Singular sentence example

singular
  • His position was one of singular difficulty.

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  • At common law, while a lease was binding on the grantor and his heirs, it was not good against " singular successors," i.e.

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  • The kloof between the mountain and Lion's Head is of singular beauty.

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  • The word was a singular impression of anguish and surprise.

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  • Ricardo's statement of the theory left upon the world an impression, not wholly just, of singular clearness.

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  • From the testimony of his pupil, and the still more conclusive evidence of his own correspondence with the father, Pavilliard seems to have been a man of singular good sense, temper and tact.

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  • It is a singular fact in the geography of Central Italy that the valleys of the Tiber and Arno are in some measure connected by that of the Chiana, a level and marshy tract, the waters from which flow partly into the Arno and partly into the Tiber.

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  • The second great quality is the singular artistic skill and balance with which the Hippocratic physician used such materials and tools as he possessed.

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  • By this desertion his self-esteem, one of his strongest passions, though curiously united with singular sincerity and humility, was doubtless hurt to the quick; but the wound inflicted was of a deeper and deadlier kind, for it confirmed him finally in his despair of the world's gradual amelioration, and established his tendency towards supernaturalism.

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  • The church of St James - also called Schottenkirche - a plain Romanesque basilica of the 12th century, derives its name from the monastery of Irish Benedictines ("Scoti") to which it was attached; the principal doorway is covered with very singular grotesque carvings.

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  • Alexander was also an idealist, but his ideals were apt to centre in himself; his dislike and distrust of talents that overshadowed his own were disarmed for a while by the singular charm of Speranski's personality, but sooner or later he was bound to discover that he himself was regarded as but the most potent instrument for the attainment of that ideal end, a regenerated Russia, which was his minister's sole preoccupation.

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  • In constituting the text, he imposed upon himself the singular restriction of not inserting any various reading which had not already been printed in some preceding edition of the Greek text.

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  • In many respects this species, the Tringa pugnax of Linnaeus and the Machetes pugnax of modern ornithologists, is one of the most singular in existence.

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  • The recent recovery of the Latin version is of singular interest, as showing that, even without the distinctively Christian additions and interpolations which our full form of the Teaching presents, it was circulating under the title Doctrina apostolorum?

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  • It consists of precepts relating to church life, which are couched in the second person plural; whereas The Two Ways uses throughout the second person singular.

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  • The word itself (in the singular) came to be used in the general sense of "home."

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  • It is certain that originally each household had only one Lar; the plural was at first only used to include other classes of Lares, and only gradually, after the time of Cicero, ousted the singular.

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  • The singular fact of the existence of animals so closely allied as the Malayan and the American tapirs in such distant regions of the earth and in no intervening places is accounted for by the geological history of the race, for the tapirs once had a very wide distribution.

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  • He had a singular faculty for reading the minds and the motives of men, and to this insight he perhaps owed the power of adaptability (called by his opponents shiftiness) which characterized his whole career.

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  • Sometimes, though not very often, the sections are in no proper sense essays, but merely commonplace book entries of singular facts or quotations, with hardly any comment.

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  • Certainly the priestly writer who produced the latter could not have said that God modelled the first man out of moistened clay, or have adopted the singular account of the formation of Eve in ii.

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  • The singular Colossus bridge, built in 1812 over the Schuylkill, a kind of flat arched truss, had a span of 340 ft.

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  • But it was in Austria that this singular procedure was first brought to technical perfection; and it became an Austrian speciality.

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  • On the proposal of had helped her in the management of her most private affairs and had acted as an intermediary between her and her ministers with singular ability and success.

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  • On his return to London he published an Enquiry into the Nature, Cause, and Cure of a Singular Disease of the Eyes, with a dedication to the Royal Society.

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  • The end of his life was marked by singular hypochondriacal fancies.

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  • Geneva is well supplied with charitable institutions, hospitals, &c. Among other remarkable sights of the city may be mentioned the great hydraulic establishment (built 1882-1899) of the Forces Motrices du Rhone (turbines), the singular monument set up to the memory of the late duke of Brunswick who left his fortune to the city in 1873, and the tie Jean-Jacques Rousseau now connected with the Pont des Bergues.

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  • Certainly it was not the " priest " who did so, for he in this narrative is always in the singular.

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  • It is singular that the second law is still ignored by many zoologists.

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  • The separation of the Pipils from the chief tribes of the Nahuatl branch happened centuries before the conquest, and they developed a singular and characteristic civilization, which can be seen in the wonderful stone-reliefs and sculptures of Sta Lucia de Cozumalhuapa on the Pacific coast of Guatemala.

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  • He was put out of all need of money by the singular benefaction of Cotta, the well-known Stuttgart publisher, who was part-proprietor of the Constitutionnel, and made over to Thiers his dividends, or part of them.

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  • The strongly marked characteristics which determined Isaac D'Israeli's career were displayed to a singular degree even in his boyhood.

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  • It is with respect to this number of segments that respectively constitute the pygidium and the midregion of the body that Trilobites differ most markedly from each other; and it is a singular fact that the extremes in structural organization in this particular to be met with in the Trilobita are found side by side in strata of Cambrian age.

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  • Officially the name is The United States of America, but The United States (used as a singular and not a plural) has become accepted as the name of the country; and pre-eminent usage has now made its citizens Americans, in distinctiofi from the other inhabitants of North and South America.

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  • From 1832 to 1835 he sat in the Hungarian Diet, where his extreme liberal views and his singular eloquence soon rendered him famous as a parliamentary leader.

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  • In A Copper Cylinder (1888), Describes A Singular Race Whose Cardinal Doctrine Is That Poverty Is Honourable And Wealth The Reverse.

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  • The work of criticism has brought to light important examples of fluctuating tradition, singular lacunae in some places and unusual wealth of tradition in others, and has demonstrated that much of that which had long been felt to be impossible and incredible was due to writers of the post-exilic age many centuries after the presumed date of the events.

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  • With singular fatuity Charles had taken no precautions in view of a violent outbreak.

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  • The result of V6 r ellesley's singular personal ascendancy among the Mahrattas came into full view when the Mahratta War broke out.

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  • The most singular feature in connexion with the history of silk is the persistent efforts which have been made by monarchs and other potentates to stimulate sericulture within their dominions, efforts which continue to this day in British colonies, India and America.

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  • It was, as Carlyle wrote to the author, "a sermon in stones," "a singular sign of the times," "a new Renaissance."

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  • Although reared as an ordinary farm lad, he proved to be a man of singular devotion and spiritual genius.

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  • Their most singular feature, perhaps, was their reverence for the sun.

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  • Dread of the Normans, too, explains the singular attitude of the Curia towards the Comneni, of whom it was alternately the enemy and the protector or ally.

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  • That a sovereign like St Louis should be able to associate himself officially with the feudalism of his realm to repress abuses of church jurisdiction; that a contemporary of Philip the Fair, the lawyer Pierre Dubois, should dare to suggest the secularization of ecclesiastical property and the conversion of the clergy into a class of functionaries paid out of the royal treasury; and that Philip the Fair, the adversary of Boniface VIII., should be able to rely in his conflict with the leader of the Church on the popular consent obtained at a meeting of the Three Estates of France - all point to a singular demoralization of the sentiments and principles on which were based the whole power of the pontiff of Rome and the entire organization of medieval Catholicism.

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  • A large spinning-mill and coalpits lend a modern touch in singular contrast with the quaint, old-world aspect of the place.

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  • The scribes show no suspicion, however, of the name's being, anything but a singular.'

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  • Dr Thomas Hill's work, The Contemplation of Hankynde, contayning a singular Discourse after the Art of Physiognomie, published in 1571, is a quaintly written adaptation from the Italian authors of the day.

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  • It was smaller than the temple of Zeus, and, while resembling it in general plan, differed from it by its singular length relatively to its breadth.

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  • Some cuckoos are singular for their habit of using the nests of smaller birds to lay their eggs in, so that the young may be reared by foster-parents; and it has been suggested that the object of the likeness exhibited to the hawk is to enable the cock cuckoo either to frighten the small birds away from their nests or to lure them in pursuit of him, while the hen bird quietly and without molestation disposes of her egg.

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  • Sometimes Lepidoptera mimic protected members of other orders of insects - such as Coleoptera, Hymenoptera and Hemiptera; but perhaps the most singular illustrations of the phenomenon known in the order are exemplified by the larvae of the hawk-moth Chaerocampa, which imitate the heads of snakes.

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  • From a very early stage in the development of chivalry, however, we meet with the singular institution of brotherhood in arms; and from it the ultimate origin if not of the religious fraternities at any rate of the military companionships is usually derived.

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  • But the most singular esculent lichen of all is the " manna lichen," which in times of drought and famine has served as food for large numbers of men and cattle in the arid steppes of various countries stretching from Algiers to Tartary.

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  • The isolation of the Teutonic churches from the vast system with which they had been bound up, the conflicts and troubles among themselves, the necessity of fixing their own principles and defining their own rights, concentrated their attention upon themselves and their own home work, to the neglect of work abroad.8 Still the development of the maritime power of England, which the Portuguese and Spanish monarchies noted with fear and jealousy, was distinguished by a singular anxiety for the spread of the Christian faith.

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  • In this the feathers of the top of the head are very singular, looking like glossy curled shavings of black horn or whalebone, the effect being due to the dilatation of the shaft and its coalescence with the consolidated barbs.

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  • Another very singular form is A, laminirostris, which has affixed on either side of the maxilla, near the base, a quadrangular ivory-like plate, forming a feature unique in this or almost in any family of birds.

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  • The most singular, and probably the loftiest, lake in the Alps is the ever-frozen tarn that forms the summit of the Roccia Viva (11,976 ft.) in the Eastern Graians.

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  • It is a singular circumstance that reciprocal crosses are not always or even often possible; thus, one rhododendron may afford pollen perfectly potent on the stigma of another kind, by the pollen of which latter its own stigma is unaffected.

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  • But William II., though little more than a boy, was endowed with singular capacity and great strength of will, and he was intent upon ambitious projects, the scope of which has been already indicated.

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  • One of the most singular of furbearing animals, being the link between bird and beast.

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  • The scenery of both made a great impression on his mind, and was afterwards described with singular vividness in his writings.

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  • We must not, however, hastily assume that the examples thus preserved to us by a singular accident are to be taken as representing the style of building in all the Roman and Italian towns.

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  • His pastimes in the latest years were as singular as his labours.

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  • Further, from the 23rd of November 1654 dates the singular document usually known as "Pascal's amulet," a parchment slip which he wore constantly about him, and which bears the date followed by some lines of incoherent and strongly mystical devotion.

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  • The vividness and distinction of Pascal's phrase, his singular faculty of inserting without any loss of dignity in the gravest and most impassioned meditation what may be almost called quips of thought and diction, the intense earnestness of meaning weighting but not confusing the style, all appear here.

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  • On the 12th of April 1465 Philip handed over to his son the entire administration of his 1 This was the singular vow known as "the vow of the pheasant," from the fact that Philip placed his hand solemnly on a pheasant, which had been brought to him by his herald, and vowed that he would fight the Turks and challenge their sultan to single combat.

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  • The relation between him and his old preceptor was of a very singular kind.

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  • In a letter written with singular energy and dignity of thought and language, he repelled the tardy advances of his patron.

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  • From this time Godwin became a notable figure in London society, and there was scarcely an important person in politics, on the Liberal side, in literature, art or science, who does not appear familiarly in the pages of Godwin's singular diary.

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  • The decemvirs ruled with singular moderation, and submitted to the Comitia Centuriata a code of laws in ten headings, which was passed.

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  • All accounts agree in describing him in later life as a man of handsome presence, with a venerable white beard, piercing black eyes and a benevolent cast of countenance, the effect of which was heightened in conversation by a voice of singular sweetness.

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  • For administrative purposes the country is divided into eighteen counties (Amter, singular Amt), as follows.

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  • The poet Aarestrup (in 1848) declared that Blicher had raised the Danish language to the dignity of Icelandic. Blicher is a stern realist, in many points akin to Crabbe, and takes a singular position among the romantic idealists of the period, being like them, however, in the love of precise and choice language, and hatred of the mere commonplaces of imaginative writing.

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  • He seems to have been a child of singular attractiveness and promise, and stories of his boyhood were remembered.

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  • It is singular that in the last-named species two nuclei occur regularly in the spermatium.

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  • Some pieces of sculpture were found here, among them fragments of the Parthenon and a singular relief of Asclepius with a kneeling woman suppliant.

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  • Lady Ashburton, a woman of singular social charm and great ability, appreciated the author, but apparently accepted the company of the author's wife rather as a necessity than as an additional charm.

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  • The descriptions of the campaigns are admirably vivid, and show his singular eye for scenery.

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  • His unstinted generosity to his brothers during his worst times is only one proof of the singular strength of his family affections.

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  • The eastern and western seaboards present a singular contrast.

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  • They rise into prominent pyramidal mountains, which, as the stratification is usually almost horizontal, present in their terraced sides a singular contrast to the neighbouring heights, composed of highly plicated crystalline schists.

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  • In addressing chiefs, or others to whom one wishes to be respectful, the singular number of the personal pronoun is rarely used; the dual is employed instead, - the dual of dignity or of respect.

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  • And yet it is singular that no mention of them occurs in Cicero or Livy, and that altogether literary allusions to them are very scarce.

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  • It has a singular Romanesque church of the 12th century.

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  • The marriage was a very unhappy one, the husband having no qualities that could appeal to a woman who, whatever the censorious might say of her moral character, was distinguished to the last by a lively intellect and a singular charm.

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  • Nevertheless he not only failed to accomplish the chief aim of his life, but Lecky trenchantly observes that "by a singular fatality the great advocate of repeal did more than any one else to make the Union a necessity.

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  • His own temper of mind was conservative and somewhat aristocratic, but he guided political development, often under circumstances of great difficulty, with singular fairness and conspicuous magnanimity.

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  • Religious differences broke up the land after the Reformation into two portions, each called Rhoden, a term that in the singular is said to mean a "clearing," and occurs in 1070, long before the final separation.

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  • As seen from the rock of Ghulgulah, Bamian, with its ruined towers, its colossi, its innumerable grottos, and with the singular red colour of its barren soil, presents an impressive aspect of desolation and mystery.

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  • In the first of these, which consists of one principal ridge with several lateral spurs, overlooking Port Louis, are the singular peak of the Pouce (2650 ft.), so called from its supposed resemblance to the human thumb; and the still loftier Pieter Botte (2685 ft.), a tall obelisk of bare rock, crowned with a globular mass of stone.

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  • But perhaps the most singular scene is the council of three great ladies presided over by Servilia at Antium, which decides the movements of Brutus and Cassius in June 44 B.C., when Cassius " looking very fierce - you would say that he was breathing fire and sword " - blustered concerning what he considered an insult, viz.

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  • A strange mystification was practised by the last named, a scholar of singular brilliancy, who claimed to have a mutilated MS. which he called his Decurtatus, bought from a common soldier who had obtained it from a sacked monastery; also to have been furnished by a friend, Pierre de Crouzeil, a doctor of Limoges, with variants taken from an old MS. found at Noyon, and entered in the margin of a copy of the Lyons edition.

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  • The singular fact requires to be noticed that in both these species the hind toe is generally deficient, but that examples of each are occasionally found in which this functionless member has not wholly disappeared.

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  • And one of Hamilton's earliest advances in the study of his system (an advance independently made, only a few months later, by Arthur Cayley) was the interpretation of the singular operator q()q1, where q is a quaternion.

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  • One law of the panchayat is singular in its difference from the custom of any other native community in Asia; nobody who has a wife living shall marry another, except under peculiar circumstances, such as the barrenness of the living wife, or her immoral conduct.

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  • Without Stevenson, Sterne would probably have been a more decorous parish priest, but he would probably never have written Tristram Shandy or left any other memorial of his singular genius.

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  • At first sight this singular structure appears so like a deformity that writers have not been wanting to account it such, 2 ignorant of its being a piece of mechanism most beautifully adapted to the habits of the bird, enabling it to extract with the greatest ease, from fir-cones or fleshy fruits, the seeds which form its usual and almost invariable food.

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  • Within the town the arcades (or Lauben) on either side of the main street, and the numerous elaborately ornamented fountains attract the eye, as well as the two remaining towers that formerly stood on the old walls but are now in the centre of the town; the Zeitglockenthurm (famous for its singular 16th- century clock, with its mechanical contrivances, set in motion when the hour strikes) and the Kdfichthurm.

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  • According to a common Indian belief a wealthy man who dies without an heir returns to guard his wealth in the form of a serpent, and Italian superstition supposed that to find a serpent's skin brought good luck (Leland) .2 No singular preference for jewels on the part of serpents will explain the belief, and creatures like the jackdaw which have this weakness do not enjoy this prominence in folk-lore.

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  • For example, when one considers how often milk is used in the tending and propitiation of venerated snakes, it is noteworthy that in Roman cult the truly rustic deities are offered milk (Fowler), and it is no less singular that many of the old goddesses of Greece have serpent attributes (Harrison).'

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  • In some languages the personal pronouns are singular, dual and plural.

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  • It is not till the 6th century of our era, in the reign of Justinian, that we find bubonic plague in Europe, a s a part of the great cycle of pestilence, accompanied by extraordinary natural phenomena, which lasted fifty years, and is described with a singular misunderstanding of medical terms by Gibbon in his forty-third chapter.

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  • The first case is the singular occurrence of three deaths at Vienna in October 1898.

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  • He next sailed down the Red Sea to Aden (then a place of great trade), the singular position of which he describes, noticing its dependence for water-supply upon the great cisterns restored in modern times.

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  • Though there are some singular chronological difficulties in the narrative, and a good many cursory inaccuracies and exaggerations, there is no part of it except, perhaps, certain portions of the journeys in north China, which is open to doubt.

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  • The natural condition of society, natural law, natural religion, the poetry of nature, gained a singular hold, first on the English philosophers from Hume onwards, and then (through Rousseau chiefly) on the general drift of thought and action in Europe.

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  • The amount of generic divergence exhibited by the members of this family is not great in the mass, but is of singular interest in detail.

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  • Of all his singular opinions the best known is his advocacy of clerical monogamy, immortalized in the Vicar of Wakefield.

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  • Alphonso discerned the singular gifts of the young scholar, and made him tutor to his sons.

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  • Hence some stalactites have their tips under water long enough to allow tassels of crystals to grow on them, which, in a drier season, are again coated over with stalactitic matter; and thus singular distortions are occasioned.

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  • Passing over the visions and exhumations of the first half of the 12th century, we come to the singular revelations of St Elizabeth of Schdnau.

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  • Baeda's account of Cadmon's deathbed has often been quoted, and is of singular beauty.

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  • The plural form (Les Finances) was particularly reserved for this application, while the singular came to denote business activity in respect to monetary dealings (as in the expression la haute finance).

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  • The most interesting and the best known of these singular fishes is the Gymnotus or Surinam eel.

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  • He was not singular in his opinions and he was undoubtedly sincere; and it is only 3 See Letters and Life, iv.

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  • In some cases the singular is formed from the plural by the addition of -yn or -en; thus ser, " stars," seren, " star."

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  • Plural adjectives are formed from the singular by i-affection or by adding the termination -ion or -on; thus hardd, " beautiful," pl.

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  • The verb does not agree with its subject unless the latter is a personal pronoun; when the subject is a noun the verb is put in the third person singular; thus carant, " they love," can take a pronominal subject - carant hwy, " they love "; but " the men love " is car y dynion (not carant y dynion, which can only mean " they love the men ").

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  • In relative clauses the verb is sometimes made to agree; but in the oldest poetry we generally find the singular verb, as in the oft-repeated Gododin phrase Grvyr a aeth Gatraeth, " men who went (to) Catraeth " (not Gwyr a aethant).

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  • The whole history of religion presents perhaps no more singular spectacle than the mosques of Bagdad in the middle of the 9th century filled with vast crowds of twenty and thirty thousand of the faithful, assembled to discuss the dogmas of the created and the un created Koran.'

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  • A man of profound ability and singular force of character, he acted a leading part in the complications preceding the fall of the Tokugawa shogunate, and was obliged to fly from Kioto accompanied by his coadjutor, Prince Sanjo.

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  • Its plan is somewhat singular, as a portion of the history of England is given on one page, and a general sketch of the contemporaneous history of Europe on the opposite page.

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  • This singular way of electing members for the principal city in the kingdom could not fail further to irritate the parties.

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  • These dramas' are not particularly well arranged, but they form a little body of theatrical literature of singular interest and value.

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  • His singular dramas, The Bacchantes (1822), Sigurd Ring, which was posthumous, and The Martyrs (1821), are esteemed by many critics to be his most original productions.

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  • The singular offshoot of the Church of Utrecht thus created established its headquarters in a former Congregational chapel (dedicated significantly to the Englishman St Willibrord, the first bishop of Utrecht) in River Street, London, N., the minister of which had joined the movement with his congregation.

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  • But some were essentially indigenous, and he observed a singular character given to the fauna by the presence of certain Eastern forms, unknown in other parts of Persia, such as the tiger, a remarkable deer of the IndoMalayan group, allied to Cervus axis, and a pit viper (Halys).

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  • Middle Persian.The singular phenomena presented by FilavI writing have been discussed in a separate article (see HLAVI).

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  • His last published volume contains a series of sonnets of singular beauty, addressed to the river, resembling Wordsworth's "Sonnets to the Duddon," but more perfect in form; and a blank verse idyll, "Ii Pettirosso" ("The Redbreast"), bearing an equally strong, though equally accidental, resemblance to the similar compositions of Coleridge.

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  • Prince Josaphat grows up in this seclusion, acquires all kinds of knowledge and exhibits singular endowments.

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  • The apparent gathering together of the sheaf into a fine and well-defined stream is an effect of singular beauty.

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  • It is probably the most singular thing in connexion with this singular administration, that its most pregnant measure should thus have been one directly opposed to the well-known principles of its head.

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  • The original deists displayed a singular incapacity to understand the true conditions of history; yet amongst them there were some who pointed the way to the truer, more generous interpretation of the past.

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  • In this connexion, however, Fata may be singular, the masculine and feminine Fatus, Fata, being the usual forms in popular and ceremonial language.

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  • The city occupies a position of singular beauty on the Salzach which passes at this point between two isolated hills, the MOnchsberg (1646 ft.) on the left and the Capuzinerberg (2132 ft.) on the right.

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  • The hard, indigestible seed swallowed by the guacharo are found in quantities on the floor and the ledges of the caverns it frequents, where many of them for a time vegetate, the plants thus growing being etiolated from want of light, and, according to travellers, forming a singular feature of the gloomy scene which these places present.

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  • This singular romance is diversified by, or, to speak more properly, it is the vehicle of the most bewildering abundance of digression, burlesque amplification, covert satire on things political, social and religious, miscellaneous erudition of the literary and scientific kind.

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  • It is said to have been dictated, which may possibly account in some degree for the singular vivacity and picturesqueness of the style.

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  • A most singular habit possessed by this bird is that of rising in the air and soaring there in circles at an immense altitude, uttering at intervals the very loud cry of which its local name is an imitation.

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  • As viceroy of Norway (1506-1512) he had already displayed a singular capacity for ruling under exceptionally difficult circumstances.

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  • It would not be difficult to multiply these antitheses in the character and the opinions of this singular man.

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  • The 2nd viscount's eldest son, Henry John, is mentioned by Lady Elliot in her correspondence as a boy of singular vivacity and energy.

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  • To meet these peculiarities the insect, bird and bat are furnished with extensive flying surfaces in the shape of wings, which they apply with singular velocity and power to the air, as levers of the third order.

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  • Although the third order of lever is particularly inefficient when the fulcrum is rigid and immobile, it possesses singular advantages when these conditions are reversed, that is, when the fulcrum, as happens with the air, is elastic and yielding.

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  • Two singular features of the frontier of the department towards the east are only to be explained by historical reasons.

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  • It has a singular appearance from the structure of the leaves, which are oblong in shape, from 6 to 18 in.

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  • Around the western and northern edge of the Old Red Sandstone plain the underlying Silurian rocks (and even the Cambrian and Archaean in places) have been bent up so that their edges form hills of singular abruptness and beauty.

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  • Even more extraordinary is the effect of the singular constitution of the church on its discipline.

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  • In fact, he was always a preacher, though of a singular order.

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  • Many of these points are of so unimportant, or of so singular a nature, that it is extremely improbable that they should have been independently acquired by aboriginally distinct species or races.

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  • This is a singular prose poem, in language sometimes rather bombastic but often beautiful.

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  • In 1860 appeared a singular book, somewhat after the fashion of Ahasverus, entitled Merlin l'enchanteur, in 1862 a Histoire de la campagne de 1815, in 1865 an elaborate book on the French Revolution, in which the author, republican as he was, blamed the acts of the revolutionists unsparingly, and by that means drew down on himself much wrath from more thoroughgoing partisans.

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  • The secret of the marriage was not kept by Fulbert; and when Heloise, true to her singular purpose, boldly denied it, life was made so unsupportable to her that she sought refuge in the convent of Argenteuil.

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  • In this lady he had found a sitter whose face and smile possessed in a singular degree the haunting, enigmatic charm in which he delighted.

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  • The scene presents to a European eye a panorama of singular novelty and interest - rice fields covered with water to a great depth; the ears of grain floating on the surface; the stupendous embankments, which restrain without altogether preventing the excesses of the inundations; and peasants going out to their daily work with their cattle in canoes or on rafts.

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  • For two years he worked hard in preparing for the army, but, by a singular conjunction of circumstances and at the sacrifice of his own natural bent to his father's wish, he matriculated at Brasenose College, Oxford, just two weeks before his commission was put into his hands.

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  • A very strong "bore" or tidal wave runs up the estuary of the Meghna at spring tides, and a singular sound like thunder, known as the "Barisal guns," is often heard far out at sea about the time it is coming in.

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  • He resolved to appeal to the emperor, rode to Prague, won over Rudolph by his singular address, and, richly supplied with funds, reappeared in Transylvania as imperial governor.

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  • The large class of heterogeneous nouns which are masculine in the singular and feminine in the plural constitute what is sometimes called the neuter declension.

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  • It is quite certain that Bunyan was, at eighteen, what, in any but the most austerely puritanical circles, would have been considered as a young man of singular gravity and innocence.

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  • He has described his sufferings with singular energy, simplicity and pathos.

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  • In the next year the singular extravaganza entitled L'Illusion comique followed, and was succeeded about the end of November by the Cid, based on the Mocedades del Cid of Guillem de Castro.

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  • Almost the first thing which strikes a reader is the singular inequality of this poet, and the attempts to explain this inequality, in reference to his own and other theories, leave the fact untouched.

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  • But though to the very end of his life he retained much of the singular learning of his childhood and youth, often reading Persian and Arabic in the intervals of sterner pursuits, he had long abandoned them as a study, and employed them merely as a relaxation.

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  • This singular result is still known by the name conical refraction," which he proposed for it when he first predicted its existence in the third supplement to his " Systems of Rays," read in 1832.

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  • The lecturer had a singular power of identifying himself for the time with the system which he expounded and the historical character he portrayed.

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  • To this was joined a singular power of rhetorical climax.

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  • The history of the Hague is in some respects singular.

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  • By the mythologists of Cicero's time the name was connected with the verb furere and the noun feria, which in the plural (not being used in the singular in this sense) was accepted as the equivalent of the Greek Erinyes.

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  • It is singular that the Argasidae, which are for the most part parasitic upon birds, contain the only species of ticks, especially 0.

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  • It was thought that the general, whose singular devotion to duty made him a popular hero, had been allowed to assume an impossible task; had been feebly supported; and that the measures for his relief had been unduly postponed and at last only reluctantlyundertaken.

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  • Each singular kind presents itself as a limit separating two kinds of inferior singularity; the cuspidal separates the crunodal and the acnodal, and these last separate from each other the complex and the simplex.

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  • The singular kinds arise as before; in the crunodal and the cuspidal kinds the whole curve is an odd circuit, but in an acnodal kind the acnode must be regarded as an even circuit.

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  • There are in some cases points termed centres, or singular or multiple foci (the nomenclature is unsettled), which are the intersections of improper tangents from the two circular points respectively; thus, in the circular cubic, the tangents to the curve at the two circular points respectively (or two imaginary asymptotes of the curve) meet in a centre.

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  • The inhabitants present a remarkable conglomeration of different races, various nationalities, divers languages, distinctive costumes and conflicting faiths, giving, it is true, a singular interest to what may be termed the human scenery of the city, but rendering impossible any close social cohesion, or the development of a common civic life.

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  • Soon after the publication of Vivian Grey, Disraeli, who is said by Froude to have been "overtaken by a singular disorder," marked by fits of giddiness ("once he fell into a trance, and did not recover for a week"), went with the Austens on a long summer tour in France, Switzerland and Italy.

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  • Towards Great Britain the executive council and the Convention behaved with singular folly.

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  • More singular was the influential position assigned, in civic legislation and administration, to the clergy, to whom in conjunction with the councillors, there was even, in certain cases, an appeal from the judgment of the scabini.

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  • There are also fragments of poems in Half's Saga, Asmund KappaBana's Saga, in the Latin verses of Saxo, and the Shield Lays (Ragnarsdrapa) by Bragi, &c., of this school, which closes with the Sun-Song, a powerful Christian Dantesque poem, recalling some of the early compositions of the Irish Church, and with the 12th-century Lay of Ragnar, Lay of Starkad, The Proverb Song (Havamal) and Krakumal, to which we may add those singular Gloss-poems, the Pulur, which also belong to the Western Isles.

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  • A singular and unlooked-for result of eclipse-work has been to include the corona within the scope of solar periodicity.

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  • Pronouns are numerous, and the personal pronoun includes four numbers - singular, dual, trinal and general plural, also inclusive and exclusive.

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  • There are several dialects, the construction resembling Fijian, as in the pronominal suffixes in singular, triad and plural; the numerals, however, are Polynesian in character.

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  • His criticism had the singular advantage of being in some sort foreign, without the disadvantage which attaches in French eyes to all criticism of things French written in a foreign language.

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  • Concrete terms are further subdivided as Singular, the names of things regarded as individuals, and General or Common, the names which a number of things bear in common in virtue of their possession of common characteristics.

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  • This singular association of lay and spiritual powers was liable to the abuse of allowing the whole succession to fall into lay hands, as happened to a large extent in later times.

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  • In the first of these the proof rests on the ordinary grounds of realism, and coincides to some extent with the earlier theory of Augustine, though it is carried out with singular boldness and fulness.

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  • The chief objection to these processes is that they require, as a necessary condition, a singular amount of memory on the one hand and of forgetfulness on the other.

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  • This singular reversion to savagery itself needs some explanation.

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  • However the distribution of this singular myth may be explained, its origin can scarcely be sought in the imagination of races higher in culture than the Tinneh and Tacullies, among whom dogs and beavers are the theriomorphic form of Purusha or Ymir.

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  • When thus considered as the common features derived by examination from singular instances, it becomes a universal or common term strictly so called.

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  • Little remains beyond an Early English chapel of singular beauty.

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  • It is a singular circumstance, however, that the argument upon which Galileo mainly relied as furnishing a physical demonstration of the truth of the new theory rested on a misconception.

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  • His position now was one of singular diffiMinistry, culty.

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  • The singular weakneas of the government revealed by this abdication of part of the essential functions of the civil power would have led to its speedy downfall, but for the truce cried during the festivities connected with the marriage of the king with Princess Victoria Eugnie Ena of Battenberg, which took place on the 31st of May.

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  • It was from the first in a position of Moret singular weakness, without a homogeneous majority Ministry, in the Cortes, and depending for its very existence 1909-1910.

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  • Some instanCes of ii occur in the ancient tongue, applying indifferently to the nominative and the objective case; el applying to the singular is also not wholly unknown.

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  • In the present indicative and subjunctive many verbs in it takethe inchoative form already described, by lengthening the radical in the three persons of the singular and in the third person of the plural by means of the syllable esc (isc).

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  • But besides this, we find him in his character of astrologer drawing a singular prediction from the appearance of this comet.

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  • He owed the signal successes of his reign partly to his skilful choice of advisers and administrators, to his chancellors Jean and Guillaume de Dormans and Pierre d'Orgemont, to Hugues Aubriot, provost of Paris, Bureau de la Riviere and others; partly to a singular coolness and subtlety in the exercise of a not over-scrupulous diplomacy, which made him a dangerous enemy.

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  • In view of the simplicity of the necessary appliances, and of the small amount of labour that would be required, we find a singular paucity of such observations.

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  • In this capacity his industry, singular grasp of affairs, and persuasive powers of speech speedily gained for him a position of influence.

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  • The forests of central France during this epoch showed, according to Saporta, a singular admixture of living European species, with trees now characteristic of the Canary Isles and of North America.

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  • A large proportion of the plants, however, may still be found living in Holland and Britain; but there is a singular scarcity of Composites, though this order is fairly well represented in British strata of slightly later date.

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  • For this he made a collection of manuscripts, which he sold in 1835 (many of them passed into the library of Sir Thomas Philipps), drawing up a catalogue under the singular title of Traite de materiaux manuscrits de divers genres d'histoire.

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  • Genial in private life, he was harsh and unyielding in his official capacity, and his singular skill in devising fresh taxes to meet the enormous demands of Napoleon's government made him the best-hated man in Lombardy, the more so that, being a Piedmontese, he was regarded as a foreigner.

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  • The most singular and characteristic feature of this edifice is the almost total absence of every sacred emblem.

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  • He wasn't going to let her go for long, since she was his singular food source.

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  • Be careful to use a singular pronoun with a singular noun in your writing.

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  • In English the third person singular pronoun is he, she or it.

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  • Notice the singular - the first bullfight for the bull is also his last.

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  • This is a highly cohesive exhibition, which successfully shows the diverse nature of artistic interpretation of a singular theme.

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  • A zero value occurring on the leading diagonal does not mean the matrix is singular.

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  • The most significant divergence has been the use of singular object names.

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  • Peter made a singular contribution to the cultural exchange of the trip.

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  • You live in happy times, and enjoy a singular felicity.

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  • It also generalizes simply to the 2D problem by taking the biggest two singular vectors instead of the biggest three.

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  • Despite the occasional stylistic infelicity and the overuse of the first person singular, Nettle writes well.

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  • The singular value decomposition is given by where the columns of are orthonormal and is a diagonal square-root matrix.

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  • Subtle exponentially small effects result from singular perturbations implicit in certain multiple time scale systems.

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  • Reference in these articles to the singular shall be deemed to include the plural.

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  • Everyone should be careful to use a singular pronoun with singular nouns in their writing.

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  • Words importing one gender include all other genders and words importing the singular include the plural and vise versa.

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  • In the policy, words in the singular will include the plural meaning and words in the plural will include the singular.

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  • Well, dear reader (you'll notice I use the singular ), fret no longer!

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  • The main thing to remember about the present time in English is the third person singular.

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  • Can it really mean to talk to God in the second person singular all day long?

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  • There was not, nor could there ever be, any first person singular in the language of Palador.

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  • Everyone should be careful to use a singular pronoun with singular pronoun with singular nouns in their writing.

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  • These people have a somewhat singular taste in the matter of relics.

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  • Derbyshire caves are rather singular in that tho many of them possess deep drops, there are only three open potholes of any note.

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  • By a very singular coincidence, the newly arrived minister gave out " There's a light in the Valley for thee.

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  • When the input configuration is almost but not quite singular, the computation will be prone to rounding errors.

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  • Although my own records only refer to two sites they are not so singular.

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  • Used alone, either and neither are always singular.

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  • Leave the signal subspace set to 6. Click OK to close the singular values dialog.

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  • To search for the second singular values and principal tensor associated an orthogonality constraint is added [4] .

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  • He glanced to windward where the squall already whitened the near sea and heralded its coming with a singular and dismal sound.

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  • His interest in theology was profound, and he brought to it a spirituality of outlook and an aptitude for metaphysical inquiry and exposition which added a singular attraction to his writings.

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  • Most of them are natives of the Old World, and chiefly of its eastern division, but several inhabit the western portion of North America, and one, C. githagineus (of which there seem to be at least two local races), is an especial native of the deserts, or their borders, of Arabia and North Africa, extending even to some of the Canary Islands - a singular modification in the habitat of a form which one would be apt to associate exclusively with forest trees, and especially conifers.

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  • His father was pre-eminent for practical genius, his mother a woman of half-wild blood, weird, visionary and terrible; and Alexander himself is singular among men of action for the imaginative splendours which guided him, and among romantic dreamers for the things he achieved.

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  • Though on more than one occasion personal rancour against the men of the Moderate Left prevented the Right from following Sellas advice and regaining, by timely coalition with cognate parliamentary elements, a portion of its former influence, the bulk of the party, with singular inconsistency, drew nearer and nearer to the Liberal cabinets.

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  • When David Hume (Dialogues concerning Natural Religion) protests that the universe is a " singular effect " and that we have no right to affirm a cause for it, unless we have experience of the origin of many universes, and can generalize the conclusion, They all have causes - he may be unassailable upon empiricist grounds.

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  • His cheerful conversation, his smart and lively sallies, a singular mixture of malice of speech with goodness of heart, and of delicacy of wit with simplicity of manners, rendered him a pleasing and interesting companion; and if his manner was sometimes plain almost to the extent of rudeness, it probably set all the better an example of a much-needed reform to the class to which he belonged.

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  • Already in this play Ford exhibits the singular force of his pathos; the despondent misery of the aged Meleander, and the sweetness of the last scene, in which his daughter comes back to him, alike go to the heart.

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  • A singular menace to agriculture in Nevada was the plague in1907-1908of Carson field mice.

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  • Apropos of hostility towards Samaria, it is singular that the term of reproach, " Cutheans," applied to the Samaritans is derived from Cutha, the famous seat of the god Nergal, only some 25 m.

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  • The main grammatical distinction between Syriac and all the west Aramaic dialects is that in Syriac the 3rd person of the imperfect (singular and plural) of the verb begins with n, but in west Aramaic, as in the other Semitic languages, it begins with y.

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  • Number is never indicated when the sense is obvious or can be gathered from the context; otherwise plurality is expressed by adjectives such as sagala, all, and banak, many more rarely by the repetition of the noun, and the indefinite singular by sa or satu, one, with a class-word.

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  • Throughout the epistle we have a singular combination of the seemingly desultory method of a letter, turning aside at a word and straying wherever the mood of the moment leads, with the firm, forward march of earnest and mature thought.

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  • But in reading all the accounts of Mme de Stael's life which come from herself or her intimate friends, it must be carefully remembered that she was the most distinguished and characteristic product of the period of sensibilite - the singular fashion of ultra-sentiment which required that both men and women, but especially women, should be always palpitating with excitement, steeped in melancholy, or dissolved in tears.

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  • Such a doctrine, in the stress it lays upon the singular, the object of immediate perception, is evidently inspired by a spirit differing widely even from the moderate Realism of Thomas.

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  • His relations with these "adopted children of his thought" possessed a singular charm of affectionate simplicity; their intellectual progress and material interests were objects of equal solicitude to him, and he demanded in return only diligence in the pursuit of knowledge.

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  • The class as a whole is linked to the Turbellaria not only by its similarity of structure, but by the intermediation of the singular class the Temnocephaloidea (see Planarians), which in habit and in organization form an almost ideal annectant group.

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  • No longer armed or wearing their former singular dress, the remnant of them in Lebanon seems likely ere long to be assimilated to the "Osmanli" Moslems. Their feud with the Maronites, whose accentuation in the middle of the 19th century was largely due to the tergiversations of the ruling Shehab family, now reduced to low estate, is dying away, but they retain something of their old clan feeling and feudal organization, especially in Shuf.

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  • This was in 1732, and Rousseau, who for a time had unimportant employments in the service of the Sardinian crown, was shortly in- stalled by Madame de Warens, whom he still called Maman, as amant en titre in her singular household, wherein she diverted herself with him, with music and with chemistry.

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  • In all these works the phenomena of societies in an archaic stage, whether still capable of observation or surviving in a fragmentary manner among more modern surroundings or preserved in contemporary records, are brought into line, often with singular felicity, to establish and illustrate the normal process of development in legal and political ideas.

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  • Buzurg Khan delivered himself up to indolence and debauchery, but Yakub Beg, with singular energy and perseverance, made himself master of Yangi Shahr, Yangi-Hissar, Yarkand and other towns, and eventually became sole master of the country, Buzurg Khan proving himself totally unfitted for the post of ruler.

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  • Buckle has the idea that the two principal works of Smith, the Theory of Moral Sentiments and the Wealth of Nations, are mutually complementary parts of one great scheme, in which human nature is intended to be dealt with as a whole - the former exhibiting the operation of the benevolent feelings, the latter of what, by a singular nomenclature, inadmissible since Butler wrote, he calls "the passion of selfishness."

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  • Once committed to the Russian alliance, however, he became the faithful henchman of the emperor Alexander, whose fascinating personality exercised over him to the last a singular power, and began that influence of Russia at the court of Berlin which was to last till Frederick William IV.'s supposed Liberalism was to shatter the cordiality of the entente.

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  • The earliest Christian monastic communities (see MoNASTtersM) with which we are acquainted consisted of groups of cells or huts collected about a common centre, which was usually the abode of some anchorite celebrated for superior holiness or singular asceticism, but without any attempt at orderly arrangement.

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  • The imperative shows no ending in the singular; in the plural It has y.

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  • It thus has obviously nothing to do with the Roman liturgy; but as an independent setting of the text it is one of the most sublime and profoundly religious works in all art; and its singular perfection as a design is nowhere more evident than in its numerous adaptations of earlier works.

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  • Mahommed was a singular character, full of pretence at least to many accomplishments and virtues, the founder of public charities, and a profuse patron of scholars, but a parricide, a fratricide, and as madly capricious, bloodthirsty and unjust as Caligula.

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  • Sir John Taylor Coleridge, his fellow scholar at Corpus and his life-long friend, says of him, after their friendship of five and fifty years had closed, "It was the singular happiness of his nature, remarkable even in his undergraduate days, that love for him was always sanctified by reverence - reverence that did not make the love less tender, and love that did but add intensity to the reverence."

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  • Characteristic of the high mountainous region are the arctic fox, the glutton and the lemming, whose singular intermittent migrations to the lowlands have a considerable temporary influence on the distribution of beasts and birds of prey.

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  • It was due entirely to his steadfast adherence to these principles that Poland in the course of the 15th century rose to the rank of a great power; but by a singular irony of fate, Casimir, in consequence of his unswerving efforts to make his country glorious and prosperous, entirely forfeited the popularity of his Polish subjects, whose true interests he understood far better than they did themselves.

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  • He combined the power of patient and minute investigation with a singular faculty for bold generalization and the capacity for tracing out the effects of thoughts and ideas on political and social life.

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  • A striking and singular Sept, II, event; for the history of France and a great part of Europe was now for fifteen years to be summed up in the person of a single man (see NAPOLEON).

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  • I found this a somewhat mechanical and reductive approach, which was too confident in finding singular interpretations for each phase of Titanic remembrance.

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  • Well, dear reader (you'll notice I use the singular), fret no longer !

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  • The singular value decomposition is a very useful tool in this chapter.

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  • By a very singular coincidence, the newly arrived minister gave out There 's a light in the Valley for thee.

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  • On the basis of this Comrade Foster arrives at the singular conclusion that I sympathize with the minority group.

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  • To search for the second singular values and Principal Tensor associated an orthogonality constraint is added [4 ].

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  • Twain 's singular wit is on full display engaging the reader to such an extent that pages swiftly fly by.

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  • You can't accredit all of these national problems to a singular issue.

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  • While the prices at these stores are already a huge discount off retail, VIP shoppers receive additional savings, special advance notice of sales, and other singular shopping invitations.

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  • Where before you were an "other half" or a "part of the whole" now you're a singular identity.

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  • Among the home's most singular features are the two cantilevered concrete platforms that jut out from the stone main face of the building.

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  • More than anything else, it is important to remember that prom is just a singular event and the girl you are asking is just a girl.

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  • Serving plenty of bite-size nosh in lieu of large portions of singular dishes is also a fun way to give everyone at the reception some variety - and plenty to talk about, too!

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  • B. coronata is an interesting annual flower, showy, the foliage elegant, and the growth dwarf, the structure of the flowers singular.

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  • Dragons Mouth (Arum Crinitum) - In flower this is very grotesque, from the singular shape of its broad speckled spathe.

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  • Candelabra Bellflower (Campanula Macrostyla) - A singular plant, having large flowers, with blue netted veins on a white ground, which gets purple at the edges, and with a huge stigma.

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  • Cobweb Houseleek (Sempervivum Arachnoideum) - One of the most singular of alpine plants, with tiny rosettes of fleshy leaves covered at the top with a thick white down, which intertwines itself all over the leaves like a spiders web.

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  • Its singular color makes it a valuable contrast to other plants, but at present it is not much known.

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  • Its curious leaves, hollowed like a horn, are blood-red in color, and form a compact tuft 1 foot or more in height and the same in breadth; the flowers, singular in shape, are not very showy.

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  • The long round leaves are barred with bands of yellow and green, and it is a striking plant, as its rigid habit and singular markings stand out in bold relief.

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  • Spraguea - S. umbellata, a singular and pretty plant allied to Claytonia, 6 to 9 inches high, has fleshy foliage, and spikes of showy pinkish blossoms.

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  • Whorl-flower (Morina) - M. longifolia is a handsome and singular perennial, with large spiny leaves, resembling those of certain Thistles, and with long spikes of whorled flowers, 2 to 3 feet high.

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  • Bass tab is usually easier to read than guitar tabs due to the singular note-playing nature of the bass guitar, as well as the fact that there are usually only four strings to play.

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  • Overhead expanse lighting, instead of a singular fixture stuck in the middle of the ceiling.

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  • Central air conditioning sends cooled air throughout the entire house from a singular location, unlike window units that only cool the room they're installed in.

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  • Check out Eyewear Repair Express eBay for singular eyeglass parts purchases, including nose pads and screws.

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  • The wines contain blends or singular varietals made from Pinot Noir and Chardonnay grapes.

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  • No symbol in the Chinese culture has a singular meaning behind its status, especially when it comes to feng shui symbols.

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  • Since each hair shaft grows at its own rate, the body is constantly in different phases, making it impossible to determine how fast a singular strand is growing.

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  • On the other hand, those who enjoy a well-coordinated look will take comfort in the monokini's singular style.

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  • Immediately recognizable for its signature shape, it resembles a backpack in some ways, but differs because of its user-friendly singular strap.

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  • You would never see these verbs used with the singular objects je, tu, or il/elle.

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  • The main and often singular complaint about the brief today is that it is often mocked as being old-fashioned and out of date.

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  • We built a singular platform so hosts could send their invitations and manage all their communications, including reminders and follow-ups, via email, sms/text, web, and social media.

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  • Whether your wasp sting is singular or multiple in nature, recognizing the symptoms and administering early treatment precautions can help reduce the likelihood of serious, if not fatal, complications.

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  • While the initial bite may be singular, the allergic reaction to the injected chemicals may cause a rash, especially if the bite is scratched and spread.

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  • It can also be used to examine why people within organizations react to certain things the way they do, with a special emphasis being placed on the cumulative reaction of the entire group as opposed to the singular reaction of individuals.

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  • He became by a singular arrangement, only repeated in the case of Lord Ellenborough, a member of the cabinet, and remained in that position through various changes of administration for nearly fifteen years, and, although he persistently refused the chancellorship, he acted as Speaker of the House of Lords while the Great Seal was in commission.

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  • The widely-spread plovers, Charadriidae, have two not less singular generic developments, Thinornis, and the extraordinary wrybill, Anarhynchus.

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  • There is a Cid of history and a Cid of romance, differing very materially in character, but each filling a large space in the annals of his country, and exerting a singular influence in the development of the national genius.

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  • The men, however, refused to march without seeing their sultan, and the singular expedient was resorted to of propping up the dead monarch's body in a dark room and concealing behind it an attendant who raised the hands and moved the head of the corpse as the troops marched past.

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  • A singular series of negotiations, however, secured from the king of Sweden a promise of the ambassadorship for twelve years and a pension in case of its withdrawal, and the marriage took place on the 14th of January 1786.

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  • She was in Paris when the news of Napoleon's landing arrived and at once fled to Coppet, but a singular story, much discussed, is current of her having approved Napoleon's return.

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  • Mme de Stael occupies a singular position in French literature.

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  • The only point of practical interest requiring mention here is the very singular fact attested by all peach-growers, that, while certain peaches are liable to the attacks of mildew, others are not.

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  • The meaning of this singular contrast between the two animals may be that we have here an instance of an interesting gradation in evolution.

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  • One of the most singular facts concerning the geographical distribution of Enteropneusta has recently been brought to light by Benham, who found a species of Balanoglossus, sensu stricto, on the coast of New Zealand hardly distinguishable from one occurring off Japan.

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  • In coloration it bears some resemblance to a chaffinch, but its much larger size and enormous beak make it easily recognizable, while on closer inspection the singular bull-hook form of some of its wing-feathers will be found to be very remarkable.

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  • But it was in the application to mechanical questions of the instrument which he thus helped to form that his singular merit lay.

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  • Of works in English there is a singular dearth.

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  • The singular adaptability of the Portuguese language to poetical expression, coupled with the imaginative temperament of the people, has led to an unusual production and appreciation of poetry.

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  • He has, indeed, a system, but it is a singular medley of doctrines borrowed, not only from Saint-Simonian, but from Pythagorean and Buddhistic sources.

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  • Hetherington, and which he justified on the singular ground that "the vast bulk of the population believe that morality depends entirely on revelation; and if a doubt could be raised among them that the ten commandments were given by God from Mount Sinai, men would think they were at liberty to steal, and women would consider themselves absolved from the restraints of chastity."

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  • Taken strictly his words state the position of extreme Nominalism; but even if we were not forbidden to do so by other passages, in which the doctrine of moderate Realism is adopted (under cover of the current distinction between the singular as felt and the pure universal as understood), it would still be unfair to press any passage in the writings of this period.

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  • His publications show him to have been a man of original and active mind with a singular facility in applying mathematics to practical questions.

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  • Tisza, a statesman of singular probity and tenacity, seemed to be the one person capable of carrying out the programme of the king and the majority.

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  • Other characteristic features are the use of the singular substantive after numerals, and adjectives of quantity, e.g.

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  • The lyric poems of Kolcsey can hardly be surpassed, whilst his orations, and markedly the Emlek beszed Kazinczy felett (Commemorative Speech on Kazinczy), exhibit not only his own powers, but the singular excellence of the Magyar language as an oratorical medium.

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  • Fay's singular powers in this direction were well shown by his Jdvor orvos es Bakator Ambrus szolgdja (Doctor Javor and his servant Ambrose Bakator), brought out at Pest in 1855.

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  • The long-sought cause of the "great inequality" of Jupiter and Saturn was found in the near approach to commensurability of their mean motions; it was demonstrated in two elegant theorems, independently of any except the most general considerations as to mass, that the mutual action of the planets could never largely affect the eccentricities and inclinations of their orbits; and the singular peculiarities detected by him in the Jovian system were expressed in the so-called "laws of Laplace."

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  • The evidence of Peter Ramus (1515-1572) on this point is interesting, but he gives no authority for his singular statements.

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  • It is not surprising when these characteristics of Lamartine's work are appreciated to find that his fame declined with singular rapidity in France.

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  • His results, nevertheless, were vitiated by being obtained in the interest of a theory, and by singular want of discrimination.

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  • It was in this same year that he received the singular diplomatic mission to Frederick which nobody seems to have taken seriously, and after his return the oscillation between Brussels, Cirey and Paris was resumed.

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  • But there is immense wit, a wonderful command of such metre and language as the taste of the time allowed to the poet, occasionally a singular if somewhat artificial grace, and a curious felicity of diction and manner.

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