How to use Skeat in a sentence

skeat
  • Another alliterative poem in the northern dialect, of 15th-century origin, is based on the Historia de proeliis, and was edited by Skeat for the E.E.T.S.

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  • Skeat's Malay Magic (London, 1900) is a compilation of all the writings on the subject of Malay superstitions by the best authorities and contains considerable original matter.

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  • Skeat suggests a possible connexion with Spanish rabo, tail, rabear, to wag the hind-quarters.

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  • Skeat refers it to a root meaning "to kill," which may connect it with Gr.

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  • According to Skeat, the origin is to be found in the name for a cask or liquid measure appearing in various forms in several Teutonic languages, in Dutch oxhooft (modern okshoofd), Dan.

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  • The Anglo-Saxon name of the Parret, a river in Somerset, is Pedreda or Pedrida, which at first sight looks as if it had to do with the proper name, Petrus; but Skeat believes there is no connexion between them - the latter portion of the word being rio, a stream.

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  • English lurked in farms and hovels, amongst villeins and serfs, in the outlying country-districts, in the distant ' See Stevenson, Waring and Skeat, op. cit.

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  • Skeat (Early English Text Society, 1870-1889; reprinted, after revision by the editor, by the Scottish Text Society, 1893-1895).

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  • Chalmers's, in his Poetic Remains of some of the Scottish Kings (1824); Rogers's Poetical Remains of King James the First (1873); Skeat's edition published by the Scottish Text Society (1884).

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  • Skeat has connected it with Old English lcietan, to let, which is very doubtful, though this is the origin of the use of the word in such expressions as "two-" "three-way leet," a place where cross-roads melt.

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  • It is served by the Lancashire & Yorkshire and London & North Western 1 Skeat, Etym.

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  • The ceremony of turning to the west three times with renunciation of the Evil One, then to the east, is exactly paralleled in a rite of purification by water common among the Malays and described by Skeat in his book on Malay magic. If the Malay rite is not derived through Nlahommedanism from Christianity, it is a remarkable example of how similar psychological conditions can produce almost identical rites.

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  • Skeat takes the ultimate root to be kar, to move, especially in a circular motion, seen in "curve," "circle," &c. The word "worm" is applied to many objects resembling the animals in having a spiral shape or motion, as the spiral thread of a screw, or the spiral pipe through which vapour is passed in distillation.

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  • Frosch; Skeat suggests a possible original source in the root meaning "to jump," "to spring," cf.

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  • To the second hypothesis Skeat (Dictionary, p. 433) objects that it "will not account for the suffix -in, and is therefore wrong; besides which the ` Dutchmen ' [who were asserted to be the authors of the name] turn out to be Sir Francis Drake" and his men.

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  • Skeat's inquiry (loc. cit.), whether the name may not after all be South American, is to be answered in the negative, since, so far as evidence goes, it was given to the North-American bird before the South-American was known in Europe.

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  • Late in 2004, founding guitarist Andy Powell, bassist Bob Skeat and drummer Ray Weston were joined by Finnish guitar slinger Muddy Manninen.

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