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shrewsbury

shrewsbury

shrewsbury Sentence Examples

  • In 1717 this part of Marlboro, with other lands, was erected into the township of Westboro, to which parts of Sutton (1728),(1728), Shrewsbury (1762 and 1793) and Upton (1763) were subsequently annexed, and from which Northboro was separated in 1766.

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  • But the lands belonging to these titles remained with the Crown and he had to repair his fortunes by one of those marriages which never failed his house, his wife being Alathea Talbot, who was at last the heir of Gilbert, earl of Shrewsbury.

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  • of Shrewsbury.

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  • The plot was frustrated by Hotspur's defeat at Shrewsbury (21st of July 1403); and Northumberland for the time submitted.

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  • When nineteen he became the pupil of a doctor in Shrewsbury, also acting as dresser in the infirmary there.

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  • WATLING STREET, the Early English name for the great road made by the Romans from London past St Albans (Roman Verulamium) to Wroxeter (Roman Viroconium) near Shrewsbury and used by the Anglo-Saxons, just as a great part of it is used to-day.

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  • In 1884, at Shrewsbury, a prize of £Ioo was awarded for a sheafbinding reaper, and one of £50 for a similar machine.

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  • His Memoirs of Sir Robert Walpole (London, 1798), Memoirs of Horatio, Lord Walpole (London, 1802), Memoirs of John, duke of Marlborough (London, 1818-1819), Private and Original Correspondence of Charles Talbot, duke of Shrewsbury (London, 1821), Memoirs of the Administrations of Henry Pelham (London, 182 9), are very valuable for the history of the 18th century.

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  • During the invasion of South Wales under William Rufus, Arnulf de Montgomeri, fifth son of Roger earl of Shrewsbury,.

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  • At this castle Mary queen of Scots was detained in 1569 under the custody of the earls of Huntingdon and Shrewsbury.

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  • It is the terminal station of a branch of the London & North-Western railway coming southward from Shrewsbury, and is a station on the main line of the Great Western running to Fishguard; it is also the terminus of a branch-line of the Great Western running to Newcastle-Emlyn.

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  • In 1401 he was succeeded by his son Earl Richard, a brave and chivalrous warrior, who defeated Owen Glendower, fought the Percys at Shrewsbury, and, after travelling in state through Europe and the Holy Land, was employed against the Lollards and afterwards as lay ambassador from England to the council of Constance (1414).

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  • He was educated at Shrewsbury and at Queen's College, Oxford, of which he became a scholar.

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  • In 1215 he took Shrewsbury.

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  • When he arrived at the Castle Foregate, Shrewsbury, early on the 21st of July, and demanded provisions, he found the king's forces had arrived before him.

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  • from Shrewsbury.

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  • Percy's body was buried at Whitchurch, but was disinterred two days later to be exhibited in Shrewsbury.

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  • Tn the Domesday Survey it is included in the manor of Maesbury, which Rainald, sheriff of Shropshire, held of Roger, earl of Shrewsbury; but Rainald or his predecessor Warm had already raised a fortification at Oswestry called Louvre.

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  • by a charter dated 1398 granted all the privileges which belonged to Shrewsbury, and a similar charter was obtained from Thomas, earl of Arundel in 1407.

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  • In the 15th and 16th .centuries a weekly market was held at Oswestry for the sale of woollen goods manufactured in North Wales, but in the 17th century the drapers of Shrewsbury determined to get the trade into their own town, and although an Order in the Privy Council was passed to restrain it to Oswestry they agreed in 1621 to buy no more cloth there.

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  • (London, 1897); Shrewsbury Correspondence, ed.

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  • Coxe (London, 1821); Shrewsbury MSS.

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  • But now the queen's sudden death on the 1st of August, and the appointment of Shrewsbury to the lord treasurership, instantly changed the whole scene and ruined Bolingbroke.

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  • Robert Waring Darwin (1766-1848), his third son by his first marriage, a doctor at Shrewsbury, was the father of the famous Charles Darwin; and Violetta, his eldest daughter by his second marriage, was the mother of Francis Galton.

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  • JOB ORTON (1717-1783), English dissenting minister, was born at Shrewsbury on the 4th of September 1717.

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  • He entered the academy of Dr Philip Doddridge at Northampton, became minister of a congregation formed by a fusion of Presbyterians and Independents at High Street Chapel, Shrewsbury (1741), received Presbyterian ordination there (1745), resigned in 1766 owing to ill-health, and lived in retirement at Kidderminster until his death.

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  • THOMAS CHURCHYARD (c. 1520-1604), English author, was born at Shrewsbury about 1520, the son of a farmer.

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  • The master and the second master of Shrewsbury (founded 1550 were to be " well able to make a Latin verse, and learned in the Greek tongue."

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  • During the rest of the century the leading landmarks are the three royal commissions known by the names of their chairmen: (1) Lord Clarendon's on nine public schools, Eton, Winchester, Westminster, Charterhouse, Harrow, Rugby, Shrewsbury, St Paul's and Merchant Taylors' (1861-1864), resulting in the Public Schools Act of 1868; (2) Lord Taunton's on 782 endowed schools (1864-1867), followed by the act of 1869; and (3) Mr Bryce's on secondary education (1894-1895).

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  • The reform was carried forward at University College, London, by Professor Key and by Professor Robinson Ellis in 1873, and was accepted at Shrewsbury, Marlborough, Liverpool College, Christ's Hospital, Dulwich, and the City of London school.

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  • He was educated at Shrewsbury and St.

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  • Many English place-names contain the word, the most familiar being Shrewsbury (Scrobbesbyrig) and Wormwood Scrubs.

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  • north-west of York and the most northerly Romano-British town; Ratae, now Leicester, capital of the Coritani; Viroconium, now Wroxeter, near Shrewsbury, capital of the Cornovii; Venta Silurum, now Caerwent, near Chepstow; Corinium, now Cirencester, capital of the Dobuni; Isca Dumnoniorum, now Exeter, the most westerly of these towns; Durnovaria, now Dorchester, in Dorset, capital of the Durotriges; Venta Belgarum, now Winchester; Calleva Atrebatum, now Silchester, 10 m.

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  • By the treaty of Shrewsbury (1265) he was recognized as overlord of Wales; and in return Simon de Montfort was supplied with Welsh troops for his last campaign.

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  • On the 28th of November she was removed to Sheffield Castle, where she remained for the next fourteeen years in charge of the earl of Shrewsbury.

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  • In December 1583 Mary had laid before the French ambassador her first complaint of the slanders spread by Lady Shrewsbury and her sons, who were ultimately compelled to confess the falsehood of their imputations on the queen of Scots and her keeper.

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  • Anthony Babington, in his boyhood a ward of Shrewsbury, resident in the household at Sheffield Castle, and thus subjected to the charm before which so many victims had already fallen, was now induced to undertake the deliverance of the queen of Scots by the murder of the queen of England.

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  • Paulet, with loyal and regretful indignation, declined the disgrace proposed to him in a suggestion "to shed blood without law or warrant"; and on the 7th of February the earls of Shrewsbury and Kent arrived at Fotheringay with the commission of the council for execution of the sentence given against his prisoner.

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  • Three months after the massacre of St Bartholomew had caused some additional restrictions to be placed upon her freedom of action, Shrewsbury writes to Burghley that "rather than continue this imprisonment she sticks not to say she will give her body, her son, and country for liberty"; nor did she ever show any excess of regard for any of the three.

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  • The cope belonged to the convent of Syon near Isleworth, was taken to Portugal at the Reformation, brought back early in the 19th century to England by exiled nuns and given by them to the Earl of Shrewsbury.

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  • Mary's, Shrewsbury, in 1884; in 1885 he became private chaplain to the Bishop of Lichfield and in 1889 head of the Oxford House, Bethnal Green, where he gained much popularity owing to his devoted work among the East End poor.

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  • Eyton in his history of Shropshire identifies it with one of the "Ludes" mentioned in the Domesday Survey, which was held by Roger de Lacy of Osbern FitzRichard and supposes that Roger built the castle soon after 1086, while a chronicle of the FitzWarren family attributes the castle to Roger earl of Shrewsbury.

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  • From October 1400 the administration of Wales was conducted in his name; less than three years later he was in actual command of the English forces and fought against the Percies at Shrewsbury.

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  • of Shrewsbury on the London & North Western railway.

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  • In the reign of Edward the Confessor Wem was held as four manors, but at the time of the Domesday Survey William Pantulf was holding the whole as one manor of Roger, earl of Shrewsbury, from whom it passed to the Botelers, barons of Wem.

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  • The hostile forces met at Shrewsbury, and Shakespeare has made the result immortal.

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  • The Percies were to rise in arms, and meeting Owen at Shrewsbury, overwhelm the prince before help could arrive.

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  • But Owen's share in the undertaking miscarried through his own defeat near Carmarthen on the 12th of July, and Percy was crushed at Shrewsbury ten days later.

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  • See also Shrewsbury's anonymous correspondent in Hist.

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  • A friend of Harley, the duke of Shrewsbury, was first appointed to office, and subsequently the great body of the Whigs were displaced by Tories, Harley being made chancellor of the exchequer and Henry St John secretary of state.

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  • During a last moment of returning consciousness, and by the advice of the whole council, who had been joined on their own initiative by the Whig dukes Argyll and Somerset, she placed the lord treasurer's staff in the hands of the Whig duke of Shrewsbury, and measures were immediately taken for assuring the succession of the elector.

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  • from London on the Stafford-Shrewsbury joint line of the London & NorthWestern and Great Western railways, and on the Shrewsbury canal.

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  • The abbey was founded in 1145, under charter from King Stephen, by Richard de Baumes or Belmeis, dean of St Alkmund, Shrewsbury, for Augustinian canons, who were brought from Dorchester Abbey, Oxfordshire.

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  • gave with the rest of the county of Shropshire to Roger, earl of Shrewsbury.

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  • granted the manor of Bridgnorth to Earl Roger of Shrewsbury, whose son Robert de Belesme transferred his castle and borough from Quatford to Bridgnorth, but on Robert's attainder in 1102 the town became a royal borough.

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  • The 8th century saw a further curtailment of the Welsh territories under Offa, king of Mercia, who annexed Shrewsbury (Amwythig) and Hereford (Henfordd) with their surrounding districts, and constructed the artificial boundary known as Offa's Dyke running due N.

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  • Thus Hugh the Wolf was placed in Chester (Caer), Roger de Montgomery at Shrewsbury and William FitzOsbern at Hereford.

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  • Uriconium, a town near the Wrekin, and Pengwyrn, the modern Shrewsbury, were destroyed; but soon Ceawlin was defeated by the Britons at Fethanleag or Faddiley, near Nantwich, and his progress was effectually checked.

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  • The Old Hall hotel at the west end of the Crescent stands on the site of the mansion built in 1572 by the earl of Shrewsbury in the reign of Queen Elizabeth, which was the residence of Mary queen of Scots when she visited the town.

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  • The baths were visited at least four times by Mary queen of Scots, when a prisoner in charge of George, earl of Shrewsbury, other famous Elizabethan visitors being Lord Burleigh, the earl of Essex, and Robert, earl of Leicester.

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  • Hazlitt has recorded his very favourable impression of a remarkable sermon delivered at Shrewsbury; but there are other accounts of Coleridge's preaching not so enthusiastic. In the summer of 1795 he met for the first time the brother poet with whose name his own will be for ever associatedWordsworth and his sister had established themselves at Racedown in the Dorsetshire hills, and here Coleridge visited them in 1797.

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  • He was proclaimed king at Carlisle, joined by the earl of Derby in Lancashire, evaded the troops of Lambert and Harrison in Cheshire, marched through Shropshire, meeting with a rebuff at Shrewsbury, and entered Worcester with a small, tired and dispirited force of only 16,000 men (22nd of August).

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  • He excused himself from convocation in 1397, and from the subservient parliament at Shrewsbury in 1398.

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  • His second wife, the "wanton Shrewsbury" of Pope, a daughter of the earl of Cardigan, was seduced by the duke of Buckingham, whom the outraged husband challenged to a duel.

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  • to the dignity of a duke, but as he left no son this title died along with him in 1718, and the earldom of Shrewsbury devolved on his cousin Gilbert, a Roman Catholic priest.

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  • On the death of this cousin the descent of the title was for a short time in dispute, and the lands were claimed for Lord Edmund Howard (now Talbot), an infant son of the duke of Norfolk, under the will of the last earl; but the courts decided that, under a private act obtained by the duke of Shrewsbury shortly before his death, the title and bulk of the estates must go together, and the true successor to the earldom was found in Earl Talbot, the head of another line of the descendants of Sir Gilbert Talbot of Grafton, sprung from a second marriage of Sir Gilbert's son, Sir John Talbot of Albrighton.

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  • All the titles just mentioned have been united in the line of the Earl Talbot who successfully claimed the Shrewsbury title as the 18th earl, the earldom of Shrewsbury (1442) being now the oldest existing that is not merged in a higher title.

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  • The manufacture of iron in New Jersey dates from 1674, when the metal was reduced from its ores near Shrewsbury, Monmouth county.

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  • In the meantime Governor Nicolls of New York, ignorant of the grant to Berkeley and Carteret, had approved certain Indian sales of land to settlers within New Jersey, and had confirmed their titles to tracts in what later became Elizabethtown, Middletown and Shrewsbury.

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  • At the next session, in the following November, the towns of Shrewsbury and Middletown declared that they held their grants from Governor Nicolls, and that they were consequently exempt from any quit-rents the proprietors might claim.

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  • Numerous additional main lines - Reading to Newbury, Weymouth and the west, a new line opened in 1906 between Castle Cary and Langport effecting a great reduction in mileage between London and Exeter and places beyond; Didcot, Oxford, Birmingham, Shrewsbury, Chester with connexions northward, and to North Wales; Oxford to Worcester, and Swindon to Gloucester and the west of England; South Welsh system (through route from London via Wootton Bassett or via Bristol, and the Severn tunnel), Newport, Cardiff, Swansea, Milford.

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  • (5) The line from Shrewsbury to Craven Arms and Hereford, giving connexion between the north and the south-west, and Wales, is worked by the North-Western and Great Western companies.

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  • 2 The West Midlands (Shropshire, &c.) include the coal-fields of Shrewsbury, Leebotwood, Coalbrookdale, the Clee Hills and the Forest of Wyre.

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  • The mitred abbots in England were those of Abingdon, St Alban's, Bardney, Battle, Bury St Edmund's, St Augustine's Canterbury, Colchester, Croyland, Evesham, Glastonbury, Gloucester, St Benet's Hulme, Hyde, Malmesbury, Peterborough, Ramsey, Reading, Selby, Shrewsbury, Tavistock, Thorney, Westminster, Winchcombe, St Mary's York.

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  • Their opponents were led by kings whose orders were punctually obeyed from Shrewsbury to Dover and from London to Exeter.

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  • The palatine earls of Chester and Shrewsbury were not only endowed with special powers and rights of jurisdiction, but were almost the only tenants-in-chief within their respective shires.

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  • The advance was begun by his great vassals, the earls of Chester, Shrewsbury and Hereford, all of whom occupied new districts on the edge of the mountains of Powys and Gwynedd.

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  • In 1095 the same body of barons made a second and a more formidable rising, headed by the earls of Shrewsbury, Eu and Northumberland.

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  • The rising was led by Robert of Belesme, earl of Shrewsbury, a petty tyrant of the most ruffianly type, the terror of the Welsh marches.

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  • After taking the strong castles of Arundel, Tickhill, Bridgnorth and Shrewsbury, Henry forced the rebels to submit.

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  • Edward beheaded him at Shrewsbury as a traitor, having the Conquest of Wales.

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  • But the act which provoked the nation most was that he terrified the parliament which met at Shrewsbury in 1398 into voting away its powers to a small committee of ten persons, all creatures of his own.

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  • They then advanced towards Shrewsbury, where they hoped that Glendower might meet them.

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  • But long ere the Welsh could appear, King Henry was on the spot; he brought the rebels Defeat of to action at Hately Field, just outside the gates of the rebels Shrewsbury, and inflicted on them a complete defeat, at Shrews- in which his young son Henry of Monmouth first bur~v.

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  • By winning the battle of Shrewsbury Henry IV.

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  • The leaders of this period of the war were the duke of York, and the aged Lord Talbot, afterwards earl of Shrewsbury.

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  • Somerset was in command; he showed hopeless incapacity and timidity, and in a few months the duchy which had been so long held by the swords of Bedford, York and Shrewsbury was hopelessly lost.

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  • earl of Shrewsbury and the greater part of his Anglo-Gascon host were Battle of cut to pieces at the hard-fought battle of Castillon.

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  • The Welsh joined him in great numbers, not forgetting that by his Tudor descent he was their own kinsman, and when he reached Shrewsbury English adherents also began to flock in to his banner, for the whole country was seething with discontent, and Battle of Bosworth.

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  • She was in consequence regarded with suspicion and disfavour by Elizabeth and closely watched and guarded at Hardwick by the dowager countess of Shrewsbury.

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  • to John Talbot, earl of Shrewsbury, who was created earl of Waterford.

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  • bestowed it on the earl of Shrewsbury.

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  • In the parliament of 1841 he was member for Shrewsbury.

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  • The earls of Shrewsbury are still earls of Waterford, and retain the right to carry the white staff as hereditary stewards, but the palatinate jurisdiction over Wexford was taken away by Henry VIII.

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  • The lands of the earl of Shrewsbury and other absentees, who had performed no duties, were resumed; and both Celtic and feudal nobles were encouraged to come to court.

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  • According to Giraldus Cambrensis, Roger de Bellesme, a follower of William I., afterwards created earl of Shrewsbury, imported some stallions from Spain into England; their produce was celebrated by Drayton the poet.

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  • ORDERIC VITALIS (1075 - c. 1142), the chronicler, was the son of a French priest, Odeler of Orleans, who had entered the service of Roger Montgomery, earl of Shrewsbury, and had received from his patron a chapel in that city.

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  • They sent him at the age of five to learn his letters from an English priest, Siward by name, who kept a school in the church of SS Peter and Paul at Shrewsbury.

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  • Once we got to Shrewsbury, I found myself totally bamboozled by the one-way system.

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  • criticisereen Party's leading prospective candidate for the Assembly, Martyn Shrewsbury, today sharply criticized UKIP for its " disingenuous " action.

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  • Silver Series: Shrewsbury 1962 - Back to steam again, in this busy crossroads on a summer Saturday.

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  • crossroads of important routes from the coast to Shrewsbury with smaller roads connecting the communities of the Montgomeryshire countryside.

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  • The noble earl of Shrewsbury, let's hear him.

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  • Mark Stallard joins The imps on a two year contract from League Two rivals Shrewsbury Town.

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  • Teaching: late prehistoric and Roman Britain and Europe, co-ordinator for Certificate in British Archeology, Shrewsbury.

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  • The south-facing slope which drops away from the terrace is reputed to have been a vineyard belonging to Shrewsbury Abbey.

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  • It was he who was responsible for erecting a castle on the narrow spit of land to protect the growing settlement of Shrewsbury.

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  • transference of skills from Shrewsbury flax workers to employees of the firm.

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  • The Shrewsbury family remained in residence until 1923, after a sometimes turbulent 700 year history.

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  • His army, supported by welsh chieftains and eventually numbering 5,000 reaches Shrewsbury within a week.

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  • In 1717 this part of Marlboro, with other lands, was erected into the township of Westboro, to which parts of Sutton (1728),(1728), Shrewsbury (1762 and 1793) and Upton (1763) were subsequently annexed, and from which Northboro was separated in 1766.

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  • But the lands belonging to these titles remained with the Crown and he had to repair his fortunes by one of those marriages which never failed his house, his wife being Alathea Talbot, who was at last the heir of Gilbert, earl of Shrewsbury.

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  • of Shrewsbury.

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  • The plot was frustrated by Hotspur's defeat at Shrewsbury (21st of July 1403); and Northumberland for the time submitted.

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  • When nineteen he became the pupil of a doctor in Shrewsbury, also acting as dresser in the infirmary there.

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  • WATLING STREET, the Early English name for the great road made by the Romans from London past St Albans (Roman Verulamium) to Wroxeter (Roman Viroconium) near Shrewsbury and used by the Anglo-Saxons, just as a great part of it is used to-day.

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  • In 1884, at Shrewsbury, a prize of £Ioo was awarded for a sheafbinding reaper, and one of £50 for a similar machine.

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  • His Memoirs of Sir Robert Walpole (London, 1798), Memoirs of Horatio, Lord Walpole (London, 1802), Memoirs of John, duke of Marlborough (London, 1818-1819), Private and Original Correspondence of Charles Talbot, duke of Shrewsbury (London, 1821), Memoirs of the Administrations of Henry Pelham (London, 182 9), are very valuable for the history of the 18th century.

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  • During the invasion of South Wales under William Rufus, Arnulf de Montgomeri, fifth son of Roger earl of Shrewsbury,.

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  • At this castle Mary queen of Scots was detained in 1569 under the custody of the earls of Huntingdon and Shrewsbury.

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  • It is the terminal station of a branch of the London & North-Western railway coming southward from Shrewsbury, and is a station on the main line of the Great Western running to Fishguard; it is also the terminus of a branch-line of the Great Western running to Newcastle-Emlyn.

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  • In 1401 he was succeeded by his son Earl Richard, a brave and chivalrous warrior, who defeated Owen Glendower, fought the Percys at Shrewsbury, and, after travelling in state through Europe and the Holy Land, was employed against the Lollards and afterwards as lay ambassador from England to the council of Constance (1414).

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  • He was educated at Shrewsbury and at Queen's College, Oxford, of which he became a scholar.

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  • In 1215 he took Shrewsbury.

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  • When he arrived at the Castle Foregate, Shrewsbury, early on the 21st of July, and demanded provisions, he found the king's forces had arrived before him.

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  • from Shrewsbury.

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  • Percy's body was buried at Whitchurch, but was disinterred two days later to be exhibited in Shrewsbury.

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  • Tn the Domesday Survey it is included in the manor of Maesbury, which Rainald, sheriff of Shropshire, held of Roger, earl of Shrewsbury; but Rainald or his predecessor Warm had already raised a fortification at Oswestry called Louvre.

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  • by a charter dated 1398 granted all the privileges which belonged to Shrewsbury, and a similar charter was obtained from Thomas, earl of Arundel in 1407.

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  • In the 15th and 16th .centuries a weekly market was held at Oswestry for the sale of woollen goods manufactured in North Wales, but in the 17th century the drapers of Shrewsbury determined to get the trade into their own town, and although an Order in the Privy Council was passed to restrain it to Oswestry they agreed in 1621 to buy no more cloth there.

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  • (London, 1897); Shrewsbury Correspondence, ed.

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  • Coxe (London, 1821); Shrewsbury MSS.

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  • But now the queen's sudden death on the 1st of August, and the appointment of Shrewsbury to the lord treasurership, instantly changed the whole scene and ruined Bolingbroke.

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  • Robert Waring Darwin (1766-1848), his third son by his first marriage, a doctor at Shrewsbury, was the father of the famous Charles Darwin; and Violetta, his eldest daughter by his second marriage, was the mother of Francis Galton.

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  • JOB ORTON (1717-1783), English dissenting minister, was born at Shrewsbury on the 4th of September 1717.

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  • He entered the academy of Dr Philip Doddridge at Northampton, became minister of a congregation formed by a fusion of Presbyterians and Independents at High Street Chapel, Shrewsbury (1741), received Presbyterian ordination there (1745), resigned in 1766 owing to ill-health, and lived in retirement at Kidderminster until his death.

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  • THOMAS CHURCHYARD (c. 1520-1604), English author, was born at Shrewsbury about 1520, the son of a farmer.

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  • The master and the second master of Shrewsbury (founded 1550 were to be " well able to make a Latin verse, and learned in the Greek tongue."

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  • During the rest of the century the leading landmarks are the three royal commissions known by the names of their chairmen: (1) Lord Clarendon's on nine public schools, Eton, Winchester, Westminster, Charterhouse, Harrow, Rugby, Shrewsbury, St Paul's and Merchant Taylors' (1861-1864), resulting in the Public Schools Act of 1868; (2) Lord Taunton's on 782 endowed schools (1864-1867), followed by the act of 1869; and (3) Mr Bryce's on secondary education (1894-1895).

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  • The reform was carried forward at University College, London, by Professor Key and by Professor Robinson Ellis in 1873, and was accepted at Shrewsbury, Marlborough, Liverpool College, Christ's Hospital, Dulwich, and the City of London school.

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  • He was educated at Shrewsbury and St.

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  • Many English place-names contain the word, the most familiar being Shrewsbury (Scrobbesbyrig) and Wormwood Scrubs.

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  • north-west of York and the most northerly Romano-British town; Ratae, now Leicester, capital of the Coritani; Viroconium, now Wroxeter, near Shrewsbury, capital of the Cornovii; Venta Silurum, now Caerwent, near Chepstow; Corinium, now Cirencester, capital of the Dobuni; Isca Dumnoniorum, now Exeter, the most westerly of these towns; Durnovaria, now Dorchester, in Dorset, capital of the Durotriges; Venta Belgarum, now Winchester; Calleva Atrebatum, now Silchester, 10 m.

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  • By the treaty of Shrewsbury (1265) he was recognized as overlord of Wales; and in return Simon de Montfort was supplied with Welsh troops for his last campaign.

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  • On the 28th of November she was removed to Sheffield Castle, where she remained for the next fourteeen years in charge of the earl of Shrewsbury.

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  • In 1584 the long-suffering earl of Shrewsbury was relieved of his fourteen years' charge through the involuntary good offices of his wife, whose daughter by her first husband had married a brother of Darnley; and their orphan child Arabella, born in England, of royal descent on the father's side, was now, in the hopeful view of her grandmother, a more plausible claimant than the king or queen of Scots to the inheritance of the English throne.

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  • In December 1583 Mary had laid before the French ambassador her first complaint of the slanders spread by Lady Shrewsbury and her sons, who were ultimately compelled to confess the falsehood of their imputations on the queen of Scots and her keeper.

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  • Anthony Babington, in his boyhood a ward of Shrewsbury, resident in the household at Sheffield Castle, and thus subjected to the charm before which so many victims had already fallen, was now induced to undertake the deliverance of the queen of Scots by the murder of the queen of England.

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  • Paulet, with loyal and regretful indignation, declined the disgrace proposed to him in a suggestion "to shed blood without law or warrant"; and on the 7th of February the earls of Shrewsbury and Kent arrived at Fotheringay with the commission of the council for execution of the sentence given against his prisoner.

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  • Three months after the massacre of St Bartholomew had caused some additional restrictions to be placed upon her freedom of action, Shrewsbury writes to Burghley that "rather than continue this imprisonment she sticks not to say she will give her body, her son, and country for liberty"; nor did she ever show any excess of regard for any of the three.

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  • The cope belonged to the convent of Syon near Isleworth, was taken to Portugal at the Reformation, brought back early in the 19th century to England by exiled nuns and given by them to the Earl of Shrewsbury.

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  • After some years of hard and The year ended with another great victory at Fredericksburg successful work in this capacity, "the last survivor of the old Th v.), Chancellorsville (see Wilderness) won against odds martial prelates, fitter for harness than for bishops' robes, for (q of two to one, and the great three days' battle of Gettysburg a court of justice than a court of theology," died at Shrewsbury o (q.v.), where for the first time fortune turned decisively against in June 1543.

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  • Mary's, Shrewsbury, in 1884; in 1885 he became private chaplain to the Bishop of Lichfield and in 1889 head of the Oxford House, Bethnal Green, where he gained much popularity owing to his devoted work among the East End poor.

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  • Eyton in his history of Shropshire identifies it with one of the "Ludes" mentioned in the Domesday Survey, which was held by Roger de Lacy of Osbern FitzRichard and supposes that Roger built the castle soon after 1086, while a chronicle of the FitzWarren family attributes the castle to Roger earl of Shrewsbury.

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  • From October 1400 the administration of Wales was conducted in his name; less than three years later he was in actual command of the English forces and fought against the Percies at Shrewsbury.

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  • of Shrewsbury on the London & North Western railway.

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  • In the reign of Edward the Confessor Wem was held as four manors, but at the time of the Domesday Survey William Pantulf was holding the whole as one manor of Roger, earl of Shrewsbury, from whom it passed to the Botelers, barons of Wem.

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  • The hostile forces met at Shrewsbury, and Shakespeare has made the result immortal.

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  • The Percies were to rise in arms, and meeting Owen at Shrewsbury, overwhelm the prince before help could arrive.

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  • But Owen's share in the undertaking miscarried through his own defeat near Carmarthen on the 12th of July, and Percy was crushed at Shrewsbury ten days later.

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  • See also Shrewsbury's anonymous correspondent in Hist.

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  • A friend of Harley, the duke of Shrewsbury, was first appointed to office, and subsequently the great body of the Whigs were displaced by Tories, Harley being made chancellor of the exchequer and Henry St John secretary of state.

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  • During a last moment of returning consciousness, and by the advice of the whole council, who had been joined on their own initiative by the Whig dukes Argyll and Somerset, she placed the lord treasurer's staff in the hands of the Whig duke of Shrewsbury, and measures were immediately taken for assuring the succession of the elector.

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  • from London on the Stafford-Shrewsbury joint line of the London & NorthWestern and Great Western railways, and on the Shrewsbury canal.

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  • The abbey was founded in 1145, under charter from King Stephen, by Richard de Baumes or Belmeis, dean of St Alkmund, Shrewsbury, for Augustinian canons, who were brought from Dorchester Abbey, Oxfordshire.

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  • gave with the rest of the county of Shropshire to Roger, earl of Shrewsbury.

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  • granted the manor of Bridgnorth to Earl Roger of Shrewsbury, whose son Robert de Belesme transferred his castle and borough from Quatford to Bridgnorth, but on Robert's attainder in 1102 the town became a royal borough.

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  • The 8th century saw a further curtailment of the Welsh territories under Offa, king of Mercia, who annexed Shrewsbury (Amwythig) and Hereford (Henfordd) with their surrounding districts, and constructed the artificial boundary known as Offa's Dyke running due N.

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  • Thus Hugh the Wolf was placed in Chester (Caer), Roger de Montgomery at Shrewsbury and William FitzOsbern at Hereford.

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  • Llewelyn's brother, now David III., designated by the English " the last survivor of that race of traitors," for a few months defied the English forces amongst the fastnesses of Snowdon, but ere long he was captured, tried as a disloyal English baron by a parliament at Shrewsbury, and finally executed under circumstances of great barbarity on the 3rd of October 1283.

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  • Uriconium, a town near the Wrekin, and Pengwyrn, the modern Shrewsbury, were destroyed; but soon Ceawlin was defeated by the Britons at Fethanleag or Faddiley, near Nantwich, and his progress was effectually checked.

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  • The Old Hall hotel at the west end of the Crescent stands on the site of the mansion built in 1572 by the earl of Shrewsbury in the reign of Queen Elizabeth, which was the residence of Mary queen of Scots when she visited the town.

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  • The baths were visited at least four times by Mary queen of Scots, when a prisoner in charge of George, earl of Shrewsbury, other famous Elizabethan visitors being Lord Burleigh, the earl of Essex, and Robert, earl of Leicester.

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  • Hazlitt has recorded his very favourable impression of a remarkable sermon delivered at Shrewsbury; but there are other accounts of Coleridge's preaching not so enthusiastic. In the summer of 1795 he met for the first time the brother poet with whose name his own will be for ever associatedWordsworth and his sister had established themselves at Racedown in the Dorsetshire hills, and here Coleridge visited them in 1797.

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  • He was proclaimed king at Carlisle, joined by the earl of Derby in Lancashire, evaded the troops of Lambert and Harrison in Cheshire, marched through Shropshire, meeting with a rebuff at Shrewsbury, and entered Worcester with a small, tired and dispirited force of only 16,000 men (22nd of August).

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  • He excused himself from convocation in 1397, and from the subservient parliament at Shrewsbury in 1398.

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  • His second wife, the "wanton Shrewsbury" of Pope, a daughter of the earl of Cardigan, was seduced by the duke of Buckingham, whom the outraged husband challenged to a duel.

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  • to the dignity of a duke, but as he left no son this title died along with him in 1718, and the earldom of Shrewsbury devolved on his cousin Gilbert, a Roman Catholic priest.

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  • On the death of this cousin the descent of the title was for a short time in dispute, and the lands were claimed for Lord Edmund Howard (now Talbot), an infant son of the duke of Norfolk, under the will of the last earl; but the courts decided that, under a private act obtained by the duke of Shrewsbury shortly before his death, the title and bulk of the estates must go together, and the true successor to the earldom was found in Earl Talbot, the head of another line of the descendants of Sir Gilbert Talbot of Grafton, sprung from a second marriage of Sir Gilbert's son, Sir John Talbot of Albrighton.

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  • All the titles just mentioned have been united in the line of the Earl Talbot who successfully claimed the Shrewsbury title as the 18th earl, the earldom of Shrewsbury (1442) being now the oldest existing that is not merged in a higher title.

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  • The manufacture of iron in New Jersey dates from 1674, when the metal was reduced from its ores near Shrewsbury, Monmouth county.

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  • In the meantime Governor Nicolls of New York, ignorant of the grant to Berkeley and Carteret, had approved certain Indian sales of land to settlers within New Jersey, and had confirmed their titles to tracts in what later became Elizabethtown, Middletown and Shrewsbury.

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  • At the next session, in the following November, the towns of Shrewsbury and Middletown declared that they held their grants from Governor Nicolls, and that they were consequently exempt from any quit-rents the proprietors might claim.

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  • Numerous additional main lines - Reading to Newbury, Weymouth and the west, a new line opened in 1906 between Castle Cary and Langport effecting a great reduction in mileage between London and Exeter and places beyond; Didcot, Oxford, Birmingham, Shrewsbury, Chester with connexions northward, and to North Wales; Oxford to Worcester, and Swindon to Gloucester and the west of England; South Welsh system (through route from London via Wootton Bassett or via Bristol, and the Severn tunnel), Newport, Cardiff, Swansea, Milford.

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  • (5) The line from Shrewsbury to Craven Arms and Hereford, giving connexion between the north and the south-west, and Wales, is worked by the North-Western and Great Western companies.

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  • 2 The West Midlands (Shropshire, &c.) include the coal-fields of Shrewsbury, Leebotwood, Coalbrookdale, the Clee Hills and the Forest of Wyre.

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  • The mitred abbots in England were those of Abingdon, St Alban's, Bardney, Battle, Bury St Edmund's, St Augustine's Canterbury, Colchester, Croyland, Evesham, Glastonbury, Gloucester, St Benet's Hulme, Hyde, Malmesbury, Peterborough, Ramsey, Reading, Selby, Shrewsbury, Tavistock, Thorney, Westminster, Winchcombe, St Mary's York.

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  • Their opponents were led by kings whose orders were punctually obeyed from Shrewsbury to Dover and from London to Exeter.

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  • The palatine earls of Chester and Shrewsbury were not only endowed with special powers and rights of jurisdiction, but were almost the only tenants-in-chief within their respective shires.

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  • The advance was begun by his great vassals, the earls of Chester, Shrewsbury and Hereford, all of whom occupied new districts on the edge of the mountains of Powys and Gwynedd.

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  • In 1095 the same body of barons made a second and a more formidable rising, headed by the earls of Shrewsbury, Eu and Northumberland.

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  • The rising was led by Robert of Belesme, earl of Shrewsbury, a petty tyrant of the most ruffianly type, the terror of the Welsh marches.

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  • After taking the strong castles of Arundel, Tickhill, Bridgnorth and Shrewsbury, Henry forced the rebels to submit.

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  • Edward beheaded him at Shrewsbury as a traitor, having the Conquest of Wales.

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  • But the act which provoked the nation most was that he terrified the parliament which met at Shrewsbury in 1398 into voting away its powers to a small committee of ten persons, all creatures of his own.

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  • They then advanced towards Shrewsbury, where they hoped that Glendower might meet them.

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  • But long ere the Welsh could appear, King Henry was on the spot; he brought the rebels Defeat of to action at Hately Field, just outside the gates of the rebels Shrewsbury, and inflicted on them a complete defeat, at Shrews- in which his young son Henry of Monmouth first bur~v.

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  • By winning the battle of Shrewsbury Henry IV.

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  • The leaders of this period of the war were the duke of York, and the aged Lord Talbot, afterwards earl of Shrewsbury.

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  • Somerset was in command; he showed hopeless incapacity and timidity, and in a few months the duchy which had been so long held by the swords of Bedford, York and Shrewsbury was hopelessly lost.

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  • earl of Shrewsbury and the greater part of his Anglo-Gascon host were Battle of cut to pieces at the hard-fought battle of Castillon.

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  • The Welsh joined him in great numbers, not forgetting that by his Tudor descent he was their own kinsman, and when he reached Shrewsbury English adherents also began to flock in to his banner, for the whole country was seething with discontent, and Battle of Bosworth.

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  • She was in consequence regarded with suspicion and disfavour by Elizabeth and closely watched and guarded at Hardwick by the dowager countess of Shrewsbury.

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  • to John Talbot, earl of Shrewsbury, who was created earl of Waterford.

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  • bestowed it on the earl of Shrewsbury.

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  • In the parliament of 1841 he was member for Shrewsbury.

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  • The earls of Shrewsbury are still earls of Waterford, and retain the right to carry the white staff as hereditary stewards, but the palatinate jurisdiction over Wexford was taken away by Henry VIII.

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  • The lands of the earl of Shrewsbury and other absentees, who had performed no duties, were resumed; and both Celtic and feudal nobles were encouraged to come to court.

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  • According to Giraldus Cambrensis, Roger de Bellesme, a follower of William I., afterwards created earl of Shrewsbury, imported some stallions from Spain into England; their produce was celebrated by Drayton the poet.

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  • ORDERIC VITALIS (1075 - c. 1142), the chronicler, was the son of a French priest, Odeler of Orleans, who had entered the service of Roger Montgomery, earl of Shrewsbury, and had received from his patron a chapel in that city.

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  • They sent him at the age of five to learn his letters from an English priest, Siward by name, who kept a school in the church of SS Peter and Paul at Shrewsbury.

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  • The delightful Severn Valley from MOAT LANE through NEWTOWN and WELSHPOOL to SHREWSBURY where semaphore signaling abounds.

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  • The south-facing slope which drops away from the terrace is reputed to have been a vineyard belonging to Shrewsbury Abbey.

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  • It was he who was responsible for erecting a castle on the narrow spit of land to protect the growing settlement of Shrewsbury.

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  • It is not clear whether there was any transference of skills from Shrewsbury flax workers to employees of the firm.

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  • The Shrewsbury family remained in residence until 1923, after a sometimes turbulent 700 year history.

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  • His army, supported by welsh chieftains and eventually numbering 5,000 reaches Shrewsbury within a week.

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  • Otto was a small Dachshund/Terrier mixed breed dog that had been owned and loved by Lynn and Peter Jones of Shrewsbury, England since he was just six weeks old.

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  • Located in Alton, Staffordshire, on the grounds of a gothic country estate formerly owned by the Earl of Shrewsbury, the park is home to several world famous coasters.

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  • Located in Staffordshire, the park is spread over the grounds of an abandoned gothic mansion formerly occupied by the Earl of Shrewsbury.

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  • On this page, Clastonbury and Red Coat are typical Old English fonts that you can download, but don't forget to take a look at Shrewsbury and Boister as well.

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