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somersetshire

somersetshire Sentence Examples

  • His parents died before he was ten years of age, and he inherited extensive estates in Hampshire, Wiltshire, Dorsetshire and Somersetshire, much reduced, however, by litigation in Chancery.

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  • Journeys were also made by land, and, among others, the entertaining author of the Crudities, Thomas Coryate, of Odcombe in Somersetshire, wandered on foot from France to India, and died (1617) in the company's factory at Surat.

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  • MINEHEAD, a market town and seaside resort in the Wellington parliamentary division of Somersetshire, England, 188 m.

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  • It lies near the border of Somersetshire, on the southern slope of a hill overlooking the river Yeo, in a fertile, well-wooded district.

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  • CREWKERNE, a market town in the southern parliamentary division of Somersetshire, England, 132 m.

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  • DUNSTER, a market town in the Western parliamentary division of Somersetshire, England, 12 m.

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  • " In Somersetshire," he says, " they do shere theyr wheat very lowe; and the wheate strawe that they purpose to make thacke of, they do not threshe it, but cut off the ears, and bynd it in sheves, and call it rede, and therewith they thacke theyr houses."

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  • CLEVEDON, a watering-place in the northern parliamentary division of Somersetshire, England, on the Bristol Channel, 151 m.

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  • He reduced Vectis (Isle of Wight) and penetrated to the borders of Somersetshire.

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  • An excellent portraiture of early Quakerism is given in William Tanner's Lectures on Friends in Bristol and Somersetshire.

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  • The principal English lead mines are in Derbyshire; but there are also mines at Allandale and other parts of western Northumberland, at Alston Moor and other parts of Cumberland, in the western parts of Durham, in Swaledale and Arkendale and other parts of Yorkshire, in Salop, in Cornwall, in the Mendip Hills in Somersetshire, and in the Isle of Man.

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  • After the Restoration he was successively rector of Wimbush, Essex, vicar of Frome Selwood, Somersetshire, rector of Streat and Walton.

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  • It has an area of some 1,048,000 acres, slightly greater than that of Somersetshire, and consists of three well-marked zones running N.

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  • When this order was brought to England in 1178 the first house was founded at Witham in Somersetshire.

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  • He was the son of Thomas Ken of Furnival's Inn, who belonged to an ancient stock, - that of the Kens of Ken Place, in Somersetshire; his mother was a daughter of the now forgotten poet, John Chalkhill, who is called by Walton an "acquaintant and friend of Edmund Spenser."

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  • MIDSOMER NORTON, an urban district in the northern parliamentary division of Somersetshire, England, i 2 z m.

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  • FROME, a market town in the Frome parliamentary division of Somersetshire, England, 107 m.

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  • EXMOOR FOREST, a high moorland in Somersetshire and Devonshire, England.

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  • ILCHESTER, a market town in the southern parliamentary division of Somersetshire, England, in the valley of the river Ivel or Yeo, 5 m.

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  • The ignorance of the people of the north made it very difficult for Methodism to benefit from these manifestations, until the advent of the Rev. Thomas Charles (1755-1814), who, having spent five years in Somersetshire as curate of several parishes, returned to his native land to marry Sarah Jones of Bala.

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  • parliamentary division of Somersetshire, England, on the Great Western and South-Western railways, 127 m.

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  • WIVELISCOMBE (pronounced Wilscomb), a market town in the western parliamentary division of Somersetshire, England, q z m.

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  • 121 9 ?), Anglo-Norman conqueror of Ulster, was a member of a celebrated Norman family of Oxfordshire and Somersetshire, whose parentage is Unknown, and around whose career a mass of legend has grown up. It would appear that he accompanied William Fitz-Aldelm to Ireland when the latter, after the death of Strongbow, was sent thither by Henry II., and that he immediately headed an expedition from Dublin to Ulster, where he took Downpatrick, the capital of the northern kingdom.

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  • Edred died on the 23rd of November 955 at Frome, in Somersetshire, and was buried in the old minster at Winchester.

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  • SHEPTON MALLET, a market town in the eastern parliamentary division of Somersetshire, England, 22 m.

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  • He declared himself on the side of the Puritans by subscribing "The testimony of the ministers in Somersetshire to the truth of Jesus Christ" and "The Solemn League and Covenant," and assisted the commissioners of the parliament in their work of ejecting unsatisfactory ministers.

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  • He came of a Somersetshire family, which had given five consecutive generations of clergymen to the Anglican church.

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  • A lofty column was raised to his memory on a hill near Butleigh, Somersetshire, and in Butleigh Church is another memorial, with an inscription written by Southey.

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  • The earliest was that at Witham in Somersetshire, founded by Henry II., by whom the order was first brought into England.

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  • LANGPORT, a market town in the eastern parliamentary division of Somersetshire, England, 132 m.

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  • Not far distant is the church of Huish Episcopi, with one of the finest of the Perpendicular towers for which Somersetshire is noted.

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  • JOHN LOWELL (1743-1802), American jurist, was born in Newburyport, Massachusetts, on the 17th of June 1743, and was a son of the Reverend John Lowell, the first pastor of Newburyport, and a descendant of Perceval Lowle or Lowell (1571-1665), who emigrated from Somersetshire to Massachusetts Bay in 1639 and was the founder of the family in New England.

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  • ATHELNEY, a slight eminence of small extent in the low level tract about the junction of the rivers Tone and Parrett in Somersetshire, England.

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  • WESTON-SUPER-MARE, a seaside resort in the Wells parliamentary division of Somersetshire, England, on the Bristol Channel, 1372 m.

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  • CHEDDAR, a small town in the Wells parliamentary division of Somersetshire, England, 22 m.

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  • Perhaps owing to a confusion between Glasberg or Ynysvitrin and the Anglo-Saxon Glaestinga-burh, Glastonbury, the name "Isle of Avalon" was given to the low ridge in central Somersetshire which culminates in Glastonbury Tor, while Glastonbury itself came to be called Avalon.

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  • GLASTONBURY, a market town and municipal borough in the Eastern parliamentary division of Somersetshire, England, on the main road from London to Exeter, 37 m.

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  • Warre, "Glastonbury Abbey," in Proc. of Somersetshire Archaeol.

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  • In Rome he received a hint that his articles in the Morning Post had been brought to Napoleon's notice, and he made the voyage from Leghorn in an American ship. On a visit to Somersetshire in 1807 he met De Quincey for the first time, and the younger man's admiration was shown by a gift of X300, "from an unknown friend."

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  • from Worcester, where he separated himself from all his followers except Wilmot, concealing himself in the famous oak during the 6th of September, moving subsequently to Boscobel, to Moseley and Bentley Hall, and thence, disguised as Miss Lane's attendant, to Abbots Leigh near Bristol, to Trent in Somersetshire, and finally to the George Inn at Brighton, having been recognized during the forty-one days of his wanderings by about fifty persons, none of whom, in spite of the reward of £1000 offered for his capture, or of the death penalty threatened for aiding his concealment, had betrayed him.

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  • He was born in 1852, of an old Somersetshire county family, and, after a varied career as university man, sailor before the mast, soldier, coffee-planter, curate in the Church of England and evangelist in the Salvation Army, was converted about 1897 to the views of Prince.

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  • He had been nominated a member of Barebones' parliament in 1653, and he was returned to the parliament of 1654 for Cambridgeshire, and to that of 1656 for Somersetshire.

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  • In the north of Hampshire along its boundary with Surrey and Berkshire, in the southern half of Wiltshire (where rises the upland of Salisbury Plain), in Dorsetshire, and the south of Somersetshire, the hills may be said to run in a series of connected groups.

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  • In the northern part of Somersetshire, two ranges, short but well defined, lie respectively east and west of a low plain which slopes to the Bristol Channel.

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  • The Blackdown Hills, in south-western Somersetshire and eastern Devonshire, reach 1035 ft.

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  • In western Somersetshire and north Devonshire the elevated mass of Exmoor reaches 1707 ft.

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  • But the most remarkable plain is that in Somersetshire, enclosed by the Mendips, the Western Downs, Blackdown Hills and the Quantocks and entered by the Parrett and other streams. The midlands, owing to the comparatively slight elevation of the land, are capable of geographical consideration as a plain.

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  • shire, the midland counties generally, and Somersetshire, have the highest proportion, and the counties of the East Anglian seaboard the lowest.

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  • There is also plenty of hillpasture in the south-western counties (from Hampshire and Berkshire westward), especially in Devonshire, Cornwall and Somersetshire, and also in Monmouthshire and along the Welsh marches, on the Cotteswold Hills, &c. In all these localities sheep are extensively reared, especially in Northumberland, but on the other hand in Lincolnshire the numbers of sheep are roughly equal to those in the northern county.

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  • Cattle are reared in great numbers in Lincolnshire, Lancashire and the West Riding of Yorkshire, Devonshire, Somersetshire and Cornwall; but the numbers of both cattle and sheep are in no English county (save Middlesex) to be regarded as insignificant.

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  • Pigs are bred most extensively in Suffolk, Norfolk and Lincolnshire and in Somersetshire.

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  • Somersetshire.

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  • Gorges named his tract the County of New Somersetshire, and immediately began the administration of government, setting up in 1635 or 1636 a court at Saco under the direction of his kinsman William Gorges.

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  • Thus William of Malmesbury says that he was sent to Britain by St Philip, and, having received a small island in Somersetshire, there constructed "with twisted twigs" the first Christian church in Britain - afterwards to become the Abbey of Glastonbury.

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  • The woollen manufactures which had begun in the eastern counties in the 14th century were now spreading all over the land, taking root especially in Somersetshire, Yorkshire and some districts of the Manufac- Midlands.

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  • of Belluton, in Somersetshire, on the 29th of August 1632, six years after the death of Bacon, and three months before the birth of Spinoza.

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  • He also interested himself in a variety of schemes for the advancement of the social and religious welfare of the community, including the establishment of the Association for the Better Observance of Sunday, the foundation, with Hannah More, of schools at Cheddar, Somersetshire, a project for opening a school in every parish for the religious instruction of children, a plan for the education of the children of the lower classes, a bill for securing better salaries to curates, and a method for disseminating, by government help, Christianity in India.

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  • Somersetshire >>

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  • conditional pardon who came on the Somersetshire in 1814.

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  • The Census shows: George, aged 47 holder of a conditional pardon who came on the Somersetshire in 1814.

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  • His parents died before he was ten years of age, and he inherited extensive estates in Hampshire, Wiltshire, Dorsetshire and Somersetshire, much reduced, however, by litigation in Chancery.

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  • Journeys were also made by land, and, among others, the entertaining author of the Crudities, Thomas Coryate, of Odcombe in Somersetshire, wandered on foot from France to India, and died (1617) in the company's factory at Surat.

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  • MINEHEAD, a market town and seaside resort in the Wellington parliamentary division of Somersetshire, England, 188 m.

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  • It lies near the border of Somersetshire, on the southern slope of a hill overlooking the river Yeo, in a fertile, well-wooded district.

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  • CREWKERNE, a market town in the southern parliamentary division of Somersetshire, England, 132 m.

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  • DUNSTER, a market town in the Western parliamentary division of Somersetshire, England, 12 m.

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  • " In Somersetshire," he says, " they do shere theyr wheat very lowe; and the wheate strawe that they purpose to make thacke of, they do not threshe it, but cut off the ears, and bynd it in sheves, and call it rede, and therewith they thacke theyr houses."

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  • In his thirty-third year he had already become renowned for the obstinate zeal with which he supported the falling dynasty of the Stuarts, and was rewarded for his services with the prebend and rectory of Cudworth, with the chapel of Knowle annexed, in Somersetshire.

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  • CLEVEDON, a watering-place in the northern parliamentary division of Somersetshire, England, on the Bristol Channel, 151 m.

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  • He reduced Vectis (Isle of Wight) and penetrated to the borders of Somersetshire.

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  • An excellent portraiture of early Quakerism is given in William Tanner's Lectures on Friends in Bristol and Somersetshire.

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  • The principal English lead mines are in Derbyshire; but there are also mines at Allandale and other parts of western Northumberland, at Alston Moor and other parts of Cumberland, in the western parts of Durham, in Swaledale and Arkendale and other parts of Yorkshire, in Salop, in Cornwall, in the Mendip Hills in Somersetshire, and in the Isle of Man.

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  • After the Restoration he was successively rector of Wimbush, Essex, vicar of Frome Selwood, Somersetshire, rector of Streat and Walton.

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  • It has an area of some 1,048,000 acres, slightly greater than that of Somersetshire, and consists of three well-marked zones running N.

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  • When this order was brought to England in 1178 the first house was founded at Witham in Somersetshire.

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  • He was the son of Thomas Ken of Furnival's Inn, who belonged to an ancient stock, - that of the Kens of Ken Place, in Somersetshire; his mother was a daughter of the now forgotten poet, John Chalkhill, who is called by Walton an "acquaintant and friend of Edmund Spenser."

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  • MIDSOMER NORTON, an urban district in the northern parliamentary division of Somersetshire, England, i 2 z m.

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  • FROME, a market town in the Frome parliamentary division of Somersetshire, England, 107 m.

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  • EXMOOR FOREST, a high moorland in Somersetshire and Devonshire, England.

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  • ILCHESTER, a market town in the southern parliamentary division of Somersetshire, England, in the valley of the river Ivel or Yeo, 5 m.

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  • The ignorance of the people of the north made it very difficult for Methodism to benefit from these manifestations, until the advent of the Rev. Thomas Charles (1755-1814), who, having spent five years in Somersetshire as curate of several parishes, returned to his native land to marry Sarah Jones of Bala.

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  • parliamentary division of Somersetshire, England, on the Great Western and South-Western railways, 127 m.

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  • WIVELISCOMBE (pronounced Wilscomb), a market town in the western parliamentary division of Somersetshire, England, q z m.

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  • 121 9 ?), Anglo-Norman conqueror of Ulster, was a member of a celebrated Norman family of Oxfordshire and Somersetshire, whose parentage is Unknown, and around whose career a mass of legend has grown up. It would appear that he accompanied William Fitz-Aldelm to Ireland when the latter, after the death of Strongbow, was sent thither by Henry II., and that he immediately headed an expedition from Dublin to Ulster, where he took Downpatrick, the capital of the northern kingdom.

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  • Edred died on the 23rd of November 955 at Frome, in Somersetshire, and was buried in the old minster at Winchester.

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  • SHEPTON MALLET, a market town in the eastern parliamentary division of Somersetshire, England, 22 m.

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  • He declared himself on the side of the Puritans by subscribing "The testimony of the ministers in Somersetshire to the truth of Jesus Christ" and "The Solemn League and Covenant," and assisted the commissioners of the parliament in their work of ejecting unsatisfactory ministers.

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  • He came of a Somersetshire family, which had given five consecutive generations of clergymen to the Anglican church.

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  • A lofty column was raised to his memory on a hill near Butleigh, Somersetshire, and in Butleigh Church is another memorial, with an inscription written by Southey.

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  • The earliest was that at Witham in Somersetshire, founded by Henry II., by whom the order was first brought into England.

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  • LANGPORT, a market town in the eastern parliamentary division of Somersetshire, England, 132 m.

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  • Not far distant is the church of Huish Episcopi, with one of the finest of the Perpendicular towers for which Somersetshire is noted.

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  • JOHN LOWELL (1743-1802), American jurist, was born in Newburyport, Massachusetts, on the 17th of June 1743, and was a son of the Reverend John Lowell, the first pastor of Newburyport, and a descendant of Perceval Lowle or Lowell (1571-1665), who emigrated from Somersetshire to Massachusetts Bay in 1639 and was the founder of the family in New England.

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  • ATHELNEY, a slight eminence of small extent in the low level tract about the junction of the rivers Tone and Parrett in Somersetshire, England.

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  • WESTON-SUPER-MARE, a seaside resort in the Wells parliamentary division of Somersetshire, England, on the Bristol Channel, 1372 m.

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  • CHEDDAR, a small town in the Wells parliamentary division of Somersetshire, England, 22 m.

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  • Bulleid, "The Lake Village near Glastonbury," in Proceedings of the Somersetshire Archaeological Society, vol.

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  • RALPH CUDWORTH (1617-1688), English philosopher, was born at Aller, Somersetshire, the son of Dr Ralph Cudworth (d.

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  • Perhaps owing to a confusion between Glasberg or Ynysvitrin and the Anglo-Saxon Glaestinga-burh, Glastonbury, the name "Isle of Avalon" was given to the low ridge in central Somersetshire which culminates in Glastonbury Tor, while Glastonbury itself came to be called Avalon.

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  • GLASTONBURY, a market town and municipal borough in the Eastern parliamentary division of Somersetshire, England, on the main road from London to Exeter, 37 m.

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  • Warre, "Glastonbury Abbey," in Proc. of Somersetshire Archaeol.

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  • In Rome he received a hint that his articles in the Morning Post had been brought to Napoleon's notice, and he made the voyage from Leghorn in an American ship. On a visit to Somersetshire in 1807 he met De Quincey for the first time, and the younger man's admiration was shown by a gift of X300, "from an unknown friend."

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  • from Worcester, where he separated himself from all his followers except Wilmot, concealing himself in the famous oak during the 6th of September, moving subsequently to Boscobel, to Moseley and Bentley Hall, and thence, disguised as Miss Lane's attendant, to Abbots Leigh near Bristol, to Trent in Somersetshire, and finally to the George Inn at Brighton, having been recognized during the forty-one days of his wanderings by about fifty persons, none of whom, in spite of the reward of £1000 offered for his capture, or of the death penalty threatened for aiding his concealment, had betrayed him.

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  • About twenty years after the Marlborough legacy, Sir William Pynsent, a Somersetshire baronet to whom he was personally quite unknown, left him his entire estate, worth about three thousand a year, in testimony of approval of his political career.

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  • He was born in 1852, of an old Somersetshire county family, and, after a varied career as university man, sailor before the mast, soldier, coffee-planter, curate in the Church of England and evangelist in the Salvation Army, was converted about 1897 to the views of Prince.

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  • He had been nominated a member of Barebones' parliament in 1653, and he was returned to the parliament of 1654 for Cambridgeshire, and to that of 1656 for Somersetshire.

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  • In the north of Hampshire along its boundary with Surrey and Berkshire, in the southern half of Wiltshire (where rises the upland of Salisbury Plain), in Dorsetshire, and the south of Somersetshire, the hills may be said to run in a series of connected groups.

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  • In the northern part of Somersetshire, two ranges, short but well defined, lie respectively east and west of a low plain which slopes to the Bristol Channel.

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  • The Blackdown Hills, in south-western Somersetshire and eastern Devonshire, reach 1035 ft.

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  • In western Somersetshire and north Devonshire the elevated mass of Exmoor reaches 1707 ft.

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  • But the most remarkable plain is that in Somersetshire, enclosed by the Mendips, the Western Downs, Blackdown Hills and the Quantocks and entered by the Parrett and other streams. The midlands, owing to the comparatively slight elevation of the land, are capable of geographical consideration as a plain.

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  • The proportion of females varies much in different localities, being highest in such districts as London and the home counties, which are residential, and in which, therefore, many domestic servants are enumerated; and Somersetshire, Bedfordshire and other seats of industries which especially occupy women (e.g.

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  • shire, the midland counties generally, and Somersetshire, have the highest proportion, and the counties of the East Anglian seaboard the lowest.

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  • There is also plenty of hillpasture in the south-western counties (from Hampshire and Berkshire westward), especially in Devonshire, Cornwall and Somersetshire, and also in Monmouthshire and along the Welsh marches, on the Cotteswold Hills, &c. In all these localities sheep are extensively reared, especially in Northumberland, but on the other hand in Lincolnshire the numbers of sheep are roughly equal to those in the northern county.

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  • Cattle are reared in great numbers in Lincolnshire, Lancashire and the West Riding of Yorkshire, Devonshire, Somersetshire and Cornwall; but the numbers of both cattle and sheep are in no English county (save Middlesex) to be regarded as insignificant.

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  • Pigs are bred most extensively in Suffolk, Norfolk and Lincolnshire and in Somersetshire.

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  • Gorges named his tract the County of New Somersetshire, and immediately began the administration of government, setting up in 1635 or 1636 a court at Saco under the direction of his kinsman William Gorges.

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  • Thus William of Malmesbury says that he was sent to Britain by St Philip, and, having received a small island in Somersetshire, there constructed "with twisted twigs" the first Christian church in Britain - afterwards to become the Abbey of Glastonbury.

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  • The woollen manufactures which had begun in the eastern counties in the 14th century were now spreading all over the land, taking root especially in Somersetshire, Yorkshire and some districts of the Manufac- Midlands.

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  • of Belluton, in Somersetshire, on the 29th of August 1632, six years after the death of Bacon, and three months before the birth of Spinoza.

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  • He also interested himself in a variety of schemes for the advancement of the social and religious welfare of the community, including the establishment of the Association for the Better Observance of Sunday, the foundation, with Hannah More, of schools at Cheddar, Somersetshire, a project for opening a school in every parish for the religious instruction of children, a plan for the education of the children of the lower classes, a bill for securing better salaries to curates, and a method for disseminating, by government help, Christianity in India.

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