Shows sentence example

shows
  • Granted, he's been secretive about Julie but the fact he brought her here to meet us shows he's opening up.

    14
    3
  • Just don't tell the Iceman I cometh when he shows up.

    10
    0
  • The fact that she shows no terror as she sits before me is most vexing.

    10
    1
  • She was watching the latest of his two TV shows, the one where he was a cook.

    11
    2
  • In one direction the tabby shows a tendency to melanism which culminates in complete blackness, while in the other direction there is an equally marked tendency to albinism; grey cats, which may be regarded as tabbies whose stri p es have disappeared, forming the connecting link between the tabby and the white cat.

    8
    1
    Advertisement
  • Because television was radio with pictures, the first television shows were simply men in suits standing in front of microphones reading the news.

    6
    0
  • There would be dinners, a Saturday night dance, slide shows and hundreds of ice climbing exhibits.

    6
    1
  • In all other questions of this kind he shows himself far in advance of the economic fallacies of the day.

    5
    0
  • It shows me you have some inkling of the importance of this gift you possess and the dire consequences of it falling into the wrong hands.

    3
    0
  • She'd never been in a police station, but she didn't think they'd be this different from the police shows on television!

    6
    3
    Advertisement
  • Just imagine being a little mouse in the corner, see­ing who shows up, what they have to say about you.

    3
    0
  • The Hampton Court organ of 1690 shows that Schmidt had further lowered his pitch a semitone, to a' 441 7.

    3
    0
  • I remembered your mentioning the perfect attendance—how your son and husband had a little bet going but his personnel record shows he took a day off, on the fourth of March.

    2
    0
  • From July to October the level of the Senegal shows a series of fluctuations, with, however, a general increase till the end of August or beginning of September, when the maximum occurs.

    2
    0
  • The 12-hour term is much less variable, especially as regards its phase angle; its amplitude shows distinct maxima near the equinoxes.

    2
    0
    Advertisement
  • During thunderstorms the record from an electrograph shows large sudden excursions, the trace usually going off the sheet with every flash of.

    2
    1
  • All his work shows a judicial tone of mind, and is remarkable for the charm of its style.

    2
    1
  • The Annales, which are in seven books, deal with the history of Bavaria in conjunction with general history from the earliest times to 1460, and the author shows a strong sympathy for the Empire in its struggle with the Papacy.

    1
    0
  • It is rough in form and the author shows no power of discriminating between important and unimportant events; yet the chronicle is an excellent authority for the history of Saxony during the reigns of the emperors Otto III.

    1
    0
  • The appended table shows the progress made since 1850 with regard to steam power.

    1
    0
    Advertisement
  • Experience shows that in the modern orchestra there is safety in.

    1
    0
  • The export of agricultural products shows a large increase.

    1
    0
  • The anterior end of body always shows some "cephalization."

    1
    0
  • The young foot shows a bilobed form.

    1
    0
  • Shows you're a fool.

    4
    3
    Advertisement
  • I'm not lying when I say there is no firm proof that your hus­band's death was anything more than an accidental drowning— that's what the overwhelming evidence shows.

    0
    0
  • The herm is a dry work and the head upon the coins shows various degrees of idealization.

    0
    0
  • The site, now called Eski-shehr, shows only a few traces of the old town.

    0
    0
  • This is not so, for his will (Memoirs, p. 427) shows that besides his large estates he left a considerable amount of personal property.

    0
    0
  • The import trade shows the largest totals in foodstuffs, wines and liquors, textiles and raw materials for their manufacture, wood and its manufactures, iron and its manufactures, paper and cardboard, glass and ceramic wares.

    0
    0
  • The following table shows the number of live stock in the country at intervals of ten years since 1885.

    0
    0
  • This shows that the principle of the dissipation of energy has control over the actions of those agents only whose faculties are too gross to enable them to grapple individually with the minute portions of matter which are the seat of energy.

    0
    0
  • He shows that the amount of work obtainable is equal to that which can be done by the first gas in expanding into the space occupied by the second (supposed vacuous) together with that done by the second in expanding into the space occupied by the first.

    0
    0
  • But experiment shows that in this condition much of the violin part sounds incomplete; and the truth appears to be that Haydn is thinking, like any modern composer, of the opposition of two solid bodies of tone - the pianoforte and the stringed instruments.

    0
    0
  • Timbre itself is, as Helmholtz shows, a kind of harmony felt but not heard.

    0
    0
  • The hydroid colony shows many variations in form and architec- ture which depend simply upon differences in the methods in which polyps are budded.

    0
    0
  • The sub-umbrella invariably shows a velum as an inwardly projecting ridge or rim at its margin, within the circle .of tentacles; hence the medusae of this sub-class are termed craspedote.

    0
    0
  • The endoderm of the medusa shows the same general types of structure as in the polyp, described above.

    0
    0
  • The body bears tentacles, but shows no division into hydrorhiza, hydrocaulus or hydranth; it is temporarily fixed and has no perisarc. The polyp is usually hermaphrodite, developing both ovaries and testes in the same individual.

    0
    0
  • The development of the Trachomedusae, so far as it is known, shows an actinula-stage which is either free (larval) or passed over in the egg (foetal) as in Geryonia; in no case does there appear to be a free planula-stage.

    0
    0
  • The development of the Narcomedusae is in the main similar to that of the Trachomedusae, but shows some remarkable features.

    0
    0
  • As yet, however, the medusa of Microhydra has only been seen in an immature condition, but it shows some well-marked differences from Limnocodium, especially in the structure of the tentacles, which furnish useful characters for distinguishing species amongst medusae.

    0
    0
  • Thus even his idea of the relation of the divine activity to the world shows a tendency to a pantheistic notion of a divine thought which gradually realizes itself in the process of becoming.

    0
    0
  • All organic forms are at bottom but one organization, and the inorganic world shows the same formative activity in various degrees or potences.

    0
    0
  • He shows that in the 3rd century B.C. the language used throughout northern India was practically one, and that it was derived directly from the speech of the Vedic Aryans, retaining many Vedic forms lost in the later classical Sanskrit.

    0
    0
  • Franke also shows that there were local peculiarities in small matters of spelling and inflexion, and that the particular form of the language used in and about the Avanti district, of which the capital was Ujjeni (a celebrated pre-Buddhistic city), was the basis of the language used in the sacred texts as we now have them.

    0
    0
  • The registry of the citizens, the suppression of litigation, the elevation of public morals, the care of minors, the retrenchment of public expenses, the limitation of gladiatorial games and shows, the care of roads, the restoration of senatorial privileges, the appointment of none but worthy magistrates, even the regulation of street traffic, these and numberless other duties so completely absorbed his attention that, in spite of indifferent health, they often kept him at severe labour from early morning till long after midnight.

    0
    0
  • His position, indeed, often necessitated his presence at games and shows, but on these occasions he occupied himself either in reading, in being read to, or in writing notes.

    0
    0
  • The Mosses and Liverworts include forms with a more or less leaf-like thallus, such as many of the liverworts, and forms in which the plant shows a differentiation into a stem bearing remarkably simple leaves, as in the true mosses.

    0
    0
  • The gametophyte is a small thalloid structure which shows varying degrees of independence affording an interesting transition to the next group.

    0
    0
  • The sporophyte is the plant which is differentiated into stem, leaf and root, which show a wonderful variety 01 form; the internal structure also shows increased complexity and variety as compared with the other group of vascular plants, the Pteridophyta.

    0
    0
  • The tissue developed to meet the demands for conduction in such cases always shows some of the characters described.

    0
    0
  • This leptom is not so highly differentiated as in the most advanced Laminariaceae, but shows some of the characters of sieve-tubes with great distinctness.

    0
    0
  • The study of simple organisms, many of which consist of nothing but a little mass of protoplasm, exhibiting a very rudimentary degree of differentiation, so far as our methods enable us to determine any at all, shows that the duties of existence can be discharged in the absence of any cell-wall.

    0
    0
  • If we pass a little higher up the scale ot life we meet with forms consisting of two or more cells, each of which contains a similar minute mass of living substance, A study of them shows that each is practically independent of the others; in fact, the connection between them is so slight that they can separate and each becofne free without the slightest disadvantage to another.

    0
    0
  • What little differentiation can be found to exist in the protoplasm of the simple unicellular organism shows the importance of an adequate water-supply, and indeed, the dependence of life upon it.

    0
    0
  • Careful staining shows that the granular substance of the interior really consists of a large number of delicate rod-like bodies.

    0
    0
  • After making its way into the interior, the intruder sets up a considerable hyper trophy of the tissue, causing the formation of a tubercle, which soon shows a certain differentiation, branches of the vascular bundles of the root being supplied to it.

    0
    0
  • The turgidity in the cells of a growing member is not uniform, but shows a fairly rhythmical variation in its different parts.

    0
    0
  • If the member is one which shows a difference of structure on two sides, such as a leaf, the two sides frequently show a difference of degree of turgidity, and consequently of rate of growth.

    0
    0
  • It took place southwards, for the arctic flora is remarkably uniform, and, as Chodat points out, it shows no evidence of having been recruited from the several mountain floras.

    0
    0
  • Internally they are found to consist of a lamina twisted upon itself, and externally they generally exhibit a tortuous structure, produced, before the cloaca was reached, by the spiral valve of a compressed small intestine (as in skates, sharks and dog-fishes); the surface shows also vascular impressions and corrugations due to the same cause.

    0
    0
  • The Demeter of Cnidus in the British Museum, of the school of Praxiteles, apparently shows her mourning for the loss of her daughter.

    0
    0
  • A more intricate social organization caused internal weakness, and Eastern history shows with what rapidity peoples who have become strong by discipline and moderation pass from the height of their glory into extreme corruption and disintegration.'

    0
    0
  • The sequel shows how a Jew might rise to power in the civil service of the Egyptian Empire and yet remain a hero to some of the Jews - provided that he did not intermarry with a Gentile.

    0
    0
  • The apology for the necessary defects of a translation put forward by the translator of Ecclesiasticus in his Prologue shows that the work was carried on beyond the limits of the Law.

    0
    0
  • The Talmud shows the influence of that law in many points, and may justly be compared to it as a monument of codification based on great principles.

    0
    0
  • The comparative evidence afforded by the discovery of Egyptian relics shows that the Great Age of the Cretan palaces covers the close of the third and the first half of the second millennium before our era.

    0
    0
  • The evidence supplied by this and other Cretan sites shows that the principal Minoan divinity was a kind of Magna Mater, a Great Mother or nature goddess, with whom was associated a male satellite.

    0
    0
  • This quarter of the palace shows the double axe sign constantly repeated on its walls and pillars, and remains of miniature wall-paintings showing pillar shrines, in some cases with double axes stuck into the wooden columns.

    0
    0
  • Milchhdfer (Anfdnge der Kunst) had called attention to certain remarkable examples of archaic Greek bronze-work, and the subsequent discovery of the votive bronzes in the cave of Zeus on Mount Ida, and notably the shields with their fine embossed designs, shows that by the 8th century B.C. Cretan technique in metal not only held its own beside imported Cypro-Phoenician work, but was distinctly ahead of that of the rest of Greece (Halbherr, Bronzi del antro di Zeus Ideo).

    0
    0
  • The recent excavations by the British School on the site of the Dictaean temple at Palaikastro bear out this conclusion, and an archaic marble head of Apollo found at Eleutherna shows that classical tradition was not at fault in recording the existence of a very early school of Greek sculpture in the island, illustrated by the names of Dipoenos and Scyllis.

    0
    0
  • Wherever stratification is observed in these formations in Mississippi, it shows a dip west and south of 20 or 30 ft.

    0
    0
  • The -fact that the name of the ant has come down in English from a thousand years ago shows that this class of insects impressed the old inhabitants of England as they impressed the Hebrews and Greeks.

    0
    0
  • Such " workers " are essential to the formation of a social community of Hymenoptera, and their wingless condition among the ants shows that their specialization has been carried further in this family than among the wasps and bees.

    0
    0
  • The Blue Grotto is in the Tithonian limestones; it shows indications of recent changes of level.

    0
    0
  • The existence of numerous ancient cisterns shows that in Roman as in modern times rain-water was largely used for lack of springs.

    0
    0
  • These stamens encircle a style which is the upward continuation of the ovary, and which shows at its free end traces of the three originally separate but now blended carpels of which the ovary consists.

    0
    0
  • Of all the Asiatic ranges the Himalayan is, geologically, the best known; and the evidence which it affords shows clearly that the folds to which it owes its elevation were produced by an overthrust from the north.

    0
    0
  • The occurrence of mammals of the Marsupial order in the Molucca Islands and Celebes, while none have been found in the adjacent islands of Java and Borneo, lying on the west of Wallace's line, or in the Indian region, shows that the margin of the Australian region has here been reached.

    0
    0
  • Among the Anacanthini, the cod family so well known in Europe shows but one or two species in the seas of south Asia, though the soles and allied fishes are numerous along the coasts.

    0
    0
  • It is the main inspiration of Japanese art, which, however, shows great originality in its treatment of borrowed themes.

    0
    0
  • In these features, and in the fact that the gonads are local proliferations of the coelomic epithelium, which have undergone no further changes in the simpler forms, the coelom of this group shows in a particularly clear fashion the general characters of the coelom in the higher Metazoa.

    0
    0
  • The well-known Syllid, discovered during the voyage of the "Challenger," shows a modification of this form of budding.

    0
    0
  • This result shows that Cyrus must have been a great warrior and statesman.

    0
    0
  • Luard supposes that Matthew never intended his work to see the light in its present form, and many passages of the autograph have against them the note offendiculum, which shows that the writer understood the danger which he ran.

    0
    0
  • The Getica of Jordanes shows Gothic sympathies; but these are probably due to an imitation of the tone of Cassiodorus, from whom he draws practically all his material.

    0
    0
  • Finally, connected as he was with the Alans, he shows himself friendly to them, whenever they enter into his narrative.

    0
    0
  • The passing of some 3500 enclosure bills, affecting between 5 and 5z million acres, during the reign of George III., before which the whole number was between 200 and 250, shows how rapidly the break-up of the common-field husbandry and the cultivation of new land now proceeded.

    0
    0
  • The declining prices that have operated against the growers of wheat should be studied in conjunction with Table III., which shows, at intervals of five years, the imports of TABLE III.

    0
    0
  • A similar comparison for the several sections of Great Britain, as set forth in Table VI., shows that to England belong about 95% of the wheat area, over 80% of the barley area, over 60% of the oats area, and over 70% of the potato area, and these proportions do not vary much from year to year.

    0
    0
  • The fact that much of the wheat to which the figures apply is still in the stack after the publication of the figures shows that the latter are essentially estimates.

    0
    0
  • It has been proved at the Christmas fat stock shows that the older a bullock gets the less will he gain in weight per day as a result of the feeding.

    0
    0
  • The society holds annual shows, publishes annually the Shire Horse Stud Book and offers'_gold and silver medals for competition amongst Shire horses at agricultural shows in different parts of the country.

    0
    0
  • This volume records the births in the herds of members of the society, and gives the pedigrees of cows and bulls, besides furnishing lists of prizewinners at the principal shows and butter-test awards, and reports of sales by auction of Jersey cattle.

    0
    0
  • Prizes are offered by the society at various agricultural shows where Hampshire Down sheep are exhibited.

    0
    0
  • The exhibition of pigs at agricultural shows has to be abandoned, in consequence of swine fever regulations.

    0
    0
  • It is the custom of the Royal Agricultural Society of England to invite competitions at its annual shows in specified classes of implements, and an enumeration of these will indicate the character of the appliances which were thus brought into prominence in the latter years of the 19th and the early years of the 10th century.

    0
    0
  • It shows that the Autobiography rather understates the amount of work done.

    0
    0
  • Again, the classification of an economic bibliography at once shows how varied has been the character of economic investigation, ranging from the most abstract speculation on the one hand to almost technical studies of particular trades on the other.

    0
    0
  • That which terminated in 1304, though unfortunately few characteristics, personal or individual, have been preserved, shows him by his conduct to have been the normal Scottish noble of the time.

    0
    0
  • Bruce is reputed to have been one of the advisers who assisted in framing it; but a provision that his castle of Kildrummy was to be placed in charge of a person for whom he should answer shows that Edward, not without reason, suspected his fidelity.

    0
    0
  • It everywhere shows a preference for a moist but well-drained soil, and never attains its full stature or luxuriance of growth upon arid ground, whether on plain or mountain - a peculiarity that should be remembered by the planter.

    0
    0
  • The detorted visceral commissure shows a tendency to the concentration of all its elements round the oesophagus, so that except in the Bullomorpha and in Aplysia the whole nervous system is aggregated in the cephalic region, either dorsally or ventrally.

    0
    0
  • The foot is always simple, with its flat crawling surface extending from end to end, but in the embryo Limnaea it shows a bilobed character, which leads on to the condition characteristic of Pteropoda.

    0
    0
  • What makes Origen's answer so instructive is that it shows how close an affinity existed between Celsus and himself in their fundamental philosophical and theological presuppositions.

    0
    0
  • Theatral structures found at Cnossus and Phaestus, within the precincts of the palaces, were perhaps used for shows or for sittings of a royal assize, rather than for popular assemblies.

    0
    0
  • A painted sarcophagus, found at Hagia Triada, also possibly shows a hero-cult of the dead.

    0
    0
  • That of painting in fresco, for instance, shows the same orderly development from at any rate Period II.

    0
    0
  • The art of all the area gives evidence of one spirit and common models; in religious representations it shows the same anthropomorphic personification and the same ritual furniture.

    0
    0
  • Treating of God in his various aspects "as a being of the understanding," "as a moral being or law," "as love" and so on, Feuerbach shows that in every aspect God corresponds to some feature or need of human nature.

    0
    0
  • This is followed s s, by a sub-costal which some times shows two main branches.

    0
    0
  • Moreover, in this order the abdomen shows at first a division into only nine segments and a terminal mass, which last subsequently becomes divided into two.

    0
    0
  • In the metabolic Hexapoda the resting pupal instar shows externally the wings and other characteristic imaginal organs which have been gradually elaborated beneath the larval cuticle.

    0
    0
  • Such excessive multiplication of the larger taxonomic divisions shows an imperfect sense of proportion, for if the term " class " be allowed its usual zoological value, no student can fail to recognize that the Hexapoda form a single welldefined class, from which few entomologists would wish to exclude even the Apterygogenea.

    0
    0
  • Most of the families and a large proportion of the genera of insects are exceedingly widespread, but a study of the genera and species in any of the more important families shows that faunas can be distinguished whose headquarters agree fairly with the regions that have been proposed to express the distribution of the higher vertebrates.

    0
    0
  • The occurrence of weevils - among the most specialized of the Coleoptera - in Triassic rocks shows us that this great order of metabolous insects had become differentiated into its leading families at the dawn of the Mesozoic era, and that we must go far back into the Palaeozoic for the origin of the Endopterygota.

    0
    0
  • The minute-book of the Linnean Society of London shows that his Prolusio was read at meetings of that Society between the 15th of November 1814 and the 21st of February 1815.

    0
    0
  • This seems to have been his last attempt; for, two years later, his Bibliography of Zoology shows little trace of his favourite theory, though nothing he had uttered in its support was retracted.

    0
    0
  • Tiedemann's carefully-wrought Anatomic and N aturgeschichte der V gel - which shows a remarkable advance upon the work which Cuvier did in 1805, and in some respects is superior to his later production of 1817.

    0
    0
  • A third part shows, from the practices of their religious worship, that the Christians had in truth dedicated themselves to God.

    0
    0
  • The Procuratie Vecchie is perhaps the longest arcaded façade in the world and certainly shows the least amount of wall space; the whole design is simple, the .moulding and ornamentation severe.

    0
    0
  • He also shows how his method may be used to determine some curious and long-discussed problems, such as the light of the stars, the ebb and flow of the tide, the motion of the balance.

    0
    0
  • In this connexion Yaqui tells a curious story of the opening of one of the tombs by the caliph, which in spite of fabulous incidents, recalling the legend of Roderic the Goth, shows some traces of local knowledge.

    0
    0
  • The pedal equation is r 3 =a 2 p, which shows FIG.

    0
    0
  • The site shows a Roman theatre, amphitheatre, temple and other ruins, with part of the city wall, and the moles of the Roman harbour, with a ruined Greek cathedral and other medieval buildings.

    0
    0
  • The city still shows some signs of its former magnificence.

    0
    0
  • No other fish shows finer proportions in the shape of its body.

    0
    0
  • A forfeiture is also waived if the landlord elects not to take advantage of it - and shows his election either expressly or impliedly by some act, which acknowledges the continuance of the tenancy, e.g.

    0
    0
  • Microscopic examination of a specimen of mature cotton shows that the hairs are flattened and twisted, resembling somewhat in general appearance an empty and twisted fire hose.

    0
    0
  • Experience shows that 1000 lb of seed are produced for every 50o lb of cotton brought to market.

    0
    0
  • Inspection of a field of cotton shows that different plants vary as regards productiveness, length, and character of the lint, period of ripening, power of resistance to various pests and of withstanding drought.

    0
    0
  • He is also to be credited with the abolition of the gladiatorial shows in 404 (although there is said to be evidence of their existence later), a reduction of the taxes, improvements in criminal law, and the reorganization of the defensores civitatum, municipal officers whose duty it was to defend the rights of the people and set forth their grievances.

    0
    0
  • Embryology shows that originally these different parts are separately started, and only ultimately become united into one.

    0
    0
  • What we do find is a slight transverse furrow on each side of the head, close to the tip, but the most careful examination of sections made through the tissues of the head and brain shows the absence of any further apparatus comparable to that described above.

    0
    0
  • Large sums of money and games and shows were provided for the people, and, in addition, all the arrears of taxation for the last fifteen years (about £10,000,000) were cancelled and the bonds burnt in the Forum of Trajan.

    0
    0
  • It shows a clear discernment of the dangers of the ascetic life, and a deep insight into the significance of the Augustinian doctrine of grace.

    0
    0
  • The value of farm property in the southern counties, which have been developed very recently, shows a steady increase, that of Hillsboro county surpassing the other counties of the state.

    0
    0
  • The general analogy shows itself further in the idea of the deity as the husband (ba'al) of his worshippers or of the land in which they dwell.

    0
    0
  • Again, the adult Pentastomum shows no trace of appendages, unless the two pairs of chitinous hooks are to be regarded as the vestiges of jaws or ambulatory limbs.

    0
    0
  • This law bears the title of Liber Constitutionum, which shows that it emanated from the king; it is also known as the Lex Gundobada or Lex Gombata.

    0
    0
  • The barbarian law of the Burgundians shows strong traces of Roman influence.

    0
    0
  • The vehement protest made in the 9th century by Agobard, bishop of Lyons, against the Lex Gundobada shows that it was still in use at that period.

    0
    0
  • The reference to affranchisement in ecclesia shows that it was composed at a period subsequent to the conversion of the Alamanni to Christianity.

    0
    0
  • The word used shows Loyola's military ideal of the duties and methods of the nascent society.

    0
    0
  • Farn; the Indo-European root, seen in the Sanskrit parna, a feather, shows the primary meaning; cf.

    0
    0
  • Sakya Muni, the Buddha, came here from Gaya in the 6th century B.C. (from which time some of the remains may date), in order to establish his religion, which shows that the place was even then a great centre.

    0
    0
  • Its solution in concentrated sulphuric acid is of a yellow colour and shows a marked blue fluorescence.

    0
    0
  • The retaining of alchemists at various courts shows the high opinion which the doctrines had gained.

    0
    0
  • A scheme such as the preceding one shows that the first dibrombenzene must be the ortho-compound, the second the meta-, and the third the para-derivative.

    0
    0
  • Thus benzene, (CH) gives thiophene, (CH) S, from which it is difficultly distinguished; pyridine, (CH) N, gives thiazole, (CH) N S, which is a very similar substance; naphthalene gives thionaphthen, C 11 S, with which it shows great analogies, especially in the derivatives.

    0
    0
  • In the first group, we have to notice the titration of a cyanide with silver nitrate, when a milkiness shows how far the reaction has gone; the titration of iron with permanganate, when the faint pink colour shows that all the iron is oxidized.

    0
    0
  • Examination of the absorption spectra of coloured compounds shows that certain groupings displace the absorption bands in one direction, and other groupings in the other.

    0
    0
  • The following table shows where isomorphism may be generally expected.

    0
    0
  • Moreover, the work was intended to be in one act, and is now so performed at Bayreuth; and, although it is very long for a one-act opera, this is certainly the only form which does justice to Wagner's conception.1 Spohr's appreciation of Der fliegende Hollander is a remarkable point in musical history; and his criticism that Wagner's style (in Tannhauser) " lacked rounded periods " shows the best effect of that style on a well-disposed contemporary mind.

    0
    0
  • The theme thus shows no trivial connexion with a stage-property, mechanically important in the plot; but it represents the desire for power, and what that desire means to each different type of mind.

    0
    0
  • The bare conception of such art as this shows how perfect is the unity between the different elements in Wagner's later musicdrama.

    0
    0
  • But the more serious difficulties which to many minds still stand in the way of the acceptance of the epistle have come from the developed phase of Pauline theology which it shows, and from the general background and atmosphere of the underlying system of thought, in which the absence of the well-known earlier controversies is remarkable, while some things suggest the thought of John and a later age.

    0
    0
  • His career shows no great political ideas, and none of his actions indicate genius.

    0
    0
  • He shows considerable animus against John Wycliffe and the Lollards.

    0
    0
  • In North America about thirty species and twice as many geographic races (subspecies) are known, and the occurrence of several distinct fossil forms shows that the genus has long been established.

    0
    0
  • The objection that a copper plate shows signs of wear after a thousand impressions have been taken has been removed, since duplicate plates are readily produced by electrotyping, while transfers of copper engravings, on stone, zinc or aluminium, make it possible to turn out large editions in a printing-machine, which thus supersedes the slow-working hand-press.

    0
    0
  • The map or diagram of which Leonardo Dati in his poem on the Sphere (Della Spera) wrote in 1422 " un T dentre a uno 0 mostra it disegno " (a T within an 0 shows the design) is one of the most persistent types among the circular or wheel maps of the world.

    0
    0
  • Very different in character is the Catalan map of 1375, for its author, discarding Ptolemy, shows India as a peninsula.

    0
    0
  • The establishment of shows at Newcastle-on-Tyne in June 1859 secured for dogs attention which had been denied them up to that time, although sportsmen had appreciated their value for centuries and there had been public coursing meetings since the reign of Charles I.

    0
    0
  • But neither the promoters nor the sportsmen who supported it could have had the faintest idea as to how popular dog shows would become.

    0
    0
  • So great a success was scored that other shows were held in the same year at Birmingham and Edinburgh; while the Cleveland Agricultural Society also established a show of foxhounds at Redcar, the latter being the forerunner of that very fine show of hounds which is now held at Peterborough every summer and is looked upon as the out-of-season society gathering of hunting men and women.

    0
    0
  • The club has control over all the shows held in the.

    0
    0
  • Each club has a standard of points; some hold their own shows; while others issue club gazettes.

    0
    0
  • Dog lovers are now numbered by their tens of thousands, and in addition to shows of their favourites, owners are also liberally catered for in the shape of working trials, for during the season competitions for bloodhounds, pointers, setters, retrievers, spaniels and sheepdogs are held.

    0
    0
  • The Newfoundland is simply an enormous spaniel, and shows its origin by the facility with which it takes to water and the readiness with which it mates with spaniels and setters.

    0
    0
  • The patent roll of 1290 shows that in addition to his lands in Ulster, Connaught and Munster, he had held the Isle of Man, but had surrendered it to the king.

    0
    0
  • The preface to the prose life of Cuthbert proves that he had stayed at Lindisfarne prior to 721, while the Epistle to Egbert shows that he had visited him at York in 733.

    0
    0
  • As a little boy he would take his place among the pupils of the monastic school, though he would soon pass to the ranks of the teachers, and the fact that he was ordained deacon at nineteen, below the canonical age, shows that he was regarded as remarkable both for learning and goodness.

    0
    0
  • And though it would be wrong to call Bede a critical historian in the modern sense of the words, he shows a very unusual conscientiousness in collecting his information from the best available sources, and in distinguishing between what he believed to be fact, and what he regarded only as rumour or tradition.

    0
    0
  • The church of St Cuthbert shows good transitional Norman details.

    0
    0
  • Schoppe, as the long list -of his writings shows, knew also something of grammar and philosophy, and had an excellent acquaintance with Latin.

    0
    0
  • The reasons for believing that this roll was substantially identical with the book of Deuteronomy were already appreciated by Jerome, Chrysostom, Theodoret and others,' and a careful examination shows that the character of the reformation which followed agrees in all its essential features with the prescriptions and exhortations of that book.

    0
    0
  • Cicero shows that he was much interested in casuistical questions, as, for example, whether a good man who had received a coin which he knew to be bad was justified in passing it on to another.

    0
    0
  • His full-length of Lady Mary Coke is remarkable for the skill and delicacy with which the white satin drapery is managed; while in the portrait of his brown-eyed wife, the eldest daughter of Sir Alexander Lindsay of Evelick, in the Scottish National Gallery, we have a sweetness and tenderness which shows the painter at his highest.

    0
    0
  • This last-named work shows the influence of French art, an influence which helped greatly to form the practice of Ramsay, and which is even more clearly visible in the large collection of his sketches in the possession of the Royal Scottish Academy and the Board of Trustees, Edinburgh.

    0
    0
  • They deal chiefly with the games of the circus and works of art, and the language shows the author to have been well acquainted with the legends and antiquities of the classical period of Rome.

    0
    0
  • The style shows that the book was written in Greek, though naturally it contains Hebraisms. The author of the first part was in all probability an Alexandrian Jew; nothing further is known of him; and this is true of the author of the second part, if that be a separate production.

    0
    0
  • In its present form the law shows plainly the Latin and English elements.

    0
    0
  • Collectively it shows long isolation from the other Antilles.

    0
    0
  • Also, as the Cartesian geometry shows, all the relations between points are expressible in terms of geometric quantities.

    0
    0
  • Thus Russell's contradiction vanishes, and an examination of the other contradictions shows that they vanish also.

    0
    0
  • In this work Law shows himself at least 'the equal of the ablest champion of Deism.

    0
    0
  • The table on the following page, for which the writer is indebted to the kindness of Carolidi Effendi, formerly professor of history in the university of Athens, and in 1910 deputy for Smyrna in the Turkish parliament, shows the various races of the Ottoman Empire, the regions which they inhabit, and the religions which they profess.

    0
    0
  • Table B shows the total indebtedness of the Ottoman Empire, exclusive of tribute loans.

    0
    0
  • Afewyearsafter Constantinople passed into the hands of the Ottomans, some ghazels, the work of the contemporary Tatar prince, Mir `Ali Shir, who under the nom de plume of Nevayi wrote much that shows true talent and poetic feeling, found their way to the Ottoman capital, where they were seen and copied by Ahmed Pasha, one of the viziers of Mahommed II.

    0
    0
  • He at the same time shows the Greeks that their own greatest philosophers and poets recognized the unity of the divine Being, and had caught glimpses of the true nature of God, but that fuller light had been thrown on this subject by the Hebrew prophets.

    0
    0
  • In the first Clement discusses the necessity for and the true nature of the Paedagogus, and shows how Christ as the Logos acted as Paedagogus, and still acts.

    0
    0
  • He issued few ordinances; the unofficial compilation known as the Leges Henrici shows that, like the Conqueror, he made it his ideal to maintain the "law of Edward."

    0
    0
  • Its principal imports are coffee (of which it is the greatest continental market), tea, sugar, spices, rice, wine (especially from Bordeaux), lard (from Chicago), cereals, sago, dried fruits, herrings, wax (from Morocco and Mozambique), tobacco, hemp, cotton (which of late years shows a large increase), wool, skins, leather, oils, dyewoods, indigo, nitrates, phosphates and coal.

    0
    0
  • His diary shows how little he understood, or cared for, the business of a king.

    0
    0
  • Window glass exposed to alkaline vapours often shows a thin iridescent surface film which is supposed to be due to crystallization; the same change is found in pieces of Roman glass which have been dug out of the ruins of Pompeii.

    0
    0
  • The chemical composition of typical obsidians is shown by the following analyses Obsidian, when broken, shows a conchoidal fracture, like that of glass, and yields sharp-edged fragments, which have been used in many localities as arrow-points, spear-heads, knives and razors.

    0
    0
  • The mean result of the best determinations shows that when a current of one ampere is passed for one second, a mass of silver is deposited equal to o ooi i 18 gramme.

    0
    0
  • Thus neither a chlorate, which contains the ion C103, nor monochloracetic acid, shows the reactions of chlorine, though it is, of course, present in both substances; again, the sulphates do not answer to the usual tests which indicate the presence of sulphur as sulphide.

    0
    0
  • The rise of conductivity with temperature, therefore, shows that the fluidity becomes greater when the solution is heated.

    0
    0
  • The result of the investigation shows that the electrical work Ee is given by the_equation Ee =1 where v is the volume of the solution used and p its osmotic pressure.

    0
    0
  • If, instead of using a single Daniell's cell, we employ some source of electromotive force which can be varied as we please, and gradually raise its intensity, we shall find that, when it exceeds a certain value, about 1.7 volt, a permanent current of considerable strength flows through the solution, and, after the initial period, shows no signs of decrease.

    0
    0
  • The revolt against Democratic rule was undoubtedly serious, but a study of the popular vote shows that the election of Harrison, the Whig candidate, was less of a revolution than many affected to think.

    0
    0
  • Consideration of the definition of the determinant shows that the value is unaltered when the suffixes in each element are transposed.

    0
    0
  • This expression of R shows that, as will afterwards appear, the resultant is a simultaneous invariant of the two forms.

    0
    0
  • The fourth shows that every term of the invariant is of the same weight.

    0
    0
  • Moreover, if we add the first to the fourth we obtain aj 2w ak = 7 1=6, j, =0j, where 0 is the degree of the invariant; this shows, as we have before observed, that for an invariant w= - n0.

    0
    0
  • Hesse's canonical form shows at once that there cannot be more than two independent invariants; for if there were three we could, by elimination of the modulus of transformation, obtain two functions of the coefficients equal to functions of m, and thus, by elimination of m, obtain a relation between the coefficients, showing them not to be independent, which is contrary to the hypothesis.

    0
    0
  • The word "pure" is emphasized because experience shows that the presence in a water of even small proportions of calcium bicarbonate or sulphate prevents its action on lead.

    0
    0
  • At the same time, however, it forms a number of compounds in which it is most decidedly tetravalent; and thus it shows relations to carbon, silicon, germanium and tin.

    0
    0
  • One of the stamens has been deprived of its spur; the other shows its spur, c. a row down the centre, are shot out to some little distance from she parent plant.

    0
    0
  • Glanvill supported a much more honourable cause when he undertook the defence of the Royal Society of London, under the title of Plus Ultra, or the Progress and Advancement of Science since the time of Aristotle (1668), a work which shows how thoroughly he was imbued with the ideas of the empirical method.

    0
    0
  • The demand of six ships from the town by the king in 1324 shows its importance in the 14th century, but there is no mention of a mayor until 1467.

    0
    0
  • Equation (44) shows that as a first approximation.

    0
    0
  • Ii shows the relation of B to H in a specimen which has never before been magnetized.

    0
    0
  • The full line shows the result of an experiment in which the magnetizing force was carried up to 585,1 FIG.

    0
    0
  • The following table shows some results of other experiments in which H was believed to have sensibly the same value inside as outside the metal.

    0
    0
  • The results of a typical experiment are given in the annexed table, which shows how greatly the hysteresis loss is diminished as the critical temperature is approached.

    0
    0
  • The following table shows the principal results.

    0
    0
  • Hurmuzescu shows that these results are in accord with theory.

    0
    0
  • The form of the name is of considerable interest, as it shows the suffix -NOsuperimposed upon the suffix -CO-, a change which probably indicates some conquest of an earlier tribe by the invading Safini (or Sabini, q.v.).

    0
    0
  • The figure B also shows the peculiar neural investiture formed by the cerebral arteries in Limulus and the derivation from this of the arteries to the limbs, III, IV, VI, whereas in Scorpio the latter have a separate origin from the anterior aorta.

    0
    0
  • As they stood in the Septuagint or Greek canon, along 2 The New Testament shows undoubtedly an acquaintance with several of the apocryphal books.

    0
    0
  • The quotation shows that this gospel was the expression of complete pantheism.

    0
    0
  • See Ktientzle, Ober die Sternsagen der Griechen (1897), and his article in Roscher's Lexikon; he shows that in the oldest legend Orion the constellation and Orion the hero are quite distinct, without deciding which was the earlier conception.

    0
    0
  • The fauna shows striking analogies with that of the Bokkeveld beds of South Africa on the one hand and of the Hamilton group of North America on the other.

    0
    0
  • In the province of Sergipe, on the east coast, the beds are approximately on the horizon of the Cenomanian; in the valley of the Amazon they belong to the highest parts of the Cretaceous system, and the fauna shows Tertiary affinities.

    0
    0
  • The fibre of the piassava (Leopoldinia piassava, or Attalea funifera) is widely used for cordage, brushes and brooms. There are many other palms whose fruit, fibre and wood enter largely into the domestic economy of the natives, but the list given shows how important a service these trees rendered to the aboriginal inhabitants of tropical America, and likewise how useful they still are to the people of tropical Brazil.

    0
    0
  • Although the coast of Brazil shows a large number of bays and tide-water river channels which are apparently suitable for commercial ports, a close examination of them reduces the number of good ports to less than a dozen.

    0
    0
  • Domesday Book shows that in his confiscations he can have paid little attention to abstract justice.

    0
    0
  • Enrico treats of the fall of the Visigothic monarchy and the beginnings of resistance in the Asturias which gave 1 The - diagram shows the arrangement and proportions of the Villa Ercolanese.

    0
    0
  • But the Platonically conceived proof of the being of God contained in the Monologion shows that Anselm's doctrine of the universals as substances in things (universalia in re) was closely connected in his mind with the thought of the universalia ante rem, the exemplars of perfect goodness and truth and justice, by participation in which all earthly things are judged to possess these qualities.

    0
    0
  • The monotheistic influence of Aristotle and his Arabian commentators shows itself in Albert and Aquinas, at the outset, in the definitive fashion in which the " mysteries " y sof the Trinity and the Incarnation are henceforth detached from the sphere of rational or philosophical theology.

    0
    0
  • In general it may be said that Duns shows less confidence in the power of reason than Aquinas, and to that extent Erdmann and others are right in looking upon his system as the beginning of the decline of Scholasticism.

    0
    0
  • In his treatment of the conception of matter, Duns shows that he inclined much more to the Realism which makes for pantheism than was the case with the Aristotelianism of Thomas.

    0
    0
  • The work shows extreme diligence, and scrupulous care in the use of authorities.

    0
    0
  • The agricultural census taken in 1895 shows the great progress made in agriculture by Hungary, manifested by the increase in arable lands and the growth of the average production.

    0
    0
  • The laborious John Garay in his Szent Ldszlo shows considerable ability as an epic poet, but his greatestmerit was rather as a romancist and ballad writer, as shown by the, " Pen Sketches " or Tollrajzok (1845), and his legendary series Arpddok (1847).

    0
    0
  • Among successful dramatic pieces may be mentioned the Falu rossza (Village Scamp) of Edward Toth (1875), which represents the life of the Hungarian peasantry, and shows both poetic sentiment and dramatic skill; A szerelem harcza (Combat of Love), by Count Geza Zichy; Iskdriot (1876) and the prize tragedy Tamora (1879), by Anthony Varady; Janus (1877), by Gregory Csiky; and the dramatized romance Szep Mikhal (Handsome Michal), by Maurus Jokai (1877).

    0
    0
  • The problem of finding the sum of r terms is aided by graphic representation, which shows that the terms may be taken in pairs, working from the outside to the middle; the two cases of an odd number of terms and an even number of terms may be treated separately at first, and then combined by the ordinary method, viz.

    0
    0
  • Graphical representation shows that there are two solutions, and that an equation X2= 9a2 may be taken to be satisfied not only by X=3a but also by X= -3a.

    0
    0
  • We know that log l oN(I+9) = log l oN+log 10 (I+0), and inspection of a table of logarithms shows that, when 0 is small, log 10 (I+B);s approximately equal to X0, where X is a certain constant, whose value is.

    0
    0
  • In this work, which is one of the most valuable contributions to the literature of algebra, Cardan shows that he was familiar with both real positive and negative roots of equations whether rational or irrational, but of imaginary roots he was quite ignorant, and he admits his inability to resolve the so-called lation of Arabic manuscripts.

    0
    0
  • This writer, after having published an edition of Stevin's works in 1625, published in 1629 at Amsterdam a small tract on algebra which shows a considerable advance on the work of Vieta.

    0
    0
  • The preceding summary shows the specialized 'nature which algebra has assumed since the 17th century.

    0
    0
  • The Franciscan friar Kacic, who did so much for the revival of popular poetry in Bosnia and Dalmatia in the mid-18th century, shows similar traces of Serbophil feeling, and the achievements of Dusan and other Serbian Tsars have bulked almost as largely in the modern literature of the Croats as of the Serbs themselves.

    0
    0
  • Since the maxima occur when u = (m +1)7r it nearly, the successive values are not very different from 4 4 4 &c The application of these results to (3) shows that the field is brightest at the centre =o, =0, viz.

    0
    0
  • The form of (3) shows immediately that, if a and b be altered, the co-ordinates of any characteristic point in the pattern vary as a-'- and b-1.

    0
    0
  • Calculation shows that, if the aperture be s in., an achromatic lens has no sensible advantage if the focal length be greater than about II in.

    0
    0
  • Later, in his article " Chromatics " in the supplement to the 5th edition of this encyclopaedia, he shows that the colours " lose the mixed character of periodical colours, and resemble much more the ordinary prismatic spectrum, with intervals completely dark interposed," and explains it by the consideration that any phasedifference which may arise at neighbouring striae is multiplied in proportion to the total number of striae.

    0
    0
  • This is the ordinary formula for a reflecting plane grating, and it shows that the spectra are formed in the usual directions.

    0
    0
  • The occurrence of sin 4 as a factor in (6) shows that the relative intensities of the primary light and of that diffracted in the direction B depend upon the condition of the former as regards polarization.

    0
    0
  • The factor (I -cos 0) shows in what manner the secondary disturbance depends upon the direction in which it is propagated with respect to the front of the primary wave.

    0
    0
  • The hieroglyph of some other early sun temples shows a disk on the pyramidion.

    0
    0
  • The construction of the building at this southwestern corner shows that there was some sacred object that had to be bridged over by a huge block of marble; this we know from inscriptions to have been the Cecropeum or tomb of Cecrops.

    0
    0
  • The defence which Josephus puts forward has a permanent value and shows him at his best.

    0
    0
  • The division into five books was known to Hippolytus, but a closer examination of the doxologies shows that it does not represent the original scheme of the Psalter; for, while the doxologies to the first three books are no part of the psalms to which they are attached, but really mark the end of a book in a pious fashion not uncommon in Eastern literature, that to book IV., with its rubric addressed to the people, plainly belongs to the psalm, or rather to its liturgical execution, and does not therefore really mark the close of a collection once separate.

    0
    0
  • A papal diploma, still extant, shows that Count Borel and Bishop Octo or Otho of Ausona were at Rome in January 971, and, as all the other indications point to a corresponding year, enables us to fix the chronology of Gerbert's later life.

    0
    0
  • Despite his residence on the Spanish mark, he shows no token of a knowledge of Arabic, a fact which is perhaps sufficient to overthrow the statement of Adhemar as to his having studied at Cordova.

    0
    0
  • He shows how, for purely personal ends, Kruger allied himself with the British faction who were agitating for annexation, and to undermine him and endeavour to gain the presidency, urged the Boers to pay no taxes.

    0
    0
  • The form of this notice shows, as von Gutschmid and others have remarked, that Christianity was not yet the religion of the state; but it must for some time have had a home in Edessa.

    0
    0
  • But as an example of Syriac prose style it is of the best, and the author at times shows considerable dramatic power.

    0
    0
  • In Egypt, too, the spirit of caricature occasionally shows itself.

    0
    0
  • The favourite attitude, one leg planted firmly before the other, shows the right leg fully exposed.

    0
    0
  • The underlying conception shows itself under differing though not unrelated forms over western Asia, and in their light the question of religious and ceremonial dress is of great interest.

    0
    0
  • N.W., shows slight remains of the originalAugustinian priory; but the present beautiful gabled building, picturesquely situated, dates mainly from 1618.

    0
    0
  • Horace, so depreciatory in general of the older literature, shows his appreciation of Terence by the frequent reproduction in his Satires and Odes of his language and his philosophy of life.

    0
    0
  • The correspondence of the two shows that they were far from being on cordial personal terms with one another, but Hood always discharged his duty punctually, and his capacity was so great, and so signally proved, that no question of removing him from the station ever arose.

    0
    0
  • The temperature at which the limb is kept, no doubt, favours and hastens the natural process of destruction, so that putrefaction shows itself sooner than would be the case with a dead tissue removed from the body and kept at a lower temperature.

    0
    0
  • Again, a fractured bone in a paralysed limb often fails to unite, while another in the opposite sound limb unites readily, and an ulcerated surface on a paralysed limb shows little healing reaction.

    0
    0
  • The loss of an eye will be followed by atrophy of the optic nerve; the tissues in a stump of an amputated limb show atrophic changes; a paralysed limb from long disuse shows much wasting; and one finds at great depths of the sea fishes and marine animals, which have almost completely lost the organs of sight, having been cut off for long ages from the stimuli (light) essential for these organs, and so brought into an atrophic condition from disuse.

    0
    0
  • The nucleus in its vegetative stage shows a fine network throughout containing in the meshes the so-called nuclear-sap; attached to the network are the chromosomes, in the form of small irregular masses, which have a strong affinity for the " basic dyes."

    0
    0
  • The nucleolus shows an unstainable point at the centre known as the endonucleolus or nucleoluolus (Auerbach).

    0
    0
  • Usually the cytoplasm shows a marked affinity for the acid stains, but the different bodies found in the cell may show great variation in their staining reactions.

    0
    0
  • Yet all that we read of Syracusan military and naval action during the former part of the Athenian siege shows how Syracuse had lagged behind the cities of old Greece, constantly practised as they were in warfare both by land and sea.

    0
    0
  • It was a peripteral hexastyle, and must have had at least nineteen columns at the sides; the portion excavated shows that its total width is 744 ft., the width of the cella 382 ft., the lower diameter of the columns 64 ft.

    0
    0
  • The south wall of Epipolae, considerable remains of which exist, shows traces of different periods in its construction, and was probably often restored.2 It is built of rectangular blocks of limestone generally quarried on the spot, about 53 ft.

    0
    0
  • Yet, even there, his discipleship shows certain limitations.

    0
    0
  • The last type shows Dunbar at his best, and points the difference between him and Chaucer.

    0
    0
  • The main value of the last is historical, but it too shows Dunbar's mastery of form, even when dealing with lists of poetic predecessors.

    0
    0
  • The work on diseases of women is the only complete work on that subject which has come down to us from antiquity, and shows remarkable fullness of practical knowledge in relation to its subject.

    0
    0
  • Still in some parts of his system Sylvius shows an anxiety to base his pathology on anatomical changes.

    0
    0
  • He shared and defended many of Sydenham's principles, and in the few medical observations he has left shows himself to be even more thorough-going than the "English Hippocrates."

    0
    0
  • It is difficult to form a clear estimate of the importance of the last systematizer of medicine - John Brown (1735-1788) - for, though in England he has been but little regarded, the wide though shortlived popularity of his system on the Continent shows that it must have contained some elements of brilliancy, if not originality.

    0
    0
  • Darwin's work shows, however, the tendency to connect medicine with physical science, which was an immediate consequence of the scientific discoveries of the end of the 18th century, when Priestley and Cavendish in England exercised the same influence as Lavoisier in France.

    0
    0
  • Cicero, by his professed antagonism to the doctrines of Epicurus, by his inadequate appreciation of Lucretius himself and by the indifference which he shows to other contemporary poets, seems to have been neither fitted for the task of correcting the unfinished work of a writer whose genius was so distinct from his own, nor likely to have cordially undertaken such a task.

    0
    0
  • No writer shows a juster scorn of all mere rhetoric and exaggeration.

    0
    0
  • No one shows truer courage, not marred by irreverence, in confronting the great problems of human destiny, or greater strength in triumphing over human weakness.

    0
    0
  • No one shows a truer humanity and a more tender sympathy with natural sorrow.

    0
    0
  • He greatly admired, or professed to admire, the genius of the early Roman poets, while he shows indifference to the poetical genius of his younger contemporaries.

    0
    0
  • The famous "pour encourager les autres" (that the shooting of Byng did "encourage the others" very much is not to the point) is a typical example, and indeed the whole of Candide shows the style at its perfection.

    0
    0
  • No one of Voltaire's works shows his antireligious or at least anti-ecclesiastical animus more strongly.

    0
    0
  • Almost all his more substantive works, whether in verse or prose, are preceded by prefaces of one sort or another, which are models of his own light pungent causerie; and in a vast variety of nondescript pamphlets and writings he shows himself a perfect journalist.

    0
    0
  • The foreign-born popu lation shows a large increase in percentage to the whole, being 1.57 in 1881 and 2.98 in 1901.

    0
    0
  • The following table shows the average birthrate and death-rate per thousand at stated periods.

    0
    0
  • A return of the percentage of inhabitants dwelling in over-crowded tenements shows 2.7 for Lewisham, 4.5 for Wandsworth, 5.5 for Stoke Newington, and 6.4 for Hampstead, against 35.2 for Finsbury and 29.9 for Shoreditch.

    0
    0
  • The Royal Botanic Society has private gardens in the midst of Regent's Park, where flower shows and general entertainments are held.

    0
    0
  • The debt of London, like that of other municipalities, has considerably increased and shows a tendency to go on increasing, although certain safeguards against too ready borrowing have been imposed.

    0
    0
  • This shows the growing importance of the city.

    0
    0
  • The name Middle Saxons plainly shows that Middlesex must have been settled after the East and West Saxons had given their names to their respective districts.

    0
    0
  • We have somewhat fully described this historical incident here because it has an important bearing on the history of London, and shows also the small importance of the districts outside the walls at that period.

    0
    0
  • The lord mayor's shows, which had been discontinued for some years, were revived by order of the king in 1609.

    0
    0
  • It is not worth while to refer to all the wild guesses that were made by various writers, but Dr Creighton shows the absurdity of one of these calculations made in 1554 by Soranzo, the Venetian ambassador for the information of the doge and senators of Venice.

    0
    0
  • The remarkable instance of this after the Conquest was the election of Stephen, but William the Conqueror did not feel secure until he had the sanction of the Londoners to his kingship, and his attitude towards London when he hovered about the neighbourhood of the city for a time shows that he was anxious to obtain this sanction freely rather than by compulsion.

    0
    0
  • A striking point in this municipal revolution is that the new privileges extended to the city of London were entirely copied from those of continental cities, and Mr Round shows that there is conclusive proof of the assertion that the Commune of London derived its origin from that of Rouen.

    0
    0
  • If the deposit shows great variations in thickness in its outcrop along the surface it is probable that a drift or a slope would show the same thing in depth.

    0
    0
  • The use of such explosives decreases to some extent the danger from dust explosions; but experiment shows that no efficient explosive is absolutely safe, if used in excessive quantity, or in an improper manner.

    0
    0
  • A careful examination, however, of the "we" sections shows that words and expressions characteristic of the author of the third Gospel and the Acts are found in them to an extent which is very remarkable, and that in many instances they belong to the very texture of the passages.

    0
    0
  • Baber always calls the range Hindu Kush, and the way in which he speaks of it shows clearly that it was a range that was meant, not a solitary pass or peak (according to modern local use, as alleged by Elphinstone and Burnes).

    0
    0
  • An analysis shows that not quite two in every thousand Burmese profess Christianity, and there are about the same number of Mahommedans among them.

    0
    0
  • This glass shows a pattern in high relief and gives a very brilliant effect.

    0
    0
  • Nearly every specimen shows traces of the pressure of a tool on the outside of the neck, as well as signs of the base having been closed by melting.

    0
    0
  • An analysis of the glass of a Cairene mosque lamp shows that it is a soda-lime glass and contains as much as 4% of magnesia.

    0
    0
  • Column 3 shows the charge causing a permanent elongation of 0.05 mm.

    0
    0
  • The influence of the author's military experience shows itself in certain portions of the narrative.

    0
    0
  • This shows that the C.P. is the antipole of the line of intersection of its plane with the free surface with respect to the momental ellipse at the C.G.

    0
    0
  • The theory of conformal representation shows that the motion is given by (b-a'.u -a) +?

    0
    0
  • Even the most ancient text, that in 65 chapters, contains passages which a comparison with the later texts shows to be interpolations.

    0
    0
  • His letter shows that he considered the rise of Assyria a menace to himself.

    0
    0
  • The superscription shows points of connexion with the Rest of the Words of Baruch, but little weight can be attached to the fact, since titles and superscriptions were so frequently transformed and expanded in ancient times.

    0
    0
  • He shows no inconsiderable knowledge of anatomy in his remarkable description of inflammation and abscess of the mediastinum in his own person, and its diagnosis from common pleuritis as well as from abscess and dropsy of the pericardium.

    0
    0
  • The portrait of Archbishop Warham at Lambeth, for instance, shows a rochet with fairly wide sleeves narrowing towards the wrists, where they are confined by fur cuffs.

    0
    0
  • Fructification of the fungus, entire and in section; the latter shows the asci containing ascospores, much enlarged.

    0
    0
  • The incident is fuller and shows a great advance in ideas of morality.

    0
    0
  • The preaching of Jesus shows traces of this, and the Fourth Gospel (as well as the Synoptists) displays a marked interest in connecting the Johannine movement with the beginnings of Christianity.

    0
    0
  • It shows the greatest quantity of juice that may be expressed from canes, according to the different proportions of fibre they contain, but without employing maceration or imbibition, to which processes reference is made hereafter.

    0
    0
  • He was reporter of the committee which drew up the constitution of the year III., and his report shows keen apprehension of a return of the Reign of Terror, and presents reactionary measures as precautions against the re-establishment of "tyranny and anarchy."

    0
    0
  • In the Philosophy of the Practical, but more especially in the work entitled What is living and what is dead of the Philosophy of Hegel Croce criticizes the erroneous treatment of the opposites, and shows that on the contrary every opposition has at bottom a distinction from which it arises, and that therefore the true unity is unity-distinction, which is development and, as such, opposition that is continuously surpassed and continually re-appearing to be again surpassed.

    0
    0
  • It shows a close agreement with that of Caryophyllaeus.

    0
    0
  • G shows formation of proglottides.

    0
    0
  • Internal evidence shows that it must have been written long after the time of Herodotus, about 350 B.C.

    0
    0
  • This last event shows that the Etruscan power was formidable, and that by means of their fleet the Etruscans held under their exclusive control the commerce of the Tyrrhenian Sea.

    0
    0
  • Their reckoning shows the same peculiarity.

    0