Smallpox sentence example

smallpox
  • Smallpox has been with us for thousands of years.
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  • In 1958, with smallpox still killing two million people a year, the World Health Organization pledged to eradicate it.
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  • She contracted smallpox at the age of 33.
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  • In 1733-1734 there was a dreadful epidemic of smallpox, which destroyed a great number of the people.
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  • At the age of twelve he fell ill of smallpox, but his parents showed little or no interest in his recovery.
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  • He died in 1774 of smallpox.
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  • If James developed smallpox and died he would be a murderer.
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  • He then infected him with the normally deadly smallpox.
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  • To Jenner's relief James did not catch smallpox.
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  • And we did eliminate smallpox, which is a very evil affliction, almost entirely.
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  • If James lived Jenner would have found a way of preventing smallpox.
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  • On a visit to England after the Restoration of her brother, Charles II, she had contracted smallpox and died there.
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  • Now, it wants open the Pandora's Box of genetically-engineered smallpox.
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  • In the 18th century smallpox was a very common disease and was a major cause of death.
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  • These achievements are especially remarkable for one who was blinded by smallpox at the age of one.
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  • I had a biopsy taken from the smallpox vaccination scar on my upper arm.
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  • The Iraqis claimed the equipment was used to make smallpox vaccine, Tucker said.
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  • As a logical consequence of this view of disease the mode of treatment among peoples in the lower stages of culture is mainly magical; they endeavour to propitiate the evil spirits by sacrifice, to expel them by spells, &c. (see Exorcism), to drive them away by blowing, &c.; conversely we find the Khonds attempt to keep away smallpox by placing thorns and brushwood in the paths leading to places decimated by that disease, in the hope of making the disease demon retrace his steps.
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  • Emmet was short and slight in figure; his face was marked by smallpox, and he was described in 1803 for the purpose of identification as being "of an ugly, sour countenance and dirty brown complexion."
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  • The decrease may chiefly have been due to infectious diseases, especially a very severe epidemic of smallpox.
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  • In the century leading up to its extermination, smallpox killed about 500,000,000 people.
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  • That is the dreadful history of the final, and deadliest, century of smallpox.
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  • In the last thirty years there has not been a single smallpox death or even a single infection.
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  • In the eradication of smallpox, as in the near-elimination of polio, I find both fascinating lessons of history and enormous reason for hope.
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  • In the 800s, smallpox wiped out a third of Japan.
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  • Two things were known at the time about smallpox, also called variola.
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  • When Jenner did variolations on milkmaids who had had cowpox, they never came down with smallpox.
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  • Phipps never came down with smallpox.
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  • And Jenner had created this vaccine for smallpox without even understanding the basics of germ theory!
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  • Ten years later, in Somalia, the last natural case of smallpox occurred.
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  • We can draw lessons and encouragement from the histories of polio and smallpox, on several counts.
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  • Smallpox affected the rich and the poor and it changed the course of history: It killed Queen Mary II of England in 1694, King Louis I of Spain in 1724, Emperor Peter II of Russia in 1730, and King Louis XV of France in 1774, and changed the succession to the thrones of nations a dozen more times.
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  • I think that is the case with polio and smallpox, which means they weren't eliminated because they were easy, but because they were awful.
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  • The last U.S. case of smallpox occurred in Texas in 1949, and routine vaccinations ended in America 30 years ago.
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  • To Jenner 's relief James did not catch smallpox.
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  • Mary died, childless, of smallpox at the age of 32.
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  • The Tamils had suspected cholera and smallpox at the time.
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  • Robert contracted smallpox as a child, surviving disfigured and scarred.
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  • Now, it wants open the Pandora 's Box of genetically-engineered smallpox.
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  • Worldwide stocks of smallpox vaccine will be measured at about 90 million - however, many of these were produced in the 1980s.
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  • Their busiest year was 1902 during a major smallpox outbreak.
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  • Five of them, however, died of smallpox in prison awaiting trial.
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  • Without engineers building the bombs, programming the missiles, splicing the genes into the smallpox virus, this stuff would n't exist.
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  • Smallpox was eradicated worldwide by 1980, and the US stockpiles of vaccine are decades old.
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  • Father Fined For Blocking Pox Jab A father has been fined for refusing to have his children vaccinated against smallpox.
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  • British doctor Edmund Jenner performs the first vaccination against smallpox.
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  • However, the government did award Edward Jenner £ 10,000 to carry on his work in developing a vaccine against smallpox.
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  • After the introduction of the vaccination, we were able to effectively eradicate smallpox.
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  • Vaccinations in children began about 1900 with the smallpox vaccine.
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  • Two reasons account for this decline: the worldwide elimination of smallpox and advances in protein chemistry in vaccines with fewer antigens.
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  • It also lists a 1976 smallpox vaccine study that may be linked to autism.
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  • The Malays formerly suffered severely from smallpox epidemics, but in the portion of the peninsula under British rule vaccination has been introduced, and the ravages of the disease no longer assume serious dimensions.
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  • He died at Holme-Pierrepoint, near Nottingham, on the 9th of December 1683, of smallpox.
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  • Epidemics of smallpox and typhoid occur; and leprosy, imported from the Orange River and Cape Colonies, has taken firm hold on the Basuto, of whom about 9r per too() are sufferers from this disease.
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  • In November he caught smallpox and was very seriously ill, so that the book was not given to the world till the spring of 1724 (and then of course, as it had no privilege, appeared privately).
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  • Hospitals.-The Metropolitan Asylums Board, though established in 1867 purely as a poor-law authority for the relief of the sick, insane Metro- and infirm paupers, has become a central hospital authority for infectious diseases, with power to receive into politan its hospitals persons, who are not paupers, suffering from Asylums fever, smallpox or diphtheria.
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  • For smallpox the Board maintains hospital ships moored in the Thames at Dartford, and a land establishment at the same place.
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  • Bilious remittent fever occurs in the summer months, and smallpox prevails from November to March.
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  • The climate is unhealthy - fever, smallpox, dysentery and rheumatism being the prevailing diseases.
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  • The death-rate is high, especially among children, owing to the prevalence of cholera, smallpox and fevers during the dry weather.
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  • Smallpox is frequent on the coast, but is diminishing before vaccination; other epidemic diseases are extremely rare.
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  • In 1772 he sailed for London to visit Friends in the north of England, especially Yorkshire, and died in York of smallpox on the 7th of October.
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  • From 1886 he was forced by ill-health to spend much of his time abroad, and he died of smallpox Alicante on the 16th of March 1892, while on a tour in Spain.
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  • In the meanwhile typhus and smallpox had broken out amongst the French, many of the national guards were impatient of control, and the German trenches, in spite of difficulties of ground and weather, made steady progress towards the Perches.
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  • Smallpox also is practically endemic, owing in great part to negligent sanitary supervision.
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  • Among the deaths 2789 were from tuberculosis, 1200 from smallpox, 77 8 from malarial diseases, 331 from la grippe, and 106 from beri-beri.
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  • When not quite six months old he lost his sight by smallpox, and his career is largely interesting as that of one who achieved what he did in spite of blindness.
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  • Nature had made him mean, the smallpox had made him hideous, and his degraded habits made him loathsome.
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  • Busily engaged in secret negotiations with France, he had retired to his hunting seat at Dieren, when he fell ill with smallpox on the 27th of October.
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  • On landing (October 2) at Cape Coast, Wolseley found the Ashanti, who had been decimated by smallpox and fever, preparing to return home.
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  • The village was abandoned in or before 1758, owing probably to an epidemic of smallpox, and the fort was abandoned in 1759.
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  • In 1724 the population was reduced by smallpox to thirty souls.
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  • The boils last for about a year, after which there is no more likelihood of a recurrence of the trouble than in the case of smallpox.
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  • After a dissolute life he died at Fontainebleau from smallpox.
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  • Smallpox is not uncommon, and skin diseases are numerous, but the two most prevalent diseases among the Egyptians are dysentery and ophthalmia.
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  • He again advanced to El Fasher in February 1889, but was seized with smallpox.
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  • Thus malaria and sand-fly fever, dysentery, typhoid and paratyphoid fever, cholera, smallpox, and occasionally typhus fever, eye diseases, oriental sores and indeed any disease conveyed by impure water, flies, contaminated dust or the contagion of sufferers from infectious diseases, are prevalent in the inhabited places along the Persian Gulf, and precautions must always be taken to guard against them.
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  • Smallpox, dysentery and fevers, frequently of a bilious character, are endemic and occasionally epidemic. Cholera breaks out from time to time and works great havoc, as was the case in 1903 when one of the raja of Sarawak's punitive expeditions was stricken while ascending the Limbang river by boat, and lost many hundreds of its numbers before the coast could be regained.
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  • During the smallpox epidemic of 1721 he attempted in vain to have treatment by inoculation employed, for the first time in America; and for this he was bitterly attacked on all sides, and his life was at one time in danger; but, nevertheless, he used the treatment on his son, who recovered, and he wrote An Account of the Method and further Success of Inoculating for the Small Pox in London (r 721).
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  • This was tried largely in the case of smallpox, and once at least by Dr Erasmus Darwin in the case of scarlet fever.
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  • To Edward Jenner we owe the discovery that vaccination protects against smallpox, and it is now generally acknowledged that smallpox and vaccine are ' Quoted by Weir Mitchell, "Researches on the Venom of the Rattlesnake," Smithsonian Contributions (1860), p. 97.
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  • At the very outset of a promising career he suddenly succumbed to an attack of smallpox on the 6th of November 1650, his son William III.
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  • Hence follows the idea of producing a modified attack of the disease as a means of prevention - a principle which had been previously applied in inoculation against smallpox.
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  • The diseases to which the act applies are smallpox, cholera, membranous croup, erysipelas, scarlatina or scarlet fever, typhus, typhoid, enteric, relapsing, continued or puerperal fever, and any other infectious disease to which the act has been applied by the local authority of the district in the prescribed manner.
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  • The power given to provide hospitals must be exercised so as not to create a nuisance, and much litigation has taken place in respect of the providing of hospitals for smallpox.
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  • Up to the present time, however, the courts have refused to accept as a principle that a smallpox hospital is necessarily a source of danger to the neighbourhood, and for the most part applications for injunction on that ground have failed.
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  • Almost immediately afterwards he was inoculated for smallpox, which was raging in Princeton and vicinity, and, always feeble, he died of the inoculation on the 28th of March 1758.
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  • Besides those who died in warfare, whole tribes of Hottentots were destroyed by epidemics of smallpox in 1713 and in 1755.
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  • Other charitable institutions include the hospital, John Watt's hospital and the smallpox hospital.
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  • Smallpox, famine, sheep disease, and the eruptions of 1765 and 1783 follow each other in terrible succession.
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  • Smallpox is endemic in the Chinese city during the autumn and winter, and enteric is common in the autumn.
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  • His second wife died of smallpox in 1698, and in 1700 Burnet married again, his third wife being Elizabeth (1661-1709), widow of Robert Berkeley and daughter of Sir Richard Blake, a rich and charitable woman, known by her Method of Devotion, posthumously published in 1710.
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  • English officers who saw him at Navarino describe him as short, grossly fat and deeply marked with smallpox.
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  • He has brown, short hair, dark eyes, a sallow complexion & several marks of the smallpox.
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  • In 1864 there was a smallpox epidemic in the district.
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  • Not until 6 years ago was smallpox eradicated from the world.
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  • The only dreaded disease to have been totally eradicated is smallpox, which was wiped out more than two decades ago.
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  • The boy was then inoculated with smallpox in July, which did not develop thus proving Jenner's argument.
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  • Thus the screening project will identify not just potential agents against smallpox but also putative anti-cancer drugs.
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  • After variolation, sometimes people died from the smallpox they caught.
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  • But in other cases, variolation worked: The person who survived it did not subsequently get smallpox.
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  • If the smallpox and polio successes were achieved in a low-tech world, think how much more we can accomplish with vastly improved tools, infrastructure, and communication.
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  • Even smallpox has been sequenced and is available for download.
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