How to use South-wales in a sentence

south-wales
  • We were presented corn production figures from Columbia or hafnium levels from New South Wales.

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  • The Bowling Associations of Victoria and New South Wales were established in 1880, and it was not until 1892 that the Scottish Bowling Association was founded.

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  • In 1864 the two associations or synods of North and South Wales were united in a general assembly.

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  • It consists in the main of an Archean block or " coign,"which still occupies nearly the whole of the western half of the continent, outcrops in north-eastern Queensland, forms the foundation of southern New South Wales and eastern Victoria, and is exposed in western Victoria, in Tasmania, and in the western flank of the Southern Alps of New Zealand.

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  • This Silurian sea was less extensive than the Ordovician in Victoria; but it appears to have been wider in New South Wales and in Queensland.

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  • The best Silurian sequence is in New South Wales.

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  • Similar granitic intrusions occurred in New South Wales and Queensland, and built up a mountain chain, which ran north and south across the continent; its worn-down stumps now form the east Australian highlands.

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  • The mountains both in Victoria and New South Wales were snow-capped, and glaciers flowed down their flanks and laid down Carboniferous glacial deposits, which are still preserved in basins that flank the mountain ranges, such as the famous conglomerates of Bacchus Marsh, Heathcote and the Loddon valley in Victoria, and cf Branxton and other localities in New South Wales.

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  • Kitson's work in Tasmania shows that there also the glacial beds may be correlated with the lower or Greta Coal Measures of New South Wales.

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  • The Permian deposits are best developed in New South Wales and Tasmania, where their characters show the continuation of the Carboniferous conditions.

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  • The Cretaceous period was initiated by the subsidence of a large area to the south of the Gulf of Carpentaria, whereby a Lower Cretaceous sea spread southward, across western Queensland, western New South Wales and the north-eastern districts of South Australia.

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  • These rocks were followed by the outpouring of the extensive older basalts in the Great Valley of Victoria and on the highlands of eastern Victoria, and also in New South Wales and Queensland.

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  • The sea extended up the Murray basin into the western plains of New South Wales.

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  • The first of these wells was opened at Kallara in the west of New South Wales in 1880.

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  • At Brisbane the fall is 50 in., and portions of the New South Wales coast receive a like quantity, but speaking generally the fall is from 30 in.

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  • Climatically, New South Wales is divided into three marked divisions.

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  • The rainfall of New South Wales ranges from an annual average of 64 in.

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  • The climate of Victoria does not differ greatly from that of New South Wales.

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  • The ornithology of New South Wales and Queensland is more varied and interesting than that of the other provinces.

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  • Whiting, mullet, gar-fish, rock cod and many others known by local names, are in the lists of edible fishes belonging to New South Wales and Victoria.

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  • This element was introduced via Torres Strait, and spread down the Queensland coast to portions of the New South Wales littoral, and also round the Gulf of Carpentaria, but has never been able to obtain a hold in the more arid interior.

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  • The distribution of population at the close of 1906 (4,118,000) was New South Wales 1,530,000, Victoria 1,223,000, Queensland 534,000, South Australia 381,000, Western Australia 270,000, Tasmania 180,000.

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  • The rate of increase since the previous census was 1.5% per annum, varying from 0.31 in Victoria to 2 06 in New South Wales and 6.9 in Western Australia.

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  • The statutory ages differ in the various states; in New South Wales and Western Australia it is from 6 to 13 years inclusive, in Victoria 6 to 12 years, in Queensland 6 to II years, and in South Australia 7 to 12 years inclusive.

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  • Maize and sugar-cane are grown in New South Wales and Queensland..

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  • The vine is cultivated in all the states, but chiefly in South Australia, Victoria and New South Wales.

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  • Tobacco thrives well in New South Wales and Victoria, but kinds suitable for exportation are not largely grown.

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  • Trout may now be taken in many of the mountain streams. At one time whaling was an important industry on the coasts of New South Wales and Tasmania, and afterwards on the Western Australian coasts.

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  • In New South Wales the greatest production was in 1852, soon after the first discovery of the precious metal, when the output was valued at £2,660,946; the production in 1905 was about 270,000 oz., valued at £1,150,000.

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  • The fields of New South Wales have proved to be of immense value, the yield of silver and lead during 1905 being £2,500,000, and the total output to the end of the year named over £40,000,000.

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  • It is situated beyond the river Darling, and close to the boundary between New South Wales and South Australia.

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  • The principal deposits of copper in New South Wales are found in the central part of the state between the Macquarie, Darling and Bogan rivers.

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  • The most important tin-mines in Queensland are in the Herberton district, south-west of Cairns; at Cooktown, on the Annan and Bloomfield rivers; and at Stanthorpe, on the border of New South Wales.

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  • In New South Wales lode tin occurs principally in the granite and stream tin under the basaltic country in the extreme north of the state, at Tenterfield, Emmaville, Tingha, and in other districts of New England.

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  • The total value of tin produced in Australia is nearly a million sterling per annum, and the total production to the end of 1905 was £22,500,000, of which Tasmania produced about 40%, New South Wales one-third, Queensland a little more than a fourth.

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  • In New South Wales there are, together with coal and limestone Iron.

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  • Magnetite, or magnetic iron, the richest of all iron ores, is found in abundance near Wallerawang in New South Wales.

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  • In New South Wales the principal centre of this industry is Hillgrove, near Armidale, where Other the Eleanora Mine, one of the richest in the state, is minerals.

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  • The principal mine in New South Wales is situated at Kingsgate, in the New England district, where the mineral is generally associated with molybdenum and gold.

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  • Manganese probably exists in all the states, deposits having been found in New South Wales, Victoria, Queensland and Western Australia, the richest specimens being found in New South Wales.

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  • The rare element tellurium has been discovered in New South Wales at Bingara and other parts of the northern districts, as well as at Tarana, on the western line, though at present in such minute quantities as would not repay the cost of working.

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  • The association of this metal with silver in the Broken Hill mines of New South Wales adds very greatly to the value of the product.

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  • Mercury is found in New South Wales and Queensland.

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  • Molybdenum, in the form of molybdenite (sulphide of molybdenum), is found in Queensland, New South Wales and Victoria, associated in the parent state with tin and bismuth in quartz reefs.

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  • The manganese ores of the Bathurst district of New South Wales often contain a small percentage of cobalt - sufficient, indeed, to warrant further attempts to work them.

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  • In New South Wales chromium is found in the northern portion of the state, in the Clarence and Tamworth districts and also near Gundagai.

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  • Arsenic, in its well-known and beautiful forms, orpiment and realgar, is found in New South Wales and Victoria.

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  • The coal-fields of New South Wales are situated in three distinct regions - the northern, southern and western districts.

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  • The coal mines of New South Wales give employment to 14,000 persons, and the annual production is over 6,600,000 tons.

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  • Kerosene shale (torbanite) is found in several parts of New South Wales.

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  • Marble is found in many parts of New South Wales and South Australia.

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  • Kaolin, or porcelain clay, although capable of application to commercial purposes, has not as yet been utilized to any extent, although found in several places in New South Wales and in Western Australia.

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  • Asbestos has been found in New South Wales in the Gundagai Bathurst and Broken Hill districts - in the last-mentioned district in considerable quantities.

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  • Diamonds are found in all the states; but only in New South Wales have any attempts been made to work the diamond drifts.

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  • The best of the New South Wales diamonds are harder and much whiter than the South African diamonds, and are classified as on a par with the best Brazilian gems, but no large specimens have yet been found.

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  • The oriental topaz has been found in New South Wales.

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  • Oriental amethysts also have been found in that state, and the ruby has been found in Queensland, as well as in New South Wales.

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  • Chrysoberyls have been found in New South Wales; spinel rubies in New South Wales and Victoria; and white topaz in all the states.

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  • In several of the states, New South Wales and South Australia proper, the railways yield more than the interest paid by the government on the money borrowed for their construction.

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  • In New South Wales the body is often burned and the ashes buried.

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  • In 1827 and the two following years, Cunningham prosecuted instructive explorations on both sides of the Liverpool range, between the upper waters of the Hunter and those of the Peel and other tributaries of the Brisbane north of New South Wales.

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  • The interior of New South Wales and Queensland, all that lies east of the r40th degree of longitude, was examined.

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  • Of the six Australian states, New South Wales is the oldest.

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  • The early history, therefore, of New South Wales is peculiar to itself.

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  • New South Wales became prosperous and attractive to emigrants with capital.

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  • The population of New South Wales in 1851 was 190,000; that of Victoria, 77,000; and that of South Australia about the same.

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  • Since 1870 there have been five radical changes made in New South Wales.

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  • The effects of the crisis were mainly felt in the three eastern states, Queensland, New South Wales and Victoria, Tasmania and South Australia being affected chiefly by reason of the fact of their intimate financial connexion with the eastern states.

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  • The question of federation was not lost sight of by the framers of the original constitution which was bestowed upon New South Wales.

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  • The constitution was accepted by Victoria, South Australia and Tasmania by popular acclamation, but in New South Wales very great opposition was shown, the main points of objection being the financial provisions, equal representation in the Senate, and the difficulty in the way of the larger states securing an amendment of the constitution in the event of a conflict with the smaller states.

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  • Western Australia did not put it to the vote, as the Enabling Act of that colony only provided for joining a federation of which New South Wales should form a part.

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  • In New South Wales and Queensland there were still a large number of persons opposed to the measure, which was nevertheless carried in both colonies.

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  • New South Wales having decided in favour of federation, the way was clear for a decision on the part of Western Australia.

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  • After the year 1884 Labour troubles became very frequent, the New South Wales coal miners in particular being at war with the colliery owners during the greater part of the six years intervening between then and what is called the Great Strike.

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  • New South Wales was the first country which endeavoured to settle its labour grievances through the ballot-box and to send a great party to parliament as the direct representation of Labour, pledged to obtain through legislation what it was unable to obtain by strikes and physical force.

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  • Several attempts had been made by individuals belonging to the Labour party to enter the New South Wales parliament, but it was not until 1891 that the occurrence of a general election gave the party the looked-for opportunity for concerted action.

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  • The two features of the Labour party in New South Wales are its detachment from other parties and the control of the caucus.

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  • The one ideal which has just been described represents the Labour party from the New South Wales standpoint.

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  • Wise, was carried after much opposition in New South Wales in 1901, to remain in force till the 30th of June 1908.

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  • In the years 1900 and 1902 acts were passed in Western Australia still more closely modelled on the New Zealand act than was the above-mentioned statute in New South Wales.

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  • In 1843 he was nominated by Sir George Gipps, the governor, to a seat in the New South Wales Legislative Council; owing to a difference with Gipps he resigned his seat, but was elected shortly afterwards for Sydney.

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  • The town owed its origin and growth to its position on the shores of the Bristol Channel, and its good harbour developed an oversea trade with Bristol, South Wales and the Irish ports.

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  • In South Wales again, where in 1811 the railways in connexion with canals, collieries and iron and copper works had a total length of nearly 150 miles, the plate-way was almost universal.

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  • Just as the German reaper leaves the last ears of corn as an offering to Wodan, so the Australian black offers a portion of a find of honey; in New South Wales a pebble is said to have been offered or a number of spears, in Queensland the skin removed in forming the body-scars.

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  • The entire revocation of the muzzling order, which accordingly followed, proved, however, to be premature, and it became necessary to reimpose it in the districts where it had last been operative, namely, certain parts of South Wales.

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  • Many other papers and reports are being issued from Australia, notably by Froggatt in New South Wales.

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  • Milford Haven is the terminus of a branch-line of the South Wales section of the Great Western railway.

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  • Pembroke is a station on the South Wales system of the Great Western railway.

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  • The several accounts by John White, Collins, Phillips, Hunter and others of the colonization of New South Wales at the end of the last century ought not to be overlooked by any Australian ornithologist.

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  • Lewin s Natural History of the Birds of New South Wales (4to, 1822), which reached a third edition in 1838.

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  • Some notices of Australian birds by Mr Ramsay and others are to be found in the Proceedings of the Linnaean Society of New South Wales and of the Royal Society of Tasmania.

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  • Queensland, New South Wales and South Australia possess suitable climatic conditions, and in the first-named state the cotton has been grown on a commercial scale in past years, the crop in 1897 being about 450 bales.

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  • They are important ores of silver (the pure chloride contains 75.3% of silver), and have been extensively mined at several places in Chile, also in Mexico, and at Broken Hill in New South Wales.

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  • The other public buildings of the town include the infirmary founded in 1837, the present buildings being erected in 1883, and subsequently enlarged; the sanatorium, the seamen's hospital, the South Wales Institute of Mining Engineers (which has a library) built in 1894, the exchange, an institute for the blind, a school for the deaf and dumb, and one of the two prisons for the county (the other being at Swansea).

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  • The newspapers of Cardiff include two weeklies, the Cardiff Times and Weekly Mail, founded in 1857 and 1870 respectively, two morning dailies, the South Wales Daily News and Western Mail, established in 1872 and 1869 respectively, and two evening dailies.

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  • Deposits are also worked at Broken Hill, New South Wales.

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  • The first castellan of this new stronghold was Giraldus de Windsor, husband of the Princess Nest of South Wales and grandfather of Giraldus Cambrensis.

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  • In any case, the antiquity of the town is undisputed, and it served as the seat of government for Ystrad Tywi until the year 877, when Prince Cadell of South Wales abandoned Carmarthen for Dinefawr, near Llandilo, probably on account of the maritime raids of the Danes and Saxons.

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  • Its railway station, which is the chief terminus of the South Wales system of the Great Western railway, is at the hamlet of Goodwick across the bay, a mile distant to the south-west.

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  • Indeed, experiments have been made in this direction near Cardiff in South Wales.

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  • In Australia tobacco is produced on a small scale in Queensland, New South Wales and Victoria.

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  • The district between Bizerta and the Gulf of Tunis is a most attractive country, resembling greatly the mountainous regions of South Wales.

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  • It derived importance from its situation on the road to South Wales.

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  • Wilton, the New South Wales Magazine (1833), the New South Wales Literary, Political and Commercial Advertiser (1835), edited by the eccentric Dr Lhotsky, Tegg's Monthly Magazine (1836), the Australian Magazine (1838), the New South Wales Magazine (1843), the Australian Penny Journal (1848) and many others.

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  • The pest even crossed the oceans, and appeared in Australia, at Geelong, about 1880; it has since twice broken out in Victoria, and has ravaged the vineyards of South Australia and New South Wales.

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  • Thus the semi 'anthracitic coals of South Wales are known as " dry " or " steam coals," being especially valuable for use in marine steam-boilers, as they burn more readily than anthracite and with a larger amount of flame, while giving out a great amount of heat, and practically without producing smoke.

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  • Australia possesses fields of great value, principally in the south-east (New South Wales and Victoria), and in New Zealand considerable quantities of coal and lignite are raised, chiefly in South Island.

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  • In the South Wales system of working, cross headings are driven from the main roads obliquely across the rise to get a sufficiently easy gradient for horse roads, and from these the stalls are opened out with a narrow entrance, in order to leave support on either side of the road, but afterwards widening to as great a breadth as the seam will allow, leaving pillars of a minimum thickness.

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  • Thomas, of the gases dissolved or occluded in coals from South Wales basin shows them to vary considerably with the class of coal.

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  • The gases from the bituminous house coals of South Wales are comparatively free from marsh gas, as compared with those from the steam coal and anthracite pits.

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  • One of the earliest examples was erected at Llanbradack in South Wales in 1894, and they have been somewhat extensively used in Westphalia and the north of France.

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  • In South Wales a somewhat similar treatment is now adopted in the anthracite districts.

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  • The scope of the inquiry in New South Wales was somewhat extended and made to include occupations other than agriculture and stock-breeding.

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  • The reports for New South Wales and Victoria are especially valuable in their statistical aspect from the analysis they contain of the vital conditions of a comparatively young community under modern conditions of progress.

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  • In 1821 he went to New South Wales as astronomer at the observatory built at Parramatta by Sir Thomas Brisbane.

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  • The Maitai beds have generally been considered to be Carboniferous from the presence of species of Productus found in the Permo-Carboniferous of New South Wales.

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  • It was discovered in 1774 by Captain Cook, and was taken by Philip King of the "Stirling" and twenty-four convicts from New South Wales.

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  • This settlement was abandoned in 1805, but in 1826 the island was made a penal settlement from New South Wales.

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  • In 1821 he was appointed governor of New South Wales.

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  • The South Wales clergy who regularly itinerated were dying out; the majority of those remaining itinerated but irregularly, and were most of them against the change.

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  • In 1842, the South Wales Association opened a college at Trevecca, leaving Bala to the North; the Rev. David Charles became principal of the former, and the Rev. Lewis Edwards of the latter.

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  • Of the British possessions among the islands of the Pacific, Fiji is a colony, and its governor is also high commissioner for the western Pacific. In this capacity, assisted by deputies and resident commissioners, he exercises jurisdiction over all the islands except Fiji and those islands which are attached to New Zealand and New South Wales.

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  • The climate of Porthcawl is bracing, and the rainfall (averaging 25 in.) is about the lowest on the South Wales coast.

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  • In 1842 Melbourne was incorporated and first sent members to the New South Wales parliament.

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  • A strong popular agitation caused the Port Phillip district to be separated from New South Wales in 1851, and a new colony was formed with the name of Victoria, Melbourne becoming its capital.

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  • In 1901 Melbourne became the temporary capital of the Australian commonwealth pending the selection of the permanent capital in New South Wales.

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  • Wyatt; the Guildhall; the barracks, which are the headquarters of two battalions of the South Wales Borderers; the county infirmary founded in 1832; and the prison (in Llanfaes) for the counties of Brecon and Radnor.

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  • It has a station on the Rhondda and Swansea Bay railway and is also on the main South Wales line of the Great Western, whose station, however, is at Port Talbot, half a mile distant, on the eastern side of the Avon.

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  • Sapphire is widely distributed through the gold-bearing drifts of Victoria, New South Wales and Queensland, but the blue colour of the Australian stones is usually dark, and it is notable that green tints are not infrequent.

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  • Thus, Gellygaer in South Wales and Hardknott in Cumberland have yielded nothing later than the opening of the 2nd century.

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  • North and South Wales also have their Chapel Funds.

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  • The Maoris of New Zealand first came under Christian influence through the efforts of Samuel Marsden, a colonial chaplain in New South Wales about 1808.

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  • This clearer water extended from Ireland across north-central England and through South Wales and Somerset into Belgium and Westphalia; but a narrow ridge of elevated older rocks ran across the centre of England towards Belgium at this time.

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  • Most of the British iron works lie in and near the important coal-fields in Scotland between the mouth of the Clyde and the Forth, in Cleveland and Durham, in Cumberland and Lancashire, in south Yorkshire, Derbyshire, and Lincolnshire, in Staffordshire and Northamptonshire, and in south Wales in spite of its lack of ore.

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  • At Inverell in New South Wales a diamond (1906) has been found embedded in a hornblende diabase which is described as a dyke intersecting the granite.

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  • Brisbane was founded in 1825 as a penal settlement, taking its name from Sir Thomas Brisbane, then governor of the colony of New South Wales; in 1842 it became a free settlement and in 1859 the capital of the new colony of Queensland, the town up to that time having belonged to New South Wales.

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  • Llanelly is a station on the South Wales section of the Great Western railway.

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  • The mother-church of St Elliw, or Elli (whence the town derives its name) has been practically rebuilt (1906), but it retains its 13th-century tower and other ancient features of the original fabric. Its situation on a broad estuary and its central position with regard to a neighbourhood rich in coal, iron and limestone, have combined to make Llanelly one of the many important industrial towns of South Wales.

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  • Llanelly, though an ancient parish and a borough by prescription under a portreeve and burgesses in the old lordship of Kidwelly, remained insignificant until the industrial development in South Wales during the 19th century.

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  • The rate per head of population within the United Kingdom has not increased much during recent years, and in the Australasian colonies it has apparently fallen greatly as compared with recorded averages of 12 lb per head in Victoria and 9 lb in New South Wales in 1884.

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  • In 1817 Ceylon was added to his charge; in 182 3 all British subjects in the East Indies and the islands of the Indian Ocean; and in 1824 "New South Wales and its dependencies"!

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  • It was first assumed by the metropolitans of Canada and Rupert's Land, at the desire of the Canadian general synod in 1893; and subsequently, in accordance with a resolution of the Lambeth conference of 1897, it was given by their synods to the bishop of Sydney as metropolitan of New South Wales and to the bishop of Cape Town as metropolitan of South Africa.

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  • The southern edge of the county is formed by the scarps and moorlands of the Carboniferous Limestone and Millstone Grit (both of which form also the outlier of Pen-ceryg-calch north of Crickhowell), while the lowest beds of the Coal Measures of the South Wales coalfield are reached in the Tawe and Neath valleys (where the beds are much folded) and near Tredegar and Brynmawr.

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  • The acreage devoted to any other crop is practically infinitesimal, though in the eastern part more attention is paid to fruit-growing than perhaps in any other part of South Wales.

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  • The main roads of the county are probably the best in South Wales.

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  • The county forms part of the South Wales circuit, and the assizes are held at Brecon.

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  • Considerable quantities of coal come from South Wales.

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  • Professor Rhys, who at one time considered runes and ogam to be connected, now thinks that ogam was the invention of a grammarian in South Wales who was familiar with Latin letters.

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  • In New South Wales and New Zealand, too, the marriage-rates fell off in the same period by 11 and 28% respectively, whilst the decline in the birth-rates amounted to 35 and 31%.

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  • In 1905 New South Wales produced 831,000, Victoria 1,726,000,1,726,000, and South Australia 2,846,000 gallons respectively.

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  • In the great strike in the South Wales coal-field in 1898 he addressed, together with Robert Smillie, huge meetings of miners, and in the general election of 1906 he was reelected to Parliament for Merthyr Tydfil.

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  • Except in some districts of the Marches and in certain tracts lying along the South Wales coast, nearly all parishes, villages, hamlets, farms, houses, woods, fields, streams and valleys possess native appellations, which in most cases are descriptive of natural situation, e.g.

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  • Cardigan, in Welsh Aberteifi, from its situation near the mouth of the Teifi, and Brecon, in Welsh Aberhonddu, from its site near the confluence of the Usk and Honddu, are examples of corrupted Welsh names in common use - Ceredigion, Brychan - which possess in addition pure Celtic forms. In the third division, English place-names are tolerably frequent everywhere and predominate in the Marches and on the South Wales coast.

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  • But with the systematic development of the vast mineral resources of the South Wales coalfield, the population of Glamorganshire has increased at a more rapid rate than that of any other county of the United Kingdom, so that at present this county contains about half the population of all Wales.

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  • The great South Wales coalfield, one of the largest in the kingdom, covers the greater part of Monmouthshire and Glamorganshire, the south-eastern corner of Carmarthenshire, and a small portion of south Pembrokeshire, and the quality of its coal is especially suitable for smelting purposes and for use in steamships.

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  • The two principal railways serving the Principality are the London & North-Western, which passes along the North Wales coast-line by way of Conway and Bangor, crosses the Menai Strait and has its terminus at Holyhead; and the Great Western, which traverses South Wales by way of Cardiff, Landore, Llanelly and Carmarthen, and has its principal terminal station at Fishguard Harbour.

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  • The lines of the Cambrian railway serve North and Mid-Wales, and branches of the London & North-Western and the Midland penetrate into South Wales as far as Swansea.

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  • Some 330 out of a possible total of 520 incumbents were now ejected in South Wales and Monmouthshire, and there is every reason to suppose that the beneficed clergy of North Wales suffered equally under the new system.

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  • Despite the fierce efforts of Vavasor Powell and his brother itinerant preachers to thwart the reception of this South Wales petition at Westminster, Colonel Freeman was able to urge the claims of the petitioners, or " Anti-Propagators " as they were termed, at the bar of the House of Commons, openly declaring that by the late policy of ejectment and destruction " the light of the Gospel was almost extinguished in Wales."

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  • The University College of Wales was founded at Aberystwyth in 1872; that of South Wales at Cardiff in 1883; and of North Wales at Bangor in 1884.

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  • How wide-spread and enthusiastic is this true spirit of nationalism amongst all classes and sects of Welsh society to-day may be observed at the great meetings of the National Eisteddfod, which is held on alternate years in North and South Wales at some important centre, and at which the immense crowds collected and the interest displayed make a deep impression on the Anglo-Saxon or foreign visitors.

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  • The mouth of the Hunter river (named after Governor John Hunter), now known as Newcastle Harbour, was discovered in 1797 by Lieutenant John Shortland, who accompanied Hunter to New South Wales.

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  • It is situated on the river Murray, across which it is connected by bridge with Moama, on the New South Wales side, whence a railway runs to Deniliquin.

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  • In 1837 he was invested with a government commission in the West Indies, and two years later was made superintendent of the Port Philip district of New South Wales.

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  • The benevolent institutions include the general hospital, founded in 1817, removed to the present site in 1867, extended by the addition of two wings in 1878 and of an eye department in 1890; a convalescent home for twenty patients from the hospital only (1903); the Royal Cambrian Institution for the Deaf and Dumb, established in 1847 at Aberystwyth, removed to Swansea in 1850, and several times enlarged, so as to have at present accommodation for ninety-eight pupils; the Swansea and South Wales Institution for the Blind, established in 1865 and now under the Board of Education; the Swansea and South Wales Nursing Institute (1873), providing a home for nurses in the intervals of their employment; a nursing institution (1902) for nursing the sick poor in their own homes, affiliated with the Queen's Jubilee Institute of London; the Sailors' Home (1864); a Sailors' Rest (1885); and a Mission to Seamen's Institute (1904).

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  • Its trade is mainly with Bristol and the ports of South Wales.

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  • The name was given by Captain Cook, in his exploratory voyage in 1770, to the southern portion of the eastern coast of Australia, from some imagined resemblance of its coast-line to that of South Wales.

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  • The great plain district, lying west of the tableland, is part of a vast basin which comprises portions of Queensland, South Australia and Victoria, as well as of New South Wales.

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  • The Murray has a very tortuous course, as may be judged from the fact that the measurement along the joint boundary of New South Wales and Victoria is only 460 m.

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  • The highlands of New South Wales consist, geographically, of a series of tablelands, now in the condition of dissected peneplains; geologically, they are built of a foundation of Archean and folded Lower Palaeozoic rocks, covered in places by sheets of more horizontal Upper Palaeozoic and Mesozoic rocks; these deposits occur along the edge of the highlands, and are widely distributed on the floor of the coastal districts.

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  • The highland rocks no doubt once extended along the whole length of the state from north to south; but they are now crossed by a band of Upper Palaeozoic sediments, which extend up to the valley of the Hunter river and separate the Blue Mountains and the Southern Highlands of New South Wales from the New England tableland to the north.

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  • The oldest rocks in New South Wales are referrable to the Archean system, and consist of gneisses and schists, including the glaucophane-schists in the New England tableland, and hornblendeschists of Berthong.

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  • The Archean rocks are comparatively sparsely exposed in New South Wales.

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  • The Silurian system is the best-known constituent of the Lower Palaeozoic foundation of New South Wales.

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  • They are also developed in the New South Wales highlands, to the south-east of Goulburn.

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  • The Devonian system is separated from the Carboniferous by an interval, during which there were powerful earth movements; they produced a lofty mountain chain, running north and south across New South Wales.

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  • The Mesozoic rocks of New South Wales begin with the Narrabeen Shales; they are covered by the Hawkesbury Sandstones, which are well exposed around Sydney; and they in turn are covered by the Wianamatta Shales.

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  • The most significant point in the distribution of the marine Cainozoic rocks in New South Wales is their complete absence from the coastal districts; this fact indicates that while the Middle Cainozoic marine beds of Victoria and New Guinea were being deposited, Australia extended far eastward into the Tasman Sea.

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  • The Cainozoic series of New South Wales contains many interesting volcanic rocks, including leucite-basalts, nepheline-basalts and sodalite-basalts.

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  • The most important mineral in New South Wales is coal, of which the state has probably a larger available supply than any other country in the southern hemisphere.

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  • The silver-lead mines of New South Wales are famous owing to the importance of Broken Hill.

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  • The geology of New South Wales has been described in the Monographs, Memoirs and Records of the Geological Survey, which in the fullness and high scientific character form the most valuable contribution to Australasian geology.

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  • Liversidge, The Minerals of New South Wales (1888), and to him is due a valuable chemical study of the meteorites and gold nuggets.

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  • Contributions on the palaeontology of New South Wales are contained in the Rec. Austral.

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  • Since 1860 New South Wales had added more largely to its population than any of the other Australian states.

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  • The political constitution of New South Wales is that of a self-governing British colony, and rests on the provisions of the Constitution Act.

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  • Bills were passed in 1909 by the legislative assembly of New South Wales and by the federal parliament, transferring this territory to the federation.

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  • New South Wales might be described as essentially a pastoral country, and the cultivation of the soil has always beC' secondary to stock-raising.

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  • New South Wales took up its position amongst wheatexporting countries in 1900; the bulk of the grain exported goes to the United Kingdom.

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  • The copper lodes of New South Wales contain ores of a much higher grade than those of many well-known mines .worked at a profit in other parts of the world, and, with a fair price for copper, the production largely increases.

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  • Commerce.-During 1905, 2725 vessels entered New South Wales ports from places outside the state; their tonnage was 4,697,500; the value of goods imported was £29,424,008; and the value of exports was £36,757,002.

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  • New South Wales maintains a large trade with foreign countries aggregating £3,434,609 imports and £10,762,439 exports.

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  • Penal establishments were formed at Newcastle in New South Wales, at Hobart and Launceston in Tasmania, and an unsuccessful attempt was made to colonize Port Phillip. The most noteworthy incident in the first decade of the 19th century was the forcible deportation by the officers of the New South Wales Corps, a regiment raised in England for service in the colony, of the governor, Captain Bligh, R.N., the naval officer identified with the mutiny of the " Bounty."

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  • For some time the government was administered by the senior officer of the New South Wales Corps, but in 1809 he was succeeded by Captain Macquarie, who retained the governorship for eleven years.

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  • During the regime of this able administrator New South Wales was transformed from a penal settlement to a colony.

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  • Before the arrival of Macquarie schools and churches had been erected, a newspaper, the Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser, had been started, and attempts had been made to acclimatize the drama.

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  • In 1840 the press was free in every part of Australia, trial by jury had been introduced, and every colony possessed a legislature, although in none of them except New South Wales had the principle of representation been introduced, and in that colony only to a very limited extent.

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  • In 1851, when separate autonomy was granted to Victoria, New South Wales had a population of 187,243, the annual imports were £2,078,338, the exports £ 2, 399,5 80, the revenue was £575,794, and the colony contained 1 3 2, 437 horses, 1,738,965 cattle and 13,059,324 sheep.

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  • Telegraphic communication was established between Sydney, Melbourne, Adelaide and Tasmania in 1859; and during the same year the Moreton Bay district was separated from New South Wales and was constituted the colony of Queensland.

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  • Dalley, who was acting Premier during the absence through ill-health of Sir Alexander Stuart, made to the British government the offer of a contingent of the armed forces of New South Wales to aid the Imperial troops in the Sudan.

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  • In 1889 the premier, Sir Henry Parkes, gave in his adhesion to the movement for Australasian federation, and New South Wales was represented at the first conference held at Melbourne in the beginning of 1890.

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  • Federation was not so popular in New South Wales as in the neighbouring colonies, and no progress was made between 1891 and 1894, although Sir Henry Parkes, who was at that time in opposition, brought the question before the legislature.

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  • The then Premier, Mr Reid, was rather lukewarm, as he considered that the free-trade policy of New South Wales would be overridden by its protectionist neighbours and its metropolitan position Attitude interfered with.

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  • But his hand was to a great extent forced by a People's Federation Convention held at Bathurst, and in the early portion of 1897 delegates from New South Wales met those from all the other colonies, except Queensland, at Adelaide, and drafted the constitution, which with some few modifications eventually became law.

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  • Large contingents of troops from New South Wales were sent to South Africa during 1899 and 1900.

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  • The other most extensive centres of dense population are the coal-mining or manufacturing districts of Northumberland and Durham, of the midlands (parts of Warwickshire, Worcestershire and Leicestershire), and of South Wales and Monmouthshire; and it is in these districts, and others smaller, but of similar character, that the greatest increase of population has been recorded, since the extensive development of 'As in Bartholomew's Survey Atlas of England and Wales (1903).

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  • The tonnage annually shipped ranges from about 42 millions of tons in the case of Newcastle to some half a million in the case of Liverpool; but the export trade of Cardiff in South Wales far surpasses that of any English port, being more than three times that of Newcastle in 1903.

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  • In New South Wales thirteen thin concrete dams, dependent upon horizontal curvature for their resistance to water pressure, have been constructed in narrow gorges at comparatively small cost to impound water for the use of villages.

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  • A similar bad repute attaches to other species in different parts of South America; while Argas miniatus has been proved to be the carrier of the Spirochaete causing spirillosis in fowls in Rio Janeiro, and also in New South Wales whither it has been introduced with imported poultry.

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  • In the spring of 1869 this was tried on the person of a " fasting girl " in South Wales.

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  • He made alliances with the princes of North and South Wales.

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  • The ranges from Kerry to Waterford, on the other hand, truncated by the sea at either end, are clearly parts of an east and west system, the continuation of which may be looked for in South Wales and Belgium.

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  • A curious passage in Cormac's Glossary connects one of the leaders of this sept, Cairpre Musc, with the settlements of the Irish in south Wales which may have taken place as early as the 3rd century.

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  • Literary evidence of the colonization of south Wales is preserved both in Welsh and Irish sources, and some idea of the extent of Irish oversea activity may be gathered from the distribution of the Ogam inscriptions in Wales, south-west England and the Isle of Man.

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  • He may have been descended from an Irish family settled in south Wales.

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  • The connexion between Ireland and Wales was strong in the 6th century, and it was from south Wales that the great reform movement in the Irish monasteries emanated.

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  • But tribes far from the sea, as in northern New South Wales and Queensland, have the All-Father belief, with individual marriage and female descent, while tribes of the north coast, with male descent, are credited with no All-Father; and the Arunta, as far as possible from the sea, have no All-Father (save in Strehlow's district), and have individual marriage and male reckoning of descent in matters of inheritance; while the Urabunna and Dieri, with female descent and the custom of pirrauru (called " group marriage " by Howitt), are not credited with the All-Father belief.

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  • Experiments he made with South Wales iron were failures because the product was devoid of malleability; Mr GOransson, a Swedish ironmaster, using the purer charcoal pig iron of that country, was the first to make good steel by the process, and even he was successful only after many attempts.

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  • Tenby is a station on the WhitlandPembroke Dock branch of the South Wales system of the Great Western railway.

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  • After the Restoration the importance and wealth of Tenby showed a constant tendency to decline, but towards the close of the 18th century it rose into great popularity as a watering-place, and it has since maintained its reputation as the most picturesque seaside resort of South Wales.

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  • The climate is probably more healthy than that of any of the Australian states, although, owing to the large number of old people in the colony, the death-rate would appear to put Tasmania on a par with New South Wales and South Australia.

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  • Tasmania finds its best markets for fruits in New South Wales and in Great Britain.

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  • In 1802 the " Cumberland," a small schooner, landed at King's Island in Bass Strait, and in 1803 Lieutenant Bowen was sent by Governor King of New South Wales to form a settlement on the south coast of Van Diemen's Land.

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  • He had aboard his two ships, the " Lady Nelson " of 60 tons and the whaler " Albion " of 3 06 tons, three officials, a lance-corporal and seven privates of the New South Wales Corps, six free men and twenty-five convicts, together with an adequate supply of live stock, and landed at Risdon, near Hobart, where he was joined shortly afterwards by fifteen soldiers and forty-two convicts.

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  • This system was abolished in New South Wales in 1840, after which date the island was the receptacle for all convicts not only from the United Kingdom, but from India and the colonies, and it was not until 18J3 that transportation to Van Diemen's Land finally ceased; in the same year representative institutions were introduced, the name of the colony was changed to Tasmania, and three years later the colony was granted responsible government.

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  • For many years the island was inhabited by greybeards and children; the young men and women of all classes, so soon as they had reached manhood and womanhood, crossed Bass Strait, and entered upon the wider life and the more brilliant prospects which first Victoria, and subsequently New South Wales and Queensland, afforded them.

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  • It is stated that these machines were first made in New South Wales in 1859, but the first Harrison machine adopted successfully for industrial purposes in England was applied in the year 1861 for cooling oil in order to extract the paraffin.

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  • The boghead of Scotland, Autun and New South Wales is regarded by Renault and Bertrand as mainly composed of gelatinous Algae (Piles and Reinschia), having a hollow, saccate thallus formed of a single layer of cells.

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  • From strata in New South Wales overlying Devonian and Lower Carboniferous rocks certain plants were discovered in the early part of the 19th century which were compared with European Jurassic genera, and for several years it was believed that these plant-beds belonged to the Mesozoic period.

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  • New South Wales Government - Ministry for the Arts Book here for The Landscape of Childhood Season including acrobat.

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  • A barrage could supply much of South Wales and the West Country, but would dramatically alter the local environment.

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  • In 1991, we began producing alternators at our Cardiff plant in South Wales.

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  • He successfully besieged Chepstow Castle during Cromwell's campaign in South Wales during the Second Civil War.

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  • Cathodoluminescence micrograph of zoned calcite cement in thin section, Pwll y Cwm Oolite, Lower Carboniferous, Baltic Quarry, South Wales.

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  • One last Class 29 remained for many years among some older compatriots in the scrap line at Woodham's in Barry, South Wales.

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  • More The waiting is finally over to see real live Italian gladiators in south Wales!

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  • In 1805 he was appointed governor of the colony of New South Wales.

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  • As that country had been a major customer, the Tariff soon became the harbinger of doom for much of the South Wales industry.

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  • Gerald's cousin, the Lord Rhys, had been appointed the king's justiciar in South Wales.

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  • Recorded memoirs of Glyn Williams, formerly South Wales.

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  • Australia to trial point-to-point speed cameras The Australian State of New South Wales has announced it will trial point-to-point speed cameras targetting long-distance speeders.

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  • Experts from the South Wales Police football liaison office in Swansea were trying to identify ringleaders.

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  • The site had a clay subgrade and demonstrated considerable problems on the heavily loaded up-line, which carried steel freight trains from South Wales.

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  • Well seeing that the job is in south wales that is me sorted out for the next 30 years!

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  • We're on the border of ' The Forest of Dean ' and ' south wales ' .

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  • We are south wales Premier Award Winning watersports facility.

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  • In New South Wales there are several important rivers, the largest of which is the Hunter, draining 11,000 sq.

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  • The Middle Devonian was marked by the same great transgression as in Europe and America; it produced inland seas, extending into Victoria, New South Wales and Queensland, in which were deposited limestones with a rich coral fauna.

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  • In Victoria, Tasmania, northern New South Wales and Queensland, there are Jurassic terrestrial deposits, containing the coal seams of Victoria, of the Clarence basin of north-eastern New South Wales, and of the Ipswich series in Queensland; the same beds range far inland on the western slopes of the east Australian highlands in New South Wales and Queensland and they occur, with coal-seams, at Leigh's Creek, at the northern foot of the South Australian highlands.

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  • The total area of the Carboniferous strata of New South Wales is estimated at 23,950 sq.

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  • It was an auxiliary penal station under New South Wales till in 1825 it became a separate government.

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  • Not only in these lucky provinces, New South Wales and Victoria, where the auriferous deposits were revealed, but in every British colony of Australasia, all ordinary industry was left for the one exciting pursuit.

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  • Of the seven colonies New South Wales and New Zealand stood aloof from the council, and from the beginning it was therefore shorn of a large share of the prestige that would have attached to a body speaking and acting on behalf of a united Australia.

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  • This fear proved to be well founded, for the result of the referendum in New South Wales showed 7 1, 595 votes in favour of the bill and 66,228 against it, and it was accordingly lost.

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  • The new parliament decided to adopt the procedure of again sending the premier, Mr Reid, into conference, armed with a series of resolutions affirming its desire to bring about the completion of federal union, but asking the other colonies to agree to the reconsideration of the provisions which were most generally objected to in New South Wales.

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  • Some of the loveliest scenery of South Wales lies within reach of Llandilo, which stands nearly in the centre of the Vale of Towy.

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  • The opening of the Taff Vale railway in 1840 and of the South Wales railway to Cardiff in 1850 necessitated further accommodation, and the trustees of the marquess (who died in 1848) began in 1851 and opened in 1855 the East Bute dock and basin measuring 464 acres.

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  • In 1136 the army of Griffith ap Rhys met with a large English force near Cardigan, composed of the denizens of the South Wales castles and of the hated Flemish colonists, who had been lately planted by Henry I.

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  • The greed and tyranny of several of the commissioners, and the bigotry and mismanagement of well-meaning fanatics such as Cradock and Powell, soon wrought dire confusion throughout the whole Principality, so that a monster petition, signed alike by moderate Puritans and by High Churchmen, was prepared for presentation to parliament in 1652 by Colonel Edward Freeman, attorney-general for South Wales.

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  • The final fall of Napoleon in 1815 gave the people of the United Kingdom leisure to think about their possessions at the Ante podes; and in 1817 free settlers commenced to arrive in coy siderable numbers, attracted by the success of Captain Joh i M'Arthur, an officer in the New South Wales Regiment, who had demonstrated that the soil, grass and climate were well adapted for the growth.

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  • Dived under ice in South Wales for 48 minutes wearing only a 5.5mm sharkskin suit, detached hood and boots too.

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  • Tollgate Bathrooms are the South Wales leaders in bathroom wall paneling.

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  • Well seeing that the job is in south wales that is me sorted out for the next 30 years !

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  • We 're on the border of ' The Forest of Dean ' and ' South wales '.

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  • Willing to travel around the outskirts of london or in south wales area.

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  • Australian farmers grow Melaleuca or tea trees on plantation throughout the northeast coast of New South Wales.

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  • The New South Wales Olympic committee had not wanted to allow women to compete, and even the president of the NSW Ladies Swimming Association was against it on the grounds of immodesty.

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  • The tree grows in North America, but is more common in Australia, Asia, and New South Wales.

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