How to use Southwark in a sentence

southwark
  • When Jack Cade's rebellion occurred in 1450 Waynflete was employed with Archbishop Stafford, the chancellor, to negotiate with the rebels at St Margaret's church, Southwark, close to Winchester House.

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  • On the 7th of May 1451 Waynflete, from "le peynted chambre" in his manor house at Southwark, asserting that his bishopric was canonically obtained and that he laboured under no disqualification, but feared some grievous attempt against himself and his see, appealed to the protection of the pope.

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  • He died in the Marshalsea on the 5th of September 1569, and was buried in St George's, Southwark, at midnight to avoid the risk of a hostile demonstration.

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  • The Herold Institute, a branch of the Borough Polytechnic, Southwark, is devoted to instruction in connexion with the leather trade.

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  • Southwark Park in the centre of the borough is 63 acres in extent.

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  • Bermondsey is in the parliamentary borough of Southwark, including the whole of Rotherhithe and part of the Bermondsey division.

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  • Tooley Street, leading east from Southwark by London Bridge railway station, is well known in connexion with the story of three tailors of Tooley Street, who addressed a petition to parliament opening with the comprehensive expression "We, the people of England."

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  • The borough is connected with the City of London by Blackfriars, Southwark and London bridges; the thoroughfares leading from these and the other road-bridges as far up as Lambeth converge at St George's Circus; another important junction is the "Elephant and Castle."

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  • Southwark is a bishopric of the Church of England created by act of 1904 (previously a suffragan bishopric in the diocese of Rochester), and also of the Roman Catholic Church.

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  • The municipal borough includes the western and part of the Bermondsey divisions of the parliamentary borough of Southwark, and the borough of Newington, divided into the western and Walworth divisions; each division returning one member.

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  • The history of Southwark is intimately connected with that of the City of London.

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  • The citizens of London having suffered from the depredations of thieves and felons who escaped into Southwark, petitioned parliament for protection.

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  • The junction in Southwark of the great roads from the south of England for the passage of the Thames sufficiently accounted for the early origin of Southwark.

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  • Southwark witnessed various episodes during the invasions of the Norsemen, and was fortified by the Danes against the City in the reign of Ethelred the Unready.

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  • The many historical associations of Southwark, contemporary memorials of which are almost wholly swept away, centre upon the district bordering the river, and formerly known as Bankside.

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  • Southwark was further noted for its inns and its prisons.

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  • Charles Dickens had an early acquaintance with Southwark, as his father was confined in the Marshalsea, one of several prisons here.

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  • At home a Union for Social Service was formed in 1906, the natural outcome of Thomas Jackson's efforts for the hungry and distressed in Clapton and Whitechapel, and of similar work at St George's Hall, Southwark.

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  • His powers as a boy preacher became widely known, and at the close of 1853 he was "called" to New Park Street Chapel, Southwark.

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  • Reaching Blackheath on the 12th, the insurgents burnt the prisons in Southwark and pillaged the archbishop's palace at Lambeth, while another body of rebels from Essex encamped at Mile End.

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  • Of these London Bridge, connecting the City with Southwark and Bermondsey, stands first in historical interest and in importance as a modern highway.

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  • The bridges in order above London Bridge are as follows, railway-bridges being bracketed - Southwark, (Cannon Street), (Blackfriars), Blackfriars, Waterloo, (Hungerford - with a footway), Westminster, Lambeth, Vauxhall, (Grosvenor), Victoria, Albert, Battersea, (Battersea), Wandsworth, (Putney), Putney and Hammersmith.

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  • Some of the bridges were built by companies, and tolls were levied at their crossing until modern times; thus Southwark Bridge was made toll-free in 1866, and Waterloo Bridge only in 1878, on being acquired by the City Corporation and the Metropolitan Board of Works respectively.

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  • St Saviour's in Southwark (q.v.), the cathedral church of the modern bishopric of Southwark, was the church of the priory of St Mary Overy, and is a large cruciform building mainly Early English in style.

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  • The Chelsea Water Company opened its supply from the Thames in 1721; the Lambeth waterworks were erected in 1783; the Vauxhall Company was established in 1805, the West Middlesex, near Hammersmith, and the East London on the river Lea in 1806, the Kent on the Ravensbourne (Deptford) in 1810, the Grand Junction in 1811, and the Southwark (which amalgamated with the Vauxhall) in 1822.

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  • The work of private philanthropists and philanthropical bodies among the poor of East London, Southwark and Bermondsey, and elsewhere, falls to be noticed at this point.

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  • Such are the Oxford House, Bethnal Green; the Cambridge House, Camberwell Road; Toynbee Hall, Whitechapel; Mansfield House, Canning Town; the Robert Browning Settlement, Southwark; and the Passmore Edwards Settlement, St Pancras.

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  • St Olave's and St Saviour's grammar school, Southwark, received its charter in 1571.

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  • The Hop Exchange is across the river in Southwark.

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  • There are, however, several large breweries, among which that of Messrs Barclay & Perkins, on the riverside in Southwark, may be mentioned; engineering works are numerous in East London by the river, where there are also shipbuilding yards; the leather industry centres in Bermondsey, the extensive pottery works of Messrs Doulton are in Lambeth, there are chemical works on the Lea, and paper-mills on the Wandle.

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  • Of other markets, the Whitechapel Hay Market and Borough Market, Southwark, are under the control of trustees; and Woolwich Market is under the council of that borough.

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  • Quarter-sessions for the county of London are held thirty-six times annually, for the north side of the Thames at the Sessions-house in Clerkenwell (Finsbury) and for the south side at that in Newington Causeway, Southwark.

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  • The Metropolitan police courts are fourteen in number, namely - Bow Street, Covent Garden; Clerkenwell; Great Marlborough Street (Westminster); Greenwich and Woolwich; Lambeth; Marylebone; North London, Stoke Newington Road; Southwark; South Western, Lavender Hill (Battersea); Thames, Arbour Street East (Stepney); West Ham; West London, Vernon Street (Fulham); Westminster, Vincent Square; Worship Street (Shoreditch).

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  • The bishopric of Southwark was created in 1904, having been previously a suffragan bishopric in the diocese of Rochester.

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  • Remains of Roman villas are found in Southwark, which was evidently a portion of Londinium, and it therefore hardly seems likely that a bridge-building people such as the Romans would remain contented with a ferry.

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  • Snorre the Icelander tells us that the Danes fortified Southwark with ditch and rampart, which the English assailed in vain.

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  • The Danes at once set to work to dig a great ditch by Southwark, and then dragged their ships through to the west side of the bridge.

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  • In 1550 the citizens purchased the manor of Southwark, and with it they became possessed of the monastery of St Thomas, which was enlarged and prepared for the reception of " poor, sick and helpless objects."

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  • Wyat took possession of Southwark, and expected to have been admitted into London; but finding the gates shut against him and the drawbridge cut down he marched to Kingston, the bridge at which place had been destroyed.

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  • A strong earthen rampart, flanked with bastions and redoubts, surrounded the City, its liberties, Westminster and Southwark, making an immense enclosure.

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  • He unsuccessfully contested York in 1859, but was elected for Southwark in 1860, and from 1861 to 1866 was under-secretary for foreign affairs in the successive administrations of Lord Palmerston and Lord John Russell.

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  • He sat for Southwark from 1796 to 1806, and then represented in turn Athlone (1806-1807), Bandon (1807-1812), Appleby (1812-1818), and Knaresborough (1818-1830).

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  • Southwark bridge over the Thames, designed by John Rennie with cast iron ribs and erected in 1814-1819, has a centre FIG.

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  • Kent is mainly in the diocese of Canterbury, but has parts in those of Rochester, Southwark and Chichester.

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  • Christopher Froschouer of Zurich, 3 who printed the edition of 1550, and that the sheets were sent for binding and distribution to James Nicolson, the Southwark printer.'

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  • He died in the King's Bench prison, Southwark, where he was confined for debt, in 1558.

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  • The original foundation dated from 1213, was situated in Southwark, and was connected with the priory of Bermondsey.

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  • Johnson soon had an apartment at the brewery in Southwark, and a still more pleasant apartment at the villa of his friends on Streatham Common.

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  • According to the letters patent the almspeople and scholars were to be chosen in equal proportions from the parishes of St Giles (Camberwell), St Botolph without Bishopsgate, and St Saviour's (Southwark), and " that part of the parish of St Giles without Cripplegate which is in the county of Middlesex."

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  • He preached (4th July 1848) at the opening of St George's, Southwark, an occasion unique in England since the Reformation, 14 bishops and 240 priests being present, and six religious orders of men being represented.

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  • A course of lectures at St George's, Southwark, further moderated the storm.

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  • By the terms of the treaty James was to wed a noble English lady, and on the 12th of February 1424 he was married at Southwark to Jane, daughter of John Beaufort, earl of Somerset, a lady to whom he was faithful through life.

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  • On the 6th of July 1909 he was suddenly taken ill, on the 10th he received conditional absolution from a priest of the diocese of Southwark, and on the 12th extreme unction from the prior of Storrington.

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  • In 1827 Rose was collated to the prebend of Middleton; in 1830 he accepted the rectory of Hadleigh, Suffolk, and in 1833 that of Fairsted, Essex, and in 1835 the perpetual curacy of St Thomas's, Southwark.

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  • His first preferment was the small vicarage of Cannock in Staffordshire; but he leapt into notice when holding a preachership at St Saviour's, Southwark.

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  • They were remanded on conditional bail to appear in Southwark Crown Court.

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  • One went to Peckham Rye, and the other went to Southwark Park, replacing a smaller bandstand which went to Plumstead.

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  • The winning entry will be on show outside Southwark Station for at least three months.

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  • Southwark Alliance has a list of community groups and community fora active in Southwark.

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  • A glass of wine at lunchtime with your steak frites, unthinkable in Southwark, is suddenly de rigueur.

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  • As you can imagine, Southwark is ideal if you're looking for rolling greensward with rocky outcrops.

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  • Today (21 September 2005) at Southwark Crown Court he was acquitted by the jury.

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  • The building of Southwark station was governed by the Victorian main line railroad viaduct directly above.

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  • Thus Sir John Wolfe Barry, as chairman of the Council of the Society of Arts in 1899, proposed to alleviate congestion of traffic by bridges over and tunnels under the streets at six points, namely - Hyde Park Corner, Piccadilly Circus, Ludgate Circus, Oxford Street and Tottenham Court Road, Strand and Wellington Street, and Southwark Bridge and Upper Thames Street.

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  • His chief apostle in England was Christopher Vitel, a native of Delft, an "illuminate elder," living at Colchester and Southwark, who ultimately recanted.

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  • The applause of society is but faintly audible in the slums of Whitechapel or in the squalid streets of Southwark.

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