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sow

sow

sow Sentence Examples

  • Sow vegetable marrow.

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  • Sow vegetable marrow.

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  • It is well to sow at least two bushels to the acre."

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  • It is well to sow at least two bushels to the acre."

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  • This man, I trow, has got the right sow by the ear."

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  • Sow seeds of greenhouse and hothouse plants; also the different sorts of tender annuals; pot off those sown last month; sow cineraria for the earliest bloom; also Chinese primulas.

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  • Collinsia verna: hardy, I ft., white and azure; sow as soon as ripe.

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  • Sow annuals for succession in the last week, also biennials and perennials in the nursery compartment, for planting out next year.

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  • The bear was a sow with two cubs.

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  • 4t4kr,-,' space to cover, it is much the cheaper plan to sow the lawn with grass-seeds, and equally effective, though the sward takes much longer to thicken.

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  • I don't suppose you know Gladys Gillespie of Sow Creek, Idaho do you?

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  • The seeds are harvested from various grasses, especially from Aristida oligantha, a species known as " ant rice," which often grows in quantity close to the site selected for the nest, but the statement that the ants deliberately sow this grass is an error, due, according to Wheeler, to the sprouting of germinating seeds.

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  • Sow also in heat mustard and cress for salads, onions for salads; tomatoes, celery to be pricked out for an early crop; and Early Horn carrot and kidney-beans on slight hotbeds.

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  • Yeah, that was probably said by someone who didn't have a big sow black bear after them.

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  • Together with a few other men of birth and education, he began secretly to sow the sentiments of democracy among the peasants.

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  • But along with wealth, these technologies bring information and thereby sow the seeds of their undoing.

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  • The province produces much wheat, barley, rice, millet, cotton, but the authorities every now and then prohibiting the export of cereals, the people generally sow just as much as they think will suffice for their own wants.

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  • The province produces much wheat, barley, rice, millet, cotton, but the authorities every now and then prohibiting the export of cereals, the people generally sow just as much as they think will suffice for their own wants.

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  • - Sow asparagus, sea-kale, Turnip-rooted beet, salsafy, scorzonera, skirret, carrots and onions on heavy soils; also marrow peas, Longpod and Windsor beans, turnips, spinach, celery, RIII.

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  • Mention may also be made of the Lares grundules, whose worship was connected with the white sow of Alba Longa and its thirty young (the epithet has been connected with grunnire, to grunt): the viales, who protected travellers; the hostilii, who kept off the enemies of the state; the permarini, connected with the sea, to whom L.

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  • nature which, under an appearance of simplicity, might sow the good seed of more adequate ideas on the world and man.

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  • Sow broccoli and kidney-beans both in the second and in the last week, and lettuces and small salads twice or thrice during the month; sow all herbs, if not done last month.

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  • Sow broccoli and kidney-beans both in the second and in the last week, and lettuces and small salads twice or thrice during the month; sow all herbs, if not done last month.

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  • Sow carrots, turnips, early celery, also aubergines or egg-plants, capsicums, tomatoes and successional crops of kidney-beans; cauliflower and Brussels sprouts, in gentle heat, to be afterwards planted out.

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  • Yes, but I have had a hundred and fifty-eight years to sow my wild oats.

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  • Another plan is to sow in May on dry poor soil, when a crop of small bulbs will be produced; these are to be stored in the usual way, and planted in rich soil about February, on ground made firm by treading, in rows about 1 ft.

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  • - Sow kidney-beans for succession; also the wrinkled marrow peas and Seville Longpod and Windsor beans for late crops.

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  • - Sow kidney-beans for succession; also the wrinkled marrow peas and Seville Longpod and Windsor beans for late crops.

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  • I did not know whether they had come to sow a crop of winter rye, or some other kind of grain recently introduced from Iceland.

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  • serere, to sow), the fertilized ovule of plants.

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  • Transplant to the bottom of a south wall a portion of the peas sown in pots in frames in November and January for the first crop. Sow Brussels sprouts in gentle heat for an early crop.

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  • In the last week, sow hardy annuals in the borders, with biennials that flower the first season, as also perennials.

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  • Still sow tender annuals if required; also cinerarias and primulas.

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  • Still sow tender annuals if required; also cinerarias and primulas.

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  • Sow in the last week mignonette, and hardy annuals, in a warm border, for subsequent transplanting.

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  • Sow main or successional crops of annuals of all sorts - half-hardy annuals in warm borders, or on slight hotbeds.

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  • Sow tender annuals for succession, potting and shifting those sown at an earlier period; sow cinerarias for succession; and a few hardy annuals and tenweek stock, &c., for late crops.

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  • In the Baraba district it is the practice to sow four different grain crops in five to seven years and then to let the land rest ten to twenty-five years.

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  • 17ropa&Es, from air€ip€u', to sow), the islands scattered about the Greek Archipelago, as distinguished from the Cyclades, which are grouped round Delos, and from the islands attached, as it were, to the mainlands of Europe and Asia.

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  • Sow early peas in a cold frame for transplanting.

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  • Sow also first-crop peas, early in the month, and William I.

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  • 17ropa&Es, from air€ip€u', to sow), the islands scattered about the Greek Archipelago, as distinguished from the Cyclades, which are grouped round Delos, and from the islands attached, as it were, to the mainlands of Europe and Asia.

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  • Examples: Shelley's Rosalind and Helen, 63, "A sound from thee, Rosalind dear" instead of there; Mask of Anarchy, 280 seq., "the daily strife I With common wants and common cares I Which sow the human heart with tares," for "sows."

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  • Clover thrives best, he says, when you sow it on the barrenest ground, such as the worst heath ground in England.

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  • One plant is selected again from these 500, and the general crop of seed is used to sow about five acres for the 3rd year, from which seed is obtained for the general crop in the 4th year.

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  • They also eschewed the luxuries and pursuits of settled life, and lived in tents, refusing to sow grain as well as to plant vineyards.

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  • Sow mignonette, stocks, &c., in pots; sow sweet peas and a few hardy annuals on a warm border.

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  • Sow petunias in heat, and prick out and harden for bedding out; also gloxinias to be grown on in heat till the flowering season.

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  • - Sow main crops of wrinkled marrow peas; Longpod and Windsor beans; cabbage, onions, leeks, Early Horn carrots, parsnips, salsafy, scorzonera, Brussels sprouts, borecoles, lettuces and spinach.

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  • The first step is to open test works; and directly they show the necessity, regular relief works are established, in which the people may earn enough to keep them from starvation, until the time comes to sow the next crop.

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  • The ground must also be thoroughly cleared of the roots of all coarse, perennial weeds, and be worked to a fine tilth ready for turfing or sow ing.

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  • Petunia violacea hybrida: half-hardy, I z ft., various colours; sow in heat.

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  • The first step is to open test works; and directly they show the necessity, regular relief works are established, in which the people may earn enough to keep them from starvation, until the time comes to sow the next crop.

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  • Sow also Early Horn carrot; Early Purple-top Munich turnip; onions for a full crop in light soils, with a few leeks and some parsley.

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  • "Do you remember Gladys Gillespie of Sow Creek, Idaho?" she asked.

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  • The farmers sow some tares for seed, instead of pease; never for hay or soiling.

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  • The farmers sow some tares for seed, instead of pease; never for hay or soiling.

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  • - Sow successional crops of Early Seville beans, and William I., American Wonder or other peas in the beginning and end of the month; early cabbages to follow the last sowing in August; red cabbages and savoys towards the end.

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  • Sow lettuce for succession, with radishes and Round-leaved spinach, twice in the course of the month; and small salads every fortnight.

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  • Sow salading every ten days; also carrots, onions and radishes for drawing young; and chicory for salads; sow endive for a full crop. In the first week sow Early Munich and Golden Ball turnips for succession, and in the third week for a full autumn crop. Sow scarlet and white runner beans for a late crop, and cabbages for coleworts.

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  • In the beginning and also at the end of the month sow Early Strap-leaf and Early Snowball turnips and savoys.

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  • In the last fortnight sow asparagus, cauliflower and the various sweet and savoury herbs; also sea-kale, radishes, celery, celeriac and parsley.

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  • - Sow main crop of beet in the first week, small salads every week, radishes and lettuces thrice, spinach once a fortnight, carrots and onions for late drawing, kidney-beans in the first week and together with scarlet runners in the last fortnight; endive for an early crop; also peas and Longpod and Windsor beans, cauliflowers, Early York or Little Pixie cabbages, Brussels sprouts, borecole, broccoli, savoys and kale for late crops.

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  • So profitable was sheep-farming seen to be that energetic settlers began to burn off the bracken and cut and burn the forest in the North Island and sow English grasses on the cleared land.

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  • Sow stocks, dahlias and a few tender and half-hardy annuals, on a slight hotbed, or tin pots.

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  • You can't make a silk purse out of a sow's ear.

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  • Its original shape seems to have been an irregular oblong bar, which was stamped with the figure of a sheep, ox or sow.

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  • Sow fragrant or showy annuals to flower in pots during winter; and grow on a set of decorative plants for the same object.

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  • In the first week, sow peas for the last crop of the season; also Longpod beans and French beans.

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  • In the last week, sow red globe or Chirk Castle turnip for a full winter crop, spinach for an early winter supply and Enfield Market cabbage for early summer use.

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  • Sow endive, for autumn and winter use, in the beginning and end of the month; also successional crops of lettuce and small salads.

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  • Sow seed of herbaceous calceolarias; shift heaths, if they require it; cut down pelargoniums past flowering, and plant the cuttings.

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  • Calendar (Great Britain)] Repot auriculas, and sow auricula seed in boxes under glass.

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  • - Sow winter and spring spinach in the beginning and about the end of the month; parsley and winter onions, for a full crop, in the first week; cabbages about the middle of the month, for planting out in spring; cauliflower in the first half (Scotland) and in the second half (England) of the month; Hardy Hammersmith and Brown Cos lettuce in the first and last week; small salads occasionally; and Black Spanish radish, for winter crops.

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  • Sow half-hardy annuals, as Nemophila, Collinsia, Schizanthus, Rhodanthe, &c., to flower during winter.

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  • Sow in the second and the last week, on a warm border of a light sandy soil, with an east aspect, any free-flowering hardy annuals as Silene pendula, Nemophila, &c., for planting in spring; and auricula and primula seeds in pots and boxes.

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  • - Sow small salading for late crops; and lettuce and spinach, if not done last month, for spring crops.

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  • Sow a few kidney beans for an early forced crop. Expel damp, and assist the ripening of late grapes and peaches with fires during the day.

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  • Flower Garden, &c. - Sow in the beginning of this month all halfhardy annuals required for early flowering; also mignonette in pots, thinning the plants at an early stage; the different species of primula; and the seeds of such plants as, if sown in spring, seldom come up the same season, but if sown in September and October, vegetate readily the succeeding spring.

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  • - Sow small salading and radishes in the first week, and lettuces in frames on a shallow hotbed for planting out in spring.

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  • Sow kidney beans.

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  • Sow a few pots of hardy annuals in a frame, or on a sheltered border, for successional spring use if required.

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  • Sow early peas and Early Dwarf Prolific beans in the second week, for an early crop; also in frames for transplanting.

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  • Sow Early Horn carrot; also kidney beans and radishes, on hotbeds.

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  • Sow a few peas and beans, in case of accident to those sown in November, drawing up the soil towards the stems of those which are above ground as a protection; earth up celery; blanch endive with flower-pots; sow radishes in a very sheltered place.

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  • Sow tender annual flower seeds in boxes inside.

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  • The first ten days of this month will yet be time enough to sow sweet corn, beets, lettuce, beans, cucumbers and ruta-baga turnips.

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  • Sow spinach for fall use, but not yet for the winter crop. Red top, white globe, and yellow Aberdeen turnips should now be sown; ruta-baga turnips sown last month will need thinning, and in extreme southern states they may yet be sown.

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  • Sow seeds of sweet alyssum, candytuft, daisies, mignonette, pansies, &c. Visit the roadsides and woods for interesting plants to put in the hardy borders.

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  • Lepidopleurus cancellatus, Sow.

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  • The "fox who would rob his host's hen-roost," as the old king called Louis, repaid his protector by attempting to sow discord in the ducal family of Burgundy, and then retired to the castle of Genappe in Brabant.

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  • Annual engagements are entered into by the cultivators, under a system of pecuniary advances, to sow a certain quantity of land with poppy, and the whole produce in the form of opium is delivered to government at a fixed rate.

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  • Large Black Sow.

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  • The sow is a prolific breeder and good mother, weighing, when mature but not fat, 450 lb - the boar averaging 600 lb, and barrows at six to eight months 350 lb.

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  • The brood sow should be lengthy and of a prolific strain, known to milk well.

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  • Two litters are produced in one year, as pigs are usually weaned at two months old, and the sow will take the boar at from three days to a week after the pigs are removed, according to condition.

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  • Next Theseus despatched the Crommyonian sow (or boar).

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  • AUCHTERMUCHTY (Gaelic, "the high ground of the wild sow"), a royal and police burgh of Fifeshire, Scotland, built on an elevation about 9 m.

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  • The plant should have a warm situation, and the soil should be light and well enriched; sow thinly early in April, either near a fence or wall, or in an open spot, where it will require stakes 6 to 8 ft.

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  • Sow in April in the beds or borders; and again in May for a succession.

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  • On the contrary, the cardinal of Lorraine, by his question whether the Calvinists were prepared to sign the Confession of Augsburg, attempted to sow dissension between them and the Lutheran Protestants of Germany, on whose continued support they calculated.

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  • Another etymology is from conserere (" sow," cf.

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  • I plough and sow and earn my food; you should do the same."

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  • "I too, 0 brahmin," said the beggar, "plough and sow; and having ploughed and sown I eat."

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  • The people, he contended, were no worse off under the old monarchy than they will be in the long run under assemblies that are bound by the necessity of feeding one part of the community at the grievous charge of other parts, as necessitous as those who are so fed; that are obliged to flatter those who have their lives at their disposal by tolerating acts of doubtful influence on commerce and agriculture, and for the sake of precarious relief to sow the seeds of lasting want; that will be driven to be the instruments of the violence of others from a sense of their own weakness, and, by want of authority to assess equal and proportioned charges upon all, will be compelled to lay a strong hand upon the possessions of a part.

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  • Having no clocks, they regard instead the face of the sky; the stars serve them for almanacs; they hunt and fish, they sow and reap in correspondence with the recurrent order of celestial appearances.

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  • The Elizabethan wars were most injurious to industry, for men will not sow unless they hope to reap, and the very essence of military policy had been to deprive a recalcitrant people of the means of living.

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  • The greater part of the Maremma now affords pasture to large herds of horses and half-wild cattle, but on the drier parts corn is grown, the people coming down from the hills to sow and to reap. The hill country just inland, especially near Volterra, has poor soil, largely clayey, and subject to landslips, but is rich in minerals.

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  • I don't suppose you know Gladys Gillespie of Sow Creek, Idaho do you?

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  • "Do you remember Gladys Gillespie of Sow Creek, Idaho?" she asked.

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  • The bear was a sow with two cubs.

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  • Yeah, that was probably said by someone who didn't have a big sow black bear after them.

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  • Yes, but I have had a hundred and fifty-eight years to sow my wild oats.

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  • You can't make a silk purse out of a sow's ear.

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  • amenity grassland, sow a wildflower mix.

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  • In the first place there was the problem over how much spring barley to sow.

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  • Sow seed of perpetual spinach (leaf beet) to provide a useful crop from October through until April.

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  • begrudge people who rip where they did not sow.

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  • Then we sow a mix of fescue and browntop bent, and irrigate immediately afterward to give a quick, even emergence.

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  • sowing biennials In mild areas, toward the end of the month, you can start to sow biennials for flowering next spring.

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  • He would sow a bushel of oats, he tells me; it will take no more.

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  • Allotment Diary for Monday 12th June 2006 Back to June entries If at first you don't succeed, sow some more cauliflowers.

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  • sow autumn cauliflowers in an outdoor seed bed from the middle of the month onwards.

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  • corydalis seed is one of the few that I sow immediately it is shed.

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  • The opening scene is of a sow held captive in a farrowing crate.

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  • The diet consists of natural plant material, for example dandelion, sow thistle, various herbs and red clover with occasional fruit.

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  • Foment intrigue and deceit, and thus sow dissension between the ruler and his ministers.

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  • Mind you, this is a disk that almost does manage to make a silk purse out of a sow's ear!

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  • Sow broad leaved endive and make a further sowing of curly endive.

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  • Spent the next sixteen years in general veterinary practice being awarded the Fellowship of the RCVS for his thesis entitled Dystocia in the Sow.

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  • envious man would sow tares.

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  • If you sow unto the spirit you will of the spirit reap life everlasting.

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  • farrowing nest requires nearly the length of the sow, almost two meters.

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  • farrowing sow?

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  • Sow them over a period of months to avoid a glut.

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  • My tip would be to sow green manures well in advance of their last possible sowing dates, " says Sally.

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  • hoe off the emerging weeds Sow immediately into the prepared, weed free bed.

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  • With the obvious coming betrayal of the leaders the slogan only served to sow illusions.

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  • And see his good deeds springing from the wound, to sow the world with life immortal!

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  • lactateuditor observed a lactating sow trapped on 17 May 2000.

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  • LETTUCE Continue to sow lettuce Continue to sow lettuce over the next few months to ensure a succession of them.

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  • My tip would be to sow green manures well in advance of their last possible sowing dates, " says Sally.

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  • You may wish to sow or plant a wildflower meadow.

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  • I could get drunk, sow a few wild oats " .

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  • Sow sweet peas in a cold frame or the greenhouse for early summer blooms next year.

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  • You cannot make a silk purse out of a sow's ear.. .

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  • For example sow radish or lettuce every two or three weeks.

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  • In 2 Corinthians 9:6, the Apostle Paul wrote, " Sow sparingly, reap sparingly; sow bountifully, reap bountifully.

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  • reap what we sow.

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  • reap whatever you sow.

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  • reap what You Sow Among the many features at this year's event the Grow It!

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  • To grow, sow seed indoors during the late winter.

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  • Chervil (Anthriscus cerefolium) Annual Chervil does not like being transplanted so it is best to sow direct in to a prepared seedbed.

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  • Around the middle of each sow was a broad collar with an attached shackle, securing her to the ground.

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  • He who goes out weeping, carrying seed to sow, will return with songs of joy, carrying sheaves with him.

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  • silk purse out of a sow's ear.. .

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  • Therefore the only effectual way to destroy slugs is to sow lime, in dust, and not slaked.

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  • If your soil is n't sopping wet, you can sow some thing now but it does depend on what you're growing.

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  • sow seed indoors during the late winter.

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  • sow, seedlings died in the arid heat.

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  • sow thistles.

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  • sow sweet peas in a cold frame or the greenhouse for early summer blooms next year.

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  • A farrowing sow will build her nest of straw freely where she pleases and we observe the birthing process.

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  • The auditor observed a lactating sow trapped on 17 May 2000.

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  • Further information The injection of PG 600 into a pregnant sow or gilt will fail to produce heat and will not cause abortion.

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  • sow's ear.

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  • sow in situ or transplant from modules space for small plants from 5cm apart up to 50cm for larger plants.

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  • sow in tears will reap with songs of joy.

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  • Footage of pregnant sows reveals what was once a shed full of sow stalls.

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  • Sow seed of plants which require stratification See below for information about stratifying seeds.

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  • sow sweet peas in a cold frame or the greenhouse for early summer blooms next year.

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  • terminator genes Most of the world's farmers save seed from their crop to sow in the following year.

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  • thesis entitled Dystocia in the Sow.

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  • Key weeds: sow thistle is prevalent early in the season.

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  • Although the time to sow a new lawn has long passed you can still use turves.

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  • upkeep of the churchyard were as follows: Sow wild flower seeds in church grounds.

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  • Type Sowing Temp Cover Seed Advice Tender annual 20-25°C average layer vermiculite Sow 8 weeks prior to planting out.

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  • Sow in spring & place on a light windowsill.

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  • nature which, under an appearance of simplicity, might sow the good seed of more adequate ideas on the world and man.

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  • serere, to sow), the fertilized ovule of plants.

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  • This man, I trow, has got the right sow by the ear."

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  • Its original shape seems to have been an irregular oblong bar, which was stamped with the figure of a sheep, ox or sow.

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  • The seeds are harvested from various grasses, especially from Aristida oligantha, a species known as " ant rice," which often grows in quantity close to the site selected for the nest, but the statement that the ants deliberately sow this grass is an error, due, according to Wheeler, to the sprouting of germinating seeds.

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  • Clover thrives best, he says, when you sow it on the barrenest ground, such as the worst heath ground in England.

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  • One plant is selected again from these 500, and the general crop of seed is used to sow about five acres for the 3rd year, from which seed is obtained for the general crop in the 4th year.

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  • It proved as futile as it was impolitic; for the vizier of Damascus, Muin-eddinAnar, was able to sow dissension between the native Franks and the crusaders; and by bribes and promises of tribute he succeeded in inducing the former to make the siege an absolute failure, at the end of only four days (July 28th, 1148).

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  • They also eschewed the luxuries and pursuits of settled life, and lived in tents, refusing to sow grain as well as to plant vineyards.

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  • In the Baraba district it is the practice to sow four different grain crops in five to seven years and then to let the land rest ten to twenty-five years.

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  • satio, sowing time, the spring, from serere, to sow; in Late Lat.

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  • Mention may also be made of the Lares grundules, whose worship was connected with the white sow of Alba Longa and its thirty young (the epithet has been connected with grunnire, to grunt): the viales, who protected travellers; the hostilii, who kept off the enemies of the state; the permarini, connected with the sea, to whom L.

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  • So profitable was sheep-farming seen to be that energetic settlers began to burn off the bracken and cut and burn the forest in the North Island and sow English grasses on the cleared land.

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  • Together with a few other men of birth and education, he began secretly to sow the sentiments of democracy among the peasants.

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  • Examples: Shelley's Rosalind and Helen, 63, "A sound from thee, Rosalind dear" instead of there; Mask of Anarchy, 280 seq., "the daily strife I With common wants and common cares I Which sow the human heart with tares," for "sows."

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  • Another plan is to sow in May on dry poor soil, when a crop of small bulbs will be produced; these are to be stored in the usual way, and planted in rich soil about February, on ground made firm by treading, in rows about 1 ft.

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  • The ground must also be thoroughly cleared of the roots of all coarse, perennial weeds, and be worked to a fine tilth ready for turfing or sow ing.

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  • 4t4kr,-,' space to cover, it is much the cheaper plan to sow the lawn with grass-seeds, and equally effective, though the sward takes much longer to thicken.

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  • Collinsia verna: hardy, I ft., white and azure; sow as soon as ripe.

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  • Petunia violacea hybrida: half-hardy, I z ft., various colours; sow in heat.

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  • Sow early peas in a cold frame for transplanting.

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  • Sow also first-crop peas, early in the month, and William I.

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  • Sow also in heat mustard and cress for salads, onions for salads; tomatoes, celery to be pricked out for an early crop; and Early Horn carrot and kidney-beans on slight hotbeds.

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  • Sow mignonette, stocks, &c., in pots; sow sweet peas and a few hardy annuals on a warm border.

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  • - Sow successional crops of Early Seville beans, and William I., American Wonder or other peas in the beginning and end of the month; early cabbages to follow the last sowing in August; red cabbages and savoys towards the end.

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  • Sow also Early Horn carrot; Early Purple-top Munich turnip; onions for a full crop in light soils, with a few leeks and some parsley.

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  • Sow lettuce for succession, with radishes and Round-leaved spinach, twice in the course of the month; and small salads every fortnight.

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  • Transplant to the bottom of a south wall a portion of the peas sown in pots in frames in November and January for the first crop. Sow Brussels sprouts in gentle heat for an early crop.

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  • Sow melons and cucumbers on hotbeds and in pits.

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  • Sow carrots, turnips, early celery, also aubergines or egg-plants, capsicums, tomatoes and successional crops of kidney-beans; cauliflower and Brussels sprouts, in gentle heat, to be afterwards planted out.

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  • Sow stocks, dahlias and a few tender and half-hardy annuals, on a slight hotbed, or tin pots.

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  • Sow petunias in heat, and prick out and harden for bedding out; also gloxinias to be grown on in heat till the flowering season.

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  • Sow in the last week mignonette, and hardy annuals, in a warm border, for subsequent transplanting.

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  • - Sow main crops of wrinkled marrow peas; Longpod and Windsor beans; cabbage, onions, leeks, Early Horn carrots, parsnips, salsafy, scorzonera, Brussels sprouts, borecoles, lettuces and spinach.

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  • In the beginning and also at the end of the month sow Early Strap-leaf and Early Snowball turnips and savoys.

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  • In the last fortnight sow asparagus, cauliflower and the various sweet and savoury herbs; also sea-kale, radishes, celery, celeriac and parsley.

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  • Sow capsicum and tomato; also in slight heat such tender herbs as basil and marjoram.

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  • Sow seeds of greenhouse and hothouse plants; also the different sorts of tender annuals; pot off those sown last month; sow cineraria for the earliest bloom; also Chinese primulas.

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  • In the last week, sow hardy annuals in the borders, with biennials that flower the first season, as also perennials.

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  • - Sow asparagus, sea-kale, Turnip-rooted beet, salsafy, scorzonera, skirret, carrots and onions on heavy soils; also marrow peas, Longpod and Windsor beans, turnips, spinach, celery, RIII.

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  • Sow; pot tomatoes and capsicums for succession.

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  • Sow main or successional crops of annuals of all sorts - half-hardy annuals in warm borders, or on slight hotbeds.

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  • - Sow main crop of beet in the first week, small salads every week, radishes and lettuces thrice, spinach once a fortnight, carrots and onions for late drawing, kidney-beans in the first week and together with scarlet runners in the last fortnight; endive for an early crop; also peas and Longpod and Windsor beans, cauliflowers, Early York or Little Pixie cabbages, Brussels sprouts, borecole, broccoli, savoys and kale for late crops.

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  • Sow vegetable marrows and hardy cucumbers on a warm border in the last week; sow cardoons in trenches, or (in the north) in pots under glass shelter; sow chicory for salading.

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  • Sow late crops of cucumbers and melons.

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  • Sow tender annuals for succession, potting and shifting those sown at an earlier period; sow cinerarias for succession; and a few hardy annuals and tenweek stock, &c., for late crops.

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  • Sow annuals for succession in the last week, also biennials and perennials in the nursery compartment, for planting out next year.

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  • Sow salading every ten days; also carrots, onions and radishes for drawing young; and chicory for salads; sow endive for a full crop. In the first week sow Early Munich and Golden Ball turnips for succession, and in the third week for a full autumn crop. Sow scarlet and white runner beans for a late crop, and cabbages for coleworts.

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  • Sow fragrant or showy annuals to flower in pots during winter; and grow on a set of decorative plants for the same object.

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  • In the first week, sow peas for the last crop of the season; also Longpod beans and French beans.

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  • In the last week, sow red globe or Chirk Castle turnip for a full winter crop, spinach for an early winter supply and Enfield Market cabbage for early summer use.

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  • Sow endive, for autumn and winter use, in the beginning and end of the month; also successional crops of lettuce and small salads.

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  • Sow seed of herbaceous calceolarias; shift heaths, if they require it; cut down pelargoniums past flowering, and plant the cuttings.

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  • Calendar (Great Britain)] Repot auriculas, and sow auricula seed in boxes under glass.

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  • - Sow winter and spring spinach in the beginning and about the end of the month; parsley and winter onions, for a full crop, in the first week; cabbages about the middle of the month, for planting out in spring; cauliflower in the first half (Scotland) and in the second half (England) of the month; Hardy Hammersmith and Brown Cos lettuce in the first and last week; small salads occasionally; and Black Spanish radish, for winter crops.

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  • Sow tomatoes and cucumbers for a winter crop. Make up mushroom beds.

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  • Sow half-hardy annuals, as Nemophila, Collinsia, Schizanthus, Rhodanthe, &c., to flower during winter.

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  • Sow in the second and the last week, on a warm border of a light sandy soil, with an east aspect, any free-flowering hardy annuals as Silene pendula, Nemophila, &c., for planting in spring; and auricula and primula seeds in pots and boxes.

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  • - Sow small salading for late crops; and lettuce and spinach, if not done last month, for spring crops.

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  • Sow a few kidney beans for an early forced crop. Expel damp, and assist the ripening of late grapes and peaches with fires during the day.

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  • Flower Garden, &c. - Sow in the beginning of this month all halfhardy annuals required for early flowering; also mignonette in pots, thinning the plants at an early stage; the different species of primula; and the seeds of such plants as, if sown in spring, seldom come up the same season, but if sown in September and October, vegetate readily the succeeding spring.

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  • - Sow small salading and radishes in the first week, and lettuces in frames on a shallow hotbed for planting out in spring.

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  • Sow kidney beans.

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  • Sow a few pots of hardy annuals in a frame, or on a sheltered border, for successional spring use if required.

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  • Sow early peas and Early Dwarf Prolific beans in the second week, for an early crop; also in frames for transplanting.

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  • Sow Early Horn carrot; also kidney beans and radishes, on hotbeds.

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  • Sow a few peas and beans, in case of accident to those sown in November, drawing up the soil towards the stems of those which are above ground as a protection; earth up celery; blanch endive with flower-pots; sow radishes in a very sheltered place.

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  • Sow tender annual flower seeds in boxes inside.

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  • Seeds of Lima beans, sweet corn, melon, okra, cucumbers, &c., should be sown; and sow for succession peas, spinach, lettuce, beans, radishes, &c., every ten days.

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  • The first ten days of this month will yet be time enough to sow sweet corn, beets, lettuce, beans, cucumbers and ruta-baga turnips.

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  • Sow spinach for fall use, but not yet for the winter crop. Red top, white globe, and yellow Aberdeen turnips should now be sown; ruta-baga turnips sown last month will need thinning, and in extreme southern states they may yet be sown.

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  • Sow seeds of sweet alyssum, candytuft, daisies, mignonette, pansies, &c. Visit the roadsides and woods for interesting plants to put in the hardy borders.

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  • Lepidopleurus cancellatus, Sow.

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  • The "fox who would rob his host's hen-roost," as the old king called Louis, repaid his protector by attempting to sow discord in the ducal family of Burgundy, and then retired to the castle of Genappe in Brabant.

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  • Annual engagements are entered into by the cultivators, under a system of pecuniary advances, to sow a certain quantity of land with poppy, and the whole produce in the form of opium is delivered to government at a fixed rate.

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  • Large Black Sow.

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  • The sow is a prolific breeder and good mother, weighing, when mature but not fat, 450 lb - the boar averaging 600 lb, and barrows at six to eight months 350 lb.

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  • The brood sow should be lengthy and of a prolific strain, known to milk well.

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  • Two litters are produced in one year, as pigs are usually weaned at two months old, and the sow will take the boar at from three days to a week after the pigs are removed, according to condition.

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  • Next Theseus despatched the Crommyonian sow (or boar).

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  • AUCHTERMUCHTY (Gaelic, "the high ground of the wild sow"), a royal and police burgh of Fifeshire, Scotland, built on an elevation about 9 m.

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  • The ploughing for the lord, for instance, was not only imposed in the shape of a certain number of days in the week, but took sometimes the shape of a certain number of acres which the village had to plough and to sow for the lord irrespectively of the time employed on it.

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  • The plant should have a warm situation, and the soil should be light and well enriched; sow thinly early in April, either near a fence or wall, or in an open spot, where it will require stakes 6 to 8 ft.

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  • Sow in April in the beds or borders; and again in May for a succession.

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  • On the contrary, the cardinal of Lorraine, by his question whether the Calvinists were prepared to sign the Confession of Augsburg, attempted to sow dissension between them and the Lutheran Protestants of Germany, on whose continued support they calculated.

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  • In any case, the conception of Adonis as a swine-god does not contradict the idea of him as a vegetation or corn spirit, which in many parts of Europe appears in the form of a boar or sow.

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  • Another etymology is from conserere (" sow," cf.

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  • I plough and sow and earn my food; you should do the same."

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  • "I too, 0 brahmin," said the beggar, "plough and sow; and having ploughed and sown I eat."

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  • The people, he contended, were no worse off under the old monarchy than they will be in the long run under assemblies that are bound by the necessity of feeding one part of the community at the grievous charge of other parts, as necessitous as those who are so fed; that are obliged to flatter those who have their lives at their disposal by tolerating acts of doubtful influence on commerce and agriculture, and for the sake of precarious relief to sow the seeds of lasting want; that will be driven to be the instruments of the violence of others from a sense of their own weakness, and, by want of authority to assess equal and proportioned charges upon all, will be compelled to lay a strong hand upon the possessions of a part.

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  • Having no clocks, they regard instead the face of the sky; the stars serve them for almanacs; they hunt and fish, they sow and reap in correspondence with the recurrent order of celestial appearances.

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  • The Elizabethan wars were most injurious to industry, for men will not sow unless they hope to reap, and the very essence of military policy had been to deprive a recalcitrant people of the means of living.

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  • The greater part of the Maremma now affords pasture to large herds of horses and half-wild cattle, but on the drier parts corn is grown, the people coming down from the hills to sow and to reap. The hill country just inland, especially near Volterra, has poor soil, largely clayey, and subject to landslips, but is rich in minerals.

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  • You cannot make a silk purse out of a sow 's ear...

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  • For example sow radish or lettuce every two or three weeks.

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  • In 2 Corinthians 9:6, the Apostle Paul wrote, Sow sparingly, reap sparingly; sow bountifully, reap bountifully.

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  • If we sow generously we will reap generously because God is faithful to his words.

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  • In Bible language: we reap what we sow.

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  • Do not be deceived; God is not mocked, for you reap whatever you sow.

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  • Reap What You Sow Among the many features at this year 's event the Grow It !

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  • The promise of verse 5: Those who sow in tears will reap with songs of joy.

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  • To grow, sow seed indoors during the late winter.

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  • Chervil (Anthriscus cerefolium) Annual Chervil does not like being transplanted so it is best to sow direct in to a prepared seedbed.

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  • Propagation: Sow seed of known wild origin in a seedbed in autumn.

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  • Around the middle of each sow was a broad collar with an attached shackle, securing her to the ground.

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  • He who goes out weeping, carrying seed to sow, will return with songs of joy, carrying sheaves with him.

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  • Therefore the only effectual way to destroy slugs is to sow lime, in dust, and not slaked.

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  • If your soil is n't sopping wet, you can sow some thing now but it does depend on what you 're growing.

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  • In many parts of the country fields are empty because, where farmers did sow, seedlings died in the arid heat.

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  • Here and there in fields, or along the road sides, there are displays of the tall sow thistles.

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  • A farrowing sow will build her nest of straw freely where she pleases and we observe the birthing process.

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  • Further information The injection of PG 600 into a pregnant sow or gilt will fail to produce heat and will not cause abortion.

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  • You cannot make a silk purse out of a sow 's ear.

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  • Mature crop sow in situ or transplant from modules space for small plants from 5cm apart up to 50cm for larger plants.

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  • Footage of pregnant sows reveals what was once a shed full of sow stalls.

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  • Sow seed of plants which require stratification See below for information about stratifying seeds.

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  • Terminator genes Most of the world's farmers save seed from their crop to sow in the following year.

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  • Key weeds: Sow thistle is prevalent early in the season.

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  • He that kills a breeding sow, destroys all her offspring to the thousandth generation.

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  • Although the time to sow a new lawn has long passed you can still use turves.

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  • Comments on the upkeep of the churchyard were as follows: Sow wild flower seeds in church grounds.

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  • Type Sowing Temp Cover Seed Advice Tender annual 20-25°C Average layer vermiculite Sow 8 weeks prior to planting out.

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  • Sow in spring & place on a light windowsill.

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  • "Like so many of its race, this shrub is not long-lived, and care should be taken to sow a few seeds occasionally, to renew the stock if needed.

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  • Sow the seeds in March, prick off the young plants when large enough to handle, grow them on till they are strong, and plant out in May.

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  • To secure a good display of flower, however, the best time to sow is in August, and the soil should be a light one, where the seed can germinate freely, and where the plants will not become too robust before winter sets in.

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  • When established on old walls and in rough places it will sow itself freely with fine effect, some of the prettiest wild pictures of S.

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  • Sow D. sinensis under glass in February, with very little or no bottom-heat; give air freely during open weather, and in April plant out in well-cultivated soil, which need not be rich.

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  • Sow it in April in open ground; or else in a frame in autumn, and protect it during winter, if good plants are desired, either for pots or planting out.

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  • To raise seedlings, sow the seed in heat in February, and treat the young plants in the same way as cuttings.

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  • Sow them in a warm, open position, and a good light soil-if peaty, the better.

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  • In cold soils a good way is to sow in boxes and plant out when small near dwarf plants only.

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  • The Foxglove frequently blooms two years in succession; but it is always well to sow a little seed annually, and if there be any to spare, it may be scattered in woods or copses where it is desired to establish the plants.

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  • As all the kinds of Furze are difficult to transplant when large, the best plan is to get small plants of the double and of the dwarf kinds and to sow seed of the common single kind.

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  • With choice kinds it is better to sow the seed in pans or rough wooden boxes, but for ordinary purposes a bed of finely-pulverised soil in the open air will suffice.

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  • The plants sow themselves freely, and may be sown in the open ground either in spring or autumn.

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  • Sow the seed in April in a hot-bed, pricking out the seedlings in a hot-bed, and plant about the end of May.

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  • Sow seed in autumn, and do not expect too much the first year.

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  • Sow in cool house in September as soon as ready, prick off four or five in a 4-inch pot, keep in cold pits during winter, and guard against damp.

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  • Pot on again in March singly into 4-inch pots, and at end of April plant out into open borders; or sow on slight hot-bed in March, prick out into pits for transplanting into open in May; or sow in open in April and May.

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  • Sow seed under glass in April, for then, even without bottom-heat, they will start freely.

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  • Lettuce: Sow seeds fours weeks before last spring frost.

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  • Radish: Sow seeds three weeks before last spring frost.

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  • Spinach: Sow seeds five weeks before last spring frost.

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  • Beans: Sow seeds on the last spring frost date.

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  • Squash: Sow seeds or plant seedlings on the last spring frost date.

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  • Broccoli: Sow seeds 16 weeks before first fall frost or plant seedlings nine weeks before first fall frost.

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  • Cauliflower: Sow seeds 16 weeks before first fall frost or plant seedlings nine weeks before first fall frost.

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  • Carrots: Sow seeds 11 weeks before first fall frost.

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  • Peas: Sow seeds ten weeks before first fall frost.

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  • Radishes: Sow seeds four weeks before first fall frost.

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  • Lettuce: Sow seeds seven weeks before first fall frost.

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  • Spinach: Sow seeds seven weeks before first fall frost.

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  • You may also wish to sow lettuce seeds, which need cool temperatures and moisture to germinate.

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  • Another good resource for organic heirlooms is the Sow Organic Seed Company.

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