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singular

singular

singular Sentence Examples

  • His position was one of singular difficulty.

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  • His position was one of singular difficulty.

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  • The word was a singular impression of anguish and surprise.

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  • At common law, while a lease was binding on the grantor and his heirs, it was not good against " singular successors," i.e.

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  • The kloof between the mountain and Lion's Head is of singular beauty.

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  • From the testimony of his pupil, and the still more conclusive evidence of his own correspondence with the father, Pavilliard seems to have been a man of singular good sense, temper and tact.

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  • From the testimony of his pupil, and the still more conclusive evidence of his own correspondence with the father, Pavilliard seems to have been a man of singular good sense, temper and tact.

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  • She was a courtesan of the superior class, somewhat older than Propertius, but, as it seems, a woman of singular beauty and varied accomplishments.

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  • Far more singular was the celebration at Beauvais, which was held on the 14th of January, and represented the flight into Egypt.

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  • The importance of this singular but superficial departure from the normal structure has been so needlessly exaggerated as a character that at the present time its value is apt to be unduly depreciated.

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  • Miss Keller is distinctly not a singular proof of occult and mysterious theories, and any attempt to explain her in that way fails to reckon with her normality.

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  • Several minutes were consumed in silent admiration before they noticed two very singular and unusual facts about this valley.

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  • It is a singular fact in the geography of Central Italy that the valleys of the Tiber and Arno are in some measure connected by that of the Chiana, a level and marshy tract, the waters from which flow partly into the Arno and partly into the Tiber.

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  • Another field experiment of singular interest is that relating to the mixed herbage of permanent meadow, for which seven acres of old grass land were set apart in Rothamsted Park in 1856.

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  • Ricardo's statement of the theory left upon the world an impression, not wholly just, of singular clearness.

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  • Ricardo's statement of the theory left upon the world an impression, not wholly just, of singular clearness.

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  • Amongst Ternstroemiaceae, the singular Marcgravieae are endemic. So also are the Vochysiaceae allied to the milkworts.

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  • The second and even more singular fact was the absence of any inhabitant of this splendid place.

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  • "Carmen," he groaned in a singular expression of comprehension and grief.

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  • TAPACULO, the name 1 given in Chile to a bird of singular appearance - the Pteroptochus albicollis of ornithology, and applied in an extended sense to its allied forms, which constitute a small family, Pteroptochidae, belonging to the Clainatores division of Passeres, peculiar to South America.

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  • A singular rock of conglomerate, 2 m.

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  • A singular rock of conglomerate, 2 m.

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  • But the particular way in which oligarchy was finally established at Venice had some singular results.

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  • He became by a singular arrangement, only repeated in the case of Lord Ellenborough, a member of the cabinet, and remained in that position through various changes of administration for nearly fifteen years, and, although he persistently refused the chancellorship, he acted as Speaker of the House of Lords while the Great Seal was in commission.

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  • Still no explanation of this singular fact was forthcoming, and it was reserved for the young chemist from FrancheComte to solve a problem which had baffled the greatest chemists and physicists of the time.

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  • The political trials over which he presided, although they gave rise to numerous accusations against him, were conducted with singular fairness and propriety.

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  • The political trials over which he presided, although they gave rise to numerous accusations against him, were conducted with singular fairness and propriety.

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  • A peculiar form of baboon, Cynopithecus, and the singular ruminant, Anoa, found in Celebes, seem to have no relation to Asiatic animals, and rather to be allied to those in Africa.

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  • 8, whereas in the previous verse the singular form adoni is applied to the prophet Elijah).

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  • Giuseppe Ferraris Rivoluzioni d haIfa (1858) deserves notice as a work of singular vigour, though no great scientific importance, and Cesare Balbos Sommario (Florence, 1856) presents the main outlines of the subject with brevity and clearness.

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  • There is a Cid of history and a Cid of romance, differing very materially in character, but each filling a large space in the annals of his country, and exerting a singular influence in the development of the national genius.

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  • It was a singular experience that long acquaintance which I cultivated with beans, what with planting, and hoeing, and harvesting, and threshing, and picking over and selling them--the last was the hardest of all--I might add eating, for I did taste.

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  • Its form (singular feminine) has been supposed to be the adoption or imitation of the Arabic employment of a fem.

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  • Every Italian artist and man of letters in an age of singular intellectual brilliancy tasted or hoped to taste of his bounty.

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  • I have found it a singular luxury to talk across the pond to a companion on the opposite side.

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  • The widely-spread plovers, Charadriidae, have two not less singular generic developments, Thinornis, and the extraordinary wrybill, Anarhynchus.

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  • It is said that in his earliest boyhood Andrea was, like Giotto, put to shepherding or cattle-herding; this is not likely, and can at any rate have lasted only a very short while, as his natural genius for art developed with singular precocity, and excited the attention of Francesco Squarcione, who entered him in the gild of painters before he had completed his eleventh year.

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  • Consalvi's rule, in times of singular difficulty and unrest, was characterized by wisdom and moderation.

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  • Instead of the white lily, which requires mud, or the common sweet flag, the blue flag (Iris versicolor) grows thinly in the pure water, rising from the stony bottom all around the shore, where it is visited by hummingbirds in June; and the color both of its bluish blades and its flowers and especially their reflections, is in singular harmony with the glaucous water.

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  • Of this singular contract, which is signed, "Robert Logane of Restalrige" and "Jhone Neper, Fear of Merchiston," and is dated July 1594, a facsimile is given in Mark Napier's Memoirs.

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  • As the deed was not destroyed, but is in existence now, it is to be presumed that the terms of it were, riot fulfilled; but the fact that such a contract should have been drawn up by Napier himself affords a singular illustration of the state of society and the kind of events in the midst of which logarithms had their birth.

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  • The constitution of the commonwealth had slowly matured itself through a series of revolutions, which confirmed and defined a type of singular stability.

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  • Or what if I were to allow--would it not be a singular allowance?--that our furniture should be more complex than the Arab's, in proportion as we are morally and intellectually his superiors!

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  • Their Venetian masters at least secured to the islanders external tranquillity, and it is singular that the Turks were content to leave them in undisturbed possession of this opulent and important island for nearly two centuries after the fall of Constantinople.

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  • 1, the Septuagint shows that the singular form " terebinth " stood in the original text.

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  • Its signification was authoritatively defined by the Council of Trent in the following words: "If any one shall say that, in the Holy Sacrament of the Eucharist there remains, together with the Body and Blood of Our Lord Jesus Christ, the substance of the Bread and Wine, and shall deny that wonderful and singular conversion of the whole substance of the Bread into (His) Body and of the Wine into (His) Blood, the species only of the Bread and Wine remaining - which conversion the Catholic Church most fittingly calls Transubstantiation - let him be anathema."

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  • It is singular that such closely allied species as the domestic dog and the Arctic fox are among the favourite prey of wolves, and, as is well known, children and even full-grown people are not infrequently the objects of their attack when pressed by hunger.

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  • To Heribert is attributed the invention of the Carroccio, which played so singular and important a part in the warfare of Italian cities.

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  • Theological writers were not in the least prepared to question the worth of the marvellous descriptions of creatures that were current in the schools on the faith of authorities vaguely known as "the history of animals," "the naturalists," and "the naturalist" in the singular number (Ouo-coMyos).

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  • Its colours are beautiful, pink and red with a silvery gloss; but the male as it grows old takes on a singular deformity of the head, with a swelling in the shape of a monstrous human-like nose.

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  • i.) are unhappily mutilated; but they should be consulted, for they are all more or less unique, and that on "Robin Hoode his death" is of singular interest.

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  • By a singular contrast, the neighbouring thoroughfare of Hatton Garden, leading north from Holborn Circus, is a centre of the diamond trade.

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  • The singular shrubby Amaryllids, Vellozieae, are common to tropical and South Africa, Madagascar and Brazil.

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  • Almost simultaneously with this he expounded more particularly before the Zoological Society, in whose Proceedings (1868, pp. 2 94-3 1 9) his results were soon after published, the groups of which he believed the Alectoromorphae to be composed and the relations to them of some outlying forms usually regarded as Gallinaceous, the Turnicidae and Pteroclidae, as well as the singular hoactzin, for all three of which he had to institute new groups - the last forming the sole representative of his Heteromorphae.

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  • Their own Reform Bill came soon after and it is again characteristic of Mill - at once of his enthusiasm and of his steady determination to do work that nobody else seemed able or willing to do - that we find him in the heat of the struggle in 1831 writing: to the Examiner a series of letters on "The Spirit of the Age" which drew from Carlyle the singular exclamation "Here is a new mystic!"

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  • The effect of these extraordinary changes, then, was the carrying out of Napoleonic satrapies in the north and centre of Italy in a way utterly inconsistent with the treaty of Luneville; and the weakness with which the courts of London and Vienna looked on at these singular events confirmed Bonaparte in the belief that he could do what he would with neighbouring states.

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  • Another singular fact is that they often seemed to be totally unaware of the tendency if not the meaning of some of their own expressions: thus Macleay could write, and doubtless in perfect good faith (Trans.

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  • Their own Reform Bill came soon after and it is again characteristic of Mill - at once of his enthusiasm and of his steady determination to do work that nobody else seemed able or willing to do - that we find him in the heat of the struggle in 1831 writing: to the Examiner a series of letters on "The Spirit of the Age" which drew from Carlyle the singular exclamation "Here is a new mystic!"

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  • The effect of these extraordinary changes, then, was the carrying out of Napoleonic satrapies in the north and centre of Italy in a way utterly inconsistent with the treaty of Luneville; and the weakness with which the courts of London and Vienna looked on at these singular events confirmed Bonaparte in the belief that he could do what he would with neighbouring states.

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  • It is singular that only the first three of them belong to the order Passeriformes, a proportion which is not maintained in any other tropical region.

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  • The early form of the word in English was "sherris" (abbreviated from "sherris-wine" or "sherris-sack"), which was taken to be a plural, and "sherry" was formed as a singular by mistake.

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  • Though small in number, the Society occupies a position of singular interest.

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  • But among the Jews two other forms of the idea expressed themselves in usages which have been perpetuated in Christianity, and one of which has had a singular importance for the Christian world.

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  • In his eighteenth year, while still a student in Edinburgh, he contributed two valuable papers to the Transactions of the same society - one of which, " On the Equilibrium of Elastic Solids," is remarkable, not only on account of its intrinsic power and the youth of its author, but also because in it he laid the foundation of one of the most singular discoveries of his later life, the temporary double refraction produced in viscous liquids by shearing stress.

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  • (For the family see Vorontsov.) She received an exceptionally good education, having displayed from a very early age the masculine ability and masculine tastes which made her whole career so singular.

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  • The story of the Bahamas is a singular one, and bears principally upon the fortunes of New Providence, which, from the fact that it alone possesses a perfectly safe harbour for vessels drawing more than 9 ft., has always been the seat of: government when it was not the headquarters of lawlessness.

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  • The men, however, refused to march without seeing their sultan, and the singular expedient was resorted to of propping up the dead monarch's body in a dark room and concealing behind it an attendant who raised the hands and moved the head of the corpse as the troops marched past.

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  • A singular series of negotiations, however, secured from the king of Sweden a promise of the ambassadorship for twelve years and a pension in case of its withdrawal, and the marriage took place on the 14th of January 1786.

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  • She was in Paris when the news of Napoleon's landing arrived and at once fled to Coppet, but a singular story, much discussed, is current of her having approved Napoleon's return.

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  • Mme de Stael occupies a singular position in French literature.

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  • The only point of practical interest requiring mention here is the very singular fact attested by all peach-growers, that, while certain peaches are liable to the attacks of mildew, others are not.

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  • The meaning of this singular contrast between the two animals may be that we have here an instance of an interesting gradation in evolution.

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  • One of the most singular facts concerning the geographical distribution of Enteropneusta has recently been brought to light by Benham, who found a species of Balanoglossus, sensu stricto, on the coast of New Zealand hardly distinguishable from one occurring off Japan.

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  • The merit and glory of that singular affair belong to Elizabeth alone.

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  • In coloration it bears some resemblance to a chaffinch, but its much larger size and enormous beak make it easily recognizable, while on closer inspection the singular bull-hook form of some of its wing-feathers will be found to be very remarkable.

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  • It is singular enough that Glanvill who had not only shown, but even exaggerated, the infirmity of human reason, himself provided an example of its weakness; for, after having combated scientific dogmatism, he not only yielded to vulgar superstitions, but actually endeavoured to accredit them both in his revised edition of the Vanity of Dogmatizing, published as Scepsis scientifica (1665, ed.

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  • But it was in the application to mechanical questions of the instrument which he thus helped to form that his singular merit lay.

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  • Of works in English there is a singular dearth.

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  • The singular adaptability of the Portuguese language to poetical expression, coupled with the imaginative temperament of the people, has led to an unusual production and appreciation of poetry.

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  • He has, indeed, a system, but it is a singular medley of doctrines borrowed, not only from Saint-Simonian, but from Pythagorean and Buddhistic sources.

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  • Hetherington, and which he justified on the singular ground that "the vast bulk of the population believe that morality depends entirely on revelation; and if a doubt could be raised among them that the ten commandments were given by God from Mount Sinai, men would think they were at liberty to steal, and women would consider themselves absolved from the restraints of chastity."

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  • Taken strictly his words state the position of extreme Nominalism; but even if we were not forbidden to do so by other passages, in which the doctrine of moderate Realism is adopted (under cover of the current distinction between the singular as felt and the pure universal as understood), it would still be unfair to press any passage in the writings of this period.

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  • His publications show him to have been a man of original and active mind with a singular facility in applying mathematics to practical questions.

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  • Tisza, a statesman of singular probity and tenacity, seemed to be the one person capable of carrying out the programme of the king and the majority.

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  • Other characteristic features are the use of the singular substantive after numerals, and adjectives of quantity, e.g.

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  • The lyric poems of Kolcsey can hardly be surpassed, whilst his orations, and markedly the Emlek beszed Kazinczy felett (Commemorative Speech on Kazinczy), exhibit not only his own powers, but the singular excellence of the Magyar language as an oratorical medium.

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  • Fay's singular powers in this direction were well shown by his Jdvor orvos es Bakator Ambrus szolgdja (Doctor Javor and his servant Ambrose Bakator), brought out at Pest in 1855.

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  • The long-sought cause of the "great inequality" of Jupiter and Saturn was found in the near approach to commensurability of their mean motions; it was demonstrated in two elegant theorems, independently of any except the most general considerations as to mass, that the mutual action of the planets could never largely affect the eccentricities and inclinations of their orbits; and the singular peculiarities detected by him in the Jovian system were expressed in the so-called "laws of Laplace."

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  • The evidence of Peter Ramus (1515-1572) on this point is interesting, but he gives no authority for his singular statements.

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  • A like deviation from the ordinary character is found in the allied genus Chiromachaeris, comprehending seven species, and Sclater is of the opinion that it enables them to make the singular noise for which they have long been noted, described by O.

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  • It is not surprising when these characteristics of Lamartine's work are appreciated to find that his fame declined with singular rapidity in France.

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  • The second great quality is the singular artistic skill and balance with which the Hippocratic physician used such materials and tools as he possessed.

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  • His results, nevertheless, were vitiated by being obtained in the interest of a theory, and by singular want of discrimination.

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  • It was in this same year that he received the singular diplomatic mission to Frederick which nobody seems to have taken seriously, and after his return the oscillation between Brussels, Cirey and Paris was resumed.

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  • state of terror and despair are certainly false; but it must be regarded as singular and unfortunate that he, who had more than once gone out of his way to conform ostentatiously and with his tongue in his cheek, should have neglected or missed this last opportunity.

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  • But there is immense wit, a wonderful command of such metre and language as the taste of the time allowed to the poet, occasionally a singular if somewhat artificial grace, and a curious felicity of diction and manner.

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  • But even in these books defects are present, which appear much more strongly in the singular olla podrida entitled Essai sur les me urs, in the Annales de l'empire and in the minor historical works.

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  • erlos (men), the singular of which (erilaz) frequently occurs in the earliest Northern inscriptions, apparently as a title of honour.

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  • Of singular interest also is his De exordiis et incrementis rerum ecclesiasticarum, written between 840 and 842 and dedicated to Regenbert the librarian.

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  • They offered a singular attraction to the Romans, and their presence in remote parts of the Mi nera country no doubt was often the principal cause of Roman S pr i ngs.

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  • The dried dung of the llama (taquia) is generally used as fuel, as in pre-Spanish times, for roasting ores, as also a species of grass called ichu (Stipa incana), and a singular woody fungus, called yareta (Azorella umbellifera), found growing on the rocks at elevations exceeding 12,000 ft.

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  • From the sea, and especially from the magnificent harbour which faces the capital, the general aspect of Hong-Kong is one of singular beauty.

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  • His gaunt features were beautified by an expression of singular force and benevolence.

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  • The most singular of the external appendages found in the Polyzoa are the avicularia and vibracula of the Cheilostomata.

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  • This book would have been astonishing as the production of a youth of twenty-one, even if, since the death of Byron six years before, there had not been a singular dearth of good poetry in England.

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  • It is a singular conception, and the results obtained depend largely on chance.

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  • What then happened was very natural: imitations of the old wares were produced, and having been sufficiently disfigured by staining and other processes calculated to lend an air of rust and age, they were sold to ignorant persons, who labored under the singular yet common hallucination that the points to be looked for in specimens from early kilns were, not technical excellence, decorative tastefulness and richness of color, but dinginess, imperfections and dirt; persons who imagined, in short, that defects which they would condemn at once in new porcelains ought to be regarded as merits in old.

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  • The summit of Slieve Gullion is crowned by a large cairn, which forms the roof of a singular cavern of artificial construction, probably an early burial-place.

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  • His Menippeae Saturae, miscellanies in prose and verse, of which unfortunately only fragments are left, was a work of singular literary interest.

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  • On the eastern side the parallel valley of `Asal el-Ward deserves special mention; the descent towards the plain eastwards, as seen for example at Ma'lula, is singular - first a spacious amphitheatre and then two deep very narrow gorges.

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  • This singular phenomenon is supposed to owe its appearance to an accumulation of gas, formed by the decay of vegetable matter, detaching and raising to the surface the matted weeds which cover the floor of the lake at this point.

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  • It is singular that Joab is not blamed for killing Absalom, but it would indeed be strange if the man who helped to reconcile father and son (2 Sam.

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  • Here as elsewhere he had but one rule to guide him in matters of doctrine and discipline - the practice of Rome and the West; for it is singular to see how Jerome, who is daringly original in points of scholarly criticism, was a ruthless partisan in all other matters; and, having discovered what was the Western practice, he set tongue and pen to work with his usual bitterness (Altercatio luciferiani et orthodoxi).

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  • Controversy centres round a very long and singular undated epistle called "The Glasgow Letter" or "Letter II."

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  • But he acted with singular legerete with regard at all events to his assurances to Great Britain respecting the leases of Port Arthur and Talienwan from China; he told the British ambassador that these would be "open ports," and afterwards essentially modified thin pledge.

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  • The word even occurred as a singular in the metrical romance of Octavian:" Ferst they sent out a doseper."

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  • The church of St James - also called Schottenkirche - a plain Romanesque basilica of the 12th century, derives its name from the monastery of Irish Benedictines ("Scoti") to which it was attached; the principal doorway is covered with very singular grotesque carvings.

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  • Alexander was also an idealist, but his ideals were apt to centre in himself; his dislike and distrust of talents that overshadowed his own were disarmed for a while by the singular charm of Speranski's personality, but sooner or later he was bound to discover that he himself was regarded as but the most potent instrument for the attainment of that ideal end, a regenerated Russia, which was his minister's sole preoccupation.

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  • In constituting the text, he imposed upon himself the singular restriction of not inserting any various reading which had not already been printed in some preceding edition of the Greek text.

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  • In many respects this species, the Tringa pugnax of Linnaeus and the Machetes pugnax of modern ornithologists, is one of the most singular in existence.

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  • Th e clergy of the Y g) gY province of Canterbury were fined £100,000 and coin pelled to declare the king " their singular protector and only supreme lord, and, as far as that is permitted by the law of Christ, the supreme head of the Church and of the clergy."

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  • The recent recovery of the Latin version is of singular interest, as showing that, even without the distinctively Christian additions and interpolations which our full form of the Teaching presents, it was circulating under the title Doctrina apostolorum?

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  • It consists of precepts relating to church life, which are couched in the second person plural; whereas The Two Ways uses throughout the second person singular.

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  • The word itself (in the singular) came to be used in the general sense of "home."

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  • It is certain that originally each household had only one Lar; the plural was at first only used to include other classes of Lares, and only gradually, after the time of Cicero, ousted the singular.

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  • The singular fact of the existence of animals so closely allied as the Malayan and the American tapirs in such distant regions of the earth and in no intervening places is accounted for by the geological history of the race, for the tapirs once had a very wide distribution.

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  • He had a singular faculty for reading the minds and the motives of men, and to this insight he perhaps owed the power of adaptability (called by his opponents shiftiness) which characterized his whole career.

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  • Sometimes, though not very often, the sections are in no proper sense essays, but merely commonplace book entries of singular facts or quotations, with hardly any comment.

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  • The tour contains much minute information about roads, food, travelling, &c., but the singular condition in which it exists and the disappearance of the MS. make it rather difficult to use it as a document.

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  • - The materials for the investigation of this singular phase of prehistoric life were first collected and systematized by Dr Ferdinand Keller (1800-1881), of Zurich, and printed in Mittheilungen der Antiquarischen Gesellschaft in Zurich, vols.

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  • Certainly the priestly writer who produced the latter could not have said that God modelled the first man out of moistened clay, or have adopted the singular account of the formation of Eve in ii.

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  • The singular Colossus bridge, built in 1812 over the Schuylkill, a kind of flat arched truss, had a span of 340 ft.

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  • But it was in Austria that this singular procedure was first brought to technical perfection; and it became an Austrian speciality.

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  • On the proposal of had helped her in the management of her most private affairs and had acted as an intermediary between her and her ministers with singular ability and success.

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  • On his return to London he published an Enquiry into the Nature, Cause, and Cure of a Singular Disease of the Eyes, with a dedication to the Royal Society.

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  • The end of his life was marked by singular hypochondriacal fancies.

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  • Geneva is well supplied with charitable institutions, hospitals, &c. Among other remarkable sights of the city may be mentioned the great hydraulic establishment (built 1882-1899) of the Forces Motrices du Rhone (turbines), the singular monument set up to the memory of the late duke of Brunswick who left his fortune to the city in 1873, and the tie Jean-Jacques Rousseau now connected with the Pont des Bergues.

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  • An excellent description of this singular island is to be found in E.

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  • Certainly it was not the " priest " who did so, for he in this narrative is always in the singular.

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  • pp. 522-524, 3rd ed., 1867) to be the singular fruit called by the Arabs 'Other, produced by the Asclepias gigantea or procera of botanists.

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  • reflecting telescope, mounted first at Canonbury, later at Cranford, Middlesex, and with its aid executed many drawings of the celestial bodies of singular beauty and fidelity..

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  • The Talmud has also the singular form - Nathin.

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  • When used by St Benedict in the singular number it seems (according to the commentator Menard) to denote the abbot himself.

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  • After some fruitless attempts Turkey ceased to send pashas to Algiers - where they were not allowed even to land - and thus recognized the de facto independence of this singular republic. The authority of the deys, moreover, was scarcely more solid than that of the pashas.

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  • - These singular crustaceans have long soft flexible bodies, the eyes stalked and movable, the first antennae small and filiform, the second lamellar in the female, in the male prehensile; this last character gives rise to some very fanciful developments.

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  • Latin, is treated as a singular noun, is in its original Greek form a plural, Ta /3t(Xia, the (sacred) books - correctly expressing the fact that the sacred writings of Christendom (collectively described by this title) are made up of a number of independent.

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  • 13, where the singular use of the restrictive particle ak (EV " verily ") supported the teaching that other Sabbaths need not be observed.

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  • He is notable for having constructed the underground halls at Welbeck Abbey, and for his retiring habits of life, which gave occasion for some singular stories.'

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  • in length; the body is depressed,, covered above with minute granules and tubercles; a distinct fold of skin extends from the axilla to the groin, reminding of the similar fold of some Anguidae, to which this singular genus seems to be allied.

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  • Eleven weights from Syria and Cnidus (44) (of the curious type with two breasts on a rectangular block) show a mina of 6250 (125.0); and it is singular that this class is exactly like weights of the 224 system found with it, but yet quite distinct in standard.

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  • It has been discovered that at the beginning of the Eocene the lake of Rilly occupied a vast area east of the present site of Paris; a water-course fell there in cascades, and Munier-Chalinas has reconstructed all the details of that singular locality; plants which loved moist places, such as Marchantia, Asplenium, the covered banks overshadowed by lindens, laurels, magnolias and palms; there also were found the vine and the ivy; mosses (Fontinalis) and Chara sheltered the crayfish (Astacus); insects and even flowers have left their delicate impressions in the travertine which formed the borders of this lake.

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  • It is singular that the second law is still ignored by many zoologists.

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  • The separation of the Pipils from the chief tribes of the Nahuatl branch happened centuries before the conquest, and they developed a singular and characteristic civilization, which can be seen in the wonderful stone-reliefs and sculptures of Sta Lucia de Cozumalhuapa on the Pacific coast of Guatemala.

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  • - It is singular that while France, Spain, Italy, Bohemia and Holland possessed the Bible in the vernacular before the accession of Henry VIII., and in Germany the Scriptures were printed in 1466 and seventeen times reprinted before Luther began his great work, yet no English printer attempted to put the familiar English Bible into type.

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  • He was put out of all need of money by the singular benefaction of Cotta, the well-known Stuttgart publisher, who was part-proprietor of the Constitutionnel, and made over to Thiers his dividends, or part of them.

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  • The strongly marked characteristics which determined Isaac D'Israeli's career were displayed to a singular degree even in his boyhood.

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  • It is with respect to this number of segments that respectively constitute the pygidium and the midregion of the body that Trilobites differ most markedly from each other; and it is a singular fact that the extremes in structural organization in this particular to be met with in the Trilobita are found side by side in strata of Cambrian age.

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  • Officially the name is The United States of America, but The United States (used as a singular and not a plural) has become accepted as the name of the country; and pre-eminent usage has now made its citizens Americans, in distinctiofi from the other inhabitants of North and South America.

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  • From 1832 to 1835 he sat in the Hungarian Diet, where his extreme liberal views and his singular eloquence soon rendered him famous as a parliamentary leader.

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  • In A Copper Cylinder (1888), Describes A Singular Race Whose Cardinal Doctrine Is That Poverty Is Honourable And Wealth The Reverse.

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  • agree in singular though trivial mistakes, if they omit, apparently without motive, words and passages which other MSS.

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  • The work of criticism has brought to light important examples of fluctuating tradition, singular lacunae in some places and unusual wealth of tradition in others, and has demonstrated that much of that which had long been felt to be impossible and incredible was due to writers of the post-exilic age many centuries after the presumed date of the events.

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  • With singular fatuity Charles had taken no precautions in view of a violent outbreak.

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  • The result of V6 r ellesley's singular personal ascendancy among the Mahrattas came into full view when the Mahratta War broke out.

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  • The most singular feature in connexion with the history of silk is the persistent efforts which have been made by monarchs and other potentates to stimulate sericulture within their dominions, efforts which continue to this day in British colonies, India and America.

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  • It was, as Carlyle wrote to the author, "a sermon in stones," "a singular sign of the times," "a new Renaissance."

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  • Although reared as an ordinary farm lad, he proved to be a man of singular devotion and spiritual genius.

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  • By this desertion his self-esteem, one of his strongest passions, though curiously united with singular sincerity and humility, was doubtless hurt to the quick; but the wound inflicted was of a deeper and deadlier kind, for it confirmed him finally in his despair of the world's gradual amelioration, and established his tendency towards supernaturalism.

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  • From the sense of that which stands between two things, "mean," or the plural "means," often with a singular construction, takes the further significance of agency, instrument, &c., of which that produces some result, hence resources capable of producing a result, particularly the pecuniary or other resources by which a person is enabled to live, and so used either of employment or of property, wealth, &c. There are many adverbial phrases, such as "by all means," "by no means," &c., which are extensions of "means" in the sense of agency.

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  • From 1882 till 1887 his prime minister was Walter Murray Gibson (1823-1888), a singular and romantic genius, a visionary adventurer and a shrewd politician, who had been imprisoned by the Dutch government in Batavia in 1852 on a charge of inciting insurrection in Sumatra, and had arrived at Honolulu in 1861 with the intention of leading a Mormon colony to the East Indies.

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  • Struthious birds, was placed beyond cavil, and the author called upon all interested in zoology to aid in further research as to this singular form.

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  • These sudden appearances of vast bodies of lemmings, and their singular habit of persistently pursuing the same onward course of migration, have given rise to various speculations, from the ancient belief of the Norwegian peasants, shared by Olaus Magnus, that they fall down from the clouds, to the hypothesis that they are acting in obedience to an instinct inherited from ancient times, and still seeking the congenial home in the submerged Atlantis, to which their ancestors of the Miocene period were wont to resort when driven from their ordinary dwelling-places by crowding or scarcity of food.

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  • The existence of this singular form was first made known in 1843 by Ernst Dieffenbach (Travels in N.

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  • The Souvenirs is a narrative of a remarkable feat of travel, and contains passages of so singular a character as in the absence of corroborative testimony to stir up a feeling of incredulity.

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  • Their most singular feature, perhaps, was their reverence for the sun.

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  • Dread of the Normans, too, explains the singular attitude of the Curia towards the Comneni, of whom it was alternately the enemy and the protector or ally.

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  • That a sovereign like St Louis should be able to associate himself officially with the feudalism of his realm to repress abuses of church jurisdiction; that a contemporary of Philip the Fair, the lawyer Pierre Dubois, should dare to suggest the secularization of ecclesiastical property and the conversion of the clergy into a class of functionaries paid out of the royal treasury; and that Philip the Fair, the adversary of Boniface VIII., should be able to rely in his conflict with the leader of the Church on the popular consent obtained at a meeting of the Three Estates of France - all point to a singular demoralization of the sentiments and principles on which were based the whole power of the pontiff of Rome and the entire organization of medieval Catholicism.

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  • A large spinning-mill and coalpits lend a modern touch in singular contrast with the quaint, old-world aspect of the place.

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  • The scribes show no suspicion, however, of the name's being, anything but a singular.'

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  • The Phoenicians cannot be said to have invented any of the arts or industries, as the ancient world imagined; but what they did was something hardly less meritorious: they developed them with singular skill, and disseminated the knowledge and use of them.

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  • These plurals go back to the singular form 'El, the common Semitic name for God; but neither the singular nor the plural is at all common in the inscriptions (NSI.

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  • Dr Thomas Hill's work, The Contemplation of Hankynde, contayning a singular Discourse after the Art of Physiognomie, published in 1571, is a quaintly written adaptation from the Italian authors of the day.

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  • It was smaller than the temple of Zeus, and, while resembling it in general plan, differed from it by its singular length relatively to its breadth.

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  • Some cuckoos are singular for their habit of using the nests of smaller birds to lay their eggs in, so that the young may be reared by foster-parents; and it has been suggested that the object of the likeness exhibited to the hawk is to enable the cock cuckoo either to frighten the small birds away from their nests or to lure them in pursuit of him, while the hen bird quietly and without molestation disposes of her egg.

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  • Sometimes Lepidoptera mimic protected members of other orders of insects - such as Coleoptera, Hymenoptera and Hemiptera; but perhaps the most singular illustrations of the phenomenon known in the order are exemplified by the larvae of the hawk-moth Chaerocampa, which imitate the heads of snakes.

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  • From a very early stage in the development of chivalry, however, we meet with the singular institution of brotherhood in arms; and from it the ultimate origin if not of the religious fraternities at any rate of the military companionships is usually derived.

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  • But the most singular esculent lichen of all is the " manna lichen," which in times of drought and famine has served as food for large numbers of men and cattle in the arid steppes of various countries stretching from Algiers to Tartary.

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  • of Portugal, disembarked at Goa on the 6th of May 1542, and before his death on the Isle of St John (Hiang-Shang), on the 2nd of December 155 roused the European Christians of Goa to a new life, laboured with singular success amongst the Paravars, a fisher caste near Cape Comorin, gathered many converts in the kingdom of Travancore, visited Malacca, and founded a mission in Japan.

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  • The isolation of the Teutonic churches from the vast system with which they had been bound up, the conflicts and troubles among themselves, the necessity of fixing their own principles and defining their own rights, concentrated their attention upon themselves and their own home work, to the neglect of work abroad.8 Still the development of the maritime power of England, which the Portuguese and Spanish monarchies noted with fear and jealousy, was distinguished by a singular anxiety for the spread of the Christian faith.

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  • In this the feathers of the top of the head are very singular, looking like glossy curled shavings of black horn or whalebone, the effect being due to the dilatation of the shaft and its coalescence with the consolidated barbs.

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  • Another very singular form is A, laminirostris, which has affixed on either side of the maxilla, near the base, a quadrangular ivory-like plate, forming a feature unique in this or almost in any family of birds.

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  • The most singular, and probably the loftiest, lake in the Alps is the ever-frozen tarn that forms the summit of the Roccia Viva (11,976 ft.) in the Eastern Graians.

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  • It is a singular circumstance that reciprocal crosses are not always or even often possible; thus, one rhododendron may afford pollen perfectly potent on the stigma of another kind, by the pollen of which latter its own stigma is unaffected.

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  • But William II., though little more than a boy, was endowed with singular capacity and great strength of will, and he was intent upon ambitious projects, the scope of which has been already indicated.

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  • One of the most singular of furbearing animals, being the link between bird and beast.

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  • The scenery of both made a great impression on his mind, and was afterwards described with singular vividness in his writings.

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  • It is singular that, while we possess a detailed description of this famous eruption in two letters of the younger Pliny (Epist.

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  • We must not, however, hastily assume that the examples thus preserved to us by a singular accident are to be taken as representing the style of building in all the Roman and Italian towns.

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  • His pastimes in the latest years were as singular as his labours.

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  • Further, from the 23rd of November 1654 dates the singular document usually known as "Pascal's amulet," a parchment slip which he wore constantly about him, and which bears the date followed by some lines of incoherent and strongly mystical devotion.

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  • The vividness and distinction of Pascal's phrase, his singular faculty of inserting without any loss of dignity in the gravest and most impassioned meditation what may be almost called quips of thought and diction, the intense earnestness of meaning weighting but not confusing the style, all appear here.

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  • and in the use of singular verbs after the words Congress and the United States, where formerly they were followed by plural verbs.

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  • On the 12th of April 1465 Philip handed over to his son the entire administration of his 1 This was the singular vow known as "the vow of the pheasant," from the fact that Philip placed his hand solemnly on a pheasant, which had been brought to him by his herald, and vowed that he would fight the Turks and challenge their sultan to single combat.

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  • The relation between him and his old preceptor was of a very singular kind.

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  • In a letter written with singular energy and dignity of thought and language, he repelled the tardy advances of his patron.

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  • These difficulties were, in the main, the outcome of the peculiar constitution of the empire, of the singular compromise which it represented between ~ the traditional medieval polity and the organization of a modern state, and of the conflicts of ideals and of interests to which this gave rise; these being complicated by the masterful personality of the emperor William, and his tendency to confuse his position as German emperor by the will of the princes with his position as king of Prussia by the grace of God.

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  • From this time Godwin became a notable figure in London society, and there was scarcely an important person in politics, on the Liberal side, in literature, art or science, who does not appear familiarly in the pages of Godwin's singular diary.

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  • The decemvirs ruled with singular moderation, and submitted to the Comitia Centuriata a code of laws in ten headings, which was passed.

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  • or pl.), the speaker throughout is God, either in the first person singular or more commonly the plural of majesty " we."

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  • The singular suffixes are: (1) c.-L; (2) m.

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  • Three numbers: singular, dual (m.

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  • This MVJIk prince had the singular fortune of reigning three times, ~N~Ir being twice dethroned: he was first installed on the 14th of December 1293, when he was nine years old, and the affairs of the kingdom were undertaken by a cabinet, consisting of a vizier (Alam al-din Sinjar), a viceroy (Kitboga), a war minister (IJusam al-dIn LjIn al-RmI), a prefect of the palace (Rokneddin Bibars Jashengir) and a secretary of state (Rokneddin Bibars Man~rI).

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  • All accounts agree in describing him in later life as a man of handsome presence, with a venerable white beard, piercing black eyes and a benevolent cast of countenance, the effect of which was heightened in conversation by a voice of singular sweetness.

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  • For administrative purposes the country is divided into eighteen counties (Amter, singular Amt), as follows.

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  • The poet Aarestrup (in 1848) declared that Blicher had raised the Danish language to the dignity of Icelandic. Blicher is a stern realist, in many points akin to Crabbe, and takes a singular position among the romantic idealists of the period, being like them, however, in the love of precise and choice language, and hatred of the mere commonplaces of imaginative writing.

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  • He seems to have been a child of singular attractiveness and promise, and stories of his boyhood were remembered.

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  • It is singular that in the last-named species two nuclei occur regularly in the spermatium.

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  • Some pieces of sculpture were found here, among them fragments of the Parthenon and a singular relief of Asclepius with a kneeling woman suppliant.

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  • Lady Ashburton, a woman of singular social charm and great ability, appreciated the author, but apparently accepted the company of the author's wife rather as a necessity than as an additional charm.

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  • The descriptions of the campaigns are admirably vivid, and show his singular eye for scenery.

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  • His unstinted generosity to his brothers during his worst times is only one proof of the singular strength of his family affections.

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  • The eastern and western seaboards present a singular contrast.

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  • They rise into prominent pyramidal mountains, which, as the stratification is usually almost horizontal, present in their terraced sides a singular contrast to the neighbouring heights, composed of highly plicated crystalline schists.

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  • In addressing chiefs, or others to whom one wishes to be respectful, the singular number of the personal pronoun is rarely used; the dual is employed instead, - the dual of dignity or of respect.

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  • And yet it is singular that no mention of them occurs in Cicero or Livy, and that altogether literary allusions to them are very scarce.

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  • It has a singular Romanesque church of the 12th century.

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  • The marriage was a very unhappy one, the husband having no qualities that could appeal to a woman who, whatever the censorious might say of her moral character, was distinguished to the last by a lively intellect and a singular charm.

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  • Nevertheless he not only failed to accomplish the chief aim of his life, but Lecky trenchantly observes that "by a singular fatality the great advocate of repeal did more than any one else to make the Union a necessity.

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  • His own temper of mind was conservative and somewhat aristocratic, but he guided political development, often under circumstances of great difficulty, with singular fairness and conspicuous magnanimity.

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  • Religious differences broke up the land after the Reformation into two portions, each called Rhoden, a term that in the singular is said to mean a "clearing," and occurs in 1070, long before the final separation.

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  • As seen from the rock of Ghulgulah, Bamian, with its ruined towers, its colossi, its innumerable grottos, and with the singular red colour of its barren soil, presents an impressive aspect of desolation and mystery.

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  • "Grain," or more commonly in the plural "grains," construed as a singular, is the name of an instrument with two or more barbed prongs, used for spearing fish.

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  • In the first of these, which consists of one principal ridge with several lateral spurs, overlooking Port Louis, are the singular peak of the Pouce (2650 ft.), so called from its supposed resemblance to the human thumb; and the still loftier Pieter Botte (2685 ft.), a tall obelisk of bare rock, crowned with a globular mass of stone.

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  • It will be convenient to mention here a feature of Ciceronian prose on which singular light has been thrown by recent inquiry.

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  • It is therefore idle to reproach him with inconsistencies, though these are sometimes very singular.

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  • But perhaps the most singular scene is the council of three great ladies presided over by Servilia at Antium, which decides the movements of Brutus and Cassius in June 44 B.C., when Cassius " looking very fierce - you would say that he was breathing fire and sword " - blustered concerning what he considered an insult, viz.

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  • A strange mystification was practised by the last named, a scholar of singular brilliancy, who claimed to have a mutilated MS. which he called his Decurtatus, bought from a common soldier who had obtained it from a sacked monastery; also to have been furnished by a friend, Pierre de Crouzeil, a doctor of Limoges, with variants taken from an old MS. found at Noyon, and entered in the margin of a copy of the Lyons edition.

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  • The agreement is too close to be dismissed as a mere coincidence, and it is confirmed by a corresponding agreement of their radial motions determined by the spectroscope; and yet, seeing that a and Ursae Majoris are 19° apart, these two stars must be distant from each other at least one-third of the distance of each from the sun; thus the members of this singular group are separated by the ordinary stellar distances, and probably each has neighbours, not belonging to the system, which are closer to it than the other four stars of the group. Further, E.

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  • The singular fact requires to be noticed that in both these species the hind toe is generally deficient, but that examples of each are occasionally found in which this functionless member has not wholly disappeared.

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  • The consequence of this true metaphysics to logic is twofold: on the one hand, one singular or particular judgment, e.g.

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  • And one of Hamilton's earliest advances in the study of his system (an advance independently made, only a few months later, by Arthur Cayley) was the interpretation of the singular operator q()q1, where q is a quaternion.

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  • One law of the panchayat is singular in its difference from the custom of any other native community in Asia; nobody who has a wife living shall marry another, except under peculiar circumstances, such as the barrenness of the living wife, or her immoral conduct.

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  • Without Stevenson, Sterne would probably have been a more decorous parish priest, but he would probably never have written Tristram Shandy or left any other memorial of his singular genius.

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  • At first sight this singular structure appears so like a deformity that writers have not been wanting to account it such, 2 ignorant of its being a piece of mechanism most beautifully adapted to the habits of the bird, enabling it to extract with the greatest ease, from fir-cones or fleshy fruits, the seeds which form its usual and almost invariable food.

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  • Within the town the arcades (or Lauben) on either side of the main street, and the numerous elaborately ornamented fountains attract the eye, as well as the two remaining towers that formerly stood on the old walls but are now in the centre of the town; the Zeitglockenthurm (famous for its singular 16th- century clock, with its mechanical contrivances, set in motion when the hour strikes) and the Kdfichthurm.

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  • According to a common Indian belief a wealthy man who dies without an heir returns to guard his wealth in the form of a serpent, and Italian superstition supposed that to find a serpent's skin brought good luck (Leland) .2 No singular preference for jewels on the part of serpents will explain the belief, and creatures like the jackdaw which have this weakness do not enjoy this prominence in folk-lore.

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  • For example, when one considers how often milk is used in the tending and propitiation of venerated snakes, it is noteworthy that in Roman cult the truly rustic deities are offered milk (Fowler), and it is no less singular that many of the old goddesses of Greece have serpent attributes (Harrison).'

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  • In some languages the personal pronouns are singular, dual and plural.

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  • It is not till the 6th century of our era, in the reign of Justinian, that we find bubonic plague in Europe, a s a part of the great cycle of pestilence, accompanied by extraordinary natural phenomena, which lasted fifty years, and is described with a singular misunderstanding of medical terms by Gibbon in his forty-third chapter.

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  • The first case is the singular occurrence of three deaths at Vienna in October 1898.

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