autumnal, is sown in the end of spring, and reaped in autumn.

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  • It is common to cut down the green wheat and barley before the ear forms, for fodder, and the repetition of this, with barley at least, is said not to injure the grain crop. Bellew gives the following statement of the manner in which the soil is sometimes worked in the Kandahar district: - Barley is sown in November; in March and April it is twice cut for fodder; in June the grain is reaped, the ground is ploughed and manured and sown with tobacco, which yields two cuttings.

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  • The shrubs thus sown lived on, but the cultivation did not spread until the beginning of the 19th century.

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  • As late as 1902, however, about one-half of the land under cultivation was sown to rice.

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  • But the discontent, which had been sown under his predecessors, had now developed to such an extent that he could not suppress it in detail.

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  • The course of tillage comprises two principal harvests: the kharif, or autumn crops, sown in June and reaped in October or November; and the rabi, or spring crops, sown in October or November, and reaped in March or April.

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  • In the forcing atmosphere, however, of that age of controversy, seed such as that sown in the master's treatment of the uttered X6yos 4 quickly germinated.

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  • The two sentences, "as a man soweth, so must he reap," and "as he reaps so also he must have sown," give comprehensive expression to the idea of Karmic activity.

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  • It is a seed sown in good ground and bringing forth fruit, or in bad ground and fruitless (Luke viii.

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  • But, be this as it may," the doctrine of karma is certainly one of the firmest beliefs of all classes of Hindus, and the fear that a man shall reap as he has sown is an appreciable element in the average morality.

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  • On the smooth surface the seed is sown broadcast by hand or machine, at the rate of 3 bushels per acre, and covered in the same manner as clover seeds.

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  • Alphonse de Candolle (Geographic botanique, p. 798) informs us that several botanists of Paris, Geneva, and especially of Montpellier, have sown the seeds of many hundreds of species of exotic hardy plants, in what appeared to be the most favourable situations, but that in hardly a single case has any one of them become naturalized.

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  • p. 359), gives the following extract from the Memoirs of the Emperor Khang: - " On the 1st day of the 6th moon I was walking in some fields where rice had been sown to be ready for the harvest in the 9th moon.

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  • As soon as these produced seed, it should be sown in the same district and farther north in a climate a little more severe.

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  • After an exceptionally cold season, seed should be collected from the trees that suffered least, and should be sown in various districts all over France.

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  • Seeds are sown when ripe in well drained pans of sandy loam at a temperature of about 65°.

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  • The seed is then sown broadcast as in the case of flax.

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  • They were slain by a dragon, which was in turn destroyed by Cadmus; and by the instructions of Athena he sowed its teeth in the ground, from which there sprang a race of fierce armed men, called Sparti (sown).

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  • Vast numbers of Scotch firs are raised in nurseries for artificial planting; the seed is sown in the spring, being just covered with earth, and the seedlings transplanted in the second year into rows for further culture, or taken direct from the seed-bed for final planting; sometimes the seed is sown where the trees are intended to grow.

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  • On the drift-sands of France, especially in the Gironde, forests have been formed mainly of this pine; the seeds, sown at first under proper shelter and protected by a thick growth of broom sown simultaneously, vegetate rapidly in the sea-sand, and the trees thus raised have, by their wind-drifted seed, covered much of the former desert of the Landes with an evergreen wood.

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  • If, on the other hand, the true seeds of any of our cultivated varieties are sown, the seedlings show very wide variations from one another and from the parents.

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  • deep, radishes being sown thinly over them and covered lightly with mould.

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  • deep, and over all radishes are sown.

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  • Five main cycles of story may be distinguished: (1) the foundation of the citadel Cadmea by Cadmus, and the growth of the Sparti or "Sown Men" (probably an aetiological myth designed to explain the origin of the Theban nobility which bore that name in historical times); (2) the building of a "seven-gated" wall by Amphion, and the cognate stories of Zethus, Antiope and Dirce; (3) the tale of the "house of Laius," culminating in the adventures of Oedipus and the wars of the "Seven" and the Epigoni; (4) the advent of Dionysus; and (5) the exploits of Heracles.

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  • Cultivation hardly extends above 7000 ft., except in the valleys behind the great snowy peaks, where a few fields of buckwheat and Tibetan barley are sown up to 11,000 or 12,000 ft.

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  • Their experience is "that there is no half-way house between ova sown in redds and three-month-old fry.

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  • ramosus sown at 8.30 (to the extreme left), showing how the growth can be measured.

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  • Soil which had been cultivated for many years as pasture was sown with lupins for fifteen years in succession; an analysis then showed that the soil contained more than three times as much nitrogen as at the beginning of the experiment.

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  • For propagation of the tree, the seeds may be sown either when fresh, or, if preserved'in sand or earth, in spring.

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  • In localities where there is hoar frost in autumn and spring the seed is sown in September or at latest in the beginning of October, and the yield of opium and seed is then greater than if sown later.

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  • The Turkish government encourage the development of the industry by remitting the tithes on opium and poppy-seed for one year on lands sown for the first time, and by distributing printed instructions for cultivating the poppy and preparing the opium.

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  • The seed is sown between the 1st and 15th of November, acid germinates in ten or fifteen days.

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  • Queen Isabella reigned from 1843 to 1868, and that period was one long succession of palace intrigues, back-stairs and antechamber influences, barrack conspiracies, military pronunciamientos to further the ends of the political parties - Moderados, who ruled from 1846 to 1854, Progressists from 1854 to 1856, Union Liberal from 1856 to 1863; Moderados and Union Liberal quickly succeeding each other and keeping out the Progressists so steadily that the seeds were sown which budded into the revolution of 1868.

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  • Originally a fisherman and diver of Anthedon in Boeotia, having eaten of a certain magical herb sown by Cronus, he leapt into the sea, where he was changed into a god, and endowed with the gift of unerring prophecy.

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  • In 1795 Sassari was the centre of the reaction of the barons against the popular ideas sown by the French Revolution; an insurrection of the people led by one Angioi lasted only a short while, and led to reactionary measures.

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  • At Viborg the seed sown by Tausen fell upon good soil.

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  • Wallace (Natural Selection), " when the first skin was used as a covering, when the first rude spear was formed to assist in the chase, when fire was first used to cook his food, when the first seed was sown or shoot planted, a grand revolution was effected in nature, a revolution which in all the previous ages of the earth's history had had no parallel; for a being had arisen who was no longer necessarily subject to change with the changing universe, - a being who was in some degree superior to nature, inasmuch as he knew how to control and regulate her action, and could keep himself in harmony with her, not by a change in body, but by an advance of mind."

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  • Land comparatively poor yields crops eight to tenfold the quantity sown; the major part of the land yields twenty to thirtyfold.

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  • In 1899 hay and grain furnished the principal income from 35.4% of all farms in the state, and live-stock from 28.1% of all farms. In 1899, 255,699 acres, or 37.3% of the acreage of all crops, was sown to cereals, which were valued at $2,386,789, or 29% of the value of all crops.

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  • Aman rice is much more extensively cultivated than dus, and in favourable years is the most valuable crop, but being sown in low lands is liable to be destroyed by excessive rainfall.

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  • Aus rice is generally sown on high ground.

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  • The field is ploughed when the early rains set in, ten or twelve times over, till the soil is reduced nearly to dust, the seed being sown broadcast in April or May.

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  • Boro, or spring rice, is cultivated on low marshy land, being sown in a nursery in October, transplanted a month later, and harvested in March and April.

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  • The crop grows on either high or low lands, is sown in April and cut in August.

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  • But the seeds of distrust had already been sown among the members of his own family, and in 1478 his brother Clarence was put to death - secretly, indeed, within the Tower, but still by his authority and that of parliament - as a traitor.

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  • "I too, 0 brahmin," said the beggar, "plough and sow; and having ploughed and sown I eat."

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  • The seed sown by Wesley had grown to be a great tree.

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  • Bell, The Desert and the Sown (5907).

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  • of Great Britain rye is chiefly or solely cultivated as a forage-plant for cattle and horses, being usually sown in autumn for spring use, after the crop of roots, turnips, &c., is exhausted, and before the clover and lucerne are ready.

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  • The seed is sown very thickly at the beginning of winter and pulled, not cut, about the end of May, before the ear is ripe.

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  • Any variety may be a spring or a winter wheat according to the time at which it is sown.

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  • from the period when sown, or 1715° from the period of germination, branching or "tillering" goes on freely, and the young ears are formed.

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  • In April the snow is melting from the branches; spring comes in May; spring flowers are in blossom, and grain is sown.

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  • To the west of these last, the mountains of Connemara and, to a more marked degree, the narrow plain of bog-land between them and Galway Bay, are sown with small lakes, nearly every hollow of this wild district being filled with water.

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  • The Department of Agriculture has made efforts to improve and foster its cultivation, but without any marked results as regards increasing the area sown.

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  • When they had sown their corn, they drove their herds and flocks to the mountains, where such existed, and spent the summer there, returning in autumn to reap their corn and take up their abode in their more sheltered winter residences.

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  • Large herds of swine fatten in the oak and beech forests; and dairy-farming is a thriving industry in the highlands between Agram and Warasdin, where, during the last years of the icth century, systematic attempts were made to replace the mountain pastures by clover and sown grass.

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  • In the cultivation of rice they show very great ingenuity, the ketsa grounds, where the rice is sown before transplanting, being formed either on the margins of the streams or in the hollows of the hills in a series of terraces, to which water is often conducted from a considerable distance.

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  • But thanks to Mazarin, who completed his work, France gathered in the harvest sown by Richelieu.

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  • On lands near the rivers the durra is sown after the flood has gone down and also at the beginning of the rainy season.

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  • For the moment he remained in the cabinet, but the seed of dissension was sown.

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  • Little spring wheat is now sown except in the northern counties, the state being on the northern edge of the winter wheat belt.

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  • acreage sown to grain, and expand overall grain production capacity.

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  • After removing the arils from the seed they should be sown onto a standard potting compost.

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  • In other fields autumn sown barley is already nearly ripe.

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  • hardy biennials can be sown this month, into a nursery bed or pots stored in a greenhouse or cold frame.

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  • Very early cauliflowers may be planted out; also early sown leeks.

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  • The change from spring to winter sown cereals has led to the loss of over winter stubble.

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  • chronicle of events into a history is the moral principle that a nation reaps what is sown in past ages.

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  • Carrots can be sown now for early cropping - use cloches to protect during the winter.

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  • If you have cloches or a poly tunnel, french beans can be sown outside under this protection at the end of March.

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  • I've more sown hopefully germinating in the tent cloche.

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  • Cereals sown on wide rows, 25 cm (9 3/4 inch) At 2 leaf stage go through with the harrow comb.

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  • In short, we have degraded and sown confusion into the uppermost ranks of al-Qa'ida.

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  • Annuals, and easy to grow perennials such as ox-eye daisy are not worth growing in pots, but should be sown direct.

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  • However, the seeds of family disunity are sown from beyond the grave in the opening episode.

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  • Follow the same techniques as for a seed sown wild flower grassland set out above.

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  • Sweet peppers, tomatoes, cucumbers, aubergines, celery, salads and globe artichokes can all be sown in a frost-free greenhouse.

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  • groundnut crops sown immediately after plowing the millet seedlings will be also reduced.

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  • West Penwith ESA has a ' spring sown ' prescription for conservation headlands.

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  • If you want to grow hellebores from seed, they should be sown in July.

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  • intergenerational conflict are sown in this way.

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  • It must then that the seeds of his commercial kitsch were sown.

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  • Flowers were not planted in beds, but sown in the grass to grow as a ' flowery mead ' .

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  • In fact, BAT is reaping the whirlwind sown by its own corporate misdeeds.

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  • parsnip seeds have been sown.

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  • Seed sown in pans of field soil showed no periodicity of emergence.

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  • When police primacy became a pivotal political reality, the seeds were sown for active engagement against those violently opposing the state.

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  • In Newman's time, the seeds were being sown of the denial of supernatural revelation.

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  • These can be collected and sown but plants can more easily be propagated by dividing the thick, fleshy rhizome.

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  • Some of the pastures are sown grasslands dominated by ryegrass and few other species - low biodiversity is in-built.

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  • Italian or hybrid ryegrass may be sown alone (for short term swards) or with perennial ryegrass.

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  • To increase water capacity to twenty plus liters I buy a couple of backpacks and have them sown together to make throwover saddlebags.

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  • Do remember to thin out any recently sown carrots seedlings to ensure that competition for water is kept to the minimum.

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  • sown cereals has led to the loss of over winter stubble.

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  • sown in autumn or winter in containers that are left outdoors.

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  • sown either in trays or direct into the ground for transplanting in the late spring.

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  • sown in pots or modules to provide color in the garden.

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  • sown with wheat 5 or 6 years in succession and the last is the best.

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  • Seed sown in May emerged within 7 days. The plant develops a long taproot.

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  • tilling of the soil before the seed was sown.

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  • The Castle The seed had been sown; a brochure arrived a few days later, which went into the pending tray.

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  • triflequantity sown, is, however, very trifling.

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  • The white turnips are just up, coming up, or just sown.

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  • After the householder had sown the wheat in the field, his servant came to report that tares were growing among the grain.

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  • whirlwind sown by its own corporate misdeeds.

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  • Hell, I've sown some wild oats around the planet!

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  • Vast areas of land have been ploughed and sown with lucerne (alfalfa); magnificent permanent pasturage has been created where there were coarse and hard grasses in former days, and Argentina has been able to add baled hay to her list of exports.

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  • The acorns should be sown in November on well-prepared ground, and covered to a depth of i a or 2 in.; the seeds germinate in the spring, and the seedlings are usually transplanted when one or two years old to nursery-beds, where they are allowed to grow from two to four years, till required for the plantation.

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  • Those who were initiated into the mysteries of Eleusis found a deep meaning in the myth, which was held to teach the principle of a future life, founded on the return of Persephone to the upper world, or rather on the process of nature by which seed sown in the ground must first die and rot before it can yield new life (see Mystery).

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  • As affecting agricultural practice there were three noteworthy improvements in respect of the making of which, without the consent of or notice to his landlord, a tenant might claim compensation - (1) the consumption on the holding " by horses, other than those regularly employed on the holding," of corn, cake or other feeding-stuff not produced on the holding; (2) the "consumption on the holding by cattle, sheep, or pigs, or by horses other than those regularly employed on the holding, of corn proved by satisfactory evidence to have been produced and consumed on the holding "; (3) " laying down temporary pasture with clover, grass, lucerne, sainfoin or other seeds sown more than two years prior to the determination of the tenancy."

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  • the profits of sown land, a tenant may be entitled to these whose term comes tc an end by the happening of an uncertain contingency (see Emblements).

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  • by means of a false oracle, to offer Phrixus as a sacrifice, as the only means of alleviating a famine which she herself had caused by ordering the grain to be secretly roasted before it was sown.

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  • Unwilling to go, he feigned madness, ploughing a field sown with salt with an ox and an ass yoked together; but Palamedes discovered his deceit by placing his infant child Telemachus in front of the plough; Odysseus afterwards revenged himself by compassing the death of Palamedes.

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  • The list of seeds given for the southern states in January may now be used at the north, while for most of the southern states tender vegetables, such as egg plant, okra, sweet potatoes, melon, squash, potatoes, tomatoes, &c., may be sown and planted.

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  • Seeds of Lima beans, sweet corn, melon, okra, cucumbers, &c., should be sown; and sow for succession peas, spinach, lettuce, beans, radishes, &c., every ten days.

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  • - Beets, beans, carrots, corn, cucumbers, lettuce, peas and radishes may be sown for succession.

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  • When the flowers form, however, the mycelium sends hyphae into the young ovaries and rapidly replaces the stores of sugar and starch, &c., which would have gone to make the grain, by the soot-like mass of spores so well known as smut, &c. These spores adhere to the grain, and unless destroyed, by "steeping" or other treatment, are sown with it, and again produce sporidia and yeast-conidia which infect the seedlings.

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  • Seeds are sown when ripe in well drained pans of sandy loam at a temperature of about 65°.

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  • The spore sown at I I A.M., as shown at a, had swollen (b) perceptibly by noon, and had germinated by 3.30 P.M., as shown at c: in d at 6 P.M., and e at 8.30 P.M.; the resulting filament is segmenting into bacilli as it elongates, and at midnight (f) consisted of twelve such segments.

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  • The land is ploughed twice, the second time crosswise, so that it may be thoroughly pulverized; and the seed, mixed with four times its quantity of sand, to prevent its being sown too thickly, is scattered broadcast, about 4 to 1 lb being used for every toloom (1600 sq.

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  • from the period when sown, or 1715° from the period of germination, branching or "tillering" goes on freely, and the young ears are formed.

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  • In each section, seeds were sown in a quincunx pattern.

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  • In Newman 's time, the seeds were being sown of the denial of supernatural revelation.

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  • Their seed is sown in autumn or winter in containers that are left outdoors.

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  • Brassicas can be sown either in trays or direct into the ground for transplanting in the late spring.

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  • Hardy annuals can be sown in pots or modules to provide color in the garden.

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  • We have farms around us which has been sown with wheat 5 or 6 years in succession and the last is the best.

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  • It also served as a day to celebrate the forthcoming preparation and tilling of the soil before the seed was sown.

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  • The quantity sown, is, however, very trifling.

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  • Hell, I 've sown some wild oats around the planet !

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  • Seeds should be sown in frames in March, and the seedlings planted at the end of April or early in May in a warm border; or the seeds may be sown in the open ground in fine rich soil at the end of April.

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  • Each seeds should be sown in individual pots.

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  • Seed should be sown under glass in early spring, and the seedlings planted in rich light soil and in the hottest part of the garden, as soon as danger from frost is over.

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    0
  • The seeds may be sown in the open air, the plant being treated as a hardy annual.

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  • It should be sown in April in a hot-bed, and afterwards planted out in beds or borders.

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  • Seeds should be sown in heat in early spring, and the seedlings transplanted in May as soon as large enough.

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  • In the south seed may be sown at once in the open border.

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  • Its culture is that of a hardy annual, but it is better sown in spring than in autumn.

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  • It may be grown as an annual sown out of doors in spring, and autumnal-sown plants would be best in warm soils.

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  • Seeds should be sown early in August for spring flowering, and in April for summer flowering.

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  • If the seed be sown where the plants are to flower, the results will be most satisfactory; but if transplanting be necessary, it should be done early in the winter.

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  • They may be sown at all seasons, but, as in the case of most other hardy annuals, the finest flowers are from autumn-sown plants, which flower from May to July.

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  • It requires rich deep earth to form its finest leaves, and to raise the plants a brisk hot-bed is needed in February or March, in which to plunge the pots in which the seeds should be sown.

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  • To obtain the finest plants for spring-flowering, seed should be sown in the reserve garden in autumn, and afterwards transplanted.

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  • It should be sown in a frame on slight heat in April, and planted out in May.

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  • Seeds should be sown in autumn, and well grown till the spring; the plants will then flower earlier and produce finer flowers than spring-sown plants.

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  • It may be sown in September and pricked off into pots for winter for transplanting in spring, or again in the open ground in March and April, the seedlings being thinned out about 1 foot apart.

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  • The seeds should be sown in warm frames in spring or in August, when the seedlings require to be wintered in a pit, and flowers are borne from June to November.

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  • Sown early-in February or the beginning of March-they become sturdy little plants before planting time.

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  • The seed may be sown on rubbish heaps and in stony places, old quarries, and by roadsides.

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  • As seedlings do not transplant well, seed should be sown in the open in March, and the plants well thinned out.

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  • It is annual, or biennial, according to the way it is sown and grown.

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  • It sown early the plants will flower the first year; is late, the second.

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  • As soon as thoroughly ripened they should be sown in pans under glass, for they soon lose their vitality.

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  • The seed may be sown either in September or in April or May, and lightly covered.

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  • Easily propagated by cuttings taken in September or April, and put in slight heat, and also raised from seed sown in heat in spring.

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  • In March and April the seed should be sown in the open ground in a free soil and an open situation; but if the plants are intended for pot culture, the sowing should be two months earlier.

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  • For early flowering it should be sown in autumn, and again in March and April for later bloom.

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  • They may be sown in autumn for early summer flowering, or from March to June for late summer and autumn bloom.

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  • Seeds should be sown in heated frames in early spring, but the seedlings should be very carefully transplanted to the open border in May, as they are then very liable to injury.

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  • All these kinds should be sown thinly in heat in pots in February or March.

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  • In the southern counties they may also be sown in the open air in May on warm borders in good soil.

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  • If they are sown in pans or boxes where they can be slightly protected during winter, and are planted out early in April, they have a chance of producing a good crop of flowers for drying.

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  • Sown in the open in April, it should have a light, well-prepared soil.

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  • These little plants should be sown thinly in light rich soil, and thinned to prevent crowding.

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  • The seed is small, and is best sown in pans or boxes, under glass, early in May.

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  • It is propagated by seeds sown as soon as they are ripe, or by its fleshy roots, which, if cut into pieces, in spring, will form good plants much quicker than seedlings.

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  • If treated as half-hardy annuals, the seed should be sown in heat in spring, but if treated as biennials, the seed should be sown in August, the plants preserved in the greenhouse till May, and then planted out in rich, sandy loam.

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  • Seeds should be sown in heat in February and March, and the seedlings planted out in May.

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    0
  • Those in cultivation are perennials, but do best if frequently renewed from seed sown as soon as ripe, the seedlings being wintered in a frame, and planted out in spring.

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  • Best increased by seeds, sown as soon as ripe.

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  • They are difficult to increase by division on account of the long roots they make, but they ripen seed freely, which if sown at once rarely fails.

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  • A border flower of the highest merit in favourable soils; occasional batches of seed should be sown to keep up a supply.

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  • It should be sown in pots in August, wintered in frames, and divided and transplanted in spring, or sown in open ground in April.

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  • It is a hardy Italian annual, bearing pretty pink flowers about the size and form of the Dandelion, and should be sown in spring or autumn like other hardy annuals in any ordinary garden soil.

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  • It succeeds well as a half-hardy annual, sown outdoors in April.

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  • Increase by division late in summer, or seeds sown in a cold frame.

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  • Seed should be sown every spring, and the plants should be thinned out during growth in order to make good ones for the next year.

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    0
  • They are half-hardy annuals, and should be sown in early spring on warm borders or in frames, and afterwards planted out in good soil.

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    0
  • To ensure strong plants for winter borders or beds, seed should be sown about May, as the plant is a biennial.

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  • It seems to do best in a light gritty soil, and the seed should be sown directly it is ripe.

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  • The seeds should be sown on a gentle hot-bed in April, although they will occasionally succeed out of doors.

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  • They may be easily raised from seed sown soon after ripening, preferably in a little warmth; and, indeed, a good stock of strong plants can be ensured only by annual sowings.

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  • The seeds should be sown in spring in pots in the open border in ordinary soil.

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  • Some of the stones and sods on which it grows look as if sown with a mixture of gold and the material that forms the wings of green humming-birds.

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  • Division, or seeds, which should be sown as soon as gathered either in pots or in the open ground, they will vegetate in the following spring.

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  • Seeds should be sown in spring or autumn, in the open border in light soil.

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  • Increase by seeds sown as soon as ripe, or division of the roots in autumn or spring; this last is a work of care, the plants being somewhat averse to disturbance.

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  • It should be sown in autumn or early summer, or in spring for later bloom.

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  • The seeds should be sown early in heat, and the seedlings transplanted in May.

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  • The seed should be sown, as soon as ripe, in a frame.

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  • Seed may be sown in autumn or spring in the open air, on or in a slightly heated frame.

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  • Easily raised from seed sown in early spring in heat, they will flower in the following summer if planted out in May in good soil and sheltered situations.

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  • Increase by division of the creeping root-stock, or seed sown in cold frames as soon as ripe.

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  • Seed sown in the open ground in March or April produces in a few weeks flowering plants, which continue to bloom till late in autumn.

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  • If fine masses be wished for, the seed should be sown in pans about the end of March, the seedlings placed singly in 3-inch pots, and planted out in good soil in an open position.

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  • Plants sown in autumn will survive mild winters and produce flowers in early summer, these being finer than those of spring-sown plants.

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  • Seed may be gathered from wild plants and sown in sandy soil.

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  • Both kinds are raised from seeds sown in heat early in the year, and the tips of old plants rooted under glass come into flower earlier than seedlings.

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  • Seeds should be sown in autumn, in order to secure strong plants for the ensuing summer.

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  • Seed should be sown in heat in early spring or in the open air about the end of March, and the seedlings should be transplanted in May.

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  • N. selaginoides and N. capensis require to be sown early in heat, and to be transplanted in May in light, rich sandy loam in warm borders.

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  • Seed should be sown about the middle of February in pans or boxes in heat; the seedlings should be transplanted into boxes in soil not over-rich, and after being gradually hardened off they should be planted out about the end of May.

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  • Division, or by seed sown as soon as gathered.

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  • Increase by careful division of old plants, or seeds sown in a cold frame as soon as ripe.

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  • It merely requires to be sown in ordinary soil in the open border either in autumn or spring; but the seedlings should be well thinned out.

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  • The Polyanthus may easily be raised from seed, which should be sown as soon as ripe, say about the end of June.

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  • It will also grow well if the seed is not sown till the following spring, but by sowing immediately nearly a year is gained.

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  • For late blooming, seed should be sown in July.

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  • The plants sow themselves freely, and may be sown in the open ground either in spring or autumn.

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  • It is readily increased either by cuttings or layers, or by seeds sown as soon as the berries shrivel on the stems.

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  • B. maxima is one of the handsomest, growing 12 to 18 inches high; may be sown in the open in March in any garden soil, is quite hardy and graceful while growing, and useful for decoration either green or dried.

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  • It may be treated either as a half-hardy annual, and sown in February or March under glass or in a hot-bed, but it requires a warmer climate than ours to do well.

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  • It is extremely impatient of removal or division, and should be raised from seed sown in autumn in a cool frame.

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  • Seed sown in pots or in the open air in fine sandy soil.

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  • The best method of increase is by seeds which are freely produced and should be sown promptly.

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  • It may be sown in any ordinary garden soil-in autumn for spring flowering, or in March and April for summer flowering.

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  • If sown in April or May, in light, warm, rich soil in the open border, it flowers in July and August, and may also be sown in pots, but the ball of earth must not be broken, as the plant will not bear transplanting.

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  • S. speciosa will succeed if sown in the open in April.

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  • If seeds are sown in heat early in February, then potted singly, and planted out in May, the plants will bloom in August and September; if sown in May, the plants will not flower till the following summer.

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  • Ten-week Stocks, if sown in spring, will flower continuously during the summer and autumn.

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  • The seed may be sown at any time from the middle of March onward, but it is always well to get Stocks from seed early.

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  • Intermediate Stocks may be sown either in July or August, to stand the winter and flower early in the spring, or in March, to flower in the following autumn.

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  • It is sown in the usual way about the end of March, planted out at the end of May when 3 or 4 inches high, and blooms finely through August and September, and even later, as the numerous side shoots give spikes of flowers.

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  • Biennial Stocks comprise the Brompton and the Queen, and they should be sown in June and July to flower in the following spring or summer.

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  • The seed should be sown at the end of July in beds, and the plants transplanted to the open ground in the autumn.

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  • It may easily be raised from seed sown early in the year to give plants fit for putting out in early summer.

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  • Seed should be sown in sandy soil as soon as gathered, but careful division of the root in winter is the best way to increase the plant.

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  • The seeds should be sown in ordinary garden soil, either in spring for the current years flowering, or late in autumn for flowering in early summer.

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  • Seed should be sown in spring or autumn, and the seedlings thinned out when large enough.

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  • These are hardy annuals, and may be sown either in autumn or in spring in the open border, in good friable soil.

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  • A packet of mixed seed sown in any ordinary garden soil in March will give a variety of colors.

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  • Celmisia seed should usually be sown directly after harvest, when it is fresh, although seed will not germinate until after it has experienced winter conditions.

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  • Plants may be propagated by division or grown from seed, which can either be direct sown in the fall or started indoors in the spring.

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  • Another advantage of raised bed gardens is that they can typically be started a bit earlier and kept going a little longer than with gardens sown directly into the ground.

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  • Spinach, Swiss chard and kale can be sown in the fall garden and harvested throughout the winter or left to overwinter.

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  • Spinach and Swiss chard sown in the fall also winter over nicely.

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  • Having pieces that are all sown together is great for the simplicity of getting your little one dressed an undressed through the evening.

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  • In this same region the summer heat and rain provide a thoroughly tropical climate, in which rice and other tropical cereals are freely raised, being as a rule sown early in July and reaped in September or October.

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  • The fallow received a third ploughing in September, and was sown about Michaelmas.

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  • deep. Propagation is effected by seed or increase of corms; the seed should be sown as soon as it is ripe in June or July.

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  • Taking the whole of European Russia and Poland, almost exactly two-thirds of the total area is sown every year with cereals.

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  • The seeds are sown in April, and come up in three or four weeks; the plants require protection from frost during their first winter.

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  • North of the tropic the winter cold is sufficient to admit of the cultivation of almost all the cereals and vegetables of Europe, wheat being sown in November and reaped early in April.

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