How to use Soluble in a sentence

soluble
  • It is soluble in water and is very poisonous.

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  • It is easily soluble in hot nitric acid.

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  • The powder is soluble in alcohol and strong solutions of alkalis, such as ammonia.

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  • The glycols are somewhat thick liquids, of high boiling point, the pinacones only being crystalline solids; they are readily soluble in water and alcohol, but are insoluble in ether.

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  • It forms small needles, very sparingly soluble in water.

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  • It is decomposed by heat into the oxide and water, and is soluble in ammonia but not in excess of dilute potassium hydroxide; this latter property serves to distinguish it from zinc hydroxide.

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  • Chlorophyll is not soluble in water, nor in acids or alkalies without decomposition.

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  • It is easily soluble in nitric acid.

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  • The monometallic salts are strongly acid, the dimetallic are neutral or faintly alkaline, whilst the soluble trimetallic salts are strongly alkaline.

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  • It will not dissolve in water as gums do, but it is soluble in alcohol, as resin usually is.

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  • Aurous iodide, Aul, is a light-yellow, sparingly soluble powder obtained, together with free iodine, by adding potassium iodide to auric chloride; auric iodide, Au13, is formed as a dark-green powder at the same time, but it readily decomposes to aurous iodide and iodine.

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  • The acid, auricyanic acid, 2HAu (CN) 4.3H20, is obtained by treating the silver salt (obtained by precipitating the potassium salt with silver nitrate) with hydrochloric acid; it forms tabular crystals, readily soluble in water, alcohol and ether.

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  • Subsequent treatment with sulphuric acid renders the copper soluble in water as sulphate, and the final residue contains only gold and silver, which is parted or refined in the ordinary way.

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  • Many processes have been suggested in which the gold of auriferous deposits is converted into products soluble in water, from which solutions the gold may be precipitated.

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  • Chlorine, generally prepared by the interaction of pyrolusite, salt and sulphuric acid, is led from a suitable generator beneath the false bottom, and rises through the moistened ore, which rests on a bed of broken quartz; the gold is thus converted into a soluble chloride, which is afterwards removed by washing with water.

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  • It is based upon the facts that concentrated hot sulphuric acid converts silver and copper into soluble sulphates without attacking the gold, the silver sulphate being subsequently reduced to the metallic state by copper plates with the formation of copper sulphate.

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  • Thus obtained it is a yellow powder, soluble in the mineral acids to form soluble salts, which are readily precipitated as basic salts when the solution is diluted.

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  • The separate determination of the volume and mass of such substances as gunpowder, cotton-wool, soluble substances, &c., supplies the only means of determining their densities.

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  • It is soluble in water, the solution gradually decomposing with deposition of tellurium; it also decomposes on exposure to light.

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  • The alkaline tellurites are soluble in water.

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  • Some tellurates exist in two forms, a colourless form soluble in water and acids, and a yellow form insoluble in water and acids.

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  • The normal salts are all insoluble in water; the complex acid, hexatantalic acid, H $ Ta 6 0, 9 (which does not exist in the free state), forms soluble salts with the alkaline metals.

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  • In modern chemistry alkali is a general term used for compounds which have the property of neutralizing acids, and is applied more particularly to the highly soluble hydrates of sodium and potassium and of the three rarer "alkali metals," caesium, rubidium and lithium, also to aqueous ammonia.

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  • In a smaller degree these alkaline properties are shared by the less soluble hydrates of the "metals of the alkaline earths," calcium, barium and strontium, and by thallium hydrate.

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  • That nothing analogous to bitumen exists in coals is proved by the fact that the ordinary solvents for bituminous substances, such as bisulphide of carbon and benzol, have no effect upon them, as would be the case if they contained bitumen soluble in these re-agents.

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  • It crystallizes in short hard prisms, which are readily soluble in water but insoluble in alcohol.

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  • Acetylene is readily soluble in water, which at normal temperature and pressure takes up a little more than its own volume of the gas, and yields a solution giving a purple-red precipitate with ammoniacal cuprous chloride and a white precipitate with silver nitrate, these precipitates consisting of acetylides of the metals.

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  • They are crystalline solids showing a characteristic green metallic lustre; they are readily soluble in water and dye red or violet.

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  • It is soluble in water, but the dilute solution readily decomposes on standing.

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  • Zirconium hydroxide, Zr(OH) 4, as thus obtained, is quite appreciably soluble in water and easily in mineral acids, with formation of zirconium salts, e.g.

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  • The anhydrous oxide is with difficulty soluble even in hydrofluoric acid; but a mixture of two parts of concentrated sulphuric acid and one of water dissolves it on continued heating as the sulphate, Zr(S04)2.

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  • Aconitine (C33H45N013, according to Dunstan; C34H47NOH, according to Freund) is a crystalline base, soluble in alcohol, but very sparingly in water; its alcoholic solution is dextrorotatory, but its salts are laevorotatory.

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  • The lower members of the series are neutral liquids possessing a characteristic smell; they are soluble in water and are readily volatile (formaldehyde, however, is a gas at ordinary temperatures).

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  • As the carbon content of the molecule increases, they become less soluble in water, and their smell becomes less marked with the increase in boiling point, the highest members of the series being odourless solids, which can only be distilled without decomposition invacuo.

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  • Paraldehyde is moderately soluble in water, and when distilled with sulphuric acid is reconverted into the ordinary form.

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  • They are soluble in water, have an astringent, acid, and sweetish,, .taste, react acid to litmus, and crystallize in regular octahedra.

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  • It is very soluble in water, and is extremely difficult to purify.

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  • The solubility of the various alums in water varies greatly, sodium alum being readily soluble in water, whilst caesium and rubidium alums are only sparingly soluble.

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  • It burns on heating in air; and is scarcely attacked by hydrochloric or nitric acids, or by aqua regia; it is soluble in warm concentrated sulphuric acid.

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  • It burns when heated in air, and is soluble in warm concentrated sulphuric acid.

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  • These sodium salts are crystalline solids which are readily soluble in water and are very explosive.

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  • It is a deep yellow coloured solid, which is readily soluble in water.

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  • They are colourless solids which are readily soluble in water and possess the character of weak acids.

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  • The sulphates are treated with water, which dissolves the uranium and other soluble salts, while silica, lead sulphate, &c., remain; these are removed by filtration.

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  • These salts generally resemble the bichromates; they are yellow in colour, insoluble in water, soluble in acids, and decomposed by heat.

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  • It is almost insoluble in water, but readily soluble in alcohol and ether.

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  • Its disintegration for analytical purposes can be effected by fusion with caustic alkali in silver basins, with the formation of soluble stannate, or by fusion with sulphur and sodium carbonate, with the formation of a soluble thiostannate.

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  • This acid, H 2 Sn0 3, is readily soluble in acids forming stannic salts, and in caustic potash and soda, with the formation of orthostannates.

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  • A colloidal or soluble stannic acid is obtained by dialysing a mixture of tin tetrachloride and alkali, or of sodium stannate and hydrochloric acid.

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  • The crystals are very soluble in cold water, and if the salt is really pure a small proportion of water forms a clear solution; but on adding much water most of the salt is decomposed, with the formation of a precipitate of oxychloride, 2Sn(OH)Cl H20.

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  • Stannous sulphide, SnS, is obtained as a lead-grey mass by heating tin with sulphur, and as a brown precipitate by adding sulphuretted hydrogen to a stannous solution; this is soluble in ammonium polysulphide, and dries to a black powder.

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  • Stannic salt solutions give a yellow precipitate of SnS 2 with sulphuretted hydrogen, which is insoluble in cold dilute acids but readily soluble in sulphide of ammonium, and is re-precipitated therefrom as SnS2 on acidification.

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  • They are sometimes spoken of as "lower" or "soluble" cottons or nitrates.

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  • Generally speaking, the lower the nitrogen content of a guncotton, as found by the nitrometer, the higher the percentage of matters soluble in a mixture of ether-alcohol.

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  • These soluble matters are usually considered as "lower" nitrates.

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  • It has a strong and characteristic odour, and a hot sweetish taste, is soluble in ten parts of water, and in all proportions in alcohol, and dissolves bromine, iodine, and, in small quantities, sulphur and phosphorus, also the volatile oils, most fatty and resinous substances, guncotton, caoutchouc and certain of the vegetable alkaloids.

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  • The sugars are taken up from the circulation and stored in a less soluble form - known as " animal starch " - in the liver and muscle cells; they play an important part in the normal metabolism of the body.

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  • The free fatty acid radicle then unites with an alkali, and becomes transformed into a soluble soap which is then readily absorbed in this fluid condition by the epithelial cells of the mucous membrane.

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  • The soluble soaps which are probably conveyed by the blood will be quickly taken up by such cells, synthetized into neutral fats, and stored in a non-diffusible form till required.

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  • In all probability no excess of soluble lime salts in the blood or lymph can ever be deposited in healthy living tissues.

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  • These soluble salts combine with the albumins in the body, and are deposited as minute granules of silver albuminate in the connective tissue of the skin papillae, serous membranes, the intima of arteries and the kidney.

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  • It is a yellow powder, soluble in hot water.

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  • It is soluble in carbon bisulphide, and is decomposed by water and also by heat, in the latter case yielding the tetraiodide and the di-iodide, Si 2 I 4, an orange-coloured solid which is not soluble in carbon bisulphide.

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  • These normal esters are colourless, pleasantsmelling liquids, which are readily soluble in water.

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  • Arsenic combines readily with all metals into true arsenides, which latter, in general, are soluble in the metal itself.

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  • In the case of group I the action is more or less violent, and the hydroxides formed are soluble in water and very strongly basic; metals of group 2 are only slowly attacked, with formation of relatively feebly basic and less soluble hydroxides.

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  • By the joint action of water and air, thallium, lead, bismuth are oxidized, with formation of more or less sparingly soluble hydroxides (ThHO, PbH 2 O 2, BiH303), which, in the presence of carbonic acid, pass into still less soluble basic carbonates.

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  • Metallic chlorides, as a class, are readily soluble in water.

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  • It forms crystalline needles soluble in alkalis, chloroform and Zoo parts of water.

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  • All sugars are colourless solids or syrups, which char on strong heating; they are soluble in water, forming sweet solutions but difficultly soluble in alcohol.

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  • When slowly crystallized it forms large monoclinic prisms which are readily soluble in water but difficultly soluble in alcohol.

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  • The oxygen of the air may also bring about chemical changes which result in the production of soluble substances removable by rain, the insoluble parts being left in a loosened state.

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  • In the ordinary chemical analyses of the soil determinations are made of the nitrogen and various carbonates present as well as of the amount of phosphoric acid, potash, soda, magnesia and other components soluble in strong hydrochloric acid.

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  • Nitrates are very soluble in water and are therefore liable to be washed out of the soil by heavy rain.

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  • Later the nitrogen-content of the nodule decreases, most of the organisms, which are largely composed of proteid material, becoming digested and transformed into soluble nitrogenous compounds which are conducted to the developing roots and seeds.

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  • Zinc is also soluble in soda and potash solutions, but not in ammonia.

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  • Way about 1850, this precaution was not only superfluous but harmful, because the soil possesses a power of absorbing the soluble saline matters required by plants and of retaining them, in spite of rain, for assimilation by the roots.

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  • It is a monacid base; the hydrochloride, C 20 H 17 N0 4 HC1, is insoluble in cold alcohol, ether and chloroform, and soluble in 500 parts of water; the acid sulphate, C 20 H 17 N0 4 H 2 SO 4, dissolves in about loo parts of water.

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  • The alkaline titanate first produced is converted into crystalline fluotitanate, K 2 TiF 6, which is with difficulty soluble and is extracted with hot water and filtered off.

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  • This salt is decomposed by water with the formation of a solution of alkali free of titanium, and a residue of an acid titanate, which is insoluble in water but soluble in cold 'aqueous mineral acids.

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  • The next higher members of the series are liquids of low boiling point also readily soluble in water, the solubility and volatility, however, decreasing with the increasing carbon content of the molecule, until the highest members of the series are odourless solids of high boiling point and are insoluble in water.

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  • The primary amines are colourless liquids or crystalline solids, which are insoluble in water, but readily soluble in the common organic solvents.

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  • It is used in the extraction of sugar from molasses, since it combines with the sugar to form a soluble saccharate, which is removed and then decomposed by carbon dioxide.

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  • Strontium sulphate, SrSO 4, found in the mineral kingdom as celestine, is formed when sulphuric acid or a soluble sulphate is added to a solution of a strontium salt.

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  • It is a colourless, amorphous solid, which is almost insoluble in water, its solubility diminishing with increasing temperature; it is appreciably soluble in concentrated sulphuric acid.

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  • It crystallizes from water (in which it is very soluble) in monoclinic prisms which approximate in composition to Sr(N03)2.4H20 or Sr(N03)2.5H20.

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  • Soluble impurities which are more electro-negative than the metal under treatment must, if present, be removed by a preliminary process, and the voltage and other conditions must be so selected that none of the more electro-positive metals are co-deposited with the metal to be refined.

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  • Many electrolytic methods have been proposed for the purification of sugar; in some of them soluble anodes are used for a few minutes in weak alkaline solutions, so that the caustic alkali from the cathode reaction may precipitate chemically the hydroxide of the anode metal dissolved in the liquid, the precipitate carrying with it mechanically some of the impurities present, and thus clarifying the solution.

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  • The hydrated acid crystallizes in prisms which effloresce in air, and are readily soluble in water.

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  • Only the salts of the alkali metals are soluble in water.

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  • It is only slightly soluble in water, but is readily soluble in acids and alkalis.

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  • The metal is soluble in solutions of chlorine, bromine, thiosulphates and cyanides; and also in solutions which generate chlorine, such as mixtures of hydrochloric acid with nitric acid, chromic acid, antimonious acid, peroxides and nitrates, and of nitric acid with a chloride.

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  • But there is much uncertainty as to the mechanism of the process; some authors hold that the soluble chloride is first formed, while others postulate the intervention of a soluble aurate.

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  • It dissolves in alkalis to form well-defined crystalline salts; potassium aurate, KAu0 2.3H 2 O, is very soluble in water, and is used in electrogilding.

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  • The soluble trimetallic salts are decomposed by carbonic acid into a dimetallic salt and an acid carbonate.

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  • All soluble orthophosphates give with silver nitrate a characteristic yellow precipitate of silver phosphate, Ag 3 PO 4, soluble in ammonia and in nitric acid.

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  • All soluble pyrophosphates when boiled with water for a long time are converted into orthophosphates.

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  • It is readily soluble in water, the solution being gradually transformed into the orthoacid, a reaction which proceeds much more rapidly on boiling.

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  • Being soluble in water containing carbonic acid or organic acids it may be readily removed in solution, and may thus furnish plants and animals with the phosphates required in their structures.

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  • Where guano-beds are exposed to rain their soluble constituents are removed and the insoluble matters left behind.

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  • The soluble phosphates washed out of the guano may become fixed by entering into combination with the elements of the rock beneath.

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  • His name is chiefly known for his mineralogical observations and for his work on soluble glass.

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  • Former tributaries have given place to others developed with reference to the distribution of more or less easily eroded strata, the present longitudinal valleys being determined by the out-crop of soft shales or soluble limestones, and the parallel ridges upheld by hard sandstones or schists.

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  • Tt is a monacid base which is readily soluble in solutions of the cans' is alkalis.

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  • Whereas calcium chloride, bromide, and iodide are deliquescent solids, the fluoride is practically insoluble in water; this is a parallelism to the soluble silver fluoride, and the insoluble chloride, bromide and iodide.

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  • Calcium fluoride, CaF2, constitutes the mineral fluor-spar, and is prepared artificially as an insoluble white powder by precipitating a solution of calcium chloride with a soluble fluoride.

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  • It is insoluble in water; slightly soluble in solutions of carbonic acid and common salt, and readily soluble in concentrated hydrochloric and nitric acid.

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  • Calcium monosulphide, CaS, a white amorphous powder, sparingly soluble in water, is formed by heating the sulphate with charcoal, or by heating lime in a current of sulphuretted hydrogen.

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  • Calcium sulphite, CaSO 3, a white substance, soluble in water, is prepared by passing sulphur dioxide into milk of lime.

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  • Sulphuric acid gives a white precipitate of calcium sulphate with strong solutions; ammonium oxalate gives calcium oxalate, practically insoluble in water and dilute acetic acid, but readily soluble in nitric or hydrochloric acid.

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  • It crystallizes in colourless prisms, possessing a saline taste; it sublimes on heating and is easily soluble in water.

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  • It crystallizes in small prisms, having a sharp saline taste, and is exceedingly soluble in water.

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  • It is easily soluble in water, from which it crystallizes in cubes, and also in alcohol.

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  • It is soluble in dilute aqueous alcohol, but insoluble in strong alcohol.

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  • It forms colourless crystals which are soluble in water and decompose on heating, with the formation of nitrogen.

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  • It is soluble in water, and the aqueous solution on boiling loses ammonia and the acid phosphate NH 4 H 2 PO 4 is formed.

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  • It forms large rhombic prisms, has a somewhat saline taste and is easily soluble in water.

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  • It is very soluble in cold water, a large fall of temperature accompanying solution.

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  • The fluorides of the alkali metals, of silver, and of most of the heavy metals are soluble in water; those of the alkaline earths are insoluble.

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  • The pure salt has a sharp saline taste and is readily soluble in water.

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  • It is soluble in I in 3 of cold water and in I in 50 of 90% alcohol.

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  • They are mostly soluble in water and somewhat hygroscopic in character.

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  • From this source all soils contain small proportions of sodium in soluble forms, hence the ashes of plants, although they preferably imbibe potassium salts, contain traces and sometimes notable quantities of sodium salts.

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  • In its chemical combinations sodium is usually monovalent; its salts are generally soluble in water, the least soluble being the metantimonate.

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  • It is very soluble in water, yielding a strongly alkaline solution; it also dissolves in alcohol.

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  • Sodium combines directly with the halogens to form salts which are soluble in water and crystallize in the cubic system.

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  • The fluoride, NaF, is sparingly soluble in water (I part in 25).

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  • Sodium sulphide, Na 2 S, obtained by saturating a caustic soda solution with sulphuretted hydrogen and adding an equivalent of alkali, is employed in the manufacture of soluble soda glass.

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  • Of the sodium silicates the most important is the mixture known as soluble soda glass formed by calcining a mixture of white sand, soda-ash and charcoal, or by dissolving silica in hot caustic soda under pressure.

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  • They combine with hypochlorous acid to form chlorhydrins; and are easily soluble in concentrated sulphuric acid, giving rise to sulphuric acid esters; consequently if the solution be boiled with water, the alcohol from which the olefine was in the first place derived is regenerated.

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  • It is only very slightly soluble in water.

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  • It is still more soluble in alcohol.

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  • It Is Soluble In Water; The Aqueous Solution Gradually Decomposes On Standing, Forming Carbon Dioxide And Sulphuretted Hydrogen.

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  • It Is Easily Soluble In Solutions Of The Caustic Alkalis, Provided They Are Not Too Concentrated, Forming Solutions Of Alkaline Carbonates And Sulphides, Cos 4Kho = K2C03 K 2 S 2H20.

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  • Such potassiferous silicates are found in almost all rocks, both as normal and as accessory components; and their disintegration furnishes the soluble potassium salts which are found in all fertile soils.

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  • It is extremely soluble in even cold water, and in any proportion of water on boiling.

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  • It is sparingly soluble in absolute alcohol.

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  • It is readily soluble in water, and on evaporation in a vacuum over caustic lime it deposits colourless, rhombohedral crystals of 2KHS.H 2 0.

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  • The salt is soluble in water, but insoluble in caustic potash of sp. gr.

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  • The kelp obtained by any of these methods is then lixiviated with water, which extracts the soluble salts, and the liquid is concentrated, when the less soluble salts, which are chiefly alkaline chlorides, sulphates and carbonates, crystallize out and are removed.

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  • It is only very sparingly soluble in water, but dissolves readily in solutions of the alkaline iodides and in alcohol, ether, carbon bisulphide, chloroform, and many liquid hydrocarbons.

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  • It is soluble in a solution of caustic potash, a dilute solution most probably containing the hypoiodite, which, however, changes slowly into iodate, the change taking place rapidly on warming.

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  • Silver iodide, mercurous iodide, and mercuric iodide are insoluble in water; lead iodide is sparingly soluble, whilst most of the other metallic iodides are soluble.

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  • The soluble iodides, on the addition of silver nitrate to their nitric acid solution, give a yellow precipitate of silver iodide, which is insoluble in ammonia solution.

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  • It is readily soluble in water, but excess of water decomposes it.

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  • It is a white crystalline solid, easily soluble in water, the solution showing a strongly acid reaction with litmus; the colour, however, is ultimately discharged by the bleaching power of the compound.

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  • They are mostly insoluble or only very slightly soluble in water.

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  • The iodates of the alkali metals are, however, readily soluble in water (except potassium iodate).

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  • Most of the azoximes are very volatile substances, sublime readily, and are easily soluble in water, alcohol and benzene.

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  • The alkali and alkaline earth cyanides are soluble in water and in alcohol, and their aqueous solution, owing to hydrolytic dissociation, possesses an alkaline character.

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  • Those of the heavy metals are mostly insoluble in water, but are soluble in a solution of potassium cyanide, forming more or less stable double salts, for example KAg(NC)2, KAu(NC) 2.

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  • Ammonium cyanide, NH 4 NC, a white solid found to some slight extent in illuminating gas, is easily soluble in water and alcohol, and is very poisonous.

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  • Potassium cyanide is an excessively poisonous, colourless, deliquescent solid; it is readily soluble in water, but almost insoluble in absolute alcohol.

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  • The soluble salts are removed by lixiviation, and the residue is boiled with lime to form the soluble calcium ferrocyanide, which is finally converted into the potassium salt by potassium chloride or carbonate.

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  • It is soluble in water, but insoluble in alcohol.

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  • It is soluble in water, but is insoluble in salt solutions.

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  • It crystallizes in dark red monoclinic prisms which are readily soluble in water.

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  • It crystallizes in dark red prisms which are readily soluble in water; it is a valuable reagent for the detection of sulphur, this element when in the form of an alkaline sulphide giving a characteristic purple blue coloration with the nitroprusside.

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  • The lower members of the series are somewhat soluble in water.

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  • They are colourless liquids, readily soluble in alcohol and in ether, but insoluble in water.

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  • Silver nitrate gives a white precipitate with cyanides, soluble in excess of potassium cyanide.

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  • The salts of the acid are known as formates, and are mostly soluble in water, those of silver and lead being the least soluble.

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  • The freezing of the soil in winter, which at first sight seems a drawback, retains the soluble nitrates which might otherwise be drained out.

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  • When these fires occur while the trees are full of sap, a curious mucilaginous matter is exuded from the half-burnt stems; when dry it is of pale reddish colour, like some of the coarser kinds of gum-arabic, and is soluble in water, the solution resembling gumwater, in place of which it is sometimes used; considerable quantities are collected and sold as " Orenburg gum "; in Siberia and Russia it is occasionally employed as a semi-medicinal food, being esteemed an antiscorbutic. For burning in close stoves and furnaces, larch makes tolerably good fuel, its value being estimated by Hartig as only one-fifth less than that of beech; the charcoal is compact, and is in demand for iron-smelting and other metallurgic uses in some parts of Europe.

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  • Chromium and its salts may be detected by the fact that they give a deep green bead when heated with borax, or that on fusion with sodium carbonate and nitre, a yellow mass of an alkaline chromate is obtained, which, on solution in water and acidification with acetic acid, gives a bright yellow precipitate on the addition of soluble lead salts.

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  • Sodium and potassium hydroxide solutions precipitate green chromium hydroxide from solutions of chromic salts; the precipitate is soluble in excess of the cold alkali, but is completely thrown down on boiling the solution.

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  • Normal chromates on the addition of silver nitrate give a red precipitate of silver chromate, easily soluble in ammonia, and with barium chloride a yellow precipitate of barium chromate, insoluble in acetic acid.

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  • Chromic chloride, CrC1 31 is obtained in the anhydrous form by igniting a mixture of the sesquioxide and carbon in a current of dry chlorine; it forms violet laminae almost insoluble in water, but dissolves rapidly in presence of a trace of chromous chloride; this action has been regarded as a catalytic action, it being assumed that the insoluble chromic chloride is first reduced by the chromous chloride to the chromous condition and the original chromous chloride converted into soluble chromic chloride, the newly formed chromous chloride then reacting with the insoluble chromic chloride.

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  • The hydrated fluoride, CrF3.9H20, obtained by adding ammonium fluoride to cold chromic sulphate solution, is sparingly soluble in water, and is decomposed by heat.

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  • It is soluble in cold water, giving a violet solution, which turns green on boiling.

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  • It is easily soluble in warm water, the solution being, of a dull blue tint, and is used in calico-printing, dyeing and tanning.

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  • It forms red octahedra and is less soluble in water than the corresponding potassium compound.

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  • It is an orange crystalline powder which is soluble in water, forming a yellow solution.

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  • It is readily soluble in alcohol, ether and benzene.

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  • They are readily soluble in water or alcohol and possess a bitter taste.

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  • It is only slightly soluble in water, but is readily volatile in steam.

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  • It is a non-volatile and almost infusible white powder, which slowly absorbs moisture and carbon dioxide from air, and is readily soluble in dilute acids.

    0
    0
  • Magnesium hydroxide is a white amorphous solid which is only slightly soluble in water; the solubility is, however, greatly increased by ammonium salts.

    0
    0
  • With the exception of the fluoride, these substances are readily soluble in water and arc deliquescent.

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    0
  • It may be prepared by dissolving the metal, its oxide, hydroxide, or carbonate in dilute hydrochloric acid, or by mixing concentrated solutions of magnesium sulphate and common salt, and cooling the mixture rapidly, when the less soluble sodium sulphate separates first.

    0
    0
  • The carbonate is not easily soluble in dilute acids, but is readily soluble in water containing carbon dioxide.

    0
    0
  • It is a white amorphous powder, readily soluble in acids.

    0
    0
  • With unsaturated alkyl halides the products are only slightly soluble in ether, and two molecules of the alkyl compound are brought into the reaction.

    0
    0
  • Boric acid crystallizes from water in white nacreous laminae belonging to the triclinic system; it is difficultly soluble in cold water, but dissolves readily in hot water.

    0
    0
  • Boric acid is easily soluble in alcohol, and if the vapour of the solution be inflamed it burns with a characteristic vivid green colour.

    0
    0
  • Some pairs of liquids are soluble in each other in all proportions, but, in general, when dealing with solutions of solids or gases in liquids, a definite limit is reached to the amount which will go into solution when the liquid is in contact with excess of the solid or gas.

    0
    0
  • If the solution of a solid more soluble when hot be cooled below the saturation point, the whole of the solid sometimes remains in solution.

    0
    0
  • This relation does not hold for very soluble gases, such as ammonia, at low temperatures.

    0
    0
  • As a general rule gases are less soluble at high than at low temperatures - unlike the majority of solids.

    0
    0
  • If the two substances are soluble in each other in all proportions at all temperatures above their melting points we get a diagram reduced to the two fusion curves cutting each other at a nonvariant point.

    0
    0
  • When two substances are soluble in each other in all proportions, we get solubility curves like those of copper and silver shown in fig.

    0
    0
  • Strychnine crystallizes from alcohol in colourless prisms, which are practically insoluble in water, and with difficulty soluble in the common organic solvents.

    0
    0
  • Strychninae hydrochloridum is also used; it is much more soluble than strychnine.

    0
    0
  • The salts of nitric acid, known as nitrates, are mostly readily soluble in water and crystallize well.

    0
    0
  • This compound possesses a heat of formation so much lower that electrically it needs but a voltage of 0.9 to decomplose it, and it is easily soluble in the fused sulphides of the alkali metals.

    0
    0
  • This powder, provided that it has not been too' strongly ignited, is soluble in strong acids; by ignition it becomes denser and nearly as hard as corundum; it fuses in the oxyhydrogen flame or electric arc, and on cooling it assumes a crystalline form closely resembling the mineral species.

    0
    0
  • Aluminium hydrate, Al(OH) 3, is obtained as a gelatinous white precipitate, soluble in potassium or sodium hydrate, but insoluble in ammonium chloride, by adding ammonia to a cold solution of an aluminium salt; from boiling solutions the precipitate is opaque.

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  • Both these soluble hydrates are readily coagulated by traces of a salt, acid or alkali; Crum's hydrate does not combine with dye-stuffs, neither is it soluble in excess of acid, while Graham's compound readily forms lakes, and readily dissolves when coagulated in acids.

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  • It has a sweet astringent taste, very soluble in water, but scarcely soluble in alcohol.

    0
    0
  • Aluminium phosphates may be prepared by precipitating a soluble aluminium salt with sodium phosphate.

    0
    0
  • Burnt clay has a very beneficial effect on clay land by improving its texture and rendering soluble the alkaline substances it contains.

    0
    0
  • It forms small crystals, showing a brilliant green reflex, and is soluble in water and alcohol with formation of a deep red solution.

    0
    0
  • An aqueous solu tion of fuchsine is decolorized on the addition of sulphurous acid, the easily soluble fuchsine sulphurous acid being formed.

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  • It is insoluble in water, but is readily soluble in alcohol,, and ether.

    0
    0
  • This sulphide is nearly insoluble in the metal, but is readily soluble in the overlying basic slag, into which it therefore passes.

    0
    0
  • Again, the diazonium chlorides combine with platinic chloride to form difficultly soluble double platinum salts, such as (C 6 H 5 N 2 C1) 2 PtC1 4; similar gold salts, C 6 H,N 2 C1 AuC1 3, are known.

    0
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  • This salt is a colourless crystalline substance of composition CH30 C6H4 N2 CN HCN 2H20, and has the properties of a metallic salt; it is very soluble in water and its solution is an electrolyte, whereas the solutions of the synand anticompounds are not electrolytes.

    0
    0
  • Hydrogen is only very slightly soluble in water.

    0
    0
  • The neutral esters are as a rule insoluble in water and distil unchanged; on the other hand, the acid esters are generally soluble in water, are non-volatile, and form salts with bases.

    0
    0
  • It burns with a white flame and is soluble in water.

    0
    0
  • Digitalein is amorphous but readily soluble in water.

    0
    0
  • Before this final change the heart may be started again by the application of a soluble potassium salt, or by raising the fluid pressure within it.

    0
    0
  • The rainfall chiefly occurs in violent cloudbursts, and the soluble matter in the soil is carried down by intermittent streams to salt lakes around which deposits are formed as evaporation takes place.

    0
    0
  • It is soluble in concentrated sulphuric acid with a green colour.

    0
    0
  • Ash averages 5.7 per cent., about half of which is soluble in water.

    0
    0
  • It crystallizes in plates, and is soluble in water and alcohol.

    0
    0
  • On permeable soils, especially those of the terrace lands along the valleys, the soluble salts commonly known as alkali were gradually leached out and carried by the percolating waters towards the lower lands, where, reaching the surface, the alkali was left as a glistening crust or as pools of inky blackness.

    0
    0
  • It is also soluble in solutions of the caustic alkalis, with evolution of hydrogen a behaviour similar to that shown by aluminium.

    0
    0
  • The hydroxide Be(OH)2 separates as a white bulky precipitate on adding a solution of an alkaline hydroxide to a soluble beryllium salt; and like those of aluminium and zinc, this hydroxide is soluble in excess of the alkaline hydroxide, but is reprecipitated on prolonged boiling.

    0
    0
  • It is deliquescent, and readily soluble in water, from which it separates on concentration in crystals of composition BeC1 2.4H 2 0.

    0
    0
  • Beryllium salts are easily soluble and mostly have a sweetish taste (hence the name Glucinum, from yXv,dc, sweet); they are readily precipitated by alkaline sulphides with formation of the white hydroxide, and may be distinguished from salts of all other metals by the solubility of the oxide in ammonium carbonate.

    0
    0
  • It is easily soluble in water and alcohol, and is thrown out of its aqueous solution by the addition of calcium chloride.

    0
    0
  • The calcium salt, Ca(C4H702)2 H20, is less soluble in hot water than in cold.

    0
    0
  • Its salts are more soluble in water than those of the normal acid.

    0
    0
  • It is readily soluble in water, ioo parts of which dissolve 3 5.5 2 parts at o and 39.16 parts at ioo.

    0
    0
  • This theory being accepted, it is evident that a small quantity of water, by successive dissolution and deposition of a substance capable of existing in a more soluble and in a less soluble form, is able to bring about the crystallization of an indefinitely large quantit y of material.

    0
    0
  • It is readily soluble in nitric and sulphuric acids, but less so in hydrochloric.

    0
    0
  • Thallous chloroplatinate, T1 2 PtC1 6, readily obtainable from thallous salt solutions by addition of platinum chloride, is a yellow precipitate soluble in no less than 15,600 parts of cold water.

    0
    0
  • It forms resplendent monoclinic prisms, soluble in water.

    0
    0
  • Thallous sulphate, T1 2 SO 4, forms rhombic prisms, soluble in water, which melt at a red heat with decomposition, sulphur dioxide being evolved.

    0
    0
  • The normal salt, T1 3 PO 4, is soluble in 200 parts of water, and may be obtained by precipitation.

    0
    0
  • The hydrocarbons are separated from the "Stupp" by means of alcohol, the soluble portion on distillation giving first phenanthrene and then a mixture of pyrene and fluoranthene.

    0
    0
  • It is easily soluble in hot alcohol, ether and carbon bisulphide.

    0
    0
  • It is readily soluble in water and in alcohol, but is insoluble in chloroform and ether.

    0
    0
  • It is readily soluble in water and reduces warm silver solutions.

    0
    0
  • Fibrolysin is a modified form of thiosinamine made by mixing it with sodium salicylate Fibrolysin is freely soluble and may be given in hypodermic or intra-muscular injection.

    0
    0
  • It is readily soluble in hot water and the ordinary organic solvents, but is only slightly soluble in cold water.

    0
    0
  • The salts of benzoic acid are known as the benzoates and are mostly soluble in water.

    0
    0
  • It is slightly soluble in water and more so in alcohol.

    0
    0
  • It is a colourless crystalline solid, readily soluble in water and alcohol; it deliquesces on exposure to air.

    0
    0
  • By suspending the precipitated cerous hydroxide in water and passing chlorine through the solution, a hydrated form of the dioxide, 2CeO 2.3H 2 O, is obtained, which is readily soluble in nitric and sulphuric acids, forming ceric salts, and in hydrochloric acid, where it forms cerous chloride, with liberation of chlorine.

    0
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  • It is a white powder of specific gravity 3.912, easily soluble in cold water.

    0
    0
  • It forms yellow crystals soluble in water; the aqueous solution on standing gradually depositing a basic salt.

    0
    0
  • It is partly dissolved by cold alcohol, the remainder being soluble in ether.

    0
    0
  • Its principal constituents are always sodium carbonate and calcium sulphide, which are separated by the action of water, the former being soluble and the latter insoluble.

    0
    0
  • The lixiviation of the blackash requires great care, as the calcium sulphide is liable to be changed into soluble calcium compounds, which immediately react with sodium carbonate and destroy a corresponding quantity of the latter, rendering the soda weaker and impure.

    0
    0
  • The principal impurities of crude vat-liquor are sodium hydrate and sulphide, the latter of which always leads to the formation of soluble double sulphur salts of sodium and iron.

    0
    0
  • The mother-liquor, drained from the soda-crystals, on boiling down to dryness yields a very white, but low-strength soda-ash, as the soluble impurities of the original soda-ash are nearly all collected here; it is called " mother-alkali."

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  • The sulphur was by these converted partly into gaseous sulphuretted hydrogen, partly into soluble polysulphides, thiosulphates and other soluble compounds, and in all shapes caused a nuisance which became more and more intolerable as the number and size of alkali works increased.

    0
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  • The anodes are made of retort-carbon or other chlorine-resisting material, and they are mounted in cells which serve as diaphragms. The material of these cells is usually cement, mixed with certain soluble salts which impart sufficient porosity to the material.

    0
    0
  • From Morphinae Acetas, a white soluble amorphous powder, is made Liquor Morphinae Acetatis, strength 1% or 44 grs.

    0
    0
  • Thorium nitrate, Th(NO 3) 4.12H 2 O, forms white deliquescent tables very soluble in water.

    0
    0
  • It is readily soluble in acids, forming salts, the rate of solution being rapid if the oxide is in the amorphous condition, but slow if the oxide is crystalline.

    0
    0
  • It is readily soluble in acids and in an aqueous solution of ammonia.

    0
    0
  • Ammonium sulphide precipitates black nickel sulphide, which is somewhat soluble in excess of the precipitate (especially if yellow ammonium sulphide be used), forming a dark-coloured solution.

    0
    0
  • Ammonium hydroxide gives a green precipitate of the hydroxide, soluble in excess of ammonia, forming a blue solution.

    0
    0
  • Pinerua separates the metals by taking advantage of the fact that cobalt chloride is soluble in ether which has been saturated with hydrochloric acid gas at low temperature.

    0
    0
  • It is soluble in alcohol and in water.

    0
    0
  • It is readily soluble in hydrocarbon solvents, in chloroform and in alcohol.

    0
    0
  • The rubidium salts are generally colourless, mostly soluble in water and isomorphous with the corresponding potassium salts.

    0
    0
  • It is soluble in water and combines with many metallic chlorides to form double salts.

    0
    0
  • It is soluble in a mixture of nitric and hydrofluoric acids, and the powdered metal, in aqua regia, but slowly attacked by sulphuric, hydrochloric and hydrofluoric acids separately; it is also soluble in boiling potash solution, giving a tunstate and hydrogen.

    0
    0
  • It is slightly soluble in hydrochloric and sulphuric acids, giving purple solutions.

    0
    0
  • It is readily soluble in water, and on boiling the aqueous solution a white hydrate is first deposited which after a time is converted into the trioxide.

    0
    0
  • It is sparingly soluble in cold water, but is easily dissolved by potassium carbonate or ammonia.

    0
    0
  • Outside the body piperazin has a remarkable power of dissolving uric acid and producing a soluble urate, but in clinical experience it has not proved equally successful.

    0
    0
  • The hydrides of the halogens are all colourless, strongly fuming gases, readily soluble in water and possessing a strong acid reaction; they react readily with basic oxides, forming in most cases well defined crystalline salts which resemble one another very strongly.

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    0
  • In some respects there is a very marked difference between fluorine and the other members of the group, for, whilst sodium chloride, bromide and iodide are readily soluble in water, sodium fluoride is much less soluble; again, silver chloride, bromide and iodide are practically insoluble in water, whilst, on the other hand, silver fluoride is appreciably soluble in water.

    0
    0
  • The gas must be collected either by downward displacement, since it is soluble in water and also attacks mercury; or over a saturated salt solution, in which it is only slightly soluble.

    0
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  • Many are readily soluble in water, the chief exceptions being silver chloride, mercurous chloride, cuprous chloride and palladious chloride which are insoluble in water, and thallous chloride and lead chloride which are only slightly soluble in cold water, but are readily soluble in hot water.

    0
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  • It is readily soluble in water, with which it combines to form hypochlorous acid.

    0
    0
  • Chlorine peroxide must be collected by displacement, as it is soluble in water and readily attacks mercury.

    0
    0
  • The salts of the acid are known as the perchlorates, and are all soluble in water; the potassium and rubidium salts, however, are only soluble to a slight extent.

    0
    0
  • It crystallizes in colourless plates and is readily soluble in alcohol, ether, &c., but not in water.

    0
    0
  • It is readily soluble in water.

    0
    0
  • This reduction of acidity is partly due to the deposition of various salts of tartaric acid, which are less soluble in a dilute alcoholic medium than in water, and partly to the action of micro-organisms. Young wines differ very widely in their composition according to class and vintage.

    0
    0
  • The main result of plastering is that the soluble tartrates in the wine are decomposed, forming insoluble tartrate of lime and soluble sulphate of potash.

    0
    0
  • It crystallizes from alcohol in prisms, which are sparingly soluble in water.

    0
    0
  • It is much more soluble in water than the potassium salt.

    0
    0
  • The former, being soluble, is left in the water; but the latter, an insoluble body, is in part attached to the fibres, from which it is only separated by changing into soluble metapectic acid under the action of hot alkaline ley in the subsequent process of bleaching.

    0
    0
  • The soluble substances are dissolved by the water, and the liquid thus formed being heavier than water, sinks to the bottom of the tank where it is allowed to escape through an outlet.

    0
    0
  • Ores in which the copper is present as oxide or carbonate are soluble in sulphuric or hydrochloric acids, ferrous chloride, ferric sulphate, ammoniacal compounds and sodium thiosulphate.

    0
    0
  • Copper sulphide may be converted either into the sulphate, which is soluble in water; the oxide, soluble in sulphuric or hydrochloric acid; cupric chloride, soluble in water; or cuprous chloride, which is soluble in solutions of metallic chlorides.

    0
    0
  • Copper sulphate is readily soluble in water, but insoluble in alcohol; it dissolves in hydrochloric acid with a considerable fall in temperature, cupric chloride being formed.

    0
    0
  • It is soluble in water, the solution showing an acid reaction, owing to the formation of aceto-acetic acid, and with alkalis it yields acetates.

    0
    0
  • They are soluble in water, their solutions having an acid reaction and an astringent taste; the solutions are coloured dark blue or green by ferrous salts, a property utilized in the manufacture of ink.

    0
    0
  • When pure the acid forms a colourless, amorphous mass, very soluble in water, less so in alcohol, and practically insoluble in ether.

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    0
  • This, like the excretion of the sundew and other insectivorous plants, contains a digestive ferment (or enzyme) which renders the nitrogenous substances of the body of the insect soluble, and capable of absorption by the leaf.

    0
    0
  • Calcium chloride gives a white precipitate of calcium tartrate in neutral solutions, the precipitate being soluble in cold solutions of caustic potash but re-precipitated on boiling.

    0
    0
  • Guntz (Comptes rendus, 1901, 133, p. 872) electrolyses a saturated solution of barium chloride using a mercury cathode and obtains a 3% barium amalgam; this amalgam is transferred to an iron boat in a wide porcelain tube and the tube slowly heated electrically, a good yield of pure barium being obtained at about looo C. The metal when freshly cut possesses a silver white lustre, is a little harder than lead, and is extremely easily oxidized on exposure; it is soluble in liquid ammonia, and readily attacks both water and alcohol.

    0
    0
  • It is a white powder moderately soluble in cold water, readily soluble in hot water, the solution possessing an alkaline reaction and absorbing carbon dioxide readily.

    0
    0
  • The chloride crystallizes in colourless rhombic tables of specific gravity 3.9 and is readily soluble in water, but is almost insoluble in concentrated hydrochloric acid and in absolute alcohol.

    0
    0
  • It crystallizes in monoclinic prisms of composition Ba(103) 2 H 2 O, and is only very sparingly soluble in cold water.

    0
    0
  • It is practically insoluble in water, and is only very slightly soluble in dilute acids; it is soluble to some extent, when freshly prepared, in hot concentrated sulphuric acid, and on cooling the solution, crystals of composition BaSO 4 H 2 SO 4 are deposited.

    0
    0
  • This power is possessed alike by a glass of brandy, by solution of lime, soluble salts of zinc, copper, or silver, by tannic and gallic acids, as well as vegetable juices and extracts which contain them.

    0
    0
  • For the stomach and intestines we employ the same drug in the form of a pill; and when it is desired to act especially upon the intestines, the pills are made of a harder consistence or less soluble preparation, or are covered with keratin, so that they may not act much, if at all, upon the stomach while passing through it before reaching the intestines.

    0
    0
  • Most of these belong to the aromatic group of bodies, although one of them, antipyrin, belongs rather to the furfurol group. Carbolic acid has an antipyretic action, but on account of its poisonous properties it cannot be employed as an antipyretic. Salicylic acid has a strong antipyretic action, and is most commonly used in the form of its sodium salt, which is much more soluble than the acid itself.

    0
    0
  • It is a white powder, almost insoluble in water, and when volatilized, condenses in two crystalline forms, either octahedral or prismatic. It is insoluble in sulphuric and nitric acids, but is readily soluble in hydrochloric and tartaric acids and in solutions of the caustic alkalies.

    0
    0
  • It is soluble in alcohol and in carbon bisulphide, and also in a small quantity of water; but with an excess of water it gives a precipitate of various oxychlorides, known as powder of algaroth.

    0
    0
  • These substances are usually prepared by fusing their components together, and are dark powders which are less soluble in water the more antimony they contain.

    0
    0
  • It forms a fine dark orange powder, insoluble in water, but readily soluble in aqueous solutions of the caustic alkalis and alkaline carbonates.

    0
    0
  • It is a colourless liquid, slightly soluble in water, and is spontaneously inflammable.

    0
    0
  • The iron must be in certain soluble conditions, however, and the soluble bicarbonate of the protoxide of chalybeate springs seems most favourable; the hydrocarbonate absorbed by the cells is oxidized, probably thus 2FeCO 3 1-30H 2 +O = Fee (OH)6+2C02.

    0
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  • The general result of such research has been to show that the toxic bodies are, like proteids, precipitable by alcohol and various salts; they are soluble in water, are somewhat easily dialysable, and are relatively unstable both to light and heat.

    0
    0
  • The most modern and the most generally accepted method is volumetric, and is based on the reaction between zinc chloride and potassium ferrocyanide, by which insoluble zinc ferrocyanide and soluble potassium chloride are formed; the presence of the slightest excess of potassium ferrocyanide is shown by a brownish tint being imparted by the solution to a drop of uranium nitrate.

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  • When this liquid is cold it is diluted with cold water, heated until all the soluble salts are dissolved, transferred to a tall, narrow beaker, and diluted to about 150 cc. The electrodes are attached to a frame connected with the battery and the beaker is placed on a stool, which can be raised so that the electrodes are immersed in the liquid and reach the bottom of the beaker.

    0
    0
  • Occasionally this residue contains a small amount of iron in a difficultly soluble form; in that case the solution is slightly diluted with water and filtered into a larger flask.

    0
    0
  • According to Dr Reveil, Persian opium usually contains 75 to 84% of matter soluble in water, and some samples contain from 13 to 30% of glucose, probably due to an extract or syrup of raisins added to the paste in the pots in which it is collected, and to which the shining fracture of hard Persian opium is attributed.

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  • Soc. Morphine, or morphia, crystallizes in prisms with one molecule of water; it is soluble in woo parts of cold water and in 160 of boiling water, and may be crystallized from alcohol; it is almost insoluble in ether and chloroform.

    0
    0
  • It has an alkaline reaction and behaves as a tertiary, monacid base; its salts are soluble in water and alcohol.

    0
    0
  • Distilled with zinc dust morphine yields phenanthrene, pyridine and quinoline; dehydration gives, under certain conditions, apomorphine, C17H17N02, a white amorphous substance, readily soluble in alcohol, either and chloroform.

    0
    0
  • It is readily soluble in water, alcohol, ether, &c. In addition to its application in the cordite industry, it is used in the manufacture of chloroform and sulphonal, and as a solvent.

    0
    0
  • It is readily soluble in dilute nitric acid, nitric oxide and silver nitrate being formed; it also dissolves in hot, strong sulphuric acid, sulphur dioxide being evolved.

    0
    0
  • When salt and copper sulphate are added to the charge, they form sodium sulphate and cupric chloride, both of which are readily soluble in water.

    0
    0
  • This salt, insoluble in water but soluble in brine, also acts upon argentite (Ag 2 S-+-Cu 2 C1 2 =2AgC1±-CuS±-Cu) and pyrargyrite (2Ag 3 SbS 3 -I-Cu 2 C12 = 2AgC1 +Ag 2 S +2Ag +2CuS +Sb2S3), and would give with silver sulphide in the presence of quicksilver, the Patioreaction; metallic silver, cupric sulphide, and mercurous chloride (2Ag 2 S+Cu 2 C1 2 +2Hg=4Ag+2CuS+Hg 2 C1 2), but the iron decomposes the quicksilver salt, setting free the quicksilver.

    0
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  • The large amount of soluble sulphates of iron and copper formed in the roast is made to act upon salt charged in a copper-bottomed amalgamating pan; the chlorides formed finish in the wet way the imperfect chloridation obtained in the furnace.

    0
    0
  • The ore, supposed to have been salt-roasted, is charged loosely into the leaching vat and treated with water (to which sulphuric acid or copper sulphate may have been added), to remove soluble salts, which might later on be precipitated with the silver (base-metal chlorides), or overcharge the solution (sodium chloride and sulphate), or interfere with the solvent power (sodium sulphate).

    0
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  • Silver arsenate and antimoniate are also readily soluble, metallic silver slightly so, silver sulphide not at all.

    0
    0
  • It permits coarser crushing of the ore, the cost of plant is lower, the power required is nominal, the cost of chemicals is lower than that of quicksilver, less water is necessary, and the extraction is often higher, as silver arsenate and antimoniate are readily soluble, while they are not decomposed in amalgamation.

    0
    0
  • In principle it consists in oxidizing silver sulphide to the sulphate which is soluble in water, the silver being then precipitable by metallic copper.

    0
    0
  • It is sparingly soluble in water (one part in 3000); and the moist oxide frequently behaves as the hydroxide, AgOH, i.e.

    0
    0
  • It is readily obtained as a white curdy precipitate by adding a solution of a chloride to a soluble silver salt.

    0
    0
  • It is almost insoluble in water, soluble in 50,000 parts of nitric acid, and more soluble in strong hydrochloric acid and solutions of alkaline chlorides.

    0
    0
  • It is very slightly soluble in nitric acid, and less soluble in ammonia than the chloride.

    0
    0
  • It is obtained as a light yellow powder by dissolving the metal in hydriodic acid, or by precipitating a silver salt with a soluble iodide.

    0
    0
  • It forms with silver nitrate the yellowish green solid, Ag 2 S AgNO 3, and with silver sulphate the orange-red powder, Ag 2 S Ag 2 SO 4 Silver sulphate, Ag 2 SO 4, is obtained as white crystals, sparingly soluble in water, by dissolving the metal in strong sulphuric acid, sulphur dioxide being evolved, or by adding strong sulphuric acid to a solution of the nitrate.

    0
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  • It combines with ammonia to form the readily soluble 2NH 3 Ag 2 SO 4.

    0
    0
  • The mono-oxypyridines are easily soluble in water and possess only feeble basic properties.

    0
    0
  • It is very soluble in water.

    0
    0
  • It is readily soluble in water, alcohol and ether, and is a very powerful base.

    0
    0
  • Thymol has a strong odour of thyme and a pungent taste, and is freely soluble in alcohol, ether, chloroform or olive oil, but almost insoluble in cold water.

    0
    0
  • But inorganic liquids also grow in the latter mode, as when a soluble substance is added to them.

    0
    0
  • Very finely triturated soluble particles are rubbed into a smooth paste with an oil of the requisite consistency.

    0
    0
  • A fragment of such a paste brought into a liquid in which the solid particles are soluble, slowly expands into a honeycomb like foam, the walls of the minute vesicles being films of oil, and the contents being the soluble particles dissolved in droplets of the circumambient liquid.

    0
    0
  • It is slightly soluble in carbon bisulphide.

    0
    0
  • It combines directly with nitrogen, phosphorus, antimony and carbon, and with all the metals (except gold) to form selenides, of which those of the alkali and alkaline earth metals are soluble in water.

    0
    0